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20 Dollar Dinner


Cookbook/The $20 Dinner


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  string(2476) "For a long time, I avoided making real-deal lemonade because I didn't want to be bothered making a simple syrup, the glue that holds lemonade together. Simple syrup, as its name implies, is not difficult to make - a cooked solution of equal parts water and sugar that's gotta cool, unfortunately, before it can be used. And who has the time to wait when you're hankering for immediate lemonade gratification?

But a good lemonade speaks loudly. Your friends will travel across state lines if you know how to create the right balance of sweet and sour in a pitcher that makes perspiring worth the trouble.

So, how to avoid the simple syrup nonsense and be the most happening kid on the block? Try my trick: Add blueberries.

Lemonade gets a hearty kick in the pants from a heaping pint of blues. Their indigo pigment isn't just eye candy; it contains powerful antioxidants that work as magic wands, protecting us from cancer. When pureed with sugar and lemon zest, the berries transform from deep blue to far-out magenta, making this one of the most gorgeous beverages you'll ever drink. The pureed berries also absorb the sugar, eliminating the need for the dreaded simple syrup.

Because of its striking color, blueberry lemonade usually elicits many oohs and aahs. A few sips and most of the guests are now knitting eyebrows, trying to figure out what in the world they are tipping back. Tart, yes, but with a certain sophistication; the berries add body as well as depth of flavor.

I enjoy my blueberry lemonade with or without vodka. You will, too.

Blueberry Lemonade?
Adapted from Lemonade by Fred Thompson

1 pint (2 cups) blueberries, rinsed and picked over

1/2-3/4 cup granulated sugar, depending on sweetness of berries

Lemon zest of 2 lemons

1 cup fresh lemon juice (about 6 lemons' worth)

2 cups cold water (filtered or bottled is best)

2 oz. vodka (optional, Grey Goose is a favorite brand)

In bowl of food processor or blender, add blueberries, sugar and lemon zest, and puree, until smooth, about 3 minutes. Mixture will turn a magenta color. Pass through a strainer to filter out the blueberry skins.

Pour berry mixture into a pitcher and to that add lemon juice, water and, if using, vodka. Stir well with a wooden spoon. Although ready to drink, the lemonade is best chilled and served over ice.

Makes one quart lemonade; double amounts for a half-gallon batch.?
Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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But a good lemonade speaks loudly. Your friends will travel across state lines if you know how to create the right balance of sweet and sour in a pitcher that makes perspiring worth the trouble.

So, how to avoid the simple syrup nonsense and be the most happening kid on the block? Try my trick: Add blueberries.

Lemonade gets a hearty kick in the pants from a heaping pint of blues. Their indigo pigment isn't just eye candy; it contains powerful antioxidants that work as magic wands, protecting us from cancer. When pureed with sugar and lemon zest, the berries transform from deep blue to far-out magenta, making this one of the most gorgeous beverages you'll ever drink. The pureed berries also absorb the sugar, eliminating the need for the dreaded simple syrup.

Because of its striking color, blueberry lemonade usually elicits many oohs and aahs. A few sips and most of the guests are now knitting eyebrows, trying to figure out what in the world they are tipping back. Tart, yes, but with a certain sophistication; the berries add body as well as depth of flavor.

I enjoy my blueberry lemonade with or without vodka. You will, too.

__''Blueberry Lemonade''?__
____''Adapted from ''Lemonade'' by Fred Thompson''

1 pint (2 cups) blueberries, rinsed and picked over

1/2-3/4 cup granulated sugar, depending on sweetness of berries

Lemon zest of 2 lemons

1 cup fresh lemon juice (about 6 lemons' worth)

2 cups cold water (filtered or bottled is best)

2 oz. vodka (optional, Grey Goose is a favorite brand)

In bowl of food processor or blender, add blueberries, sugar and lemon zest, and puree, until smooth, about 3 minutes. Mixture will turn a magenta color. Pass through a strainer to filter out the blueberry skins.

Pour berry mixture into a pitcher and to that add lemon juice, water and, if using, vodka. Stir well with a wooden spoon. Although ready to drink, the lemonade is best chilled and served over ice.

Makes one quart lemonade; double amounts for a half-gallon batch.?
''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL'''s Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(2674) "       2005-07-07T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - High on Blues   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-07-07T04:04:00+00:00  For a long time, I avoided making real-deal lemonade because I didn't want to be bothered making a simple syrup, the glue that holds lemonade together. Simple syrup, as its name implies, is not difficult to make - a cooked solution of equal parts water and sugar that's gotta cool, unfortunately, before it can be used. And who has the time to wait when you're hankering for immediate lemonade gratification?

But a good lemonade speaks loudly. Your friends will travel across state lines if you know how to create the right balance of sweet and sour in a pitcher that makes perspiring worth the trouble.

So, how to avoid the simple syrup nonsense and be the most happening kid on the block? Try my trick: Add blueberries.

Lemonade gets a hearty kick in the pants from a heaping pint of blues. Their indigo pigment isn't just eye candy; it contains powerful antioxidants that work as magic wands, protecting us from cancer. When pureed with sugar and lemon zest, the berries transform from deep blue to far-out magenta, making this one of the most gorgeous beverages you'll ever drink. The pureed berries also absorb the sugar, eliminating the need for the dreaded simple syrup.

Because of its striking color, blueberry lemonade usually elicits many oohs and aahs. A few sips and most of the guests are now knitting eyebrows, trying to figure out what in the world they are tipping back. Tart, yes, but with a certain sophistication; the berries add body as well as depth of flavor.

I enjoy my blueberry lemonade with or without vodka. You will, too.

Blueberry Lemonade?
Adapted from Lemonade by Fred Thompson

1 pint (2 cups) blueberries, rinsed and picked over

1/2-3/4 cup granulated sugar, depending on sweetness of berries

Lemon zest of 2 lemons

1 cup fresh lemon juice (about 6 lemons' worth)

2 cups cold water (filtered or bottled is best)

2 oz. vodka (optional, Grey Goose is a favorite brand)

In bowl of food processor or blender, add blueberries, sugar and lemon zest, and puree, until smooth, about 3 minutes. Mixture will turn a magenta color. Pass through a strainer to filter out the blueberry skins.

Pour berry mixture into a pitcher and to that add lemon juice, water and, if using, vodka. Stir well with a wooden spoon. Although ready to drink, the lemonade is best chilled and served over ice.

Makes one quart lemonade; double amounts for a half-gallon batch.?
Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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Article

Thursday July 7, 2005 12:04 am EDT
For a long time, I avoided making real-deal lemonade because I didn't want to be bothered making a simple syrup, the glue that holds lemonade together. Simple syrup, as its name implies, is not difficult to make - a cooked solution of equal parts water and sugar that's gotta cool, unfortunately, before it can be used. And who has the time to wait when you're hankering for immediate lemonade... | more...
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  string(37) "Kitchen Witch - Anything But The Pits"
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  string(2263) "Cherries are here. Put on your sneakers and run to the market. Then run like a dog in heat because these sultry summer mamas lose their sheen almost by the time you get them home.

Phew. Now you've got a cartoon moment to decide what to do with them. When it comes to cherries, my first instinct is always cherry pie. But when I don't feel like I have time for playing with dough, the close runner-up is cherry clafoutis.

OK. Repeat after me: kla-foo-TEE. Tres bien.

In spite of its Frenchy moniker, a pan of clafoutis is homey, comforting and allows the fruit to be the boss. The hard part is describing what the hell it is. Not quite pudding, not quite cake. A waffle, maybe? Well ...

Baked in a cast-iron skillet or oven-proof dish, the highly scented, eggy batter gets a quick whiz in the food processor. Then you think this thing is a goner; it's too runny when you pour it into the pan. How's it gonna puff up and be cakey/waffley/custardy? Don't you worry. Everything comes out cherry fabulous.

Cherry Clafoutis?
Adapted from Saveur Cooks Authentic French

2 cups cherries, pitted

1/2 teaspoon almond extract

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Zest of one lemon, minced

7 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon

granulated sugar (depending on

tartness of cherries)

Butter for greasing pan

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

6 eggs

1 1/2 cups milk

Pinch salt1 cup all-purpose flour

Preheat oven to 425. Place pitted cherries in a mixing bowl. Add almond extract, cinnamon, lemon zest and 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar. Stir and let fruit macerate (soak in its juices) for about 30 minutes.

Butter a 9-inch cast-iron skillet or baking dish of similar size. In the bowl of a food processor, add vanilla extract, eggs, milk, salt, flour, and remaining sugar. Blend for about one minute, until ingredients are well mixed.

Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Spoon cherries on top. They will seem like they are floating, but don't worry. Place dish on a baking sheet (this protects the clafoutis from burning) and bake about 35 minutes. Center should jiggle slightly. Overbaked clafoutis (anything over 45 minutes) will most likely turn out dry.

Cool for at least 20 minutes and serve in slices. For leftovers, keep covered in refrigerator and eat cold or warmed up."
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  string(2279) "Cherries are here. Put on your sneakers and run to the market. Then run like a dog in heat because these sultry summer mamas lose their sheen almost by the time you get them home.

Phew. Now you've got a cartoon moment to decide what to do with them. When it comes to cherries, my first instinct is always cherry pie. But when I don't feel like I have time for playing with dough, the close runner-up is cherry clafoutis.

OK. Repeat after me: kla-foo-TEE. ''Tres bien''.

In spite of its Frenchy moniker, a pan of clafoutis is homey, comforting and allows the fruit to be the boss. The hard part is describing what the hell it is. Not quite pudding, not quite cake. A waffle, maybe? Well ...

Baked in a cast-iron skillet or oven-proof dish, the highly scented, eggy batter gets a quick whiz in the food processor. Then you think this thing is a goner; it's too runny when you pour it into the pan. How's it gonna puff up and be cakey/waffley/custardy? Don't you worry. Everything comes out cherry fabulous.

__''Cherry Clafoutis''__?
Adapted from ''Saveur Cooks Authentic French''

2 cups cherries, pitted

1/2 teaspoon almond extract

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Zest of one lemon, minced

7 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon

granulated sugar (depending on

tartness of cherries)

Butter for greasing pan

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

6 eggs

1 1/2 cups milk

Pinch salt1 cup all-purpose flour

Preheat oven to 425. Place pitted cherries in a mixing bowl. Add almond extract, cinnamon, lemon zest and 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar. Stir and let fruit macerate (soak in its juices) for about 30 minutes.

Butter a 9-inch cast-iron skillet or baking dish of similar size. In the bowl of a food processor, add vanilla extract, eggs, milk, salt, flour, and remaining sugar. Blend for about one minute, until ingredients are well mixed.

Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Spoon cherries on top. They will seem like they are floating, but don't worry. Place dish on a baking sheet (this protects the clafoutis from burning) and bake about 35 minutes. Center should jiggle slightly. Overbaked clafoutis (anything over 45 minutes) will most likely turn out dry.

Cool for at least 20 minutes and serve in slices. For leftovers, keep covered in refrigerator and eat cold or warmed up."
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  string(2477) "       2005-06-29T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Anything But The Pits   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-06-29T04:04:00+00:00  Cherries are here. Put on your sneakers and run to the market. Then run like a dog in heat because these sultry summer mamas lose their sheen almost by the time you get them home.

Phew. Now you've got a cartoon moment to decide what to do with them. When it comes to cherries, my first instinct is always cherry pie. But when I don't feel like I have time for playing with dough, the close runner-up is cherry clafoutis.

OK. Repeat after me: kla-foo-TEE. Tres bien.

In spite of its Frenchy moniker, a pan of clafoutis is homey, comforting and allows the fruit to be the boss. The hard part is describing what the hell it is. Not quite pudding, not quite cake. A waffle, maybe? Well ...

Baked in a cast-iron skillet or oven-proof dish, the highly scented, eggy batter gets a quick whiz in the food processor. Then you think this thing is a goner; it's too runny when you pour it into the pan. How's it gonna puff up and be cakey/waffley/custardy? Don't you worry. Everything comes out cherry fabulous.

Cherry Clafoutis?
Adapted from Saveur Cooks Authentic French

2 cups cherries, pitted

1/2 teaspoon almond extract

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Zest of one lemon, minced

7 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon

granulated sugar (depending on

tartness of cherries)

Butter for greasing pan

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

6 eggs

1 1/2 cups milk

Pinch salt1 cup all-purpose flour

Preheat oven to 425. Place pitted cherries in a mixing bowl. Add almond extract, cinnamon, lemon zest and 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar. Stir and let fruit macerate (soak in its juices) for about 30 minutes.

Butter a 9-inch cast-iron skillet or baking dish of similar size. In the bowl of a food processor, add vanilla extract, eggs, milk, salt, flour, and remaining sugar. Blend for about one minute, until ingredients are well mixed.

Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Spoon cherries on top. They will seem like they are floating, but don't worry. Place dish on a baking sheet (this protects the clafoutis from burning) and bake about 35 minutes. Center should jiggle slightly. Overbaked clafoutis (anything over 45 minutes) will most likely turn out dry.

Cool for at least 20 minutes and serve in slices. For leftovers, keep covered in refrigerator and eat cold or warmed up.             13018430 1254913                          Kitchen Witch - Anything But The Pits "
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Article

Wednesday June 29, 2005 12:04 am EDT

Cherries are here. Put on your sneakers and run to the market. Then run like a dog in heat because these sultry summer mamas lose their sheen almost by the time you get them home.

Phew. Now you've got a cartoon moment to decide what to do with them. When it comes to cherries, my first instinct is always cherry pie. But when I don't feel like I have time for playing with dough, the close...

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  string(2276) "It's hotter than a kitchen witch's tit, and the thought of turning on the stove is melting your brain. You've got no energy to cook, so don't. Uncook dinner instead.

This does not mean to head for the cereal box. All you need is a melon, a lime, some fresh mint and a blender (plus a few spices and aromatics to perk things up) and uncooked dinner can be yours in 10 minutes.

After work, you can stop off at the market, pick up just enough items to go through the express lane and make dinner in the amount of time it may take to pay a bill, listen to voicemail or contemplate the meaning of life. Ten minutes.

I'm not a fan of dairy-based soups, especially when they're cold, but in this case, I add a small amount of plain yogurt for body. When pureed, melon tends to separate, so a smidge of dairy is helpful to keep everything together.

With a quick whiz in the blender or food processor, the melon (I'm a sucker for cantaloupe, aka muskmelon) transforms into luscious velvet on the tongue; slurped without the heat of cayenne, a smidge of salt and some honey, however, the melon feels flat and uninteresting.

One note to keep in mind with cantaloupe: It can smell like a tropical heaven in the store but sometimes ferments quickly after being brought home. Keep refrigerated to suppress over-ripening. Otherwise, lap up this luscious puree that makes uncooked life feel quite decadent.

Chilled Cantaloupe Soup

1 large cantaloupe, seeded and cut into chunks

Approximately 5 tablespoons plain yogurt (alternatively, use soy milk, soy yogurt, buttermilk or cream)

1/4 cup chopped mint leaves, picked from stem and torn by hand

Squeeze of 1 lime

1 tablespoon honey

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon cayenne

Dash salt

Other possibilities: basil instead of mint, 1/4 cup white wine or vodka, sub 1 cucumber for 1 cup of melon, lemon instead of lime

Place melon in bowl of blender or food processor and puree. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend. Taste for consistency. If it seems too grainy, add a bit more yogurt or alternative dairy source.

Chill for at least one hour and serve. Taste before serving and adjust honey or lime if necessary. Makes four soup bowl servings.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com."
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This does not mean to head for the cereal box. All you need is a melon, a lime, some fresh mint and a blender (plus a few spices and aromatics to perk things up) and uncooked dinner can be yours in 10 minutes.

After work, you can stop off at the market, pick up just enough items to go through the express lane and make dinner in the amount of time it may take to pay a bill, listen to voicemail or contemplate the meaning of life. Ten minutes.

I'm not a fan of dairy-based soups, especially when they're cold, but in this case, I add a small amount of plain yogurt for body. When pureed, melon tends to separate, so a smidge of dairy is helpful to keep everything together.

With a quick whiz in the blender or food processor, the melon (I'm a sucker for cantaloupe, aka muskmelon) transforms into luscious velvet on the tongue; slurped without the heat of cayenne, a smidge of salt and some honey, however, the melon feels flat and uninteresting.

One note to keep in mind with cantaloupe: It can smell like a tropical heaven in the store but sometimes ferments quickly after being brought home. Keep refrigerated to suppress over-ripening. Otherwise, lap up this luscious puree that makes uncooked life feel quite decadent.

__Chilled Cantaloupe Soup__

1 large cantaloupe, seeded and cut into chunks

Approximately 5 tablespoons plain yogurt (alternatively, use soy milk, soy yogurt, buttermilk or cream)

1/4 cup chopped mint leaves, picked from stem and torn by hand

Squeeze of 1 lime

1 tablespoon honey

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon cayenne

Dash salt

Other possibilities: basil instead of mint, 1/4 cup white wine or vodka, sub 1 cucumber for 1 cup of melon, lemon instead of lime

Place melon in bowl of blender or food processor and puree. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend. Taste for consistency. If it seems too grainy, add a bit more yogurt or alternative dairy source.

Chill for at least one hour and serve. Taste before serving and adjust honey or lime if necessary. Makes four soup bowl servings.

''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL'''s Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''"
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  string(2480) "       2005-06-22T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Mind Your Melons   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-06-22T04:04:00+00:00  It's hotter than a kitchen witch's tit, and the thought of turning on the stove is melting your brain. You've got no energy to cook, so don't. Uncook dinner instead.

This does not mean to head for the cereal box. All you need is a melon, a lime, some fresh mint and a blender (plus a few spices and aromatics to perk things up) and uncooked dinner can be yours in 10 minutes.

After work, you can stop off at the market, pick up just enough items to go through the express lane and make dinner in the amount of time it may take to pay a bill, listen to voicemail or contemplate the meaning of life. Ten minutes.

I'm not a fan of dairy-based soups, especially when they're cold, but in this case, I add a small amount of plain yogurt for body. When pureed, melon tends to separate, so a smidge of dairy is helpful to keep everything together.

With a quick whiz in the blender or food processor, the melon (I'm a sucker for cantaloupe, aka muskmelon) transforms into luscious velvet on the tongue; slurped without the heat of cayenne, a smidge of salt and some honey, however, the melon feels flat and uninteresting.

One note to keep in mind with cantaloupe: It can smell like a tropical heaven in the store but sometimes ferments quickly after being brought home. Keep refrigerated to suppress over-ripening. Otherwise, lap up this luscious puree that makes uncooked life feel quite decadent.

Chilled Cantaloupe Soup

1 large cantaloupe, seeded and cut into chunks

Approximately 5 tablespoons plain yogurt (alternatively, use soy milk, soy yogurt, buttermilk or cream)

1/4 cup chopped mint leaves, picked from stem and torn by hand

Squeeze of 1 lime

1 tablespoon honey

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon cayenne

Dash salt

Other possibilities: basil instead of mint, 1/4 cup white wine or vodka, sub 1 cucumber for 1 cup of melon, lemon instead of lime

Place melon in bowl of blender or food processor and puree. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend. Taste for consistency. If it seems too grainy, add a bit more yogurt or alternative dairy source.

Chill for at least one hour and serve. Taste before serving and adjust honey or lime if necessary. Makes four soup bowl servings.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.             13018370 1254787                          Kitchen Witch - Mind Your Melons "
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Article

Wednesday June 22, 2005 12:04 am EDT

It's hotter than a kitchen witch's tit, and the thought of turning on the stove is melting your brain. You've got no energy to cook, so don't. Uncook dinner instead.

This does not mean to head for the cereal box. All you need is a melon, a lime, some fresh mint and a blender (plus a few spices and aromatics to perk things up) and uncooked dinner can be yours in 10 minutes.

After work, you can...

| more...

array(79) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(32) "Kitchen Witch - Come Fry With Me"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-06-16T01:05:28+00:00"
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  string(25) "2018-01-06T19:53:53+00:00"
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  string(50) "Tips to take the intimidation out of fried chicken"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(50) "Tips to take the intimidation out of fried chicken"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
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  string(3923) "As a kid from up North, I have long held a romantic notion that if you grew up in the South, you spent your summers sitting under a willowy tree with a glass of lemonade in one hand and a piece of fried chicken in the other. I was fascinated by fried chicken, which I never ate under a tree, but instead at my local Roy Rogers fast food ranch, where I insisted on having my seventh birthday party.

Done right, fried chicken possesses all the mystery and magic of Keebler cookies - it must be made by elves. How can mere mortals take an ordinary piece of poultry and really do justice to an otherworldly combination of crisp and juicy, salty and tangy, with opportunities to gnaw on both meat and bone? In between arguments with my father over then-President Nixon, I did wonder if anyone other than my friends Roy or the Colonel knew the secrets.

Most home cooks tell me that in spite of their love for fried chicken, they avoid it for fear of less-than-magical results. If you're game to give it another try, I've got a few tricks that may earn you some mama-slapping fried chicken honors:

First, bathe the chicken in buttermilk, which tenderizes the meat. I season it with (among other things) celery seed, which lends an earthiness that still comes through after all the frying.

Next, use salty dredging flour, which you should taste even though it's gross to taste raw flour.

Try peanut oil, which has a good flavor as well as a high smoking point - a key asset when frying.

Finish the chicken in the oven after both sides have achieved crispy-coated status in the frying pan. This method allows meat to be thoroughly cooked while minimizing burning of that precious coating.

Let the magic show begin. And pour me some lemonade, will ya?

Fearless Fried Chicken

4 pounds chicken parts of your choice, or about 12-14 pieces

1 quart buttermilk

1 tablespoon garlic salt

1-1/2 teaspoons ground celery seed

2 teaspoons ground cayenne pepper

2 teaspoons paprika

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon coarse salt

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1-1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper

Peanut oil

Place chicken parts in a nonreactive (plastic, glass, ceramic) bowl or container. Pour buttermilk on top and add garlic salt, celery seed, cayenne and paprika. With a large spoon, stir to disperse seasonings in the buttermilk bath. Cover chicken and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least four hours and up to overnight.

When ready to fry, combine flour, salt, thyme and black pepper in a container large enough for dredging (flour coating) the chicken. Taste the flour; you should be able to taste the seasonings, particularly the salt. If not, add an additional 1/4-teaspoon salt.

Remove chicken from buttermilk mixture, piece by piece, allowing excess liquid to drain off. Place drained chicken in a clean container.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, and heat a large cast-iron skillet or frying pan that's at least 3 inches deep. Add at least 1 inch of oil, on high heat.

Dredge chicken separately in flour mixture, completely coating, then shake off excess. Set aside.

Oil should be hot (but not smoking). Test it by dropping a piece of loose chicken fat or flour nib into the oil; it should sizzle. Add chicken, skin-side down, being careful not to crowd the pan, which would cause steaming. Turn heat down to medium and let chicken cook for about eight minutes on the first side. With tongs, turn over, but only if first side is golden brown. Cook on second side for five minutes. Chicken should look crispy.

Remove chicken from oil and transfer to a baking sheet for finishing in the oven. Estimate 20 minutes for oven time, or until an instant-read thermometer, placed in the middle of a thigh or breast, indicates 165 degrees.

Remove chicken from oven and let cool for a few minutes before digging in. Serves one to four, depending on how hungry you are for fried chicken.

kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(3972) "As a kid from up North, I have long held a romantic notion that if you grew up in the South, you spent your summers sitting under a willowy tree with a glass of lemonade in one hand and a piece of fried chicken in the other. I was fascinated by fried chicken, which I never ate under a tree, but instead at my local Roy Rogers fast food ranch, where I insisted on having my seventh birthday party.

Done right, fried chicken possesses all the mystery and magic of Keebler cookies - it must be made by elves. How can mere mortals take an ordinary piece of poultry and really do justice to an otherworldly combination of crisp and juicy, salty and tangy, with opportunities to gnaw on both meat ''and'' bone? In between arguments with my father over then-President Nixon, I did wonder if anyone other than my friends Roy or the Colonel knew the secrets.

Most home cooks tell me that in spite of their love for fried chicken, they avoid it for fear of less-than-magical results. If you're game to give it another try, I've got a few tricks that may earn you some mama-slapping fried chicken honors:

First, bathe the chicken in buttermilk, which tenderizes the meat. I season it with (among other things) celery seed, which lends an earthiness that still comes through after all the frying.

Next, use salty dredging flour, which you should taste even though it's gross to taste raw flour.

Try peanut oil, which has a good flavor as well as a high smoking point - a key asset when frying.

Finish the chicken in the oven after both sides have achieved crispy-coated status in the frying pan. This method allows meat to be thoroughly cooked while minimizing burning of that precious coating.

Let the magic show begin. And pour me some lemonade, will ya?

__Fearless Fried Chicken__

4 pounds chicken parts of your choice, or about 12-14 pieces

1 quart buttermilk

1 tablespoon garlic salt

1-1/2 teaspoons ground celery seed

2 teaspoons ground cayenne pepper

2 teaspoons paprika

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon coarse salt

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1-1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper

Peanut oil

Place chicken parts in a nonreactive (plastic, glass, ceramic) bowl or container. Pour buttermilk on top and add garlic salt, celery seed, cayenne and paprika. With a large spoon, stir to disperse seasonings in the buttermilk bath. Cover chicken and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least four hours and up to overnight.

When ready to fry, combine flour, salt, thyme and black pepper in a container large enough for dredging (flour coating) the chicken. Taste the flour; you should be able to taste the seasonings, particularly the salt. If not, add an additional 1/4-teaspoon salt.

Remove chicken from buttermilk mixture, piece by piece, allowing excess liquid to drain off. Place drained chicken in a clean container.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, and heat a large cast-iron skillet or frying pan that's at least 3 inches deep. Add at least 1 inch of oil, on high heat.

Dredge chicken separately in flour mixture, completely coating, then shake off excess. Set aside.

Oil should be hot (but not smoking). Test it by dropping a piece of loose chicken fat or flour nib into the oil; it should sizzle. Add chicken, skin-side down, being careful not to crowd the pan, which would cause steaming. Turn heat down to medium and let chicken cook for about eight minutes on the first side. With tongs, turn over, but only if first side is golden brown. Cook on second side for five minutes. Chicken should look crispy.

Remove chicken from oil and transfer to a baking sheet for finishing in the oven. Estimate 20 minutes for oven time, or until an instant-read thermometer, placed in the middle of a thigh or breast, indicates 165 degrees.

Remove chicken from oven and let cool for a few minutes before digging in. Serves one to four, depending on how hungry you are for fried chicken.

[mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com]"
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  string(4177) "    Tips to take the intimidation out of fried chicken   2005-06-15T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Come Fry With Me   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-06-15T04:04:00+00:00  As a kid from up North, I have long held a romantic notion that if you grew up in the South, you spent your summers sitting under a willowy tree with a glass of lemonade in one hand and a piece of fried chicken in the other. I was fascinated by fried chicken, which I never ate under a tree, but instead at my local Roy Rogers fast food ranch, where I insisted on having my seventh birthday party.

Done right, fried chicken possesses all the mystery and magic of Keebler cookies - it must be made by elves. How can mere mortals take an ordinary piece of poultry and really do justice to an otherworldly combination of crisp and juicy, salty and tangy, with opportunities to gnaw on both meat and bone? In between arguments with my father over then-President Nixon, I did wonder if anyone other than my friends Roy or the Colonel knew the secrets.

Most home cooks tell me that in spite of their love for fried chicken, they avoid it for fear of less-than-magical results. If you're game to give it another try, I've got a few tricks that may earn you some mama-slapping fried chicken honors:

First, bathe the chicken in buttermilk, which tenderizes the meat. I season it with (among other things) celery seed, which lends an earthiness that still comes through after all the frying.

Next, use salty dredging flour, which you should taste even though it's gross to taste raw flour.

Try peanut oil, which has a good flavor as well as a high smoking point - a key asset when frying.

Finish the chicken in the oven after both sides have achieved crispy-coated status in the frying pan. This method allows meat to be thoroughly cooked while minimizing burning of that precious coating.

Let the magic show begin. And pour me some lemonade, will ya?

Fearless Fried Chicken

4 pounds chicken parts of your choice, or about 12-14 pieces

1 quart buttermilk

1 tablespoon garlic salt

1-1/2 teaspoons ground celery seed

2 teaspoons ground cayenne pepper

2 teaspoons paprika

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon coarse salt

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1-1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper

Peanut oil

Place chicken parts in a nonreactive (plastic, glass, ceramic) bowl or container. Pour buttermilk on top and add garlic salt, celery seed, cayenne and paprika. With a large spoon, stir to disperse seasonings in the buttermilk bath. Cover chicken and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least four hours and up to overnight.

When ready to fry, combine flour, salt, thyme and black pepper in a container large enough for dredging (flour coating) the chicken. Taste the flour; you should be able to taste the seasonings, particularly the salt. If not, add an additional 1/4-teaspoon salt.

Remove chicken from buttermilk mixture, piece by piece, allowing excess liquid to drain off. Place drained chicken in a clean container.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, and heat a large cast-iron skillet or frying pan that's at least 3 inches deep. Add at least 1 inch of oil, on high heat.

Dredge chicken separately in flour mixture, completely coating, then shake off excess. Set aside.

Oil should be hot (but not smoking). Test it by dropping a piece of loose chicken fat or flour nib into the oil; it should sizzle. Add chicken, skin-side down, being careful not to crowd the pan, which would cause steaming. Turn heat down to medium and let chicken cook for about eight minutes on the first side. With tongs, turn over, but only if first side is golden brown. Cook on second side for five minutes. Chicken should look crispy.

Remove chicken from oil and transfer to a baking sheet for finishing in the oven. Estimate 20 minutes for oven time, or until an instant-read thermometer, placed in the middle of a thigh or breast, indicates 165 degrees.

Remove chicken from oven and let cool for a few minutes before digging in. Serves one to four, depending on how hungry you are for fried chicken.

kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com             13018312 1254672                          Kitchen Witch - Come Fry With Me "
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Article

Wednesday June 15, 2005 12:04 am EDT
Tips to take the intimidation out of fried chicken | more...
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  string(3741) "I'm the kind of cook who cooks. Baking bread is better done by others - or until I have the time to learn to be patient. I even had pizza lessons in Italy, but all I got was a misshapen dough Frisbee mixed in with bad-mouthing from Sergio, my chef instructor.

At some point, the pizza patience arrived - in my overheated apartment in northern Virginia. The recipe below is written with the dough-challenged (or first-timer) in mind. If this dough dunce can do it, you can, too.

Before you fire up the oven, consider the pizza toppings. If tomatoes are your thing, try the boxed Pomi brand, heated up, seasoned with a glug of olive oil, dried oregano and black pepper. Consider adding chopped fresh garlic, arugula leaves, pineapple chunks, pitted olives or basil. For cheese, consider fresh pecorino, at-home grated parmigiano, ricotta or sharp provolone. Any or all of these options make for a splendid feast and hold up in the leftovers department.

Pizza Dough 101 ?
Makes one larger, 16-inch-ish pie or two smaller, 10-12-inchers

1 cup water

1 envelope active dry yeast

Pinch sugar

Approximately 3 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon olive oil

Cornmeal

Heat water until 110 degrees — THIS DOES NOT MEAN BOILING WATER! — and pour into a small bowl. Sprinkle contents of yeast packet, sugar and 1 tablespoon of flour over the water. Stir until dissolved and cover bowl at room temperature, until mixture is slightly foamy, about 15 minutes.

In a larger bowl, add 1 cup flour, salt and olive oil, and stir to combine. Add yeast mixture and whisk until just combined. Add flour, 1/2 cup at a time, and switch to a wooden spoon for stirring in between flour additions. You are looking for a soft, sticky dough that just clears the sides of the bowl. Depending on weather (humidity, heat), the amount of flour used will vary between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 cups total. It's unnecessary to use maximum amount.

Lightly dust work surface with flour and pour mixture out of bowl. Begin kneading dough in the following manner: punch (gently but firmly, but no black eyes, please), fold (in half) and turn (rotate 15 minutes on your imaginary clock, or 1/4 turn). Make this your mantra until your dough becomes a smooth, soft, springy ball, as smooth as a baby's bottom.

Lightly oil a large bowl and place dough in bowl, turning to coat with oil. Cover bowl with a towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm spot, away from drafts. Let rise until doubled, about an hour.

At this point, risen dough may be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated (or frozen) for later use. (Let chilled dough warm up at room temperature for about 45 minutes before rolling and shaping.) For two pizzas, cut ball in half and work with one half at a time.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Wipe work surface clean of dough scraps, then dry thoroughly before rolling out dough. Flour-dust work surface and rolling pin (or empty wine bottle). Gently pound on dough so that it begins to look like a disc. After every few motions, rotate dough 1/4 turn. Roll out dough from center, continuing to rotate, careful not to tear dough. Roll to desired thinness and shape.

Dust a pizza pan, stone or bottom side of a baking sheet with cornmeal, for texture. Fold your dough circle in half and carefully lift onto baking surface. Adjust shape of dough and begin adding tomato puree and other toppings of your choice. A final addition of salt just before baking is recommended.

Bake until dough makes a hollow sound when you tap the crust and is golden in color. A 12-inch pie takes about 10-12 minutes, but varies by oven. Bottom of crust should be golden. Transfer pizza to cutting board and cut into slices with a serrated knife or pizza slicer."
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  string(3741) "I'm the kind of cook who cooks. Baking bread is better done by others - or until I have the time to learn to be patient. I even had pizza lessons in Italy, but all I got was a misshapen dough Frisbee mixed in with bad-mouthing from Sergio, my chef instructor.

At some point, the pizza patience arrived - in my overheated apartment in northern Virginia. The recipe below is written with the dough-challenged (or first-timer) in mind. If this dough dunce can do it, you can, too.

Before you fire up the oven, consider the pizza toppings. If tomatoes are your thing, try the boxed Pomi brand, heated up, seasoned with a glug of olive oil, dried oregano and black pepper. Consider adding chopped fresh garlic, arugula leaves, pineapple chunks, pitted olives or basil. For cheese, consider fresh pecorino, at-home grated parmigiano, ricotta or sharp provolone. Any or all of these options make for a splendid feast and hold up in the leftovers department.

__Pizza Dough 101 __?
''Makes one larger, 16-inch-ish pie or two smaller, 10-12-inchers''

1 cup water

1 envelope active dry yeast

Pinch sugar

Approximately 3 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon olive oil

Cornmeal

Heat water until 110 degrees — THIS DOES NOT MEAN BOILING WATER! — and pour into a small bowl. Sprinkle contents of yeast packet, sugar and 1 tablespoon of flour over the water. Stir until dissolved and cover bowl at room temperature, until mixture is slightly foamy, about 15 minutes.

In a larger bowl, add 1 cup flour, salt and olive oil, and stir to combine. Add yeast mixture and whisk until just combined. Add flour, 1/2 cup at a time, and switch to a wooden spoon for stirring in between flour additions. You are looking for a soft, sticky dough that just clears the sides of the bowl. Depending on weather (humidity, heat), the amount of flour used will vary between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 cups total. It's unnecessary to use maximum amount.

Lightly dust work surface with flour and pour mixture out of bowl. Begin kneading dough in the following manner: punch (gently but firmly, but no black eyes, please), fold (in half) and turn (rotate 15 minutes on your imaginary clock, or 1/4 turn). Make this your mantra until your dough becomes a smooth, soft, springy ball, as smooth as a baby's bottom.

Lightly oil a large bowl and place dough in bowl, turning to coat with oil. Cover bowl with a towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm spot, away from drafts. Let rise until doubled, about an hour.

At this point, risen dough may be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated (or frozen) for later use. (Let chilled dough warm up at room temperature for about 45 minutes before rolling and shaping.) For two pizzas, cut ball in half and work with one half at a time.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Wipe work surface clean of dough scraps, then dry thoroughly before rolling out dough. Flour-dust work surface and rolling pin (or empty wine bottle). Gently pound on dough so that it begins to look like a disc. After every few motions, rotate dough 1/4 turn. Roll out dough from center, continuing to rotate, careful not to tear dough. Roll to desired thinness and shape.

Dust a pizza pan, stone or bottom side of a baking sheet with cornmeal, for texture. Fold your dough circle in half and carefully lift onto baking surface. Adjust shape of dough and begin adding tomato puree and other toppings of your choice. A final addition of salt just before baking is recommended.

Bake until dough makes a hollow sound when you tap the crust and is golden in color. A 12-inch pie takes about 10-12 minutes, but varies by oven. Bottom of crust should be golden. Transfer pizza to cutting board and cut into slices with a serrated knife or pizza slicer."
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At some point, the pizza patience arrived - in my overheated apartment in northern Virginia. The recipe below is written with the dough-challenged (or first-timer) in mind. If this dough dunce can do it, you can, too.

Before you fire up the oven, consider the pizza toppings. If tomatoes are your thing, try the boxed Pomi brand, heated up, seasoned with a glug of olive oil, dried oregano and black pepper. Consider adding chopped fresh garlic, arugula leaves, pineapple chunks, pitted olives or basil. For cheese, consider fresh pecorino, at-home grated parmigiano, ricotta or sharp provolone. Any or all of these options make for a splendid feast and hold up in the leftovers department.

Pizza Dough 101 ?
Makes one larger, 16-inch-ish pie or two smaller, 10-12-inchers

1 cup water

1 envelope active dry yeast

Pinch sugar

Approximately 3 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon olive oil

Cornmeal

Heat water until 110 degrees — THIS DOES NOT MEAN BOILING WATER! — and pour into a small bowl. Sprinkle contents of yeast packet, sugar and 1 tablespoon of flour over the water. Stir until dissolved and cover bowl at room temperature, until mixture is slightly foamy, about 15 minutes.

In a larger bowl, add 1 cup flour, salt and olive oil, and stir to combine. Add yeast mixture and whisk until just combined. Add flour, 1/2 cup at a time, and switch to a wooden spoon for stirring in between flour additions. You are looking for a soft, sticky dough that just clears the sides of the bowl. Depending on weather (humidity, heat), the amount of flour used will vary between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 cups total. It's unnecessary to use maximum amount.

Lightly dust work surface with flour and pour mixture out of bowl. Begin kneading dough in the following manner: punch (gently but firmly, but no black eyes, please), fold (in half) and turn (rotate 15 minutes on your imaginary clock, or 1/4 turn). Make this your mantra until your dough becomes a smooth, soft, springy ball, as smooth as a baby's bottom.

Lightly oil a large bowl and place dough in bowl, turning to coat with oil. Cover bowl with a towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm spot, away from drafts. Let rise until doubled, about an hour.

At this point, risen dough may be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated (or frozen) for later use. (Let chilled dough warm up at room temperature for about 45 minutes before rolling and shaping.) For two pizzas, cut ball in half and work with one half at a time.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Wipe work surface clean of dough scraps, then dry thoroughly before rolling out dough. Flour-dust work surface and rolling pin (or empty wine bottle). Gently pound on dough so that it begins to look like a disc. After every few motions, rotate dough 1/4 turn. Roll out dough from center, continuing to rotate, careful not to tear dough. Roll to desired thinness and shape.

Dust a pizza pan, stone or bottom side of a baking sheet with cornmeal, for texture. Fold your dough circle in half and carefully lift onto baking surface. Adjust shape of dough and begin adding tomato puree and other toppings of your choice. A final addition of salt just before baking is recommended.

Bake until dough makes a hollow sound when you tap the crust and is golden in color. A 12-inch pie takes about 10-12 minutes, but varies by oven. Bottom of crust should be golden. Transfer pizza to cutting board and cut into slices with a serrated knife or pizza slicer.             13018251 1254546                          Kitchen Witch - Go for the Dough "
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Wednesday June 8, 2005 12:04 am EDT

I'm the kind of cook who cooks. Baking bread is better done by others - or until I have the time to learn to be patient. I even had pizza lessons in Italy, but all I got was a misshapen dough Frisbee mixed in with bad-mouthing from Sergio, my chef instructor.

At some point, the pizza patience arrived - in my overheated apartment in northern Virginia. The recipe below is written with the...

| more...
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  string(2125) "A good hamburger is hard to find but shouldn't be. It's one of the easiest things to make, but most cooks want to make it complicated. All a burger needs to taste lip-smacking is salt, pepper, olive oil and mindful restraint.

A few notes on those four ingredients:

Salt and Pepper:Use Kosher salt and use liberally. For every pound of meat, use one teaspoon of salt. Although less critical, pepper is best when freshly ground, as it yields more fire and flavor.

Oil:If you're grilling at the home of a friend who doesn't own measuring spoons, go by the glug method. Two healthy glugs (aka alcohol pours) will do. Extra virgin olive oil offers aroma and flavor that you won't get with less neutral options, such as canola or corn.

Mindful Restraint:This means minimal touching, fondling and fussing with your patties while shaping and grilling. Let the darn things cook in peace. Flip only once. You know that guy who likes to show off flipping and prodding those burgers? He's a misguided feller. Do the right thing and show him some burger Zen.

A simple but luscious burger?
1 pound ground chuck or sirloin, about 80 percent lean

1 teaspoon coarse salt
3/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil

Preheat gas grill or fire up charcoal/wood-burning grill, about 20 minutes in advance.

In a large bowl, add all ingredients and mix with your hands until well combined. Tear a hunk of meat that fits comfortably in the palm of your hand. Gently press and shape into a somewhat flattened ball. Grill should be hot enough that you can barely place your hand 3 inches above the grate. Place burgers on grill and let cook for about 4 minutes, then with tongs, turn over onto other side.

For cheeseburgers, place cheese after turning. Continue cooking for 4 more minutes; a total of 8 minutes should yield medium-cooked burgers. For the most accurate (and safe) results, a medium burger reads between 135 and 145 degrees with a meat thermometer. More than 10 minutes of cooking will likely result in fossil-like burgers.

Toasted English muffins, rubbed with a clove of garlic, make sublime burger bookends."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(2145) "A good hamburger is hard to find but shouldn't be. It's one of the easiest things to make, but most cooks want to make it complicated. All a burger needs to taste lip-smacking is salt, pepper, olive oil and mindful restraint.

A few notes on those four ingredients:

__Salt and Pepper:__Use Kosher salt and use liberally. For every pound of meat, use one teaspoon of salt. Although less critical, pepper is best when freshly ground, as it yields more fire and flavor.

__Oil:__If you're grilling at the home of a friend who doesn't own measuring spoons, go by the glug method. Two healthy glugs (aka alcohol pours) will do. Extra virgin olive oil offers aroma and flavor that you won't get with less neutral options, such as canola or corn.

__Mindful Restraint:__This means minimal touching, fondling and fussing with your patties while shaping and grilling. Let the darn things cook in peace. Flip only once. You know that guy who likes to show off flipping and prodding those burgers? He's a misguided feller. Do the right thing and show him some burger Zen.

__A simple but luscious burger__?
''1 pound ground chuck or sirloin, about 80 percent lean''

1 teaspoon coarse salt
3/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil

Preheat gas grill or fire up charcoal/wood-burning grill, about 20 minutes in advance.

In a large bowl, add all ingredients and mix with your hands until well combined. Tear a hunk of meat that fits comfortably in the palm of your hand. Gently press and shape into a somewhat flattened ball. Grill should be hot enough that you can barely place your hand 3 inches above the grate. Place burgers on grill and let cook for about 4 minutes, then with tongs, turn over onto other side.

For cheeseburgers, place cheese after turning. Continue cooking for 4 more minutes; a total of 8 minutes should yield medium-cooked burgers. For the most accurate (and safe) results, a medium burger reads between 135 and 145 degrees with a meat thermometer. More than 10 minutes of cooking will likely result in fossil-like burgers.

Toasted English muffins, rubbed with a clove of garlic, make sublime burger bookends."
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  string(2363) "       2005-06-02T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Zen and the art of making burgers   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-06-02T04:04:00+00:00  A good hamburger is hard to find but shouldn't be. It's one of the easiest things to make, but most cooks want to make it complicated. All a burger needs to taste lip-smacking is salt, pepper, olive oil and mindful restraint.

A few notes on those four ingredients:

Salt and Pepper:Use Kosher salt and use liberally. For every pound of meat, use one teaspoon of salt. Although less critical, pepper is best when freshly ground, as it yields more fire and flavor.

Oil:If you're grilling at the home of a friend who doesn't own measuring spoons, go by the glug method. Two healthy glugs (aka alcohol pours) will do. Extra virgin olive oil offers aroma and flavor that you won't get with less neutral options, such as canola or corn.

Mindful Restraint:This means minimal touching, fondling and fussing with your patties while shaping and grilling. Let the darn things cook in peace. Flip only once. You know that guy who likes to show off flipping and prodding those burgers? He's a misguided feller. Do the right thing and show him some burger Zen.

A simple but luscious burger?
1 pound ground chuck or sirloin, about 80 percent lean

1 teaspoon coarse salt
3/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil

Preheat gas grill or fire up charcoal/wood-burning grill, about 20 minutes in advance.

In a large bowl, add all ingredients and mix with your hands until well combined. Tear a hunk of meat that fits comfortably in the palm of your hand. Gently press and shape into a somewhat flattened ball. Grill should be hot enough that you can barely place your hand 3 inches above the grate. Place burgers on grill and let cook for about 4 minutes, then with tongs, turn over onto other side.

For cheeseburgers, place cheese after turning. Continue cooking for 4 more minutes; a total of 8 minutes should yield medium-cooked burgers. For the most accurate (and safe) results, a medium burger reads between 135 and 145 degrees with a meat thermometer. More than 10 minutes of cooking will likely result in fossil-like burgers.

Toasted English muffins, rubbed with a clove of garlic, make sublime burger bookends.             13018188 1254429                          Kitchen Witch - Zen and the art of making burgers "
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Thursday June 2, 2005 12:04 am EDT

A good hamburger is hard to find but shouldn't be. It's one of the easiest things to make, but most cooks want to make it complicated. All a burger needs to taste lip-smacking is salt, pepper, olive oil and mindful restraint.

A few notes on those four ingredients:

Salt and Pepper:Use Kosher salt and use liberally. For every pound of meat, use one teaspoon of salt. Although less critical,...

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  ["title"]=>
  string(33) "Kitchen Witch - Sauce on the Side"
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  string(2338) "The biggest grilling weekend of the year is here - have you checked on the basics? Forget the charcoal and the buns for a moment. I'm wondering about your sauce.

First of all, do you have any? Don't lie to me. You gotta have some sauce, baby, whether it's a marinade, a dipper or a condiment. Humor me, and try something new that I'm confident will blow the roof off this year's festivities. When you make it yourself, the sauce sings. And when the sauce sings, the food goes ring-a-ding-ding. Wouldn't it be nice to actually enjoy the food you throw on the grill this summer?

Best of all, the two sauces below can be made in 20 minutes in a food processor and in advance. Try the rub as a marinade, the beautifully green chimichurri as a condiment/dipper.

Spiced and Spicy Jerk Rub

3 Scotch bonnet or habanero chile peppers, seeded and chopped

6 scallions, chopped

1 small onion, chopped

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

3 tablespoons dark or amber rum (optional)

3 tablespoons ground allspice (also known as Jamaica pepper or pimento)

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

2 teaspoons coarse salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

2-3 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, removed from stems

Combine all ingredients in a food processor or blender and puree until smooth. The mixture will be thick and pasty. Add a bit more oil if mixture is too thick. Use immediately for marinating or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator, where mixture will keep for a few weeks.

Makes approximately 2 cups, enough for a whole chicken and then some, chicken thighs for six, or a five-pound pork tenderloin.

Chimichurri

Use as a condiment for grilled meat, fish or shrimp

4 cloves garlic

Handful parsley, stems removed, chopped

Handful cilantro, stems removed

2 tablespoons fresh oregano leaves (approximately 10 sprigs)

1/4-3/4 cup olive oil

1/4 cup white wine or wine vinegar

Juice of 1/2 lemon

Coarse salt, to taste

With a mortar and pestle, pound the garlic with about 1/2 teaspoon salt. (Alternatively, puree in food processor.) Add the rest of the ingredients and taste for salt; adjust for seasonings. Sauce should be intense in flavor with piquant, salty notes.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups, enough for dipping for a sauce-lusty party of five. Will keep in refrigerator in airtight container for about two days."
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  string(2350) "The biggest grilling weekend of the year is here - have you checked on the basics? Forget the charcoal and the buns for a moment. I'm wondering about your sauce.

First of all, do you have any? Don't lie to me. You gotta have some sauce, baby, whether it's a marinade, a dipper or a condiment. Humor me, and try something new that I'm confident will blow the roof off this year's festivities. When you make it yourself, the sauce sings. And when the sauce sings, the food goes ring-a-ding-ding. Wouldn't it be nice to actually enjoy the food you throw on the grill this summer?

Best of all, the two sauces below can be made in 20 minutes in a food processor and in advance. Try the rub as a marinade, the beautifully green chimichurri as a condiment/dipper.

__Spiced and Spicy Jerk Rub__

3 Scotch bonnet or habanero chile peppers, seeded and chopped

6 scallions, chopped

1 small onion, chopped

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

3 tablespoons dark or amber rum (optional)

3 tablespoons ground allspice (also known as Jamaica pepper or pimento)

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

2 teaspoons coarse salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

2-3 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, removed from stems

Combine all ingredients in a food processor or blender and puree until smooth. The mixture will be thick and pasty. Add a bit more oil if mixture is too thick. Use immediately for marinating or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator, where mixture will keep for a few weeks.

Makes approximately 2 cups, enough for a whole chicken and then some, chicken thighs for six, or a five-pound pork tenderloin.

__Chimichurri__

''Use as a condiment for grilled meat, fish or shrimp''

4 cloves garlic

Handful parsley, stems removed, chopped

Handful cilantro, stems removed

2 tablespoons fresh oregano leaves (approximately 10 sprigs)

1/4-3/4 cup olive oil

1/4 cup white wine or wine vinegar

Juice of 1/2 lemon

Coarse salt, to taste

With a mortar and pestle, pound the garlic with about 1/2 teaspoon salt. (Alternatively, puree in food processor.) Add the rest of the ingredients and taste for salt; adjust for seasonings. Sauce should be intense in flavor with piquant, salty notes.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups, enough for dipping for a sauce-lusty party of five. Will keep in refrigerator in airtight container for about two days."
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  string(2544) "       2005-05-25T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Sauce on the Side   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-05-25T04:04:00+00:00  The biggest grilling weekend of the year is here - have you checked on the basics? Forget the charcoal and the buns for a moment. I'm wondering about your sauce.

First of all, do you have any? Don't lie to me. You gotta have some sauce, baby, whether it's a marinade, a dipper or a condiment. Humor me, and try something new that I'm confident will blow the roof off this year's festivities. When you make it yourself, the sauce sings. And when the sauce sings, the food goes ring-a-ding-ding. Wouldn't it be nice to actually enjoy the food you throw on the grill this summer?

Best of all, the two sauces below can be made in 20 minutes in a food processor and in advance. Try the rub as a marinade, the beautifully green chimichurri as a condiment/dipper.

Spiced and Spicy Jerk Rub

3 Scotch bonnet or habanero chile peppers, seeded and chopped

6 scallions, chopped

1 small onion, chopped

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

3 tablespoons dark or amber rum (optional)

3 tablespoons ground allspice (also known as Jamaica pepper or pimento)

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

2 teaspoons coarse salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

2-3 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, removed from stems

Combine all ingredients in a food processor or blender and puree until smooth. The mixture will be thick and pasty. Add a bit more oil if mixture is too thick. Use immediately for marinating or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator, where mixture will keep for a few weeks.

Makes approximately 2 cups, enough for a whole chicken and then some, chicken thighs for six, or a five-pound pork tenderloin.

Chimichurri

Use as a condiment for grilled meat, fish or shrimp

4 cloves garlic

Handful parsley, stems removed, chopped

Handful cilantro, stems removed

2 tablespoons fresh oregano leaves (approximately 10 sprigs)

1/4-3/4 cup olive oil

1/4 cup white wine or wine vinegar

Juice of 1/2 lemon

Coarse salt, to taste

With a mortar and pestle, pound the garlic with about 1/2 teaspoon salt. (Alternatively, puree in food processor.) Add the rest of the ingredients and taste for salt; adjust for seasonings. Sauce should be intense in flavor with piquant, salty notes.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups, enough for dipping for a sauce-lusty party of five. Will keep in refrigerator in airtight container for about two days.             13018127 1254309                          Kitchen Witch - Sauce on the Side "
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Article

Wednesday May 25, 2005 12:04 am EDT

The biggest grilling weekend of the year is here - have you checked on the basics? Forget the charcoal and the buns for a moment. I'm wondering about your sauce.

First of all, do you have any? Don't lie to me. You gotta have some sauce, baby, whether it's a marinade, a dipper or a condiment. Humor me, and try something new that I'm confident will blow the roof off this year's festivities. When...

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  string(31) "Kitchen Witch - Fava on My Mind"
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  string(25) "2018-01-20T19:12:19+00:00"
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  string(2240) "In the vegetable world, spring means the arrival of two high-maintenance divas: the artichoke and the fava bean.

At first glance, the artichoke is a real looker. But perhaps like a beauty contest queen, she makes it difficult for admirers to get closer, with her weaponry of prickly thorns studded all over her torso. Courageous cooks in pursuit of the artichoke's heart must not only wear gloves but then work doggedly, pulling at leaves and cutting away at her exterior, only to be faced with a bunch of fuzz that may as well be a chastity belt.

I get tired just thinking about her.

The fava bean, on the other hand, is a much nicer dinner date. She comes dressed in a gorgeous overcoat of a pod, all eight to 12 inches of her. Simply twist the pod and pop goes a chorus line of kidney-shaped beans with a creamy, pale-green outer skin, which can be peeled or left alone. The fava is so easygoing she can be eaten raw, with a little bit of salt - just as the frisky Italians do.

Skin left on, the beans taste kind of waxy and bland. Nicked with a fingernail, the skin reveals a brighter green nugget that offers a nuttier, herbier flavor.

Make it easier on yourself and blanch a bunch o' beans in salted water, for about one minute. Drain and place in a bowl of cold water to stop the cooking. Then see how easy it is to slip off those outer skins, which look like pruney fingertips after a long soak in the tub. Blanching brings out the chlorophyll in green vegetables, so those favas transform into a stunning shade of your neighbor's manicured lawn.

Since one pound of pods yields only about one cup of liberated beans, you have prep work cut out for you. But there are no thorns, no fuzz and the podding can be done in front of the television.

Easy Fava Bean Snack:

Pour a few tablespoons of olive oil, with the juice of 1/2 lemon and a teaspoon or two of freshly grated parmigiano into a small bowl. Salt to taste. Add 1 cup of blanched, peeled fava beans and mix with your impromptu vinaigrette or dip those beans into the dressing, with a little cocktail fork. Beans also go great on top of toast points or with a bunch of mixed greens.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


"
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  string(2293) "In the vegetable world, spring means the arrival of two high-maintenance divas: the artichoke and the fava bean.

At first glance, the artichoke is a real looker. But perhaps like a beauty contest queen, she makes it difficult for admirers to get closer, with her weaponry of prickly thorns studded all over her torso. Courageous cooks in pursuit of the artichoke's heart must not only wear gloves but then work doggedly, pulling at leaves and cutting away at her exterior, only to be faced with a bunch of fuzz that may as well be a chastity belt.

I get tired just thinking about her.

The fava bean, on the other hand, is a much nicer dinner date. She comes dressed in a gorgeous overcoat of a pod, all eight to 12 inches of her. Simply twist the pod and pop goes a chorus line of kidney-shaped beans with a creamy, pale-green outer skin, which can be peeled or left alone. The fava is so easygoing she can be eaten raw, with a little bit of salt - just as the frisky Italians do.

Skin left on, the beans taste kind of waxy and bland. Nicked with a fingernail, the skin reveals a brighter green nugget that offers a nuttier, herbier flavor.

Make it easier on yourself and blanch a bunch o' beans in salted water, for about one minute. Drain and place in a bowl of cold water to stop the cooking. Then see how easy it is to slip off those outer skins, which look like pruney fingertips after a long soak in the tub. Blanching brings out the chlorophyll in green vegetables, so those favas transform into a stunning shade of your neighbor's manicured lawn.

Since one pound of pods yields only about one cup of liberated beans, you have prep work cut out for you. But there are no thorns, no fuzz and the podding can be done in front of the television.

__Easy Fava Bean Snack:__

Pour a few tablespoons of olive oil, with the juice of 1/2 lemon and a teaspoon or two of freshly grated parmigiano into a small bowl. Salt to taste. Add 1 cup of blanched, peeled fava beans and mix with your impromptu vinaigrette or dip those beans into the dressing, with a little cocktail fork. Beans also go great on top of toast points or with a bunch of mixed greens.

''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL'''s Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(2442) "       2005-05-12T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Fava on My Mind   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-05-12T04:04:00+00:00  In the vegetable world, spring means the arrival of two high-maintenance divas: the artichoke and the fava bean.

At first glance, the artichoke is a real looker. But perhaps like a beauty contest queen, she makes it difficult for admirers to get closer, with her weaponry of prickly thorns studded all over her torso. Courageous cooks in pursuit of the artichoke's heart must not only wear gloves but then work doggedly, pulling at leaves and cutting away at her exterior, only to be faced with a bunch of fuzz that may as well be a chastity belt.

I get tired just thinking about her.

The fava bean, on the other hand, is a much nicer dinner date. She comes dressed in a gorgeous overcoat of a pod, all eight to 12 inches of her. Simply twist the pod and pop goes a chorus line of kidney-shaped beans with a creamy, pale-green outer skin, which can be peeled or left alone. The fava is so easygoing she can be eaten raw, with a little bit of salt - just as the frisky Italians do.

Skin left on, the beans taste kind of waxy and bland. Nicked with a fingernail, the skin reveals a brighter green nugget that offers a nuttier, herbier flavor.

Make it easier on yourself and blanch a bunch o' beans in salted water, for about one minute. Drain and place in a bowl of cold water to stop the cooking. Then see how easy it is to slip off those outer skins, which look like pruney fingertips after a long soak in the tub. Blanching brings out the chlorophyll in green vegetables, so those favas transform into a stunning shade of your neighbor's manicured lawn.

Since one pound of pods yields only about one cup of liberated beans, you have prep work cut out for you. But there are no thorns, no fuzz and the podding can be done in front of the television.

Easy Fava Bean Snack:

Pour a few tablespoons of olive oil, with the juice of 1/2 lemon and a teaspoon or two of freshly grated parmigiano into a small bowl. Salt to taste. Add 1 cup of blanched, peeled fava beans and mix with your impromptu vinaigrette or dip those beans into the dressing, with a little cocktail fork. Beans also go great on top of toast points or with a bunch of mixed greens.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


             13017996 1254040                          Kitchen Witch - Fava on My Mind "
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Thursday May 12, 2005 12:04 am EDT

In the vegetable world, spring means the arrival of two high-maintenance divas: the artichoke and the fava bean.

At first glance, the artichoke is a real looker. But perhaps like a beauty contest queen, she makes it difficult for admirers to get closer, with her weaponry of prickly thorns studded all over her torso. Courageous cooks in pursuit of the artichoke's heart must not only wear gloves...

| more...
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  string(3468) "The house of my childhood was a bit like the set of "Pee-Wee's Playhouse." An upright piano, painted in a shade of Pepto pink, took center stage in the dining room. The kitchen counters, instead of being used for chopping vegetables, were taken up by a vintage milkshake maker and a glass jar of Christmas ornaments circa 1940. The walls were covered with clocks of all varieties, all set to different times, not in any particular order. Antique penny gumball machines were parked in almost every room in the house.

With a frenzied passion for collecting and interior decorating, Susan, my mother, had little interest in cooking. Although my brothers and I regularly scraped off burnt meatballs at dinner, we did so in a kitchen of eye-popping orange walls, filled with garage-sale kitsch of the highest order. We knew what a roll-top desk was before we ever tasted beef Stroganoff. We didn't know about fresh broccoli, but instead we lived among cartoon colors, Americana and crazy artifacts.

Among all the debris, which is how my father diplomatically referred to it, there would be artifacts of another kind - those made by her children. Until she moved five years ago, the paper plate plaster mold of my first-grade hand, painted in bright yellow, was still on display, next to various collectibles of other eras gone by.

Mother's Day is always a personal challenge, because gifts for Susan can never be ordinary. Over the years, I have found success in gifts of doing vs. buying. This year, I'm thinking of fixing her afternoon tea. We'll dust off one of her ancient teapots, put on a Betty Carter CD, and I'll make shortbread, even though she'll complain that it's high in carbs.

This shortbread is so easy, even Susie could make it - but I'll leave her to setting a most fanciful and wacky table instead, resplendent with Pez dispensers, snow-globes and, hopefully, my paper-plate mold.

Cashew Shortbread

Adapted from The New Tea Book by Sara Perry

1 cup salted cashews, finely chopped (food processor or blender is best)

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup powdered sugar

1/4 cup cornstarch

2 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 1/2 sticks cold unsalted butter

1-2 teaspoons granulated sugar

Optional (but highly recommended): 1 tablespoon finely chopped crystallized ginger

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Use either a springform pan (with removable rim) or a 9-inch cake pan; if using cake pan, line with parchment paper. Note: The springform pan makes the post-baking part a breeze.

In a medium bowl, add cashews, flour, powdered sugar, cornstarch and powdered ginger (and crystallized ginger, if using). Mix with a wooden spoon to combine. Using the large holes of a flat or box grater, grate butter into the flour mixture. (The colder the butter, the better; frozen butter is ideal.) With your fingers, work butter into rest of ingredients. At first, the mixture will be crumbly, but as butter softens, it will become malleable. Shape into a ball.

Pat mixture into pan. Press to an even thickness, covering the entire bottom surface of the pan. Pierce dough with a fork. Bake until golden brown, 40-45 minutes. Upon removing from oven, sprinkle granulated sugar over the surface.

Use a sharp knife to cut into 12 pie-like wedges. Let cool in pan for at least 15 minutes; you'll notice that shortbread hardens quickly, which is a good thing. Store in airtight container.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com."
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  string(3525) "The house of my childhood was a bit like the set of "Pee-Wee's Playhouse." An upright piano, painted in a shade of Pepto pink, took center stage in the dining room. The kitchen counters, instead of being used for chopping vegetables, were taken up by a vintage milkshake maker and a glass jar of Christmas ornaments circa 1940. The walls were covered with clocks of all varieties, all set to different times, not in any particular order. Antique penny gumball machines were parked in almost every room in the house.

With a frenzied passion for collecting and interior decorating, Susan, my mother, had little interest in cooking. Although my brothers and I regularly scraped off burnt meatballs at dinner, we did so in a kitchen of eye-popping orange walls, filled with garage-sale kitsch of the highest order. We knew what a roll-top desk was before we ever tasted beef Stroganoff. We didn't know about fresh broccoli, but instead we lived among cartoon colors, Americana and crazy artifacts.

Among all the debris, which is how my father diplomatically referred to it, there would be artifacts of another kind - those made by her children. Until she moved five years ago, the paper plate plaster mold of my first-grade hand, painted in bright yellow, was still on display, next to various collectibles of other eras gone by.

Mother's Day is always a personal challenge, because gifts for Susan can never be ordinary. Over the years, I have found success in gifts of doing vs. buying. This year, I'm thinking of fixing her afternoon tea. We'll dust off one of her ancient teapots, put on a Betty Carter CD, and I'll make shortbread, even though she'll complain that it's high in carbs.

This shortbread is so easy, even Susie could make it - but I'll leave her to setting a most fanciful and wacky table instead, resplendent with Pez dispensers, snow-globes and, hopefully, my paper-plate mold.

__Cashew Shortbread__

Adapted from ''The New Tea Book'' by Sara Perry

1 cup salted cashews, finely chopped (food processor or blender is best)

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup powdered sugar

1/4 cup cornstarch

2 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 1/2 sticks cold unsalted butter

1-2 teaspoons granulated sugar

Optional (but highly recommended): 1 tablespoon finely chopped crystallized ginger

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Use either a springform pan (with removable rim) or a 9-inch cake pan; if using cake pan, line with parchment paper. Note: The springform pan makes the post-baking part a breeze.

In a medium bowl, add cashews, flour, powdered sugar, cornstarch and powdered ginger (and crystallized ginger, if using). Mix with a wooden spoon to combine. Using the large holes of a flat or box grater, grate butter into the flour mixture. (The colder the butter, the better; frozen butter is ideal.) With your fingers, work butter into rest of ingredients. At first, the mixture will be crumbly, but as butter softens, it will become malleable. Shape into a ball.

Pat mixture into pan. Press to an even thickness, covering the entire bottom surface of the pan. Pierce dough with a fork. Bake until golden brown, 40-45 minutes. Upon removing from oven, sprinkle granulated sugar over the surface.

Use a sharp knife to cut into 12 pie-like wedges. Let cool in pan for at least 15 minutes; you'll notice that shortbread hardens quickly, which is a good thing. Store in airtight container.

''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL'''s Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''"
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With a frenzied passion for collecting and interior decorating, Susan, my mother, had little interest in cooking. Although my brothers and I regularly scraped off burnt meatballs at dinner, we did so in a kitchen of eye-popping orange walls, filled with garage-sale kitsch of the highest order. We knew what a roll-top desk was before we ever tasted beef Stroganoff. We didn't know about fresh broccoli, but instead we lived among cartoon colors, Americana and crazy artifacts.

Among all the debris, which is how my father diplomatically referred to it, there would be artifacts of another kind - those made by her children. Until she moved five years ago, the paper plate plaster mold of my first-grade hand, painted in bright yellow, was still on display, next to various collectibles of other eras gone by.

Mother's Day is always a personal challenge, because gifts for Susan can never be ordinary. Over the years, I have found success in gifts of doing vs. buying. This year, I'm thinking of fixing her afternoon tea. We'll dust off one of her ancient teapots, put on a Betty Carter CD, and I'll make shortbread, even though she'll complain that it's high in carbs.

This shortbread is so easy, even Susie could make it - but I'll leave her to setting a most fanciful and wacky table instead, resplendent with Pez dispensers, snow-globes and, hopefully, my paper-plate mold.

Cashew Shortbread

Adapted from The New Tea Book by Sara Perry

1 cup salted cashews, finely chopped (food processor or blender is best)

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup powdered sugar

1/4 cup cornstarch

2 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 1/2 sticks cold unsalted butter

1-2 teaspoons granulated sugar

Optional (but highly recommended): 1 tablespoon finely chopped crystallized ginger

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Use either a springform pan (with removable rim) or a 9-inch cake pan; if using cake pan, line with parchment paper. Note: The springform pan makes the post-baking part a breeze.

In a medium bowl, add cashews, flour, powdered sugar, cornstarch and powdered ginger (and crystallized ginger, if using). Mix with a wooden spoon to combine. Using the large holes of a flat or box grater, grate butter into the flour mixture. (The colder the butter, the better; frozen butter is ideal.) With your fingers, work butter into rest of ingredients. At first, the mixture will be crumbly, but as butter softens, it will become malleable. Shape into a ball.

Pat mixture into pan. Press to an even thickness, covering the entire bottom surface of the pan. Pierce dough with a fork. Bake until golden brown, 40-45 minutes. Upon removing from oven, sprinkle granulated sugar over the surface.

Use a sharp knife to cut into 12 pie-like wedges. Let cool in pan for at least 15 minutes; you'll notice that shortbread hardens quickly, which is a good thing. Store in airtight container.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.             13017935 1253919                          Kitchen Witch - Tea Treat for Mom and Me "
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Wednesday May 4, 2005 12:04 am EDT
The house of my childhood was a bit like the set of "Pee-Wee's Playhouse." An upright piano, painted in a shade of Pepto pink, took center stage in the dining room. The kitchen counters, instead of being used for chopping vegetables, were taken up by a vintage milkshake maker and a glass jar of Christmas ornaments circa 1940. The walls were covered with clocks of all varieties, all set to... | more...
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  string(2445) "From the summer of 1999 to the summer of 2001, I traveled to Barbados eight times. The farthest east of all islands in the Caribbean, Barbados was my growing-up classroom in my early 30s. There was plenty of romance, rum and swimming in the sea. But most importantly, there were mangoes.

Before I spent so much time in the Caribbean, my experience with the mango was supermarket-peripheral, out-of-season and without context.

It was the summer of 2000. The sun was starting to fade, so that meant it was nearing 6, which also meant it was cocktail hour at the house of my dear friends Gordon and Dickie Parkinson. They are the parents of Rosemary Parkinson, a cookbook author and food writer to whom I owe my introduction to Barbados.

Gordon, who retired early as an oilman and established himself as a well-known painter, was also a flirt. We were sitting in the kitchen, about to make a batch of rum cocktails, but Gordon turned his attention to fruit instead.

"This is Julie," he said to me, pointing to a hot pink-orange hunk of fruit flesh. "She is the sweetest mango there is," he said. "Go on, taste her." I obeyed, placing the mango on my tongue, letting it sit there for a moment. And then I let it slide down, while trying to savor every honeyed second, not unlike trying to memorize a sexy tune on the radio on a hot summer day.

I sat there in front of this physically unsexy old man, who was, in effect, seducing me with his Julie mango. And I allowed him to continue, handing me slice after slice, as I imagined poetry, watercolors and Caribbean seascapes. We were both quiet, save our slurping, and there was sweat on our lips, nectar staining our cheeks.

Gordon died earlier this year, and I will always have him to thank for introducing me to Julie.

How to Slice a Mango

May means the beginning of mango season in Florida, Mexico and the Caribbean. Keep your eyes peeled for the Day-Glo flesh of your dreams. Hold mango upright, stem end up. Feel pit in center. Place knife to left of pit, slicing the length of the fruit, from top to bottom. Repeat on right side. Now you have two separate mango "cheeks." With knife, score the flesh of each "cheek" in a tic-tac-toe pattern, but without cutting through the skin. Hold the edges of the skin and push the skin from underneath toward you, so that cubes of mango pop up from the inside out. Eat and savor. Best done over a sink, or in a bathtub, with someone you love.??


"
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  string(2449) "From the summer of 1999 to the summer of 2001, I traveled to Barbados eight times. The farthest east of all islands in the Caribbean, Barbados was my growing-up classroom in my early 30s. There was plenty of romance, rum and swimming in the sea. But most importantly, there were mangoes.

Before I spent so much time in the Caribbean, my experience with the mango was supermarket-peripheral, out-of-season and without context.

It was the summer of 2000. The sun was starting to fade, so that meant it was nearing 6, which also meant it was cocktail hour at the house of my dear friends Gordon and Dickie Parkinson. They are the parents of Rosemary Parkinson, a cookbook author and food writer to whom I owe my introduction to Barbados.

Gordon, who retired early as an oilman and established himself as a well-known painter, was also a flirt. We were sitting in the kitchen, about to make a batch of rum cocktails, but Gordon turned his attention to fruit instead.

"This is Julie," he said to me, pointing to a hot pink-orange hunk of fruit flesh. "She is the sweetest mango there is," he said. "Go on, taste her." I obeyed, placing the mango on my tongue, letting it sit there for a moment. And then I let it slide down, while trying to savor every honeyed second, not unlike trying to memorize a sexy tune on the radio on a hot summer day.

I sat there in front of this physically unsexy old man, who was, in effect, seducing me with his Julie mango. And I allowed him to continue, handing me slice after slice, as I imagined poetry, watercolors and Caribbean seascapes. We were both quiet, save our slurping, and there was sweat on our lips, nectar staining our cheeks.

Gordon died earlier this year, and I will always have him to thank for introducing me to Julie.

__How to Slice a Mango__

May means the beginning of mango season in Florida, Mexico and the Caribbean. Keep your eyes peeled for the Day-Glo flesh of your dreams. Hold mango upright, stem end up. Feel pit in center. Place knife to left of pit, slicing the length of the fruit, from top to bottom. Repeat on right side. Now you have two separate mango "cheeks." With knife, score the flesh of each "cheek" in a tic-tac-toe pattern, but without cutting through the skin. Hold the edges of the skin and push the skin from underneath toward you, so that cubes of mango pop up from the inside out. Eat and savor. Best done over a sink, or in a bathtub, with someone you love.??


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  string(2643) "       2005-04-27T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - My Mango Muse   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-04-27T04:04:00+00:00  From the summer of 1999 to the summer of 2001, I traveled to Barbados eight times. The farthest east of all islands in the Caribbean, Barbados was my growing-up classroom in my early 30s. There was plenty of romance, rum and swimming in the sea. But most importantly, there were mangoes.

Before I spent so much time in the Caribbean, my experience with the mango was supermarket-peripheral, out-of-season and without context.

It was the summer of 2000. The sun was starting to fade, so that meant it was nearing 6, which also meant it was cocktail hour at the house of my dear friends Gordon and Dickie Parkinson. They are the parents of Rosemary Parkinson, a cookbook author and food writer to whom I owe my introduction to Barbados.

Gordon, who retired early as an oilman and established himself as a well-known painter, was also a flirt. We were sitting in the kitchen, about to make a batch of rum cocktails, but Gordon turned his attention to fruit instead.

"This is Julie," he said to me, pointing to a hot pink-orange hunk of fruit flesh. "She is the sweetest mango there is," he said. "Go on, taste her." I obeyed, placing the mango on my tongue, letting it sit there for a moment. And then I let it slide down, while trying to savor every honeyed second, not unlike trying to memorize a sexy tune on the radio on a hot summer day.

I sat there in front of this physically unsexy old man, who was, in effect, seducing me with his Julie mango. And I allowed him to continue, handing me slice after slice, as I imagined poetry, watercolors and Caribbean seascapes. We were both quiet, save our slurping, and there was sweat on our lips, nectar staining our cheeks.

Gordon died earlier this year, and I will always have him to thank for introducing me to Julie.

How to Slice a Mango

May means the beginning of mango season in Florida, Mexico and the Caribbean. Keep your eyes peeled for the Day-Glo flesh of your dreams. Hold mango upright, stem end up. Feel pit in center. Place knife to left of pit, slicing the length of the fruit, from top to bottom. Repeat on right side. Now you have two separate mango "cheeks." With knife, score the flesh of each "cheek" in a tic-tac-toe pattern, but without cutting through the skin. Hold the edges of the skin and push the skin from underneath toward you, so that cubes of mango pop up from the inside out. Eat and savor. Best done over a sink, or in a bathtub, with someone you love.??


             13017872 1253797                          Kitchen Witch - My Mango Muse "
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Article

Wednesday April 27, 2005 12:04 am EDT

From the summer of 1999 to the summer of 2001, I traveled to Barbados eight times. The farthest east of all islands in the Caribbean, Barbados was my growing-up classroom in my early 30s. There was plenty of romance, rum and swimming in the sea. But most importantly, there were mangoes.

Before I spent so much time in the Caribbean, my experience with the mango was supermarket-peripheral,...

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  ["title"]=>
  string(38) "Kitchen Witch - A Puckery Picker Upper"
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  string(2317) "In this country, we have lemon furniture polish, dish detergent, tile cleaner and air freshener. We love how the lemon cleans our house and our bathrooms. But somehow, we forgot that the lemon, the fruit of citrus medica, is good for our bodies and helpful in our cooking.

Although ghettoized to the dregs of cleaning product world, the little ol' lemon is quite the culinary powerhouse. First, the juice. We all know how wonderful real lemonade is on a hot summer day, but, for a moment, consider this: A squeeze of a lemon can save your vinaigrette from distress, or perk up a lentil soup just before serving, or freshen up a bowl of hummus that already has plenty of salt. Lemon refreshes our palate. It wakes us up, both physically and spiritually. A lemon should always be in the fridge, and not just for tea when we have a cold.

Then, there's the zest, aka the peel without the bitter, white pith. The zest is best extracted using a handy little tool called a zester (only about five bucks at your local cookware store). The uses of zest are seemingly endless - on rice, in green salads, over roasted asparagus, on pasta, in pizza dough, cake, sorbet, with garlic and herbs ... the zest list goes on and on.

Don't take this wrong way, but after you read this, do yourself a favor and go suck on a lemon - after zesting, of course.

Real Lemon Curd

8 egg yolks

1 1/2 cups sugar

Zest and juice of 6 lemons (approximately 2 tablespoons and 1 1/2 cups, respectively)

1 stick unsalted butter, diced

Generous pinch of salt

Place all ingredients in a heavy saucepan, over low-medium heat.

Stir constantly with a rubber, heatproof spatula or balloon whisk, for up to 45 minutes. You'll notice change in color (from orangey to yellow) and texture (from liquid to almost hollandaise). But you've got to keep stirring or whisking to keep eggs from scrambling.

When you've got a nice thick streak on the back of a spoon, pour curd through a sieve to remove zest and unwanted egg particles. Immediately cover with plastic wrap. Keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two weeks.

Makes approximately 2 cups, enough for a 9-inch tart shell, plus extra for scones, pound cake, tea biscuits or snacking with a spoon.Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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  string(2370) "In this country, we have lemon furniture polish, dish detergent, tile cleaner and air freshener. We love how the lemon cleans our house and our bathrooms. But somehow, we forgot that the lemon, the fruit of citrus medica, is good for our bodies and helpful in our cooking.

Although ghettoized to the dregs of cleaning product world, the little ol' lemon is quite the culinary powerhouse. First, the juice. We all know how wonderful real lemonade is on a hot summer day, but, for a moment, consider this: A squeeze of a lemon can save your vinaigrette from distress, or perk up a lentil soup just before serving, or freshen up a bowl of hummus that already has plenty of salt. Lemon refreshes our palate. It wakes us up, both physically and spiritually. A lemon should always be in the fridge, and not just for tea when we have a cold.

Then, there's the zest, aka the peel without the bitter, white pith. The zest is best extracted using a handy little tool called a zester (only about five bucks at your local cookware store). The uses of zest are seemingly endless - on rice, in green salads, over roasted asparagus, on pasta, in pizza dough, cake, sorbet, with garlic and herbs ... the zest list goes on and on.

Don't take this wrong way, but after you read this, do yourself a favor and go suck on a lemon - after zesting, of course.

__Real Lemon Curd__

8 egg yolks

1 1/2 cups sugar

Zest and juice of 6 lemons (approximately 2 tablespoons and 1 1/2 cups, respectively)

1 stick unsalted butter, diced

Generous pinch of salt

Place all ingredients in a heavy saucepan, over low-medium heat.

Stir constantly with a rubber, heatproof spatula or balloon whisk, for up to 45 minutes. You'll notice change in color (from orangey to yellow) and texture (from liquid to almost hollandaise). But you've got to keep stirring or whisking to keep eggs from scrambling.

When you've got a nice thick streak on the back of a spoon, pour curd through a sieve to remove zest and unwanted egg particles. Immediately cover with plastic wrap. Keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two weeks.

Makes approximately 2 cups, enough for a 9-inch tart shell, plus extra for scones, pound cake, tea biscuits or snacking with a spoon.''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL'''s Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(2533) "       2005-04-20T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - A Puckery Picker Upper   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-04-20T04:04:00+00:00  In this country, we have lemon furniture polish, dish detergent, tile cleaner and air freshener. We love how the lemon cleans our house and our bathrooms. But somehow, we forgot that the lemon, the fruit of citrus medica, is good for our bodies and helpful in our cooking.

Although ghettoized to the dregs of cleaning product world, the little ol' lemon is quite the culinary powerhouse. First, the juice. We all know how wonderful real lemonade is on a hot summer day, but, for a moment, consider this: A squeeze of a lemon can save your vinaigrette from distress, or perk up a lentil soup just before serving, or freshen up a bowl of hummus that already has plenty of salt. Lemon refreshes our palate. It wakes us up, both physically and spiritually. A lemon should always be in the fridge, and not just for tea when we have a cold.

Then, there's the zest, aka the peel without the bitter, white pith. The zest is best extracted using a handy little tool called a zester (only about five bucks at your local cookware store). The uses of zest are seemingly endless - on rice, in green salads, over roasted asparagus, on pasta, in pizza dough, cake, sorbet, with garlic and herbs ... the zest list goes on and on.

Don't take this wrong way, but after you read this, do yourself a favor and go suck on a lemon - after zesting, of course.

Real Lemon Curd

8 egg yolks

1 1/2 cups sugar

Zest and juice of 6 lemons (approximately 2 tablespoons and 1 1/2 cups, respectively)

1 stick unsalted butter, diced

Generous pinch of salt

Place all ingredients in a heavy saucepan, over low-medium heat.

Stir constantly with a rubber, heatproof spatula or balloon whisk, for up to 45 minutes. You'll notice change in color (from orangey to yellow) and texture (from liquid to almost hollandaise). But you've got to keep stirring or whisking to keep eggs from scrambling.

When you've got a nice thick streak on the back of a spoon, pour curd through a sieve to remove zest and unwanted egg particles. Immediately cover with plastic wrap. Keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two weeks.

Makes approximately 2 cups, enough for a 9-inch tart shell, plus extra for scones, pound cake, tea biscuits or snacking with a spoon.Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


             13017808 1253669                          Kitchen Witch - A Puckery Picker Upper "
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Article

Wednesday April 20, 2005 12:04 am EDT

In this country, we have lemon furniture polish, dish detergent, tile cleaner and air freshener. We love how the lemon cleans our house and our bathrooms. But somehow, we forgot that the lemon, the fruit of citrus medica, is good for our bodies and helpful in our cooking.

Although ghettoized to the dregs of cleaning product world, the little ol' lemon is quite the culinary powerhouse. First,...

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  string(39) "Kitchen Witch - Hung Like A Horseradish"
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  string(3756) "Oh, Dios mio, what is this? asked the cashier at my local Whole Foods. She did have reason to wonder about the gnarly, hairy root dirtying up her grocery scanner.

"It looks like elephant foot," she said, grimacing.

"No, it doesn't," I whispered. "It looks like a penis."

Indeed, fresh horseradish can look shockingly phallic, but that's not the reason to give it a try. If the only horseradish you've ever had is the stuff out of a jar that you mix with ketchup for shrimp cocktail, it's time to experience the real deal.

In season during early spring, fresh horseradish is usually in supermarkets in time for Passover (it's one of the five bitter herbs served at Seder, which begins this year at sundown, April 23), and then it seems to disappear from the produce aisle. Beyond its misshapen, filthy exterior is a creamy white flesh that, once grated, will send your nostrils and taste buds into another galaxy.

An ancient plant known for its medicinal qualities (cough medicine, anyone?), horseradish is a member of the mustard family, which means it's related to kale, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts. Because its aroma and flavor is hyper-potent, horseradish needs taming. Think plain yogurt or sour cream, or even mayonnaise. Piquant horseradish loves the mellowness of fat, which is why it works so well with roast beef, cream cheese, and yes, those shrimp.

To get started, open the windows in the kitchen for ventilation - and if you don't believe me, let me know next week about your nostrils being set on fire. Scrub the beast thoroughly; the fresh stuff usually comes caked in dirt and needs a vigorous soak as well. With a sharp knife, cut away the skin. With a grater, grate a hunk until you have approximately 1/4 cup horseradish. This is a good amount to start with; you can also add more, but you can never take it away. I recently made a meal built around the knobby beast, using it in a sauce that worked as a medium, seamlessly linking all the components on the plate. Let me know what you discover on your horseradish journey.

A Supper with horseradish Sauce:

1/4 cup freshly grated horseradish

At least 1/2 cup plain yogurt or sour cream (add more if the flavor is too intense)

Zest of 1 lemon, chopped

Salt to taste

1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard

Small handful of fresh dill leaves, chopped

Stir together sauce ingredients and taste for salt. Set aside.For the rest of dinner:

Six to eight small, waxy potatoes

Additional fresh dill (optional)

1 teaspoon ground coriander

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

Olive oil or sesame oil

Two 6-8 oz. salmon fillets

Two crisp apples, sliced into eighths just before serving

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Boil potatoes in salted water and cook until fork tender. Mash by hand and add salt, pepper, a few teaspoons of horseradish sauce, and extra dill, if desired. Taste and adjust seasonings accordingly.

Mix the ground coriander and cumin with 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl. Rub the mixture over salmon filets with enough oil to moisten the spices (approximately 1 teaspoon). Heat a saute pan and sear the fish, skin side down, for at least three minutes. Turn fish onto other side and continue to cook — either in an ovenproof saute pan or on a baking sheet — in preheated oven. Cook until desired doneness, approximately five to seven minutes.

Place salmon on plates with a healthy scoop of mashed potatoes and sliced apple. Taste everything with the sauce and learn about your new friend, the horseradish. Isn't it spectacular against the crunch of the apple? Is it refreshing against the fat of the salmon? Serves two.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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  string(3805) "Oh, ''Dios mio'', what is this? asked the cashier at my local Whole Foods. She did have reason to wonder about the gnarly, hairy root dirtying up her grocery scanner.

"It looks like elephant foot," she said, grimacing.

"No, it doesn't," I whispered. "It looks like a penis."

Indeed, fresh horseradish can look shockingly phallic, but that's not the reason to give it a try. If the only horseradish you've ever had is the stuff out of a jar that you mix with ketchup for shrimp cocktail, it's time to experience the real deal.

In season during early spring, fresh horseradish is usually in supermarkets in time for Passover (it's one of the five bitter herbs served at Seder, which begins this year at sundown, April 23), and then it seems to disappear from the produce aisle. Beyond its misshapen, filthy exterior is a creamy white flesh that, once grated, will send your nostrils and taste buds into another galaxy.

An ancient plant known for its medicinal qualities (cough medicine, anyone?), horseradish is a member of the mustard family, which means it's related to kale, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts. Because its aroma and flavor is hyper-potent, horseradish needs taming. Think plain yogurt or sour cream, or even mayonnaise. Piquant horseradish loves the mellowness of fat, which is why it works so well with roast beef, cream cheese, and yes, those shrimp.

To get started, open the windows in the kitchen for ventilation - and if you don't believe me, let me know next week about your nostrils being set on fire. Scrub the beast thoroughly; the fresh stuff usually comes caked in dirt and needs a vigorous soak as well. With a sharp knife, cut away the skin. With a grater, grate a hunk until you have approximately 1/4 cup horseradish. This is a good amount to start with; you can also add more, but you can never take it away. I recently made a meal built around the knobby beast, using it in a sauce that worked as a medium, seamlessly linking all the components on the plate. Let me know what you discover on your horseradish journey.

__A Supper with horseradish Sauce:__

1/4 cup freshly grated horseradish

At least 1/2 cup plain yogurt or sour cream (add more if the flavor is too intense)

Zest of 1 lemon, chopped

Salt to taste

1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard

Small handful of fresh dill leaves, chopped

Stir together sauce ingredients and taste for salt. Set aside.For the rest of dinner:

Six to eight small, waxy potatoes

Additional fresh dill (optional)

1 teaspoon ground coriander

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

Olive oil or sesame oil

Two 6-8 oz. salmon fillets

Two crisp apples, sliced into eighths just before serving

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Boil potatoes in salted water and cook until fork tender. Mash by hand and add salt, pepper, a few teaspoons of horseradish sauce, and extra dill, if desired. Taste and adjust seasonings accordingly.

Mix the ground coriander and cumin with 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl. Rub the mixture over salmon filets with enough oil to moisten the spices (approximately 1 teaspoon). Heat a saute pan and sear the fish, skin side down, for at least three minutes. Turn fish onto other side and continue to cook — either in an ovenproof saute pan or on a baking sheet — in preheated oven. Cook until desired doneness, approximately five to seven minutes.

Place salmon on plates with a healthy scoop of mashed potatoes and sliced apple. Taste everything with the sauce and learn about your new friend, the horseradish. Isn't it spectacular against the crunch of the apple? Is it refreshing against the fat of the salmon? Serves two.

''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL'''s Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(3974) "       2005-04-13T04:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Hung Like A Horseradish   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-04-13T04:04:00+00:00  Oh, Dios mio, what is this? asked the cashier at my local Whole Foods. She did have reason to wonder about the gnarly, hairy root dirtying up her grocery scanner.

"It looks like elephant foot," she said, grimacing.

"No, it doesn't," I whispered. "It looks like a penis."

Indeed, fresh horseradish can look shockingly phallic, but that's not the reason to give it a try. If the only horseradish you've ever had is the stuff out of a jar that you mix with ketchup for shrimp cocktail, it's time to experience the real deal.

In season during early spring, fresh horseradish is usually in supermarkets in time for Passover (it's one of the five bitter herbs served at Seder, which begins this year at sundown, April 23), and then it seems to disappear from the produce aisle. Beyond its misshapen, filthy exterior is a creamy white flesh that, once grated, will send your nostrils and taste buds into another galaxy.

An ancient plant known for its medicinal qualities (cough medicine, anyone?), horseradish is a member of the mustard family, which means it's related to kale, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts. Because its aroma and flavor is hyper-potent, horseradish needs taming. Think plain yogurt or sour cream, or even mayonnaise. Piquant horseradish loves the mellowness of fat, which is why it works so well with roast beef, cream cheese, and yes, those shrimp.

To get started, open the windows in the kitchen for ventilation - and if you don't believe me, let me know next week about your nostrils being set on fire. Scrub the beast thoroughly; the fresh stuff usually comes caked in dirt and needs a vigorous soak as well. With a sharp knife, cut away the skin. With a grater, grate a hunk until you have approximately 1/4 cup horseradish. This is a good amount to start with; you can also add more, but you can never take it away. I recently made a meal built around the knobby beast, using it in a sauce that worked as a medium, seamlessly linking all the components on the plate. Let me know what you discover on your horseradish journey.

A Supper with horseradish Sauce:

1/4 cup freshly grated horseradish

At least 1/2 cup plain yogurt or sour cream (add more if the flavor is too intense)

Zest of 1 lemon, chopped

Salt to taste

1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard

Small handful of fresh dill leaves, chopped

Stir together sauce ingredients and taste for salt. Set aside.For the rest of dinner:

Six to eight small, waxy potatoes

Additional fresh dill (optional)

1 teaspoon ground coriander

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

Olive oil or sesame oil

Two 6-8 oz. salmon fillets

Two crisp apples, sliced into eighths just before serving

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Boil potatoes in salted water and cook until fork tender. Mash by hand and add salt, pepper, a few teaspoons of horseradish sauce, and extra dill, if desired. Taste and adjust seasonings accordingly.

Mix the ground coriander and cumin with 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl. Rub the mixture over salmon filets with enough oil to moisten the spices (approximately 1 teaspoon). Heat a saute pan and sear the fish, skin side down, for at least three minutes. Turn fish onto other side and continue to cook — either in an ovenproof saute pan or on a baking sheet — in preheated oven. Cook until desired doneness, approximately five to seven minutes.

Place salmon on plates with a healthy scoop of mashed potatoes and sliced apple. Taste everything with the sauce and learn about your new friend, the horseradish. Isn't it spectacular against the crunch of the apple? Is it refreshing against the fat of the salmon? Serves two.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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Article

Wednesday April 13, 2005 12:04 am EDT

Oh, Dios mio, what is this? asked the cashier at my local Whole Foods. She did have reason to wonder about the gnarly, hairy root dirtying up her grocery scanner.

"It looks like elephant foot," she said, grimacing.

"No, it doesn't," I whispered. "It looks like a penis."

Indeed, fresh horseradish can look shockingly phallic, but that's not the reason to give it a try. If the only horseradish...

| more...

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  string(2196) "Raise your hand if the following applies: It's the end of a hellish workday, and you're starved and can't bear to eat another bowl of cereal for dinner. But how can you enjoy a glass of wine with cereal milk?

It's time to dust off your sorry self and leave those Oaties behind; you can upgrade your evening breakfast into a respectable supper, even if all you have are various vegetable scraps in the fridge.

Meet the frittata, an Italian word for omelet, but I really like to think of it as more of an egg pie. Unlike its cousin, the fussy quiche, the frittata does not require a crust, cream or a lot of time. For the fixins, think one egg per person, plus any combination of veggies and herbs that rock your world (or that are screaming from the crisper). A few diced potatoes, when steamed in advance, transform into melty little nuggets once nestled inside the eggs, which, by the way, love a cast-iron skillet. With specks of herby greens and diced veggies, your end result, which gets a golden coat of broiled cheese, looks like a stained-glass window.

All of this color and glamour can be yours in 30 minutes. Once you realize how easy dinner can be, you can invite all of your cereal-eating friends over for a weeknight frittata fiesta.

Below are guidelines, not rules. Have fun with this dish and experiment.

1/2 medium onion, diced?
2 cloves garlic, chopped?
1 medium red bell pepper, diced?
1/2 potato per serving, diced and steamed or par-boiled?
Approximately one egg per serving (you may substitute half the amount of whole eggs with egg whites for a lower-cholesterol option), lightly beaten and seasoned with salt and pepper?
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley or dill?
Fresh thyme leaves, to taste?
Salt and pepper to taste?
Grated parmigiano, fontina or pecorino, for sprinkling

Saute onion, garlic and pepper in olive oil over medium heat. Add cooked diced potatoes and mix ingredients with a wooden spoon.

Add beaten eggs; your pan will look like a pool of eggs. Add herbs. Cover and cook over low-medium heat, until the mixture is almost set, about 12 minutes. If using cheese, sprinkle on top and place entire pan under broiler to brown the top, about three minutes.??


"
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  string(2196) "Raise your hand if the following applies: It's the end of a hellish workday, and you're starved and can't bear to eat another bowl of cereal for dinner. But how can you enjoy a glass of wine with cereal milk?

It's time to dust off your sorry self and leave those Oaties behind; you can upgrade your evening breakfast into a respectable supper, even if all you have are various vegetable scraps in the fridge.

Meet the frittata, an Italian word for omelet, but I really like to think of it as more of an egg pie. Unlike its cousin, the fussy quiche, the frittata does not require a crust, cream or a lot of time. For the fixins, think one egg per person, plus any combination of veggies and herbs that rock your world (or that are screaming from the crisper). A few diced potatoes, when steamed in advance, transform into melty little nuggets once nestled inside the eggs, which, by the way, love a cast-iron skillet. With specks of herby greens and diced veggies, your end result, which gets a golden coat of broiled cheese, looks like a stained-glass window.

All of this color and glamour can be yours in 30 minutes. Once you realize how easy dinner can be, you can invite all of your cereal-eating friends over for a weeknight frittata fiesta.

Below are guidelines, not rules. Have fun with this dish and experiment.

1/2 medium onion, diced?
2 cloves garlic, chopped?
1 medium red bell pepper, diced?
1/2 potato per serving, diced and steamed or par-boiled?
Approximately one egg per serving (you may substitute half the amount of whole eggs with egg whites for a lower-cholesterol option), lightly beaten and seasoned with salt and pepper?
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley or dill?
Fresh thyme leaves, to taste?
Salt and pepper to taste?
Grated parmigiano, fontina or pecorino, for sprinkling

Saute onion, garlic and pepper in olive oil over medium heat. Add cooked diced potatoes and mix ingredients with a wooden spoon.

Add beaten eggs; your pan will look like a pool of eggs. Add herbs. Cover and cook over low-medium heat, until the mixture is almost set, about 12 minutes. If using cheese, sprinkle on top and place entire pan under broiler to brown the top, about three minutes.??


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It's time to dust off your sorry self and leave those Oaties behind; you can upgrade your evening breakfast into a respectable supper, even if all you have are various vegetable scraps in the fridge.

Meet the frittata, an Italian word for omelet, but I really like to think of it as more of an egg pie. Unlike its cousin, the fussy quiche, the frittata does not require a crust, cream or a lot of time. For the fixins, think one egg per person, plus any combination of veggies and herbs that rock your world (or that are screaming from the crisper). A few diced potatoes, when steamed in advance, transform into melty little nuggets once nestled inside the eggs, which, by the way, love a cast-iron skillet. With specks of herby greens and diced veggies, your end result, which gets a golden coat of broiled cheese, looks like a stained-glass window.

All of this color and glamour can be yours in 30 minutes. Once you realize how easy dinner can be, you can invite all of your cereal-eating friends over for a weeknight frittata fiesta.

Below are guidelines, not rules. Have fun with this dish and experiment.

1/2 medium onion, diced?
2 cloves garlic, chopped?
1 medium red bell pepper, diced?
1/2 potato per serving, diced and steamed or par-boiled?
Approximately one egg per serving (you may substitute half the amount of whole eggs with egg whites for a lower-cholesterol option), lightly beaten and seasoned with salt and pepper?
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley or dill?
Fresh thyme leaves, to taste?
Salt and pepper to taste?
Grated parmigiano, fontina or pecorino, for sprinkling

Saute onion, garlic and pepper in olive oil over medium heat. Add cooked diced potatoes and mix ingredients with a wooden spoon.

Add beaten eggs; your pan will look like a pool of eggs. Add herbs. Cover and cook over low-medium heat, until the mixture is almost set, about 12 minutes. If using cheese, sprinkle on top and place entire pan under broiler to brown the top, about three minutes.??


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Article

Wednesday April 6, 2005 12:04 am EDT

Raise your hand if the following applies: It's the end of a hellish workday, and you're starved and can't bear to eat another bowl of cereal for dinner. But how can you enjoy a glass of wine with cereal milk?

It's time to dust off your sorry self and leave those Oaties behind; you can upgrade your evening breakfast into a respectable supper, even if all you have are various vegetable scraps in...

| more...
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  string(2229) "There's nothing like spring to make you simultaneously giddy and depressed. Just as I take an excited whiff of crocuses popping their pretty little boobies through the soil, it seems that an enormous gust of chilly wind blows right through my panties, reminding me that it ain't time for sandals just yet, dear.

Inevitably, I think of an Ella Fitzgerald tune, "Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most," which laments the season: "Doctors once prescribed a tonic ... of sulfur and molasses ... My condition must be chronic."

How I know Ella's pain. But instead of molasses, my tonic is asparagus.

Elegant, versatile and extremely nutritious, the spears of asparagus are a manic-depressive's dream come true. You can do almost anything to asparagus and it still tastes good and offers tasty, gorgeous and nutritious results. you're getting hearty quotients of potassium, vitamin C, B6, potassium and a fabulous antioxidant called glutathione. If you're dieting, those babies set you back only four calories per spear.

At market, pick stalks that look firm, proud, bright and not woody. White asparagus is green asparagus without the chlorophyll (it's grown underground), and the purple variety is the white stuff getting a peek of the sun.

Below, a few ideas to get you started. The only way you can really screw up asparagus is by overcooking it.

Blanch it: Submerge trimmed stalks into rapidly boiling water for about 1 minute, then place into an ice bath. Drain. Combine soy sauce, an inch of peeled, fresh ginger, a splash of sesame oil and some Dijon-style mustard. Pour over cooled stalks and let marinate for about 15 minutes. Killer quickie snack for cocktails.

Roast it: Set oven to 400 degrees. Place stalks in roasting pan. Spritz olive oil on top. Sprinkle coarse salt, lemon zest (aka rind) and chopped fresh garlic. Roast until tender, about 15 minutes.

Saute it: Chop stalks into half-inch pieces. Dice half a shallot. Heat olive oil in pan and cook shallot. Add stalks, salt, pepper. Cook until tender, about five minutes. Add chopped olives and mix. Remove from pan; add some goat cheese. Top with fresh chopped parsley.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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Inevitably, I think of an Ella Fitzgerald tune, "Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most," which laments the season: "Doctors once prescribed a tonic ... of sulfur and molasses ... My condition must be chronic."

How I know Ella's pain. But instead of molasses, my tonic is asparagus.

Elegant, versatile and extremely nutritious, the spears of asparagus are a manic-depressive's dream come true. You can do almost anything to asparagus and it still tastes good and offers tasty, gorgeous and nutritious results. you're getting hearty quotients of potassium, vitamin C, B6, potassium and a fabulous antioxidant called glutathione. If you're dieting, those babies set you back only four calories per spear.

At market, pick stalks that look firm, proud, bright and not woody. White asparagus is green asparagus without the chlorophyll (it's grown underground), and the purple variety is the white stuff getting a peek of the sun.

Below, a few ideas to get you started. The only way you can really screw up asparagus is by overcooking it.

__Blanch it:__ Submerge trimmed stalks into rapidly boiling water for about 1 minute, then place into an ice bath. Drain. Combine soy sauce, an inch of peeled, fresh ginger, a splash of sesame oil and some Dijon-style mustard. Pour over cooled stalks and let marinate for about 15 minutes. Killer quickie snack for cocktails.

__Roast it:__ Set oven to 400 degrees. Place stalks in roasting pan. Spritz olive oil on top. Sprinkle coarse salt, lemon zest (aka rind) and chopped fresh garlic. Roast until tender, about 15 minutes.

__Saute it:__ Chop stalks into half-inch pieces. Dice half a shallot. Heat olive oil in pan and cook shallot. Add stalks, salt, pepper. Cook until tender, about five minutes. Add chopped olives and mix. Remove from pan; add some goat cheese. Top with fresh chopped parsley.

''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL'''s Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(2433) "       2005-03-30T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Spears of Spring   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-03-30T05:04:00+00:00  There's nothing like spring to make you simultaneously giddy and depressed. Just as I take an excited whiff of crocuses popping their pretty little boobies through the soil, it seems that an enormous gust of chilly wind blows right through my panties, reminding me that it ain't time for sandals just yet, dear.

Inevitably, I think of an Ella Fitzgerald tune, "Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most," which laments the season: "Doctors once prescribed a tonic ... of sulfur and molasses ... My condition must be chronic."

How I know Ella's pain. But instead of molasses, my tonic is asparagus.

Elegant, versatile and extremely nutritious, the spears of asparagus are a manic-depressive's dream come true. You can do almost anything to asparagus and it still tastes good and offers tasty, gorgeous and nutritious results. you're getting hearty quotients of potassium, vitamin C, B6, potassium and a fabulous antioxidant called glutathione. If you're dieting, those babies set you back only four calories per spear.

At market, pick stalks that look firm, proud, bright and not woody. White asparagus is green asparagus without the chlorophyll (it's grown underground), and the purple variety is the white stuff getting a peek of the sun.

Below, a few ideas to get you started. The only way you can really screw up asparagus is by overcooking it.

Blanch it: Submerge trimmed stalks into rapidly boiling water for about 1 minute, then place into an ice bath. Drain. Combine soy sauce, an inch of peeled, fresh ginger, a splash of sesame oil and some Dijon-style mustard. Pour over cooled stalks and let marinate for about 15 minutes. Killer quickie snack for cocktails.

Roast it: Set oven to 400 degrees. Place stalks in roasting pan. Spritz olive oil on top. Sprinkle coarse salt, lemon zest (aka rind) and chopped fresh garlic. Roast until tender, about 15 minutes.

Saute it: Chop stalks into half-inch pieces. Dice half a shallot. Heat olive oil in pan and cook shallot. Add stalks, salt, pepper. Cook until tender, about five minutes. Add chopped olives and mix. Remove from pan; add some goat cheese. Top with fresh chopped parsley.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


             13017614 1253278                          Kitchen Witch - Spears of Spring "
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Article

Wednesday March 30, 2005 12:04 am EST

There's nothing like spring to make you simultaneously giddy and depressed. Just as I take an excited whiff of crocuses popping their pretty little boobies through the soil, it seems that an enormous gust of chilly wind blows right through my panties, reminding me that it ain't time for sandals just yet, dear.

Inevitably, I think of an Ella Fitzgerald tune, "Spring Can Really Hang You Up the...

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  string(2413) "Spring means the arrival of green things, like asparagus and peas and leeks, but it also means the debut of Miss Scarlet, aka rhubarb. Her ruby-red stalks are too sour to be eaten alone - and please, don't eat them raw. The gentle sweetness of strawberries mellows out the rhub's tart swipe, yet allows room to express her individuality.

The logistics of this pairing, however, are not as seamless; when rhubarb is in season, which is right about now, local strawberries are not ready for the picking. Conversely, when local strawberries bear fruit, rhubarb has already kissed us goodbye. But don't let that stop you.

You'll need just two hours to make this homey upside-down cake, which always elicits "ooh-ahh's." When inverted, the cake is so pretty, even if you thought you screwed up arranging those strawberries at the outset.

Think of this one for early spring rituals - a first kiss, an Easter feast or perhaps a salute to Mom.

Upside-Down Strawberry-Rhubarb Cake

Topping:

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

3/4 cup light brown sugar

1/3 cup sliced almonds

1 pint strawberries, stemmed and halved

2-3 cups rhubarb, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch slices

Cake:

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 cup granulated sugar

2 eggs, at room temperature

1/2 cup milk, at room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

Blanch (quick boil, followed by ice bath) rhubarb for 1 minute or so. Don't overcook or you will end up with mush. Drain and set aside.

Melt butter in saucepan. Add brown sugar and stir until smooth and dissolved, about 1 minute. Spread mixture evenly over bottom of a 9-inch cake pan. Scatter almonds on top. Strawberries go over almonds in concentric circles, cut-side up. Top with rhubarb and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine vanilla with milk. Sift flour, baking powder and salt in a small bowl. In a larger bowl, cream butter and sugar with an electric mixer. Add eggs one at a time and mix until incorporated. Alternate dry ingredients with vanilla milk, beginning and ending with dry. Mix until just combined; be mindful not to over-beat the batter.

Spread batter evenly over topping. Bake until cake springs when touched, about 1 hour, or by inserting a skewer in center until it comes out clean.

Remove cake from oven and allow it to cool for at least 20 minutes. Invert onto a plate."
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The logistics of this pairing, however, are not as seamless; when rhubarb is in season, which is right about now, local strawberries are not ready for the picking. Conversely, when local strawberries bear fruit, rhubarb has already kissed us goodbye. But don't let that stop you.

You'll need just two hours to make this homey upside-down cake, which always elicits "ooh-ahh's." When inverted, the cake is so pretty, even if you thought you screwed up arranging those strawberries at the outset.

Think of this one for early spring rituals - a first kiss, an Easter feast or perhaps a salute to Mom.

Upside-Down Strawberry-Rhubarb Cake

__Topping:__

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

3/4 cup light brown sugar

1/3 cup sliced almonds

1 pint strawberries, stemmed and halved

2-3 cups rhubarb, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch slices

__Cake:__

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 cup granulated sugar

2 eggs, at room temperature

1/2 cup milk, at room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

Blanch (quick boil, followed by ice bath) rhubarb for 1 minute or so. Don't overcook or you will end up with mush. Drain and set aside.

Melt butter in saucepan. Add brown sugar and stir until smooth and dissolved, about 1 minute. Spread mixture evenly over bottom of a 9-inch cake pan. Scatter almonds on top. Strawberries go over almonds in concentric circles, cut-side up. Top with rhubarb and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine vanilla with milk. Sift flour, baking powder and salt in a small bowl. In a larger bowl, cream butter and sugar with an electric mixer. Add eggs one at a time and mix until incorporated. Alternate dry ingredients with vanilla milk, beginning and ending with dry. Mix until just combined; be mindful not to over-beat the batter.

Spread batter evenly over topping. Bake until cake springs when touched, about 1 hour, or by inserting a skewer in center until it comes out clean.

Remove cake from oven and allow it to cool for at least 20 minutes. Invert onto a plate."
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The logistics of this pairing, however, are not as seamless; when rhubarb is in season, which is right about now, local strawberries are not ready for the picking. Conversely, when local strawberries bear fruit, rhubarb has already kissed us goodbye. But don't let that stop you.

You'll need just two hours to make this homey upside-down cake, which always elicits "ooh-ahh's." When inverted, the cake is so pretty, even if you thought you screwed up arranging those strawberries at the outset.

Think of this one for early spring rituals - a first kiss, an Easter feast or perhaps a salute to Mom.

Upside-Down Strawberry-Rhubarb Cake

Topping:

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

3/4 cup light brown sugar

1/3 cup sliced almonds

1 pint strawberries, stemmed and halved

2-3 cups rhubarb, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch slices

Cake:

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 cup granulated sugar

2 eggs, at room temperature

1/2 cup milk, at room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

Blanch (quick boil, followed by ice bath) rhubarb for 1 minute or so. Don't overcook or you will end up with mush. Drain and set aside.

Melt butter in saucepan. Add brown sugar and stir until smooth and dissolved, about 1 minute. Spread mixture evenly over bottom of a 9-inch cake pan. Scatter almonds on top. Strawberries go over almonds in concentric circles, cut-side up. Top with rhubarb and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine vanilla with milk. Sift flour, baking powder and salt in a small bowl. In a larger bowl, cream butter and sugar with an electric mixer. Add eggs one at a time and mix until incorporated. Alternate dry ingredients with vanilla milk, beginning and ending with dry. Mix until just combined; be mindful not to over-beat the batter.

Spread batter evenly over topping. Bake until cake springs when touched, about 1 hour, or by inserting a skewer in center until it comes out clean.

Remove cake from oven and allow it to cool for at least 20 minutes. Invert onto a plate.             13017492 1253037                          Kitchen Witch - Ruby Needs A Sweet Talker "
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Article

Wednesday March 16, 2005 12:04 am EST

Spring means the arrival of green things, like asparagus and peas and leeks, but it also means the debut of Miss Scarlet, aka rhubarb. Her ruby-red stalks are too sour to be eaten alone - and please, don't eat them raw. The gentle sweetness of strawberries mellows out the rhub's tart swipe, yet allows room to express her individuality.

The logistics of this pairing, however, are not as...

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  string(2425) "On the eve of the deadline of this column, it was snowing in the Washington, D.C., area, where I have made my home for several years. It was just after 9 in the morning, before the flakes began to fall, and I was strolling through the aisles of my local Whole Foods, trying to decide what to make for dinner. Although snowfall amounts were unknown, one thing was certain: That night, I would need the culinary equivalent of a blanket; something warm, reliable, and - clich be damned - comforting.

A few years ago, writer Jonathan Reynolds wrote an essay in the New York Times Magazine about Indian culinary diva Madhur Jaffrey and the alchemy brought about one night by her lemony chicken curry during a massive power outage throughout Manhattan. Since reading this tale, I have made Jaffrey's curry countless times. It has become a staple on cold, dingy days. I never mind all the chopping because I know that as soon as the ginger meets garlic and chats it up with cumin, coriander and pals, the aroma takes me on a journey, far from my troubles.

Lemony Chicken Curry With Coriander

From Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking

5-6 tablespoons vegetable oil

Approximately 2-1/2 pounds chicken thighs and/or legs, skinned and seasoned with salt and pepper

2-inch hunk of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

5 cloves garlic, chopped finely

1/2 habanero chile (or to taste), seeded and diced

1/4 teaspoon cayenne

2 teaspoons cumin

1 teaspoon coriander

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon salt

2 bunches cilantro, cleaned, stemmed and finely chopped

2/3 cup water

Juice of 1/2 lemon

?
*Place ginger in bowl of food processor and blend with 1?4 cup water, until?pureed.?
*In a heavy-bottomed pot, heat oil. When hot, but not smoking, add chicken and brown on both sides, at least 10 minutes. Remove from pot and set aside.?
*Add ginger puree and stir with a wooden spoon, scraping the stuck bits from the bottom of the pan. Add garlic, spices and salt. The mixture will become pasty, which is a good thing. Add cilantro and stir. Add water, lemon juice and return chicken to pot.?
*Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer, until meat is?tender and starting to fall off the bone. This should take about 45 minutes.?
*While the curry cooks, make some rice to serve with the meal. Feeds?approximately four curry fiends.?


Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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  string(2486) "On the eve of the deadline of this column, it was snowing in the Washington, D.C., area, where I have made my home for several years. It was just after 9 in the morning, before the flakes began to fall, and I was strolling through the aisles of my local Whole Foods, trying to decide what to make for dinner. Although snowfall amounts were unknown, one thing was certain: That night, I would need the culinary equivalent of a blanket; something warm, reliable, and - clich be damned - comforting.

A few years ago, writer Jonathan Reynolds wrote an essay in the'' New York Times Magazine'' about Indian culinary diva Madhur Jaffrey and the alchemy brought about one night by her lemony chicken curry during a massive power outage throughout Manhattan. Since reading this tale, I have made Jaffrey's curry countless times. It has become a staple on cold, dingy days. I never mind all the chopping because I know that as soon as the ginger meets garlic and chats it up with cumin, coriander and pals, the aroma takes me on a journey, far from my troubles.

__Lemony Chicken Curry With Coriander__

From ''Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking''

5-6 tablespoons vegetable oil

Approximately 2-1/2 pounds chicken thighs and/or legs, skinned and seasoned with salt and pepper

2-inch hunk of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

5 cloves garlic, chopped finely

1/2 habanero chile (or to taste), seeded and diced

1/4 teaspoon cayenne

2 teaspoons cumin

1 teaspoon coriander

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon salt

2 bunches cilantro, cleaned, stemmed and finely chopped

2/3 cup water

Juice of 1/2 lemon

?
*Place ginger in bowl of food processor and blend with 1?4 cup water, until?pureed.?
*In a heavy-bottomed pot, heat oil. When hot, but not smoking, add chicken and brown on both sides, at least 10 minutes. Remove from pot and set aside.?
*Add ginger puree and stir with a wooden spoon, scraping the stuck bits from the bottom of the pan. Add garlic, spices and salt. The mixture will become pasty, which is a good thing. Add cilantro and stir. Add water, lemon juice and return chicken to pot.?
*Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer, until meat is?tender and starting to fall off the bone. This should take about 45 minutes.?
*While the curry cooks, make some rice to serve with the meal. Feeds?approximately four curry fiends.?


''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL's'' Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(2629) "       2005-03-09T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Comfort of Curry   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-03-09T05:04:00+00:00  On the eve of the deadline of this column, it was snowing in the Washington, D.C., area, where I have made my home for several years. It was just after 9 in the morning, before the flakes began to fall, and I was strolling through the aisles of my local Whole Foods, trying to decide what to make for dinner. Although snowfall amounts were unknown, one thing was certain: That night, I would need the culinary equivalent of a blanket; something warm, reliable, and - clich be damned - comforting.

A few years ago, writer Jonathan Reynolds wrote an essay in the New York Times Magazine about Indian culinary diva Madhur Jaffrey and the alchemy brought about one night by her lemony chicken curry during a massive power outage throughout Manhattan. Since reading this tale, I have made Jaffrey's curry countless times. It has become a staple on cold, dingy days. I never mind all the chopping because I know that as soon as the ginger meets garlic and chats it up with cumin, coriander and pals, the aroma takes me on a journey, far from my troubles.

Lemony Chicken Curry With Coriander

From Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking

5-6 tablespoons vegetable oil

Approximately 2-1/2 pounds chicken thighs and/or legs, skinned and seasoned with salt and pepper

2-inch hunk of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

5 cloves garlic, chopped finely

1/2 habanero chile (or to taste), seeded and diced

1/4 teaspoon cayenne

2 teaspoons cumin

1 teaspoon coriander

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon salt

2 bunches cilantro, cleaned, stemmed and finely chopped

2/3 cup water

Juice of 1/2 lemon

?
*Place ginger in bowl of food processor and blend with 1?4 cup water, until?pureed.?
*In a heavy-bottomed pot, heat oil. When hot, but not smoking, add chicken and brown on both sides, at least 10 minutes. Remove from pot and set aside.?
*Add ginger puree and stir with a wooden spoon, scraping the stuck bits from the bottom of the pan. Add garlic, spices and salt. The mixture will become pasty, which is a good thing. Add cilantro and stir. Add water, lemon juice and return chicken to pot.?
*Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer, until meat is?tender and starting to fall off the bone. This should take about 45 minutes.?
*While the curry cooks, make some rice to serve with the meal. Feeds?approximately four curry fiends.?


Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


             13017416 1252880                          Kitchen Witch - Comfort of Curry "
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Article

Wednesday March 9, 2005 12:04 am EST
On the eve of the deadline of this column, it was snowing in the Washington, D.C., area, where I have made my home for several years. It was just after 9 in the morning, before the flakes began to fall, and I was strolling through the aisles of my local Whole Foods, trying to decide what to make for dinner. Although snowfall amounts were unknown, one thing was certain: That night, I would need... | more...
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  string(40) "Kitchen Witch - Grape Leaf Group Therapy"
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  string(2655) "Stuffed grape leaves are heady little treats, but we rarely think about making them ourselves. They seem too exotic and complicated for home chow, but what they really need is braun, not brains. There's not much to the homey meat filling, but you need lots of warm bodies to man the grape leaf assembly line. Get a group of pals together and you can whip up a batch of 50 goodies within 2 hours. Sounds like a party to me. Below, a game plan (take a quick read through the method to gather ingredients for your shopping list):

Lebanese Stuffed Grape LeavesAdapted from Lebanese Cuisine by Madelain Farah

Team A: Grape leaf duty. Carefully separate leaves from one unce jar of grape leaves and rinse in a pot of hot (but not boiling) water to dilute the brine in which they have been packed. In batches, drain over a wire rack or on rim of a colander.

Team B: Filling. Rinse 1 cup Egyptian rice (or any short-grain variety) and drain. Place in a large mixing bowl. Add 1 pound ground beef or lamb, 2 diced plum tomatoes, 1/4 teaspoon each allspice and cinnamon, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste. With clean hands, mix well, making sure that ingredients are well combined and that meat is broken up.

Everyone: Assembly line. Place leaf, vein-side up, on work surface. Stem should be closest to you. Scoop approximately one teaspoon of filling and place at stem end, allowing it to extend the width of the leaf.

On each side of the leaf, there is an end flap. Place flaps over filling. Tuck sides of leaf, then roll. Alternate tucking flaps with rolling. Do not roll too tightly, or rice will not expand. Seal the parcel by pressing the end with your finger. Stack in a grape leaf-lined pot, in snug rows.

Team C: Eye on the pot. Add water, enough to cover grape leaves about 3/4 high. Scatter 7 cloves of whole, peeled garlic over the leaves. Place a plate on top, one that is small enough to fit inside the pot. Cover and simmer on lowish heat, about 15 minutes. Uncover, remove plate and pour 1/4 cup lemon juice (about 1 lemon) over leaves. Return plate and cover, cooking for another 15-20 minutes. Check for doneness of rice by removing one stuffed leaf and slicing in half; rice should be tender and opaque.

Remove pot from heat and transfer leaves to a platter. Pour any remaining cooking liquid over the leaves. Garlic will be soft and mellow and adds to the final dish.

Serve at room temperature. If making in advance, let cool, then refrigerate, until about an hour before serving.

There is enough filling for approximately five dozen grape leaves.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


"
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  string(2751) "Stuffed grape leaves are heady little treats, but we rarely think about making them ourselves. They seem too exotic and complicated for home chow, but what they really need is braun, not brains. There's not much to the homey meat filling, but you need lots of warm bodies to man the grape leaf assembly line. Get a group of pals together and you can whip up a batch of 50 goodies within 2 hours. Sounds like a party to me. Below, a game plan (take a quick read through the method to gather ingredients for your shopping list):

Lebanese Stuffed Grape Leaves''Adapted from ''Lebanese Cuisine'' by Madelain Farah''

__Team A: Grape leaf duty.__ Carefully separate leaves from __one 8-ounce jar of grape leaves__ and rinse in a pot of hot (but not boiling) water to dilute the brine in which they have been packed. In batches, drain over a wire rack or on rim of a colander.

__Team B: Filling.__ Rinse __1 cup Egyptian rice (or any short-grain variety)__ and drain. Place in a large mixing bowl. Add __1 pound ground beef or lamb, 2 diced plum tomatoes, 1/4 teaspoon each allspice and cinnamon, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste__. With clean hands, mix well, making sure that ingredients are well combined and that meat is broken up.

__Everyone: Assembly line.__ Place leaf, vein-side up, on work surface. Stem should be closest to you. Scoop approximately one teaspoon of filling and place at stem end, allowing it to extend the width of the leaf.

On each side of the leaf, there is an end flap. Place flaps over filling. Tuck sides of leaf, then roll. Alternate tucking flaps with rolling. Do not roll too tightly, or rice will not expand. Seal the parcel by pressing the end with your finger. Stack in a grape leaf-lined pot, in snug rows.

__Team C: Eye on the pot.__ Add water, enough to cover grape leaves about 3/4 high. Scatter __7 cloves of whole, peeled garlic__ over the leaves. Place a plate on top, one that is small enough to fit inside the pot. Cover and simmer on lowish heat, about 15 minutes. Uncover, remove plate and pour __1/4 cup lemon juice (about 1 lemon)__ over leaves. Return plate and cover, cooking for another 15-20 minutes. Check for doneness of rice by removing one stuffed leaf and slicing in half; rice should be tender and opaque.

Remove pot from heat and transfer leaves to a platter. Pour any remaining cooking liquid over the leaves. Garlic will be soft and mellow and adds to the final dish.

Serve at room temperature. If making in advance, let cool, then refrigerate, until about an hour before serving.

There is enough filling for approximately five dozen grape leaves.

''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL's'' Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(2875) "       2005-03-03T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Grape Leaf Group Therapy   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-03-03T05:04:00+00:00  Stuffed grape leaves are heady little treats, but we rarely think about making them ourselves. They seem too exotic and complicated for home chow, but what they really need is braun, not brains. There's not much to the homey meat filling, but you need lots of warm bodies to man the grape leaf assembly line. Get a group of pals together and you can whip up a batch of 50 goodies within 2 hours. Sounds like a party to me. Below, a game plan (take a quick read through the method to gather ingredients for your shopping list):

Lebanese Stuffed Grape LeavesAdapted from Lebanese Cuisine by Madelain Farah

Team A: Grape leaf duty. Carefully separate leaves from one unce jar of grape leaves and rinse in a pot of hot (but not boiling) water to dilute the brine in which they have been packed. In batches, drain over a wire rack or on rim of a colander.

Team B: Filling. Rinse 1 cup Egyptian rice (or any short-grain variety) and drain. Place in a large mixing bowl. Add 1 pound ground beef or lamb, 2 diced plum tomatoes, 1/4 teaspoon each allspice and cinnamon, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste. With clean hands, mix well, making sure that ingredients are well combined and that meat is broken up.

Everyone: Assembly line. Place leaf, vein-side up, on work surface. Stem should be closest to you. Scoop approximately one teaspoon of filling and place at stem end, allowing it to extend the width of the leaf.

On each side of the leaf, there is an end flap. Place flaps over filling. Tuck sides of leaf, then roll. Alternate tucking flaps with rolling. Do not roll too tightly, or rice will not expand. Seal the parcel by pressing the end with your finger. Stack in a grape leaf-lined pot, in snug rows.

Team C: Eye on the pot. Add water, enough to cover grape leaves about 3/4 high. Scatter 7 cloves of whole, peeled garlic over the leaves. Place a plate on top, one that is small enough to fit inside the pot. Cover and simmer on lowish heat, about 15 minutes. Uncover, remove plate and pour 1/4 cup lemon juice (about 1 lemon) over leaves. Return plate and cover, cooking for another 15-20 minutes. Check for doneness of rice by removing one stuffed leaf and slicing in half; rice should be tender and opaque.

Remove pot from heat and transfer leaves to a platter. Pour any remaining cooking liquid over the leaves. Garlic will be soft and mellow and adds to the final dish.

Serve at room temperature. If making in advance, let cool, then refrigerate, until about an hour before serving.

There is enough filling for approximately five dozen grape leaves.

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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Article

Thursday March 3, 2005 12:04 am EST
Stuffed grape leaves are heady little treats, but we rarely think about making them ourselves. They seem too exotic and complicated for home chow, but what they really need is braun, not brains. There's not much to the homey meat filling, but you need lots of warm bodies to man the grape leaf assembly line. Get a group of pals together and you can whip up a batch of 50 goodies within 2 hours.... | more...
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  string(2417) "One of the most frequently asked questions I hear from aspiring cooks goes something like this: "I'm in a cooking rut. At the end of the day, I can't get excited to make more than a bowl of cereal. What should I do to get unstuck?"

At some point, we all get stuck in the kitchen. Even the most accomplished and diligent of cooks goes through an occasional bout of the culinary doldrums.

The good news: Like most things in life, the lack of inspiration is temporary. Peruse the following list of attitude adjustments, and try one on for size. In no time, your sulky self will be on the mend and the cooking barometer will begin to rise.

1) Attend to the dark corners of your kitchen that always get the short shrift. Your oven, for starters, would like a word with you: She has not been cleaned since Y2K and refuses to roast chicken under 3 inches of soot.

2) Get rid of those ancient jars of spices, oxidizing and loosing punch from light and heat. Consider the cryogenic approach and use freezer shelves as your new spice storage area. Buy as-you-need amounts from ethnic groceries or the bulk area of your supermarket.

3) For crisis management of culinary attitudes, turn to The Mindful Cook by Isaac Cronin. This powerful little gem asks you to take stock of your culinary baggage and check it accordingly. When was the last time you really spent time with an orange, for example?

4) If you have an extra 100 bucks in the reserve, buy a chef's knife and sharpening steel. A good knife is an investment for life; if cared for properly, it lasts forever. Really. More importantly, a sharp knife is amazing for culinary confidence. It whips through onions, it makes clean breaks through meat. You'll feel in charge.

5) Get reacquainted with your senses and recall the simple pleasures of being in the kitchen: the smell of brewed coffee and frying bacon, the sound of a cracking egg, the texture of a mashed potato.

6) Weather and season permitting, the most powerful cure-all for culinary doldrums is a visit to a neighborhood farmer's market (in the winter, Dekalb Farmers Market will substitute nicely). With an intoxicating array of colors, shapes and aromas, markets offer jewels of the earth and put our petty worlds into perspective. Food comes from the earth, not the supermarket. Enjoy it, celebrate it, cook it!

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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At some point, we all get stuck in the kitchen. Even the most accomplished and diligent of cooks goes through an occasional bout of the culinary doldrums.

The good news: Like most things in life, the lack of inspiration is temporary. Peruse the following list of attitude adjustments, and try one on for size. In no time, your sulky self will be on the mend and the cooking barometer will begin to rise.

1) Attend to the dark corners of your kitchen that always get the short shrift. Your oven, for starters, would like a word with you: She has not been cleaned since Y2K and refuses to roast chicken under 3 inches of soot.

2) Get rid of those ancient jars of spices, oxidizing and loosing punch from light and heat. Consider the cryogenic approach and use freezer shelves as your new spice storage area. Buy as-you-need amounts from ethnic groceries or the bulk area of your supermarket.

3) For crisis management of culinary attitudes, turn to ''The Mindful Cook'' by Isaac Cronin. This powerful little gem asks you to take stock of your culinary baggage and check it accordingly. When was the last time you really spent time with an orange, for example?

4) If you have an extra 100 bucks in the reserve, buy a chef's knife ''and'' sharpening steel. A good knife is an investment for life; if cared for properly, it lasts forever. Really. More importantly, a sharp knife is amazing for culinary confidence. It whips through onions, it makes clean breaks through meat. You'll feel in charge.

5) Get reacquainted with your senses and recall the simple pleasures of being in the kitchen: the smell of brewed coffee and frying bacon, the sound of a cracking egg, the texture of a mashed potato.

6) Weather and season permitting, the most powerful cure-all for culinary doldrums is a visit to a neighborhood farmer's market (in the winter, Dekalb Farmers Market will substitute nicely). With an intoxicating array of colors, shapes and aromas, markets offer jewels of the earth and put our petty worlds into perspective. Food comes from the earth, not the supermarket. Enjoy it, celebrate it, cook it!

''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL's'' Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(2659) "       2005-02-23T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - How to get your kitchen groove back   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-02-23T05:04:00+00:00  One of the most frequently asked questions I hear from aspiring cooks goes something like this: "I'm in a cooking rut. At the end of the day, I can't get excited to make more than a bowl of cereal. What should I do to get unstuck?"

At some point, we all get stuck in the kitchen. Even the most accomplished and diligent of cooks goes through an occasional bout of the culinary doldrums.

The good news: Like most things in life, the lack of inspiration is temporary. Peruse the following list of attitude adjustments, and try one on for size. In no time, your sulky self will be on the mend and the cooking barometer will begin to rise.

1) Attend to the dark corners of your kitchen that always get the short shrift. Your oven, for starters, would like a word with you: She has not been cleaned since Y2K and refuses to roast chicken under 3 inches of soot.

2) Get rid of those ancient jars of spices, oxidizing and loosing punch from light and heat. Consider the cryogenic approach and use freezer shelves as your new spice storage area. Buy as-you-need amounts from ethnic groceries or the bulk area of your supermarket.

3) For crisis management of culinary attitudes, turn to The Mindful Cook by Isaac Cronin. This powerful little gem asks you to take stock of your culinary baggage and check it accordingly. When was the last time you really spent time with an orange, for example?

4) If you have an extra 100 bucks in the reserve, buy a chef's knife and sharpening steel. A good knife is an investment for life; if cared for properly, it lasts forever. Really. More importantly, a sharp knife is amazing for culinary confidence. It whips through onions, it makes clean breaks through meat. You'll feel in charge.

5) Get reacquainted with your senses and recall the simple pleasures of being in the kitchen: the smell of brewed coffee and frying bacon, the sound of a cracking egg, the texture of a mashed potato.

6) Weather and season permitting, the most powerful cure-all for culinary doldrums is a visit to a neighborhood farmer's market (in the winter, Dekalb Farmers Market will substitute nicely). With an intoxicating array of colors, shapes and aromas, markets offer jewels of the earth and put our petty worlds into perspective. Food comes from the earth, not the supermarket. Enjoy it, celebrate it, cook it!

Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


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Article

Wednesday February 23, 2005 12:04 am EST

One of the most frequently asked questions I hear from aspiring cooks goes something like this: "I'm in a cooking rut. At the end of the day, I can't get excited to make more than a bowl of cereal. What should I do to get unstuck?"

At some point, we all get stuck in the kitchen. Even the most accomplished and diligent of cooks goes through an occasional bout of the culinary doldrums.

The good...

| more...
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  string(2147) "In spite of my culinary background, I do, on occasion, dream of a genie who's focused only on my needs as I trudge home on the bus after a cranky day at the office. As the bus dodges potholes, I can see, through the winter-crusted windows, my genderless genie shimmying away in the kitchen. He/she is fixing me a post-work cocktail, followed by a perfectly timed, bubbly hot meal, just like in the movies.

I don't even care what's on the menu, as long as it's salted properly and it doesn't come out of a box. In fact, the simpler, the better. I'm not picky when someone is waiting on me and fetching my slippers.

Dreams are such fun. Even better, they come true if you let them. You can start by making the magic soup described below. Although it takes only 35 minutes to prepare (start to finish), this broth, infused with garlic and chile pepper, is homey yet complex - as if a genie has been stirring a pot for hours. Composed of pantry basics such as spinach, long-grain rice and the juice of a lemon, this soup simply sings. A couple of slurps, and you'll feel not only pampered, but healthy and virtuous.

Make enough to take for lunch the next day, and life is but a dream. With this little number, my genie will need a day job.

Clear Soup with Spinach and Rice??
Adapted from The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking??
by Yamuna Devi

Olive oil to coat bottom of pot

Diced chile pepper, to taste (I am partial to 1/2 habanero, seeded)

3 cloves garlic, diced

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon coriander

1 teaspoon cumin

3 tablespoons long-grain rice

4-5 cups stock (vegetable or chicken; for canned chicken stock, I like Swanson's or Hain brands)

Approximately 20-22 spinach leaves (alternatives: chard or escarole), washed and stemmed, then chopped on a diagonal

Salt to taste

1/2 lemon

Pour oil into bottom of pan and saute the pepper and garlic. Add spices and stir with a wooden spoon. Add rice, then stock. Bring to a boil, then lower heat and cover. Cook about 20 minutes, until rice is tender.

Uncover, add salt and spinach. Cook for 1-2 minutes.

Squeeze lemon into each serving bowl before pouring soup. Serves four.



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I don't even care what's on the menu, as long as it's salted properly and it doesn't come out of a box. In fact, the simpler, the better. I'm not picky when someone is waiting on me and fetching my slippers.

Dreams are such fun. Even better, they come true if you let them. You can start by making the magic soup described below. Although it takes only 35 minutes to prepare (start to finish), this broth, infused with garlic and chile pepper, is homey yet complex - as if a genie has been stirring a pot for hours. Composed of pantry basics such as spinach, long-grain rice and the juice of a lemon, this soup simply sings. A couple of slurps, and you'll feel not only pampered, but healthy and virtuous.

Make enough to take for lunch the next day, and life is but a dream. With this little number, my genie will need a day job.

__Clear Soup with Spinach and Rice__??
''Adapted from'' The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking??
''by Yamuna Devi''

Olive oil to coat bottom of pot

Diced chile pepper, to taste (I am partial to 1/2 habanero, seeded)

3 cloves garlic, diced

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon coriander

1 teaspoon cumin

3 tablespoons long-grain rice

4-5 cups stock (vegetable or chicken; for canned chicken stock, I like Swanson's or Hain brands)

Approximately 20-22 spinach leaves (alternatives: chard or escarole), washed and stemmed, then chopped on a diagonal

Salt to taste

1/2 lemon

Pour oil into bottom of pan and saute the pepper and garlic. Add spices and stir with a wooden spoon. Add rice, then stock. Bring to a boil, then lower heat and cover. Cook about 20 minutes, until rice is tender.

Uncover, add salt and spinach. Cook for 1-2 minutes.

Squeeze lemon into each serving bowl before pouring soup. Serves four.



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I don't even care what's on the menu, as long as it's salted properly and it doesn't come out of a box. In fact, the simpler, the better. I'm not picky when someone is waiting on me and fetching my slippers.

Dreams are such fun. Even better, they come true if you let them. You can start by making the magic soup described below. Although it takes only 35 minutes to prepare (start to finish), this broth, infused with garlic and chile pepper, is homey yet complex - as if a genie has been stirring a pot for hours. Composed of pantry basics such as spinach, long-grain rice and the juice of a lemon, this soup simply sings. A couple of slurps, and you'll feel not only pampered, but healthy and virtuous.

Make enough to take for lunch the next day, and life is but a dream. With this little number, my genie will need a day job.

Clear Soup with Spinach and Rice??
Adapted from The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking??
by Yamuna Devi

Olive oil to coat bottom of pot

Diced chile pepper, to taste (I am partial to 1/2 habanero, seeded)

3 cloves garlic, diced

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon coriander

1 teaspoon cumin

3 tablespoons long-grain rice

4-5 cups stock (vegetable or chicken; for canned chicken stock, I like Swanson's or Hain brands)

Approximately 20-22 spinach leaves (alternatives: chard or escarole), washed and stemmed, then chopped on a diagonal

Salt to taste

1/2 lemon

Pour oil into bottom of pan and saute the pepper and garlic. Add spices and stir with a wooden spoon. Add rice, then stock. Bring to a boil, then lower heat and cover. Cook about 20 minutes, until rice is tender.

Uncover, add salt and spinach. Cook for 1-2 minutes.

Squeeze lemon into each serving bowl before pouring soup. Serves four.



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Article

Thursday February 17, 2005 12:04 am EST
In spite of my culinary background, I do, on occasion, dream of a genie who's focused only on my needs as I trudge home on the bus after a cranky day at the office. As the bus dodges potholes, I can see, through the winter-crusted windows, my genderless genie shimmying away in the kitchen. He/she is fixing me a post-work cocktail, followed by a perfectly timed, bubbly hot meal, just like in the... | more...
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  string(3786) "Tea for two needs cake. So do Grandma, your pals from work, and all the other lonely hearts sticking out their tongues on this lovers-only holiday.

With or without an admirer this weekend, one needs an antidote for the irrepressibly goopy love stuff on center stage at the local CVS. Walk on by those bags of cupid-themed M&Ms and pick up a few bottles of red food coloring instead. No, we're not paint-balling love birds in Piedmont Park; we're making red velvet cake.

Based on color contrast alone, the velvet cake is unlike no other. Beef tartare-shaded layers get a coat of stark white cream cheese frosting that is so bright you may need sunglasses. The combination is shocking, strangely beautiful and kind of sexy - like hot pants and white go-go boots.

Allow yourself two hours, for both cake and frosting, but please don't doll up this beauty until the cake is completely cooled. A flat-edged pastry spreader is useful, but I've used a wide serrated knife with decent success.

We all deserve a sex-kitten moment every once in a while. Preheat those ovens, pronto.

Red Velvet Valentine's CakeAdapted from James McNair's Cakes by James McNair

2 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

3/4 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 1/2 cups sugar

2 eggs, at room temperature, lightly beaten

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 bottles (1 ounce each) red liquid food coloring

1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature

Grease bottoms and sides of two 9-inch round cake pans, and line with circles of parchment paper (plan B: grease and flour pans).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Over a medium bowl, sift flour, cocoa powder, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir to mix well and set aside.

In a bowl with a hand mixer, beat butter at medium speed until creamy, about one minute. With mixer still running, slowly add sugar. Occasionally stop mixer to scrape sides of bowl. Beat until mixture is light and fluffy, about five minutes. Slowly drizzle in eggs and beat until mixed well, remembering to scrape sides of bowl. Add vanilla and food coloring. Using mixer on low speed or a rubber spatula, begin to incorporate about one-third of the dry ingredients, alternating with half of the buttermilk. Continue to alternate dry with wet, ending with the remaining flour mixture, until ingredients are incorporated.

Divide batter evenly between pans and with a spatula, make sure that it is evenly distributed. Place each pan on a baking sheet and bake until a wooden skewer inserted in center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Remove pans and cool for about 20 minutes, then invert onto wire racks to cool completely. While cake layers cool, make frosting.

Cream Cheese FrostingAlso from James McNair's Cakes

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

2 eight-ounce bricks (1 pound) cream cheese, chilled

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Pinch salt

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted

Optional: light cream or milk, if needed

In a mixing bowl, beat butter with mixer until fluffy. Add cream cheese, vanilla and salt, beating at low speed, just until mixture is smooth and creamy. Don't overbeat, as cream cheese will get thin and runny. Using a rubber spatula, scrape sides of bowl. Add 1 cup of sugar and beat on low. Add remaining cup and beat until just smooth and spreadable; taste for sweetness and consistency. If too thick, add a little light cream or milk. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate. When ready to use, allow to warm up to room temperature. Makes a generous amount for a two-layer cake.Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


"
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  string(3851) "Tea for two needs cake. So do Grandma, your pals from work, and all the other lonely hearts sticking out their tongues on this lovers-only holiday.

With or without an admirer this weekend, one needs an antidote for the irrepressibly goopy love stuff on center stage at the local CVS. Walk on by those bags of cupid-themed M&Ms and pick up a few bottles of red food coloring instead. No, we're not paint-balling love birds in Piedmont Park; we're making red velvet cake.

Based on color contrast alone, the velvet cake is unlike no other. Beef tartare-shaded layers get a coat of stark white cream cheese frosting that is so bright you may need sunglasses. The combination is shocking, strangely beautiful and kind of sexy - like hot pants and white go-go boots.

Allow yourself two hours, for both cake and frosting, but please don't doll up this beauty until the cake is completely cooled. A flat-edged pastry spreader is useful, but I've used a wide serrated knife with decent success.

We all deserve a sex-kitten moment every once in a while. Preheat those ovens, pronto.

__Red Velvet Valentine's Cake__''Adapted from ''James McNair's Cakes'' by James McNair''

2 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

3/4 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 1/2 cups sugar

2 eggs, at room temperature, lightly beaten

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 bottles (1 ounce each) red liquid food coloring

1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature

Grease bottoms and sides of two 9-inch round cake pans, and line with circles of parchment paper (plan B: grease and flour pans).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Over a medium bowl, sift flour, cocoa powder, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir to mix well and set aside.

In a bowl with a hand mixer, beat butter at medium speed until creamy, about one minute. With mixer still running, slowly add sugar. Occasionally stop mixer to scrape sides of bowl. Beat until mixture is light and fluffy, about five minutes. Slowly drizzle in eggs and beat until mixed well, remembering to scrape sides of bowl. Add vanilla and food coloring. Using mixer on low speed or a rubber spatula, begin to incorporate about one-third of the dry ingredients, alternating with half of the buttermilk. Continue to alternate dry with wet, ending with the remaining flour mixture, until ingredients are incorporated.

Divide batter evenly between pans and with a spatula, make sure that it is evenly distributed. Place each pan on a baking sheet and bake until a wooden skewer inserted in center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Remove pans and cool for about 20 minutes, then invert onto wire racks to cool completely. While cake layers cool, make frosting.

__Cream Cheese Frosting__''Also from ''James McNair's Cakes

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

2 eight-ounce bricks (1 pound) cream cheese, chilled

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Pinch salt

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted

Optional: light cream or milk, if needed

In a mixing bowl, beat butter with mixer until fluffy. Add cream cheese, vanilla and salt, beating at low speed, just until mixture is smooth and creamy. Don't overbeat, as cream cheese will get thin and runny. Using a rubber spatula, scrape sides of bowl. Add 1 cup of sugar and beat on low. Add remaining cup and beat until just smooth and spreadable; taste for sweetness and consistency. If too thick, add a little light cream or milk. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate. When ready to use, allow to warm up to room temperature. Makes a generous amount for a two-layer cake.''Culinary questions? Reach ''CL's'' Kitchen Witch at [mailto:kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com|kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com].''??


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  string(4002) "       2005-02-10T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Be my velvet Valentine   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-02-10T05:04:00+00:00  Tea for two needs cake. So do Grandma, your pals from work, and all the other lonely hearts sticking out their tongues on this lovers-only holiday.

With or without an admirer this weekend, one needs an antidote for the irrepressibly goopy love stuff on center stage at the local CVS. Walk on by those bags of cupid-themed M&Ms and pick up a few bottles of red food coloring instead. No, we're not paint-balling love birds in Piedmont Park; we're making red velvet cake.

Based on color contrast alone, the velvet cake is unlike no other. Beef tartare-shaded layers get a coat of stark white cream cheese frosting that is so bright you may need sunglasses. The combination is shocking, strangely beautiful and kind of sexy - like hot pants and white go-go boots.

Allow yourself two hours, for both cake and frosting, but please don't doll up this beauty until the cake is completely cooled. A flat-edged pastry spreader is useful, but I've used a wide serrated knife with decent success.

We all deserve a sex-kitten moment every once in a while. Preheat those ovens, pronto.

Red Velvet Valentine's CakeAdapted from James McNair's Cakes by James McNair

2 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

3/4 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 1/2 cups sugar

2 eggs, at room temperature, lightly beaten

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 bottles (1 ounce each) red liquid food coloring

1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature

Grease bottoms and sides of two 9-inch round cake pans, and line with circles of parchment paper (plan B: grease and flour pans).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Over a medium bowl, sift flour, cocoa powder, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir to mix well and set aside.

In a bowl with a hand mixer, beat butter at medium speed until creamy, about one minute. With mixer still running, slowly add sugar. Occasionally stop mixer to scrape sides of bowl. Beat until mixture is light and fluffy, about five minutes. Slowly drizzle in eggs and beat until mixed well, remembering to scrape sides of bowl. Add vanilla and food coloring. Using mixer on low speed or a rubber spatula, begin to incorporate about one-third of the dry ingredients, alternating with half of the buttermilk. Continue to alternate dry with wet, ending with the remaining flour mixture, until ingredients are incorporated.

Divide batter evenly between pans and with a spatula, make sure that it is evenly distributed. Place each pan on a baking sheet and bake until a wooden skewer inserted in center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Remove pans and cool for about 20 minutes, then invert onto wire racks to cool completely. While cake layers cool, make frosting.

Cream Cheese FrostingAlso from James McNair's Cakes

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

2 eight-ounce bricks (1 pound) cream cheese, chilled

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Pinch salt

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted

Optional: light cream or milk, if needed

In a mixing bowl, beat butter with mixer until fluffy. Add cream cheese, vanilla and salt, beating at low speed, just until mixture is smooth and creamy. Don't overbeat, as cream cheese will get thin and runny. Using a rubber spatula, scrape sides of bowl. Add 1 cup of sugar and beat on low. Add remaining cup and beat until just smooth and spreadable; taste for sweetness and consistency. If too thick, add a little light cream or milk. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate. When ready to use, allow to warm up to room temperature. Makes a generous amount for a two-layer cake.Culinary questions? Reach CL's Kitchen Witch at kim.odonnel@creativeloafing.com.??


             13017162 1252402                          Kitchen Witch - Be my velvet Valentine "
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Article

Thursday February 10, 2005 12:04 am EST

Tea for two needs cake. So do Grandma, your pals from work, and all the other lonely hearts sticking out their tongues on this lovers-only holiday.

With or without an admirer this weekend, one needs an antidote for the irrepressibly goopy love stuff on center stage at the local CVS. Walk on by those bags of cupid-themed M&Ms and pick up a few bottles of red food coloring instead. No, we're not...

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  string(741) "Legend has it that the African marula fruit drives a pachyderm mad. Of course, that is after it is allowed to fall on the ground and ferment for a short time. I'll let you do the math.

Light yellow, marula berries have a sweet and citrusy flavor that also drives humans wild. Though the plant is impossible to cultivate, Americans can experience the taste through Amarula cream, a liquor that is distilled from the berries with an added touch of cream.

At Decatur's Carpe Diem, Amarula cream is combined with vanilla vodka to create a White Elephant. Served chilled, the taste is akin to an orange Creamsicle, and the smooth texture is similar to a milk-based chocolate martini.

Carpe Diem, 105 Sycamore Place, Decatur. 404-687-9696.??


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Light yellow, marula berries have a sweet and citrusy flavor that also drives humans wild. Though the plant is impossible to cultivate, Americans can experience the taste through Amarula cream, a liquor that is distilled from the berries with an added touch of cream.

At Decatur's __Carpe Diem__, Amarula cream is combined with vanilla vodka to create a __White Elephant__. Served chilled, the taste is akin to an orange Creamsicle, and the smooth texture is similar to a milk-based chocolate martini.

''Carpe Diem, 105 Sycamore Place, Decatur. 404-687-9696.''??


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  string(920) "       2005-02-03T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Elephant love     2005-02-03T05:04:00+00:00  Legend has it that the African marula fruit drives a pachyderm mad. Of course, that is after it is allowed to fall on the ground and ferment for a short time. I'll let you do the math.

Light yellow, marula berries have a sweet and citrusy flavor that also drives humans wild. Though the plant is impossible to cultivate, Americans can experience the taste through Amarula cream, a liquor that is distilled from the berries with an added touch of cream.

At Decatur's Carpe Diem, Amarula cream is combined with vanilla vodka to create a White Elephant. Served chilled, the taste is akin to an orange Creamsicle, and the smooth texture is similar to a milk-based chocolate martini.

Carpe Diem, 105 Sycamore Place, Decatur. 404-687-9696.??


             13017048 1252181                          Kitchen Witch - Elephant love "
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Article

Thursday February 3, 2005 12:04 am EST

Legend has it that the African marula fruit drives a pachyderm mad. Of course, that is after it is allowed to fall on the ground and ferment for a short time. I'll let you do the math.

Light yellow, marula berries have a sweet and citrusy flavor that also drives humans wild. Though the plant is impossible to cultivate, Americans can experience the taste through Amarula cream, a liquor that is...

| more...
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  string(2284) "Sun., Feb. 6, is a busy day. After several long months, the football season comes to a climactic denouement, with the ultimate testosterone showdown of the year, the Super Bowl. With all the drinking, chortling and caveman dancing that ensues, one works up a healthy appetite - for something along the lines of a brontosaurus burger, perhaps?

I tested the recipe below primarily for its (lack of) difficulty level, and am delighted to announce: ALL LUNKHEADS PLEASE REPORT TO THE KITCHEN. This one is so easy, it's perfect for Super Bowl Sunday. In addition to the ingredients below, you'll need a roasting pan and some foil.

Better still, with these soy-gingery ribs, you can nod to Asian New Year festivities, which will already be in full swing by kickoff time. This year, by the way, is the Year of the Rooster. Cock-a-doodle-doo!

Orange-Soy Braised Pork Ribs
?Adapted from January 2005 issue of Gourmet

4 pounds country-style pork ribs (I used a combination of baby back and

spare ribs with success)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 cups juice of 2-3 oranges or tangerines

1/2 cup soy sauce (try low sodium if you can)

1 1/2 tablespoons honey (or sugar if you don't have honey)

2 tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped

Approximately 3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.Season ribs on both sides with salt and place in a heavy rectangular roasting pan, in a single layer.Combine orange juice, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic and pepper in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Stir until honey is dissolved. Pour mixture over ribs, turning with tongs to coat well and making sure that meat is completely covered with sauce. Cover pan tightly with foil and place in oven. After one hour, check ribs and turn with tongs, resealing foil on top of pan. After two hours, check for doneness. Ribs should be tender, almost falling off the bone. If not, cook for another 30 minutes. Transfer ribs to a baking dish or platter and keep warm. Skim fat from cooking liquid and use as a glaze to brush on top of ribs just before serving.Can be made in advance and reheated at 200 degrees. Serves 4 to 6, as part of a larger meal. Think rice and sauteed Asian greens, such as bok choy or Chinese broccoli."
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I tested the recipe below primarily for its (lack of) difficulty level, and am delighted to announce: ALL LUNKHEADS PLEASE REPORT TO THE KITCHEN. This one is so easy, it's perfect for Super Bowl Sunday. In addition to the ingredients below, you'll need a roasting pan and some foil.

Better still, with these soy-gingery ribs, you can nod to Asian New Year festivities, which will already be in full swing by kickoff time. This year, by the way, is the Year of the Rooster. Cock-a-doodle-doo!

__Orange-Soy Braised Pork Ribs__
?Adapted from January 2005 issue of ''Gourmet''

4 pounds country-style pork ribs (I used a combination of baby back and

spare ribs with success)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 cups juice of 2-3 oranges or tangerines

1/2 cup soy sauce (try low sodium if you can)

1 1/2 tablespoons honey (or sugar if you don't have honey)

2 tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped

Approximately 3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.Season ribs on both sides with salt and place in a heavy rectangular roasting pan, in a single layer.Combine orange juice, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic and pepper in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Stir until honey is dissolved. Pour mixture over ribs, turning with tongs to coat well and making sure that meat is completely covered with sauce. Cover pan tightly with foil and place in oven. After one hour, check ribs and turn with tongs, resealing foil on top of pan. After two hours, check for doneness. Ribs should be tender, almost falling off the bone. If not, cook for another 30 minutes. Transfer ribs to a baking dish or platter and keep warm. Skim fat from cooking liquid and use as a glaze to brush on top of ribs just before serving.Can be made in advance and reheated at 200 degrees. Serves 4 to 6, as part of a larger meal. Think rice and sauteed Asian greens, such as bok choy or Chinese broccoli."
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  string(2526) "       2005-02-03T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Touchdown! Year of the Rooster Ribs   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-02-03T05:04:00+00:00  Sun., Feb. 6, is a busy day. After several long months, the football season comes to a climactic denouement, with the ultimate testosterone showdown of the year, the Super Bowl. With all the drinking, chortling and caveman dancing that ensues, one works up a healthy appetite - for something along the lines of a brontosaurus burger, perhaps?

I tested the recipe below primarily for its (lack of) difficulty level, and am delighted to announce: ALL LUNKHEADS PLEASE REPORT TO THE KITCHEN. This one is so easy, it's perfect for Super Bowl Sunday. In addition to the ingredients below, you'll need a roasting pan and some foil.

Better still, with these soy-gingery ribs, you can nod to Asian New Year festivities, which will already be in full swing by kickoff time. This year, by the way, is the Year of the Rooster. Cock-a-doodle-doo!

Orange-Soy Braised Pork Ribs
?Adapted from January 2005 issue of Gourmet

4 pounds country-style pork ribs (I used a combination of baby back and

spare ribs with success)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 cups juice of 2-3 oranges or tangerines

1/2 cup soy sauce (try low sodium if you can)

1 1/2 tablespoons honey (or sugar if you don't have honey)

2 tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped

Approximately 3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.Season ribs on both sides with salt and place in a heavy rectangular roasting pan, in a single layer.Combine orange juice, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic and pepper in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Stir until honey is dissolved. Pour mixture over ribs, turning with tongs to coat well and making sure that meat is completely covered with sauce. Cover pan tightly with foil and place in oven. After one hour, check ribs and turn with tongs, resealing foil on top of pan. After two hours, check for doneness. Ribs should be tender, almost falling off the bone. If not, cook for another 30 minutes. Transfer ribs to a baking dish or platter and keep warm. Skim fat from cooking liquid and use as a glaze to brush on top of ribs just before serving.Can be made in advance and reheated at 200 degrees. Serves 4 to 6, as part of a larger meal. Think rice and sauteed Asian greens, such as bok choy or Chinese broccoli.             13017095 1252262                          Kitchen Witch - Touchdown! Year of the Rooster Ribs "
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Article

Thursday February 3, 2005 12:04 am EST

Sun., Feb. 6, is a busy day. After several long months, the football season comes to a climactic denouement, with the ultimate testosterone showdown of the year, the Super Bowl. With all the drinking, chortling and caveman dancing that ensues, one works up a healthy appetite - for something along the lines of a brontosaurus burger, perhaps?

I tested the recipe below primarily for its (lack of)...

| more...
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  string(2478) "I had countless "aha" culinary moments five years ago when I was at cooking school in Italy. The earliest one arrived on the first day of class. We were a group of 15 who had traveled from many countries to attend, bleary-eyed and disheveled in our newly unpacked chef's whites at 7 in the morning. At that hour, all I really cared about was coffee. But I remember being intrigued by the pitcher containing a garnet, red-pink liquid sitting on the breakfast table. I knew it was too dark to be grapefruit, and I knew that it was too early in the season for berries, so I scratched my jet-lagged head.

When I asked in Italian what the mysterious nectar was called, the kitchen helpers replied very matter-of-factly, "succo di arancia." Well, if I got my translation straight, that means orange juice. It was orange juice, all right, but it was the juice of something much more intense - the seductive blood orange.

The blood orange, a mutation of the sweet orange (Navel, Valencia, to name a few), has a deep red, almost plum-purple flesh that tastes like a mix of an orange and a raspberry. Although considered specialty fruit in this country, it's quite common in the Mediterranean, particularly in Sicily. Here, it grows in California, and too often is priced like an exotic gem. She's here only until February or March, and poof, is gone until next year - unless, of course, you fly to Italia.

Because her flesh is so gorgeous, she's lots of fun in the presentation department. Think salads. Here's an impromptu blood orange vinaigrette for arugula, watercress, spinach, fennel or whatever else rocks your leafy world.

BLOOD ORANGE VINAIGRETTE
?Juice of two blood oranges (yields at least 1/2 cup)
?1/4 cup sherry or red wine vinegarSalt to taste
?1/4-1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Washed, dried and torn leaves of arugula, watercress, mizuna or greens of your choice
Optional: Separated segments of one blood orange, toasted slivered almonds, pinenuts, walnuts

Pour juice into a small mixing bowl. Add vinegar and mix with a whisk. Add salt; taste along the way. Mixture should be somewhat salty. With one hand, gradually pour in the olive oil to the juice-vinegar mixture, while whisking with the other hand. You'll notice the mixture emulsifying, coming together. Taste. Enough juice? Vinegar? Olive? Salt? This is your chance to make adjustments before pouring over your greens and tossing for your guests. Add orange segments and nuts, if using. Serve immediately."
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When I asked in Italian what the mysterious nectar was called, the kitchen helpers replied very matter-of-factly, "succo di arancia." Well, if I got my translation straight, that means orange juice. It was orange juice, all right, but it was the juice of something much more intense - the seductive blood orange.

The blood orange, a mutation of the sweet orange (Navel, Valencia, to name a few), has a deep red, almost plum-purple flesh that tastes like a mix of an orange and a raspberry. Although considered specialty fruit in this country, it's quite common in the Mediterranean, particularly in Sicily. Here, it grows in California, and too often is priced like an exotic gem. She's here only until February or March, and poof, is gone until next year - unless, of course, you fly to Italia.

Because her flesh is so gorgeous, she's lots of fun in the presentation department. Think salads. Here's an impromptu blood orange vinaigrette for arugula, watercress, spinach, fennel or whatever else rocks your leafy world.

__BLOOD ORANGE VINAIGRETTE__
?Juice of two blood oranges (yields at least 1/2 cup)
?1/4 cup sherry or red wine vinegarSalt to taste
?1/4-1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Washed, dried and torn leaves of arugula, watercress, mizuna or greens of your choice
Optional: Separated segments of one blood orange, toasted slivered almonds, pinenuts, walnuts

Pour juice into a small mixing bowl. Add vinegar and mix with a whisk. Add salt; taste along the way. Mixture should be somewhat salty. With one hand, gradually pour in the olive oil to the juice-vinegar mixture, while whisking with the other hand. You'll notice the mixture emulsifying, coming together. Taste. Enough juice? Vinegar? Olive? Salt? This is your chance to make adjustments before pouring over your greens and tossing for your guests. Add orange segments and nuts, if using. Serve immediately."
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When I asked in Italian what the mysterious nectar was called, the kitchen helpers replied very matter-of-factly, "succo di arancia." Well, if I got my translation straight, that means orange juice. It was orange juice, all right, but it was the juice of something much more intense - the seductive blood orange.

The blood orange, a mutation of the sweet orange (Navel, Valencia, to name a few), has a deep red, almost plum-purple flesh that tastes like a mix of an orange and a raspberry. Although considered specialty fruit in this country, it's quite common in the Mediterranean, particularly in Sicily. Here, it grows in California, and too often is priced like an exotic gem. She's here only until February or March, and poof, is gone until next year - unless, of course, you fly to Italia.

Because her flesh is so gorgeous, she's lots of fun in the presentation department. Think salads. Here's an impromptu blood orange vinaigrette for arugula, watercress, spinach, fennel or whatever else rocks your leafy world.

BLOOD ORANGE VINAIGRETTE
?Juice of two blood oranges (yields at least 1/2 cup)
?1/4 cup sherry or red wine vinegarSalt to taste
?1/4-1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Washed, dried and torn leaves of arugula, watercress, mizuna or greens of your choice
Optional: Separated segments of one blood orange, toasted slivered almonds, pinenuts, walnuts

Pour juice into a small mixing bowl. Add vinegar and mix with a whisk. Add salt; taste along the way. Mixture should be somewhat salty. With one hand, gradually pour in the olive oil to the juice-vinegar mixture, while whisking with the other hand. You'll notice the mixture emulsifying, coming together. Taste. Enough juice? Vinegar? Olive? Salt? This is your chance to make adjustments before pouring over your greens and tossing for your guests. Add orange segments and nuts, if using. Serve immediately.             13017036 1252163                          Kitchen Witch - Gloriously gory "
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Article

Thursday January 27, 2005 12:04 am EST
I had countless "aha" culinary moments five years ago when I was at cooking school in Italy. The earliest one arrived on the first day of class. We were a group of 15 who had traveled from many countries to attend, bleary-eyed and disheveled in our newly unpacked chef's whites at 7 in the morning. At that hour, all I really cared about was coffee. But I remember being intrigued by the pitcher... | more...
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And I'm not just talking navel oranges and ruby grapefruits. There's a groovy world out there behind that rainbow of rind. This week, I take on the Minneola tangelo and its spunky grandmother, the pomelo.

The Minneola Tangelo
January isn't just for Super Bowl nachos; it's the month of the Minneola. Available only for a few short weeks, this juicy mama is a cross between a tangerine and its ancestor, the pomelo (we'll get to her shortly) - ergo the name "tange-lo." (No relation to J., by the way.)

The Minneola (also known as a honeybell) is distinctive in shape, color and flavor. In the supermarket, you can single her out by her trademark knobbed nipple. Her skin, a more intense red-orange, is slightly dimply, like pockmarks, and easy to peel. Her tender flesh is easily separated into segments, which are more like sacs of citrus essence to be sipped rather than wedges of orange meat to be chewed.

Seeds are nonexistent or scant, and the health benefits are many: vitamin C, calcium, potassium and folic acid, a boon during pregnancy.

Try them with thinly sliced fennel and olive oil, or sprigs of mint and almonds if eating them out of hand gets tired. Arugula, watercress and dandelion greens, all with a peppery quality, also love Minneola's, juicy sweet-tart nature.

The Pomelo 
Just when you think you've finished peeling away the thick yellow-green rind of the giant pomelo (say pom-EY-lo), you still have to make your way through a girdle of security guard pith before it's snack time. If you're in a rush, forget the pomelo; leave this giant beauty for the weekend or for more stress-free moments. The largest of all the citrus fruits, the pomelo looks like an overgrown grapefruit (or a bowling ball). In fact, it's thought to be the ancestor of the grapefruit, originating from Malaysia and China. Eventually, it made its way onto Caribbean soil, where it's known as a shaddock.

In addition to its unusual size, the pomelo has a gorgeous, peppery aroma (I'm surprised that no one has yet concocted a pomelo perfume). Its flesh, either coral pink or white/green grapeish, is a delightful surprise, much sweeter than that oft-puckersome grapefruit. Vitamin C and potassium you'll get — that is, if you have a half-hour to eat the thing. Pomelos are a great accompaniment to scallops and shrimp, and pairs beautifully with basil.

Next time: cousin blood orange and her many, freaky ways in the kitchen.??


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And I'm not just talking navel oranges and ruby grapefruits. There's a groovy world out there behind that rainbow of rind. This week, I take on the Minneola tangelo and its spunky grandmother, the pomelo.

__The Minneola Tangelo__
January isn't just for Super Bowl nachos; it's the month of the Minneola. Available only for a few short weeks, this juicy mama is a cross between a tangerine and its ancestor, the pomelo (we'll get to her shortly) - ergo the name "tange-lo." (No relation to J., by the way.)

The Minneola (also known as a honeybell) is distinctive in shape, color and flavor. In the supermarket, you can single her out by her trademark knobbed nipple. Her skin, a more intense red-orange, is slightly dimply, like pockmarks, and easy to peel. Her tender flesh is easily separated into segments, which are more like sacs of citrus essence to be sipped rather than wedges of orange meat to be chewed.

Seeds are nonexistent or scant, and the health benefits are many: vitamin C, calcium, potassium and folic acid, a boon during pregnancy.

Try them with thinly sliced fennel and olive oil, or sprigs of mint and almonds if eating them out of hand gets tired. Arugula, watercress and dandelion greens, all with a peppery quality, also love Minneola's, juicy sweet-tart nature.

__The Pomelo __
Just when you think you've finished peeling away the thick yellow-green rind of the giant pomelo (say pom-EY-lo), you still have to make your way through a girdle of security guard pith before it's snack time. If you're in a rush, forget the pomelo; leave this giant beauty for the weekend or for more stress-free moments. The largest of all the citrus fruits, the pomelo looks like an overgrown grapefruit (or a bowling ball). In fact, it's thought to be the ancestor of the grapefruit, originating from Malaysia and China. Eventually, it made its way onto Caribbean soil, where it's known as a shaddock.

In addition to its unusual size, the pomelo has a gorgeous, peppery aroma (I'm surprised that no one has yet concocted a pomelo perfume). Its flesh, either coral pink or white/green grapeish, is a delightful surprise, much sweeter than that oft-puckersome grapefruit. Vitamin C and potassium you'll get -- that is, if you have a half-hour to eat the thing. Pomelos are a great accompaniment to scallops and shrimp, and pairs beautifully with basil.

Next time: cousin blood orange and her many, freaky ways in the kitchen.??


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  string(2927) "       2005-01-20T05:04:00+00:00 Kitchen Witch - Citrus of a different stripe   Kim O'Donnel 1306509 2005-01-20T05:04:00+00:00  Ever realize there's never a countdown to winter like there is for summer? Me, I can't stand shorter days, colder nights, dreary skies and endless wind. The only consolation for this miserable, seemingly never-ending phenomenon is the arrival of citrus fruit.

And I'm not just talking navel oranges and ruby grapefruits. There's a groovy world out there behind that rainbow of rind. This week, I take on the Minneola tangelo and its spunky grandmother, the pomelo.

The Minneola Tangelo
January isn't just for Super Bowl nachos; it's the month of the Minneola. Available only for a few short weeks, this juicy mama is a cross between a tangerine and its ancestor, the pomelo (we'll get to her shortly) - ergo the name "tange-lo." (No relation to J., by the way.)

The Minneola (also known as a honeybell) is distinctive in shape, color and flavor. In the supermarket, you can single her out by her trademark knobbed nipple. Her skin, a more intense red-orange, is slightly dimply, like pockmarks, and easy to peel. Her tender flesh is easily separated into segments, which are more like sacs of citrus essence to be sipped rather than wedges of orange meat to be chewed.

Seeds are nonexistent or scant, and the health benefits are many: vitamin C, calcium, potassium and folic acid, a boon during pregnancy.

Try them with thinly sliced fennel and olive oil, or sprigs of mint and almonds if eating them out of hand gets tired. Arugula, watercress and dandelion greens, all with a peppery quality, also love Minneola's, juicy sweet-tart nature.

The Pomelo 
Just when you think you've finished peeling away the thick yellow-green rind of the giant pomelo (say pom-EY-lo), you still have to make your way through a girdle of security guard pith before it's snack time. If you're in a rush, forget the pomelo; leave this giant beauty for the weekend or for more stress-free moments. The largest of all the citrus fruits, the pomelo looks like an overgrown grapefruit (or a bowling ball). In fact, it's thought to be the ancestor of the grapefruit, originating from Malaysia and China. Eventually, it made its way onto Caribbean soil, where it's known as a shaddock.

In addition to its unusual size, the pomelo has a gorgeous, peppery aroma (I'm surprised that no one has yet concocted a pomelo perfume). Its flesh, either coral pink or white/green grapeish, is a delightful surprise, much sweeter than that oft-puckersome grapefruit. Vitamin C and potassium you'll get — that is, if you have a half-hour to eat the thing. Pomelos are a great accompaniment to scallops and shrimp, and pairs beautifully with basil.

Next time: cousin blood orange and her many, freaky ways in the kitchen.??


             13016986 1252072                          Kitchen Witch - Citrus of a different stripe "
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Article

Thursday January 20, 2005 12:04 am EST

Ever realize there's never a countdown to winter like there is for summer? Me, I can't stand shorter days, colder nights, dreary skies and endless wind. The only consolation for this miserable, seemingly never-ending phenomenon is the arrival of citrus fruit.

And I'm not just talking navel oranges and ruby grapefruits. There's a groovy world out there behind that rainbow of rind. This week, I...

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  string(2177) "It's January. It might be cold. It might be gray. There's an inauguration on the way.

Let's play make-believe and escape to our magic cabin in the woods, where there are no worries, no gray skies and no inauguration on the way.

Let's make the most excellent winter-in-the woods breakfast. Let's make granola.

We'll take nuts and fruit and sunflower seeds from this summer's magic garden, sweetened with our neighbor's honey and maple syrup from the tree in the forest. We'll roast the cereal over the wood fire and let it develop a rustic personality.

Within an hour, we'll see our goods from the garden transform into wholesome nuggets, for breakfast or anytime of the day. We'll pour some into bowls and crunch away with either yogurt or milk. In fact, the crunch of our freshly made cereal will be so loud, we won't hear the sound of Texas on our cabin steps. We'll have our own music, vibrating in our own ears, and we can breakdance, too.

We'll eat granola, play Scrabble and watch the snow fall. We'll keep the fire going and keep on crunching, until 2008.

Ignorance-Is-Bliss Granola

Adapted from the January 2003 issue of Food and Wine

2/3 cup whole almonds

2/3 cup pecans

1/3 cup unsalted sunflower seeds, raw or roasted

3 cups rolled oats

1 cup wheat germ

1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon (depending on taste)

1/4 cup honey

1/4 cup maple syrup

2 tablespoons molasses

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 1/2 cup raisins

Preheat oven to 275 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, combine nuts, sunflower seeds, rolled oats, wheat germ and cinnamon, stirring with a wooden spoon.

In a small saucepan, combine honey, maple syrup, molasses and oil, warming over low heat. Pour over nut mixture and combine, stirring so that everything is well coated.

Pour cereal onto baking sheet and spread evenly. Bake for about 40 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes or so, until cereal is noticeably toasted and begins to look crunchy.

Remove from oven, and stir in raisins until well combined. Let cool. Serve immediately with milk or yogurt, or store in an airtight container, for at least 2 weeks (if it lasts that long). Makes about 6 cups."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
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Let's play make-believe and escape to our magic cabin in the woods, where there are no worries, no gray skies and no inauguration on the way.

Let's make the most excellent winter-in-the woods breakfast. Let's make granola.

We'll take nuts and fruit and sunflower seeds from this summer's magic garden, sweetened with our neighbor's honey and maple syrup from the tree in the forest. We'll roast the cereal over the wood fire and let it develop a rustic personality.

Within an hour, we'll see our goods from the garden transform into wholesome nuggets, for breakfast or anytime of the day. We'll pour some into bowls and crunch away with either yogurt or milk. In fact, the crunch of our freshly made cereal will be so loud, we won't hear the sound of Texas on our cabin steps. We'll have our own music, vibrating in our own ears, and we can breakdance, too.

We'll eat granola, play Scrabble and watch the snow fall. We'll keep the fire going and keep on crunching, until 2008.

____Ignorance-Is-Bliss Granola____

Adapted from the January 2003 issue of ''Food and Wine''
''''
''''2/3 cup whole almonds

2/3 cup pecans

1/3 cup unsalted sunflower seeds, raw or roasted

3 cups rolled oats

1 cup wheat germ

1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon (depending on taste)

1/4 cup honey

1/4 cup maple syrup

2 tablespoons molasses

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 1/2 cup raisins

Preheat oven to 275 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, combine nuts, sunflower seeds, rolled oats, wheat germ and cinnamon, stirring with a wooden spoon.

In a small saucepan, combine honey, maple syrup, molasses and oil, warming over low heat. Pour over nut mixture and combine, stirring so that everything is well coated.

Pour cereal onto baking sheet and spread evenly. Bake for about 40 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes or so, until cereal is noticeably toasted and begins to look crunchy.

Remove from oven, and stir in raisins until well combined. Let cool. Serve immediately with milk or yogurt, or store in an airtight container, for at least 2 weeks (if it lasts that long). Makes about 6 cups."
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Let's play make-believe and escape to our magic cabin in the woods, where there are no worries, no gray skies and no inauguration on the way.

Let's make the most excellent winter-in-the woods breakfast. Let's make granola.

We'll take nuts and fruit and sunflower seeds from this summer's magic garden, sweetened with our neighbor's honey and maple syrup from the tree in the forest. We'll roast the cereal over the wood fire and let it develop a rustic personality.

Within an hour, we'll see our goods from the garden transform into wholesome nuggets, for breakfast or anytime of the day. We'll pour some into bowls and crunch away with either yogurt or milk. In fact, the crunch of our freshly made cereal will be so loud, we won't hear the sound of Texas on our cabin steps. We'll have our own music, vibrating in our own ears, and we can breakdance, too.

We'll eat granola, play Scrabble and watch the snow fall. We'll keep the fire going and keep on crunching, until 2008.

Ignorance-Is-Bliss Granola

Adapted from the January 2003 issue of Food and Wine

2/3 cup whole almonds

2/3 cup pecans

1/3 cup unsalted sunflower seeds, raw or roasted

3 cups rolled oats

1 cup wheat germ

1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon (depending on taste)

1/4 cup honey

1/4 cup maple syrup

2 tablespoons molasses

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Remove from oven, and stir in raisins until well combined. Let cool. Serve immediately with milk or yogurt, or store in an airtight container, for at least 2 weeks (if it lasts that long). Makes about 6 cups.             13016928 1251954                          Kitchen Witch - Crunchy fantasy "
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Article

Thursday January 13, 2005 12:04 am EST

It's January. It might be cold. It might be gray. There's an inauguration on the way.

Let's play make-believe and escape to our magic cabin in the woods, where there are no worries, no gray skies and no inauguration on the way.

Let's make the most excellent winter-in-the woods breakfast. Let's make granola.

We'll take nuts and fruit and sunflower seeds from this summer's magic garden,...

| more...