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Cityscape

In 1973, voters in Fulton and DeKalb counties and the city of Atlanta took a leap of faith and signed on to build a public transit system that would eventually link to three other counties.

It took more than 40 years for one of those counties, Clayton County, to join. Last year, residents of the county said they wanted another way to get around their car-oriented county and to the airport, as well as to be connected with the rest of MARTA’s rail network.

It took changes in demographics for metro Atlanta to start overcoming the racial and socioeconomic bogeymen that kept other counties from participating in a transit system that developers and business leaders now consider a key amenity — and in some cases, a requirement — when picking where to start moving dirt or relocating employees. It took changes in development patterns and a generational realization that sitting in traffic sucks.

Most of all, it took time. It took years of burning gasoline and reading reports noting the damage we’re doing to our bodies and environment by not being on our feet or on the bus. It took the ends of elected officials’ terms and the exits of policymakers who were too myopic to see an asset in their grasp and the changing desires of a younger generation.

When it comes to Atlanta’s cityscape, time is something we have on our side and are constantly working against. Some developers want to get whatever they can build finished and occupied before the current development boom passes out from exhaustion. Residents sometimes want a few more weeks to pore over or improve those buildings that will affect their daily lives. Politicians want to get out of the way when it comes to building skyscrapers but often take their time on improving the public realm we share.

Atlanta is still a young city compared to its peers, and it’s come a fairly long way despite being burned to the ground during the Civil War. And for all the knocks against it being a place where people come and go, there are those who stick around. They start businesses, blogs, and advocate for historic preservation. They begin gathering food and build a powerhouse nonprofit that helps feed the hungry. They band together to contribute to the parks and festivals we all enjoy. They leave their mark on the city and offer enough opportunity for others to do the same. And when they go, others will follow.

It’s what helps make Atlanta a great place and worth celebrating.

— Thomas Wheatley, News Editor

Best public tennis court BOA Award Winner

Sharon Lester Tennis Center at Piedmont Park

Best rabble rouser/activist BOA Award Winner

John Lewis
johnlewis.house.gov

Best radio station BOA Award Winner

90.1 WABE-NPR

Best rock radio station BOA Award Winner

Radio 105.7

Best tech visionary BOA Award Winner

MailChimp

Best walkable neighborhood BOA Award Winner

Inman Park

Best internet radio BOA Award Winner

Album 88.5
www2.gsu.edu/~www885/

Best local athlete BOA Award Winner

Freddie Freeman AND Matt Ryan

Freddie Freeman


@FreddieFreeman5


Matt Ryan


@M_Ryan02

Best local blogger BOA Award Winner

Dan Whisenhunt

Best local political figure BOA Award Winner

John Lewis
johnlewis.house.gov

Best non-commercial radio station BOA Award Winner

90.1 WABE-NPR

Best street BOA Award Winner

Peachtree Street

Best street character BOA Award Winner

Baton Bob
batonbob.weebly.com

Best suburb BOA Award Winner

Decatur

Best tourist spot for locals BOA Award Winner

Georgia Aquarium AND Atlanta Beltline

Georgia Aquarium


www.georgiaaquarium.org


Atlanta Beltline


www.beltline.org

Best child care center BOA Award Winner

And other metro Atlanta locations.

Best person you love to hate BOA Award Winner

Mayor Kasim Reed
kasimreed.com

Best volunteer program BOA Award Winner

Atlanta Habitat for Humanity
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Best community garden BOA Award Winner

Oakhurst Garden of the Wylde Center

Best con(vention) BOA Award Winner

Dragoncon

Best free annual event BOA Award Winner

Dogwood Festival

Best grassroots guardian of old Atlanta BOA Award Winner

Kyle Kessler

Best local blog BOA Award Winner

Decaturish

Best local celebrity BOA Award Winner

Baton Bob
batonbob.weebly.com

Best neighborhood festival BOA Award Winner

Inman Park Festival

Best party school BOA Award Winner

University of Georgia

Best public tennis court BOA Award Winner

Sharon Lester Tennis Center at Piedmont Park

Best rabble rouser/activist BOA Award Winner

John Lewis
johnlewis.house.gov

Best radio station BOA Award Winner

90.1 WABE-NPR

Best rock radio station BOA Award Winner

Radio 105.7

Best tech visionary BOA Award Winner

MailChimp

Best walkable neighborhood BOA Award Winner

Inman Park

The fourth estate: Best blogger BOA Award Winner

ATL Urbanist

The well-built environment: Best planning vision BOA Award Winner

Memorial Drive Corridor Study

Best advocate for the devil weed BOA Award Winner

Paul Cornwell

Best internet radio BOA Award Winner

Album 88.5
www2.gsu.edu/~www885/

Best local athlete BOA Award Winner

Freddie Freeman AND Matt Ryan

Freddie Freeman


@FreddieFreeman5


Matt Ryan


@M_Ryan02

Best local blogger BOA Award Winner

Dan Whisenhunt

Best local political figure BOA Award Winner

John Lewis
johnlewis.house.gov

Best non-commercial radio station BOA Award Winner

90.1 WABE-NPR

Best street BOA Award Winner

Peachtree Street

Best street character BOA Award Winner

Baton Bob
batonbob.weebly.com

Best suburb BOA Award Winner

Decatur

Best tourist spot for locals BOA Award Winner

Georgia Aquarium AND Atlanta Beltline

Georgia Aquarium


www.georgiaaquarium.org


Atlanta Beltline


www.beltline.org

The fourth estate: Best TV cameraman BOA Award Winner

Mike Daly

Best child care center BOA Award Winner

And other metro Atlanta locations.

Best free thing to do BOA Award Winner

King of Pops Yoga in the Park

Best job turning around a sports team BOA Award Winner

Steve Koonin

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