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Record Review - 3 April 22 2004

Lending new meaning to the words "Kid Rock," Atlanta musician John Boydston has carved a niche for himself with a series of retro-twang novelty CDs for children under the name Daddy A Go Go. His fourth disc, Mojo A Go Go, is another delightful assemblage of witty, uptempo tunes pitched at the 5-to-10 age group, but with definite cross-generation appeal.

A proud father of two boys, Boydston recruited an impressive lineup of other local parent-musicians for Mojo, including Big Fish Ensemble's Michael Lorant, who drums during the rollicking "The Battle of the Bands," and Elliot Dangar of the Penetrators, who pounds the skins on an arrangement of Vince Guaraldi's "Linus & Lucy" revved up with so much electric organ and twang-guitar it sounds like Booker T. and the MG's. The Jody Grind drummer Walt Brewer helps out on just about everything else.

Boydston adopts a fatherly conversational tone for "Scaredy Cat Cowboy (Pt. 1)," and manages an amusing faux-Brit accent during "Radio Dizzy," a song that complains about bland FM programming and offers great jangle-guitar licks as an alternative. Mojo concludes with "Every Single Song," a pleasantly rhythmic guitar instrumental written and performed by Boydston's 9-year-old son, Max. It's a fitting finale that hints that this project could have considerable longevity, even after Boydston becomes Grand-Daddy A Go Go.



More By This Writer

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Article

Thursday July 1, 2004 12:04 am EDT
It was early in 1966, and filmmaker Sergio Leone had a problem with Two Magnificent Rogues, his sequel to For a Few Dollars More. The initial screenplay was a slapstick farce that Leone charitably labeled a "disaster." In desperation, Leone turned to dramatist Luciano Vincenzoni, who in 11 days rewrote Two Magnificent Rogues as a sprawling, picaresque epic about three men hunting for... | more...
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"Trader Vic's kinda became his living room," says Penetrators drummer Elliot "Sticks" Dangar. "He had the calmest sense about him when he was there."

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Article

Thursday May 13, 2004 12:04 am EDT

When the Penetrators' lead guitarist Scott "Rip Thrillby" Rogers died last May, the world lost not just a tireless champion of surf music, but an outspoken devotee of Polynesian tiki culture. Friends fondly recall his enthusiasm for Trader Vic's, the exotic bamboo lounge he regularly frequented.

"Trader Vic's kinda became his living room," says Penetrators drummer Elliot "Sticks" Dangar. "He...

| more...
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Thursday April 1, 2004 12:04 am EST
Australian singer/songwriter Charles Jenkins won acclaim Down Under as frontman of the sparkling pop band Ice Cream Hands, where his Elvis Costello-ish lyrics swirled within upbeat jangle 'n' bomp. Bungalow, a solo album, finds the 'roo rocker in a quietly reflective mood more akin to the Costello of "Shipbuilding," Jenkins' voice little more than a gentle whisper over acoustic guitars on the... | more...
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Thursday January 29, 2004 12:04 am EST
Restless in L.A. commemorates 40 years of professional recording for guitarist Davie Allan, whose fabled fuzztone put the "drive" in many drive-in movie soundtracks. Among them is 1966's The Wild Angels, which showcased Allan's uncanny ability to mimic motorcycles with his instrument. Although this new CD contains a re-recorded rendition of that film's theme, it's just a parting glance in the... | more...
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  string(1793) "       2004-01-15T05:04:00+00:00 Strum and Dang   Gregory Nicoll 1223557 2004-01-15T05:04:00+00:00  In his new duo Six Strings and Vinyl (6SNV), former folkie Fran Snyder joins forces with a DJ, successfully combining the divergent sounds of acoustic pop and hip-hop.6SNV's demo disc opens with a gently strummed guitar, a scratching record and Snyder singing sweetly while a beatbox keeps the rhythm. His partner raps gently during the song's bridge, dropping subtle turntable licks into the mix. By adding urban vibes to the blue-eyed soul of Snyder's vocals, 6SNV stayed in constant demand as a live act at college campuses throughout 2003.Snyder conceived 6SNV after becoming "really tired of the acoustic solo act thing," a format he tried in coffeehouse after coffeehouse for almost a decade. "Now," he says, "I'm resigned to traveling in twos."The only glitch Snyder has encountered thus far is retaining a full-time partner. His first DJ was lured away by a full scholarship to Clark Atlanta University. Another was recruited for a tour with R&B singer Montell Jordan. Various other replacements were short-lived."It's a very challenging gig," Snyder says. "I need a DJ with a variety of skills. Foremost among them is scratching — few do it well — and turntable drumming — few do it at all. But I don't think this act really works unless the DJ brings at least one vocal skill to the mix. That skill can be rapping, beatboxing, singing or even spoken word poetry."Snyder recently teamed up with local rapper/singer/turntablist Diva Lyri, and he expects to hit the road again with 6SNV shortly."All the stressful replacements aside," Snyder says, "this is the most fun I've had playing music."             13013614 1245839                          Strum and Dang "
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Article

Thursday January 15, 2004 12:04 am EST
In his new duo Six Strings and Vinyl (6SNV), former folkie Fran Snyder joins forces with a DJ, successfully combining the divergent sounds of acoustic pop and hip-hop.6SNV's demo disc opens with a gently strummed guitar, a scratching record and Snyder singing sweetly while a beatbox keeps the rhythm. His partner raps gently during the song's bridge, dropping subtle turntable licks into the mix.... | more...
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[Admin link: Record Review - 3 April 22 2004]