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Cutlure

Culture


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Thursday May 13, 2004 12:04 am EDT

Ironically, a man named Pale is by far the most vivid personality in Lanford Wilson's Burn This. In the Actor's Express production, Daniel May plays the profane, bigoted restaurateur who explodes into the loft apartment of mild-mannered New York bohemians like one of the Sopranos loose among the cast of "Friends."

Pale barges unannounced into the apartment before dawn one morning to pick up...

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Article

Thursday May 13, 2004 12:04 am EDT
ACA student examines spectacle in onscreen violence | more...

Article

Thursday May 13, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Dale Chihuly plants his colored orbs and vessels in the Botanical Garden | more...

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Thursday May 13, 2004 12:04 am EDT

In his minimalism-meets-M.C. Escher style, artist W.C. Richardson works with subtle issues of perception.

His brightly colored paintings in burnt orange, red and inky blue explore the line between chaos and order. And the urge to impose order, to figure out what visual information to emphasize seems the crux of Richardson's paintings. We tend to assume — as resolution-craving beings...

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Article

Thursday May 13, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Laughter is evicted from Kathleen Turner's House | more...

Article

Thursday May 6, 2004 12:04 am EDT
The Process Theatre's Journeys: A True and Comic Love Story makes a much better eulogy than it does a play. Atlanta playwright Evan Guilford-Blake based the work on the friendship of Karen Skinner and the late Wayne Buidens, co-founders of Chicago's Circle Theatre, where the playwright got his start. Guilford-Blake reveals a sensitive ear for how old friends banter, bond and bid each other... | more...

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Thursday May 6, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Soprano imbues Madama Butterfly with spirituality | more...

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Thursday May 6, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Michael Lucero and his scary-cute Cast of characters | more...

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Thursday May 6, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Hoping theater gets a hip-hop infusion | more...

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Thursday May 6, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Maurice Ravel once called his Bolero "a piece for orchestra, without music." He took a single Spanish theme and repeated it nine times at a constant tempo. Listen too casually, and you might imagine the French impressionist had written but a few minutes of music before handing it over to the Industrial Age equivalent of a Xerox machine (a grisette good with a fountain pen, perhaps). But into... | more...

Article

Thursday April 29, 2004 12:04 am EDT
The political is personal in "Master Harold" ... and the boys. In probably his most popular play, South Africa's Athol Fugard condemns his homeland's apartheid system simply by recalling the turning point in the relationship between a white teenager and his family's two black employees. 7 Stages' production builds to an intense, shocking conclusion that nonetheless feels like a long time... | more...

Article

Thursday April 29, 2004 12:04 am EDT

Visiting Mr. Green feels so much like the pilot for a TV comedy, the Jewish Theatre of the South production might as well run "The Odd Couple" theme between the scenes. Director Heidi Cline and her two leading men gamely resist the network-ready instincts of playwright Jeff Baron but seldom transcend them.

Baron's TV background includes "The Tracy Ullman Show" and "A Year in the Life," but...

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Thursday April 29, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Human Element is most vivid in the margins | more...

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Thursday April 29, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Atlanta Celebrates Photography gets new director | more...

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Thursday April 22, 2004 12:04 am EDT

PushPush Theater performs the dysfunctional family drama Fireface like a punk rock song. The German play resembles the kind of rave-up played with such speed and intensity that you don't notice — at first — how derivative the melody is and how lame the lyrics are.

Playwright Marius von Mayenburg scrawls a furious family portrait that emphasizes two teenage kids, sexually...

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Thursday April 22, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Boys Will Be Boys reveals all | more...

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Thursday April 22, 2004 12:04 am EDT
City Series comes back for seconds, not thirds | more...

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Thursday April 22, 2004 12:04 am EDT

The word "shelter" can mean the physical protection of a roof, and also the emotional protection of family. Both the literal and spiritual connotations of that word are employed in artist Cooper Sanchez's exhibition at the Inman Park alternative gallery White Space.

Shelter's documentation of the comforts of nature and old-timey aesthetics is steeped in a Southern boy's imagination....

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Article

Thursday April 22, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Life Goes On pays loving tribute to silent film | more...

Article

Thursday April 15, 2004 12:04 am EDT
At first appraisal, "Pattern(ing)" might seem misnamed. Dancers spin or leap or wave their arms or fold upon themselves — each doing something different to a different time, giving every appearance of randomness fit to make a Lotto official proud. Then you notice a phrase you've seen before — a sissonne deconstructed and given a Vaudevillian vibe, or a hand-jiving bending of a body... | more...

Article

Thursday April 15, 2004 12:04 am EDT
California subculture mixes religion and kitsch at Young Blood | more...

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Thursday April 15, 2004 12:04 am EDT
All walks of life represented in Mirror Project | more...

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Thursday April 15, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Bittersweet Drawer Boy draws on familiar themes | more...

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Thursday April 15, 2004 12:04 am EDT
Robert Bolt's play A Man for All Seasons, currently showing at the Shakespeare Tavern, earns its title. Bolt dramatizes Henry VIII's persecution of England's Chancellor Sir Thomas More (Jeff Watkins), who refused to endorse the king's divorce, remarriage and break with the Catholic Church. The 40-year-old play portrays More as the kind of beacon of personal and political integrity that seldom... | more...

Article

Thursday April 8, 2004 12:04 am EDT
The shows we'd stage at a Planet playhouse | more...