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Letters to the Editor (2) - June 14 2006

BRING THE PAIN

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I felt compelled to write you regarding your article titled "The pain game" (Headcase, June 1, 2006). I have suffered with chronic pain related to endometriosis since the onset of my menstrual cycle at age 16. I have been on and off of the pain medication OxyContin five times. I would be put on it and then have a surgery, recover, and then be weaned off the medication. Six months to a year later, I would return to it until another surgery in what seems to be an endless cycle.

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I have been seeing the same pain management doctor since August 2005. I visit his office once per month, he examines me and reviews my medication and then gives me a prescription that is exactly enough medication to make it to my next appointment.

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On May 26 at 11 a.m., I went to my doctor's office for my regular appointment and was shocked to see a hand-written note hanging in his window that stated he was no longer going to be practicing. There was no referral to another doctor taking his place, no phone call in advance to warn me of his absence, no letter ... nothing. I knew that I had been on this medicine for some time and that my body had become dependant on this medication. I had taken my last dose at 1 a.m. I knew that I had little time before I was going to become sick. Not only would I be sick because of my disease, but now that was going to be compounded with withdrawal.

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I called my family practice doctor's office and they quickly refused to see me. My husband, Robert, called the insurance company, several doctors, everyone that we could possibly think of to get some help. Absolutely no one was willing to help us. As soon as you mention the word "OxyContin," no one is interested in helping. Finally, my husband's persistence paid off and a new doctor was able to squeeze me in on Wednesday afternoon.

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Not everyone is a drug-seeking abuser. There are innocent people out here suffering every day because of such events. I commend you for bringing light to this matter, when so many people prefer to ignore it.

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-- Marnee Block, Reynoldsburg, Ohio

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I BELIEVE I CAN MCFLY

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I read your article on Mighty McFly being sued by England's McFly (Vibes, "McFly vs. McFly," May 25, 2006). I was just curious if the group's manager mentioned that the current lineup of Mighty McFly bares little resemblance to the band that started in 2001.

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I was one of the founding members, along with Nikki Lixx. She and I toured with the band from August 2001 up through June of 2005. The original version of the band had two female members, including Nikki on guitar. The other girl is Bambi Lynn, who did some lead vocals; she is now the lead singer of Radio Cult.

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One of the several reasons that Nikki and I left McFly was because we had no legal rights to the name, and there was a good chance that we'd have to change it. Neither Nancy Furlong, nor lead singer Brent, nor anyone associated with Mighty McFly actually owns the name. The legal owner of the name is the original bass player, who left with Bambi a few months before Nikki and I left. In other words, in July of 2005 (less than a year ago), there was essentially a completely new band formed, with Brent on lead vocals. They simply use the name Mighty McFly because that was the easiest way to continue booking gigs. The "Mighty" was added in 2004 when I was still playing with them, and this legal battle has actually been going on since 2003.

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Anyway, I'm not trying to get you involved in band drama or anything, but I just thought as a writer you should get some of these extra "little" details.

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-- Soumen Talukder, Atlanta

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THE WAR ON ERRORISM

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A June 1 Food & Drink feature on the Flying Biscuit restaurant incorrectly implied that Krispy Kreme doughnuts originated in Atlanta. Krispy Kreme was founded in Winston Salem, N.C., and the company still is based there.