Loading...
 

Jiha Moon's candy coated chaos

Saltworks Gallery pops with Blue Peony and Impure Thoughts

Painter Jiha Moon, who lives in Atlanta but was born in Korea, invokes the vertical composition of traditional Korean painting, but opens up her work to the most American of abstract expressionists – Jackson Pollock – and the fluidity of his drips and splatters.

Zigzags and curlicues draw the eye up through the flattened space of Moon's "Blue Peony," now on view in her solo show, Blue Peony and Impure Thoughts, at Saltworks Gallery. "Yalari-Yala" pops with hot fuchsia and a cool thalo green mixed with white to make a color you'll probably recognize from your toothpaste. A lovely dark cloud blends a clear cobalt blue skyward into the darkest of indigos. Moon flings around bold colors in her work with such abandon, the combinations can be startling.

The artist professes a love for Philip Guston. A respected abstract painter, Guston made an abrupt 180-degree turn to pictorial imagery well into his career. Large heads and eyes painted in a limited red, gray, and green palette stack up on his canvases like the cigarette butts and light bulbs found elsewhere in his work. Moon doesn't evoke Guston's style so much as his spirit. While the pieces in Blue Peony don't carry the emotional weight of Guston's oil paintings, they similarly incorporate and rework cartoons, pop-culture tidbits, and the stuff of everyday life: Tigers leap small paintings in a single bound and Astro Boy comes in for a landing.

Moon's work evokes the natural landscape as much as the cultural one. Nature for her can be angst-filled, as in "Painter's Argument" in which thunder and lightning and wind and rain blow about as false teeth clatter and smoke rises above the miasma.

Quieter is "Good Place," a small tondo rubbed black and overlaid with black, blue, or red and white cartoon-like peaches that float over the surface like little time bombs.

"Storehouse," a large installation tucked into the back of the gallery, is composed of kitschy objects culled from toy stores and gift shops. Small, fastidiously arranged objects such as Pez dispensers sit just beneath eye level on exuberant red, green, blue, yellow and pink shelves. On the floor below sit five little sacks and some balls. The whole thing is like a code key to the rest of the show. Several of her small paintings rest on the shelves as if taking refuge from the turbulent world she's created outside the nook. For the onlookers, however, Moon's paintings are delicious forays into chaos.

Blue Peony and Impure Thoughts Through March 6. Free. Wed.-Fri., noon-6 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saltworks Gallery, 664 11th St. 404-881-0411. www.saltworksgallery.com.



More By This Writer

array(78) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(41) "A few questions with painter Shara Hughes"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-04-30T11:55:55+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-09T12:38:41+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2011-03-10T15:14:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(41) "A few questions with painter Shara Hughes"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(6) "145835"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson_text"]=>
  string(7) "1306460"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2011-03-10T15:14:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(51) "Content:_:A few questions with painter Shara Hughes"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(2726) "
*Shara Hughes
*"These Sweets are too Sweet"
It's difficult to live and work as an artist anywhere. Atlanta especially has its own particular set of pluses and minuses: The city’s a good place to live, but many artists here struggle to maintain their careers. Painter Shara Hughes, who went to high school at Lovett and graduated six years ago from the Rhode Island School of Design, is not represented by any Atlanta gallery but shows her work in New York City and London. She returned to her hometown more than a year ago from New York City, preferring to live in Atlanta where it doesn’t take “all day to buy a quart of milk.” 

Hughes’ loft is split down the middle, with living space on one side and her studio on the other. She mostly paints in brightly colored mixed media, including oil, day-glo acrylic paint and glitter on mid-sized stretched canvases, which hang throughout the space. The artist’s domestic interiors strongly recall English pop artist David Hockney’s cubist distortions on acid. In the world she creates on canvas, shabby chic lives side by side with glam.

Tell us about your paintings.
I like to talk about them like they are alive and like it’s more of a “we” situation. I feel as though they tell me where they need to go as much as I tell them. I say “we” because I think you have to be that connected with yourself to take it outside and put it on something flat for the world to see. That being said, I like to make interiors because I can really go anywhere I want to with it. If I feel like making a landscape, I put a window in there. If I feel like making op art or a nod to abstract expressionism, I hang it on a wall, or make it into a rug or a pattern somewhere. I have a big love and respect for art history so I try to incorporate it in my work as much as possible. 

I’m interested boundaries between what something is, what we know something is within context, and what we feel something is. If you isolate some of the objects in my paintings outside of it’s environment, you can still see what they are — like a rendered chair or a plant. However, you can take other objects out of their environment and it turns abstract, or its just looks like a pile of squeezed paint or something unknown. Then there are parts of the work that remain unknown in the context of the painting, but they are still acceptable as just being this ambiguous shape, or sculpture, or field of energy or a shadow. Inside or outside the painting, the object remains ambiguous. I like these interchangeable ideas of reference, context, abstract, and recognizable objects as a reflection on real life. Most simply put, the dialogue between illusion and reality is fascinating."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(2866) "{img src="https://media1.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/these-sweets-are-too-sweet/u/original/2919323/1299712809-thesesweetsaretoosweet.jpg"}
*Shara Hughes
*"These Sweets are too Sweet"
It's difficult to live and work as an artist anywhere. Atlanta especially has its own particular set of pluses and minuses: The city’s a good place to live, but many artists here struggle to maintain their careers. Painter Shara Hughes, who went to high school at Lovett and graduated six years ago from the Rhode Island School of Design, is not represented by any Atlanta gallery but shows her work in New York City and London. She returned to her hometown more than a year ago from New York City, preferring to live in Atlanta where it doesn’t take “all day to buy a quart of milk.” 

Hughes’ loft is split down the middle, with living space on one side and her studio on the other. She mostly paints in brightly colored mixed media, including oil, day-glo acrylic paint and glitter on mid-sized stretched canvases, which hang throughout the space. The artist’s domestic interiors strongly recall English pop artist David Hockney’s cubist distortions on acid. In the world she creates on canvas, shabby chic lives side by side with glam.

__Tell us about your paintings.__
I like to talk about them like they are alive and like it’s more of a “we” situation. I feel as though they tell me where they need to go as much as I tell them. I say “we” because I think you have to be that connected with yourself to take it outside and put it on something flat for the world to see. That being said, I like to make interiors because I can really go anywhere I want to with it. If I feel like making a landscape, I put a window in there. If I feel like making op art or a nod to abstract expressionism, I hang it on a wall, or make it into a rug or a pattern somewhere. I have a big love and respect for art history so I try to incorporate it in my work as much as possible. 

I’m interested boundaries between what something is, what we know something is within context, and what we feel something is. If you isolate some of the objects in my paintings outside of it’s environment, you can still see what they are — like a rendered chair or a plant. However, you can take other objects out of their environment and it turns abstract, or its just looks like a pile of squeezed paint or something unknown. Then there are parts of the work that remain unknown in the context of the painting, but they are still acceptable as just being this ambiguous shape, or sculpture, or field of energy or a shadow. Inside or outside the painting, the object remains ambiguous. I like these interchangeable ideas of reference, context, abstract, and recognizable objects as a reflection on real life. Most simply put, the dialogue between illusion and reality is fascinating."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T20:25:08+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T20:25:08+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "692"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "692"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13058935"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(7) "2919313"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(692)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(637)
    [2]=>
    int(692)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(637)
    [1]=>
    int(692)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "A"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(1) "A"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item204518"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "204518"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(2949) "       2011-03-10T15:14:00+00:00 A few questions with painter Shara Hughes   Deanna Sirlin 1306460 2011-03-10T15:14:00+00:00  
*Shara Hughes
*"These Sweets are too Sweet"
It's difficult to live and work as an artist anywhere. Atlanta especially has its own particular set of pluses and minuses: The city’s a good place to live, but many artists here struggle to maintain their careers. Painter Shara Hughes, who went to high school at Lovett and graduated six years ago from the Rhode Island School of Design, is not represented by any Atlanta gallery but shows her work in New York City and London. She returned to her hometown more than a year ago from New York City, preferring to live in Atlanta where it doesn’t take “all day to buy a quart of milk.” 

Hughes’ loft is split down the middle, with living space on one side and her studio on the other. She mostly paints in brightly colored mixed media, including oil, day-glo acrylic paint and glitter on mid-sized stretched canvases, which hang throughout the space. The artist’s domestic interiors strongly recall English pop artist David Hockney’s cubist distortions on acid. In the world she creates on canvas, shabby chic lives side by side with glam.

Tell us about your paintings.
I like to talk about them like they are alive and like it’s more of a “we” situation. I feel as though they tell me where they need to go as much as I tell them. I say “we” because I think you have to be that connected with yourself to take it outside and put it on something flat for the world to see. That being said, I like to make interiors because I can really go anywhere I want to with it. If I feel like making a landscape, I put a window in there. If I feel like making op art or a nod to abstract expressionism, I hang it on a wall, or make it into a rug or a pattern somewhere. I have a big love and respect for art history so I try to incorporate it in my work as much as possible. 

I’m interested boundaries between what something is, what we know something is within context, and what we feel something is. If you isolate some of the objects in my paintings outside of it’s environment, you can still see what they are — like a rendered chair or a plant. However, you can take other objects out of their environment and it turns abstract, or its just looks like a pile of squeezed paint or something unknown. Then there are parts of the work that remain unknown in the context of the painting, but they are still acceptable as just being this ambiguous shape, or sculpture, or field of energy or a shadow. Inside or outside the painting, the object remains ambiguous. I like these interchangeable ideas of reference, context, abstract, and recognizable objects as a reflection on real life. Most simply put, the dialogue between illusion and reality is fascinating.             13058935 2919313                          A few questions with painter Shara Hughes "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(223) "A few questions with painter Shara Hughes"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Thursday March 10, 2011 10:14 am EST

  • Shara Hughes
  • "These Sweets are too Sweet"

It's difficult to live and work as an artist anywhere. Atlanta especially has its own particular set of pluses and minuses: The city’s a good place to live, but many artists here struggle to maintain their careers. Painter Shara Hughes, who went to high school at Lovett and graduated six years ago from the Rhode Island School of Design, is not...

| more...
array(78) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(50) "Collage two ways: Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-04-30T11:45:37+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-09T13:26:44+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2010-11-09T18:29:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(50) "Collage two ways: Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(6) "145835"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson_text"]=>
  string(7) "1306460"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2010-11-09T18:29:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(60) "Content:_:Collage two ways: Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(919) "
*Courtesy Sandler Hudson Gallery
*Mario Petrirena's "Eyes Wide Shut, 2010"
A hundred years ago, Pablo Picasso glued an image of chair caning onto one of his cubist oil paintings and collage was born. Actually, that might be oversimplifying it just a bit. The technique of collaging (the process of making new compositions from existing images cut and pasted together on a surface) has been around for centuries. But the origin of collage in its modern fine art sense is generally attributed to Picasso.

Artists Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy are currently showing collages at Sandler Hudson Gallery and Barbara Archer Gallery, respectively. For Imagining Memory, Petrirena, a longtime Atlanta artist, exhibits small black-and-white collages made from old photos in the gallery’s project space. Biddy, in his first solo show Out of Context, has taken over Archer’s gallery with colorful collages large and small."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(1112) "{img src="https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/mario-petrirenas-eyes-wide-shut-2010/u/original/2324557/1289326473-petrirena.jpg"}
*[http://clatl.com/atlanta/ImageArchives?by=1289548|Courtesy Sandler Hudson Gallery]
*Mario Petrirena's "Eyes Wide Shut, 2010"
A hundred years ago, Pablo Picasso glued an image of chair caning onto one of his cubist oil paintings and collage was born. Actually, that might be oversimplifying it just a bit. The technique of collaging (the process of making new compositions from existing images cut and pasted together on a surface) has been around for centuries. But the origin of collage in its modern fine art sense is generally attributed to Picasso.

Artists Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy are currently showing collages at Sandler Hudson Gallery and Barbara Archer Gallery, respectively. For ''Imagining Memory'', Petrirena, a longtime Atlanta artist, exhibits small black-and-white collages made from old photos in the gallery’s project space. Biddy, in his first solo show ''Out of Context'', has taken over Archer’s gallery with colorful collages large and small."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T20:29:56+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T20:29:56+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "654"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "654"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13056500"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(7) "2324541"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "C"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(7) "Collage"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item212933"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "212933"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(1160) "       2010-11-09T18:29:00+00:00 Collage two ways: Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy   Deanna Sirlin 1306460 2010-11-09T18:29:00+00:00  
*Courtesy Sandler Hudson Gallery
*Mario Petrirena's "Eyes Wide Shut, 2010"
A hundred years ago, Pablo Picasso glued an image of chair caning onto one of his cubist oil paintings and collage was born. Actually, that might be oversimplifying it just a bit. The technique of collaging (the process of making new compositions from existing images cut and pasted together on a surface) has been around for centuries. But the origin of collage in its modern fine art sense is generally attributed to Picasso.

Artists Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy are currently showing collages at Sandler Hudson Gallery and Barbara Archer Gallery, respectively. For Imagining Memory, Petrirena, a longtime Atlanta artist, exhibits small black-and-white collages made from old photos in the gallery’s project space. Biddy, in his first solo show Out of Context, has taken over Archer’s gallery with colorful collages large and small.             13056500 2324541                          Collage two ways: Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(232) "Collage two ways: Mario Petrirena and Daniel Biddy"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Tuesday November 9, 2010 01:29 pm EST

  • Courtesy Sandler Hudson Gallery
  • Mario Petrirena's "Eyes Wide Shut, 2010"

A hundred years ago, Pablo Picasso glued an image of chair caning onto one of his cubist oil paintings and collage was born. Actually, that might be oversimplifying it just a bit. The technique of collaging (the process of making new compositions from existing images cut and pasted together on a surface) has been around...

| more...
array(78) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(53) "Marcia Wood PULLs her artists in different directions"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-04-30T03:18:41+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-09T13:26:44+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2010-10-07T13:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(53) "Marcia Wood PULLs her artists in different directions"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(6) "145835"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson_text"]=>
  string(7) "1306460"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2010-10-07T13:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(63) "Content:_:Marcia Wood PULLs her artists in different directions"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(960) "
*Courtesy Marcia Wood Gallery
*"Arcadian Troubles" by Timothy McDowell


“Printmaking camp” is what artist Joanne Mattera called the experience on her blog. This past summer, Atlanta gallerist Marcia Wood invited six of her most seasoned painters she shows to participate in a weeklong printmaking workshop last June at Connecticut College under the guidance of master printer Timothy McDowell. Each created an intaglio print as part of a limited edition portfolio titled PULL, on view at the Marcia Wood Gallery through Nov. 6 along with paintings by the artists in the neighboring annex space.  

The project came out of a conversation between Wood and McDowell about how artists could remain viable in a recessionary economy. Wood pursued the idea because she came to see it “as an exciting project to do with artists that would be stimulating creatively and a way to open doors to new ideas and connections for the artists as well as the gallery.”"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(1101) "{img src="https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/arcadian-troubles-by-timothy-mcdowell/u/original/2185867/1286394367-mcdowell-web.jpg"}
*Courtesy Marcia Wood Gallery
*"Arcadian Troubles" by Timothy McDowell


“Printmaking camp” is what artist Joanne Mattera called the experience on her blog. This past summer, Atlanta gallerist Marcia Wood invited six of her most seasoned painters she shows to participate in a weeklong printmaking workshop last June at Connecticut College under the guidance of master printer Timothy McDowell. Each created an intaglio print as part of a limited edition portfolio titled ''PULL'', on view at the Marcia Wood Gallery through Nov. 6 along with paintings by the artists in the neighboring annex space.  

The project came out of a conversation between Wood and McDowell about how artists could remain viable in a recessionary economy. Wood pursued the idea because she came to see it “as an exciting project to do with artists that would be stimulating creatively and a way to open doors to new ideas and connections for the artists as well as the gallery.”"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T20:29:56+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T20:29:56+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "654"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "654"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13055688"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(7) "2185863"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "M"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(6) "Marcia"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item212709"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "212709"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(1207) "       2010-10-07T13:00:00+00:00 Marcia Wood PULLs her artists in different directions   Deanna Sirlin 1306460 2010-10-07T13:00:00+00:00  
*Courtesy Marcia Wood Gallery
*"Arcadian Troubles" by Timothy McDowell


“Printmaking camp” is what artist Joanne Mattera called the experience on her blog. This past summer, Atlanta gallerist Marcia Wood invited six of her most seasoned painters she shows to participate in a weeklong printmaking workshop last June at Connecticut College under the guidance of master printer Timothy McDowell. Each created an intaglio print as part of a limited edition portfolio titled PULL, on view at the Marcia Wood Gallery through Nov. 6 along with paintings by the artists in the neighboring annex space.  

The project came out of a conversation between Wood and McDowell about how artists could remain viable in a recessionary economy. Wood pursued the idea because she came to see it “as an exciting project to do with artists that would be stimulating creatively and a way to open doors to new ideas and connections for the artists as well as the gallery.”             13055688 2185863                          Marcia Wood PULLs her artists in different directions "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(235) "Marcia Wood PULLs her artists in different directions"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Thursday October 7, 2010 09:00 am EDT

  • Courtesy Marcia Wood Gallery
  • "Arcadian Troubles" by Timothy McDowell



“Printmaking camp” is what artist Joanne Mattera called the experience on her blog. This past summer, Atlanta gallerist Marcia Wood invited six of her most seasoned painters she shows to participate in a weeklong printmaking workshop last June at Connecticut College under the guidance of master printer Timothy McDowell....

| more...
array(80) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(44) "Artist Chakaia Booker treads the environment"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-06-16T00:21:03+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2017-12-29T19:21:41+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2010-08-16T19:30:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(44) "Artist Chakaia Booker treads the environment"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(6) "145835"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson_text"]=>
  string(7) "1306460"
  ["tracker_field_description"]=>
  string(79) "Discarded rubber works and photogravures examine the artist's process and place"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(79) "Discarded rubber works and photogravures examine the artist's process and place"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2010-08-16T19:30:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(54) "Content:_:Artist Chakaia Booker treads the environment"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(2800) "Sustain, Chakaia Booker's solo show at the ACA Gallery of SCAD, features the artist's trademark wall reliefs and freestanding sculptures, all made of recycled tires, alongside six new photogravures. The overall effect is of dramatic black-on-black compositions. It's only by looking closely at the sculptures that one realizes what they're made of. Booker's works are so complex, the cut rubber treads wrapped so intricately and made to seem so supple, they belie the difficulty of using this intractable material.

Three reliefs, "Natural Tendencies," "Justified," and "Sheltered Thoughts" resemble big knots or complicated bows and mark the wall like calligraphic strokes in ink. "Intimate Expressions" and "40th and 5th" are freestanding sculptures in which tire treads twist, curl and jut in shapes resembling large ceremonial masks or headdresses. Other sculptural works include "Like," which evokes a large, ornate picture frame, and the curvy ladder "Vacancy." The most recent sculpture is the large wall relief, "The Color of Hope," from 2010, the title of which likely refers to the election of President Obama. It swirls like a big party on the wall: Tires cut into streamers extrude from the work, which seem to explode from its center.

The most compelling pieces here are new works Booker made in Atlanta. Each summer, in honor of the National Black Arts Festival, SCAD invites an artist of color to come to the college and collaborate with students to create a newly commissioned work of art. The outcome of Booker's residency is a suite of six photogravures, a 19th-century printmaking technique combining elements of photography and engraving. The resulting prints look like archival photographs but with the wide variety of tones only a print from an etched plate can produce. Robert Brown, the chair of the printmaking department at SCAD and a master printer, worked with Booker and the students to create the series, Foundling Warrior Quest (II 21C), 1-6.

The prints show the artist inserted into a compelling implied narrative. Booker presents herself as a kind of warrior; her combat dress combines the artist's paint-stained cargo pants and work boots with a desert dweller's belted tunic, an elaborate cloth headdress, and a cross made of bones. She stands or strides regally and purposefully through a landfill, a tire in one hand and a plastic bag in the other, alone and invincible in her quest. Although these images are performative, they're not self-conscious. Booker avoids eye contact with the camera, attending only to the task at hand as she moves through the rubble.

The portraits poignantly express Booker's relationship to the environment. She has taken it upon herself to create beauty from the things others have cast off, and is inexhaustible in her mission. "
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(2812) "''S''''ustain'', Chakaia Booker's solo show at the ACA Gallery of SCAD, features the artist's trademark wall reliefs and freestanding sculptures, all made of recycled tires, alongside six new photogravures. The overall effect is of dramatic black-on-black compositions. It's only by looking closely at the sculptures that one realizes what they're made of. Booker's works are so complex, the cut rubber treads wrapped so intricately and made to seem so supple, they belie the difficulty of using this intractable material.

Three reliefs, "Natural Tendencies," "Justified," and "Sheltered Thoughts" resemble big knots or complicated bows and mark the wall like calligraphic strokes in ink. "Intimate Expressions" and "40th and 5th" are freestanding sculptures in which tire treads twist, curl and jut in shapes resembling large ceremonial masks or headdresses. Other sculptural works include "Like," which evokes a large, ornate picture frame, and the curvy ladder "Vacancy." The most recent sculpture is the large wall relief, "The Color of Hope," from 2010, the title of which likely refers to the election of President Obama. It swirls like a big party on the wall: Tires cut into streamers extrude from the work, which seem to explode from its center.

The most compelling pieces here are new works Booker made in Atlanta. Each summer, in honor of the National Black Arts Festival, SCAD invites an artist of color to come to the college and collaborate with students to create a newly commissioned work of art. The outcome of Booker's residency is a suite of six photogravures, a 19th-century printmaking technique combining elements of photography and engraving. The resulting prints look like archival photographs but with the wide variety of tones only a print from an etched plate can produce. Robert Brown, the chair of the printmaking department at SCAD and a master printer, worked with Booker and the students to create the series, ''Foundling Warrior Quest (II 21C), 1-6''.

The prints show the artist inserted into a compelling implied narrative. Booker presents herself as a kind of warrior; her combat dress combines the artist's paint-stained cargo pants and work boots with a desert dweller's belted tunic, an elaborate cloth headdress, and a cross made of bones. She stands or strides regally and purposefully through a landfill, a tire in one hand and a plastic bag in the other, alone and invincible in her quest. Although these images are performative, they're not self-conscious. Booker avoids eye contact with the camera, attending only to the task at hand as she moves through the rubble.

The portraits poignantly express Booker's relationship to the environment. She has taken it upon herself to create beauty from the things others have cast off, and is inexhaustible in her mission. "
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-24T22:09:25+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-24T22:09:25+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "631"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "631"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13054219"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(7) "1996366"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(581)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(244)
    [2]=>
    int(581)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(244)
    [1]=>
    int(581)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "A"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(6) "Artist"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item180160"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "180160"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(3108) "    Discarded rubber works and photogravures examine the artist's process and place   2010-08-16T19:30:00+00:00 Artist Chakaia Booker treads the environment   Deanna Sirlin 1306460 2010-08-16T19:30:00+00:00  Sustain, Chakaia Booker's solo show at the ACA Gallery of SCAD, features the artist's trademark wall reliefs and freestanding sculptures, all made of recycled tires, alongside six new photogravures. The overall effect is of dramatic black-on-black compositions. It's only by looking closely at the sculptures that one realizes what they're made of. Booker's works are so complex, the cut rubber treads wrapped so intricately and made to seem so supple, they belie the difficulty of using this intractable material.

Three reliefs, "Natural Tendencies," "Justified," and "Sheltered Thoughts" resemble big knots or complicated bows and mark the wall like calligraphic strokes in ink. "Intimate Expressions" and "40th and 5th" are freestanding sculptures in which tire treads twist, curl and jut in shapes resembling large ceremonial masks or headdresses. Other sculptural works include "Like," which evokes a large, ornate picture frame, and the curvy ladder "Vacancy." The most recent sculpture is the large wall relief, "The Color of Hope," from 2010, the title of which likely refers to the election of President Obama. It swirls like a big party on the wall: Tires cut into streamers extrude from the work, which seem to explode from its center.

The most compelling pieces here are new works Booker made in Atlanta. Each summer, in honor of the National Black Arts Festival, SCAD invites an artist of color to come to the college and collaborate with students to create a newly commissioned work of art. The outcome of Booker's residency is a suite of six photogravures, a 19th-century printmaking technique combining elements of photography and engraving. The resulting prints look like archival photographs but with the wide variety of tones only a print from an etched plate can produce. Robert Brown, the chair of the printmaking department at SCAD and a master printer, worked with Booker and the students to create the series, Foundling Warrior Quest (II 21C), 1-6.

The prints show the artist inserted into a compelling implied narrative. Booker presents herself as a kind of warrior; her combat dress combines the artist's paint-stained cargo pants and work boots with a desert dweller's belted tunic, an elaborate cloth headdress, and a cross made of bones. She stands or strides regally and purposefully through a landfill, a tire in one hand and a plastic bag in the other, alone and invincible in her quest. Although these images are performative, they're not self-conscious. Booker avoids eye contact with the camera, attending only to the task at hand as she moves through the rubble.

The portraits poignantly express Booker's relationship to the environment. She has taken it upon herself to create beauty from the things others have cast off, and is inexhaustible in her mission.              13054219 1996366                          Artist Chakaia Booker treads the environment "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(226) "Artist Chakaia Booker treads the environment"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(88) "Discarded rubber works and photogravures examine the artist's process and place"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(88) "Discarded rubber works and photogravures examine the artist's process and place"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Monday August 16, 2010 03:30 pm EDT
Discarded rubber works and photogravures examine the artist's process and place | more...
array(78) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(50) "Photographer Peter Sekaer finds a home at the High"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-24T22:11:17+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2017-12-29T19:21:41+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2010-07-15T19:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(50) "Photographer Peter Sekaer finds a home at the High"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Deanna Sirlin"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(6) "145835"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson_text"]=>
  string(7) "1306460"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2010-07-15T19:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(60) "Content:_:Photographer Peter Sekaer finds a home at the High"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(3260) "The High Museum's Signs of Life: Photographs by Peter Sekaer is the sleeper photographic exhibition of the summer. A contemporary of Walker Evans and a student of Berenice Abbott, Sekaer was well-known in the 1930s and '40s but slipped through the cracks after his death in 1950, only to be rediscovered in the last few decades. Under its outgoing curator of photography, Julian Cox, the High has amassed the largest and most significant collection of the artist's work in the United States.

Sekaer, represented in this exhibition by 75 vintage prints, traveled the country and produced a significant body of Depression-era photographs while working as a photographer for U.S. government agencies such as the Housing Authority and the Rural Electrification Administration. The images reflect his considerable compositional skills, the intense compassion he felt for his subjects, and his own quirky perspective.

Sekaer came to the U.S. from Denmark at age 17. He arrived after the First World War and owned a successful poster and silkscreen business — an interest that resurfaces in his later photographs, which often include screened and painted graphics on the sides of buildings. Sekaer's attraction to the graphic art that littered early 20th-century urban landscape gives his small prints a visual verve comparable to that of paintings by his contemporary Stuart Davis, who used advertisements in ways that anticipated pop art.

Sekaer's "Restaurant Window, South Carolina," like all of the works in the exhibition, is a black-and-white print no larger than a foot in any direction. The seemingly simple image plays with the juxtaposition of two- and three-dimensional elements: A cartoonish drawing of a steaming cup and saucer decorates a torn and tattered curtain, as does a floral-printed fish-shaped patch. A reflection of the city's architecture can be seen in the glass, adding yet another layer of visual texture.

"Bowling Green, Virginia," also a photo of a window, shows an ornate frame and a graphic advertising 5-cent ice cream cones. By focusing on the graphic, Sekaer transforms an everyday encounter into a subject worthy of artistic treatment — something Andy Warhol would later become famous for with his paintings of soup cans.

"Family Shelling Pecans, Austin, Texas"  represents its subjects with quiet respect. Despite their obvious poverty, the three generations of the family do not demand our sympathy. They are focused on the task at hand, which they approach matter-of-factly. Sekaer recorded the ages of the family's members and the amount of work they had to do to earn 30-36 cents a day cracking pecans. His notes reveal the artist's awareness of his subjects' situation, and, in a way, his photograph accords them the dignity denied them by their circumstances. 

Although the world Sekaer recorded is long gone, his photographs remain relevant to contemporary life. His interest in the images and texts found on urban walls resonates amid the current local excitement over graffiti and other forms of street and public art, while his portraits of the homeless and impoverished are especially haunting in the context of our own recessionary economy. The High Museum has done well to rescue this artist from obscurity."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(3264) "The High Museum's ''Signs of Life: Photographs by Peter Sekaer'' is the sleeper photographic exhibition of the summer. A contemporary of Walker Evans and a student of Berenice Abbott, Sekaer was well-known in the 1930s and '40s but slipped through the cracks after his death in 1950, only to be rediscovered in the last few decades. Under its outgoing curator of photography, Julian Cox, the High has amassed the largest and most significant collection of the artist's work in the United States.

Sekaer, represented in this exhibition by 75 vintage prints, traveled the country and produced a significant body of Depression-era photographs while working as a photographer for U.S. government agencies such as the Housing Authority and the Rural Electrification Administration. The images reflect his considerable compositional skills, the intense compassion he felt for his subjects, and his own quirky perspective.

Sekaer came to the U.S. from Denmark at age 17. He arrived after the First World War and owned a successful poster and silkscreen business — an interest that resurfaces in his later photographs, which often include screened and painted graphics on the sides of buildings. Sekaer's attraction to the graphic art that littered early 20th-century urban landscape gives his small prints a visual verve comparable to that of paintings by his contemporary Stuart Davis, who used advertisements in ways that anticipated pop art.

Sekaer's "Restaurant Window, South Carolina," like all of the works in the exhibition, is a black-and-white print no larger than a foot in any direction. The seemingly simple image plays with the juxtaposition of two- and three-dimensional elements: A cartoonish drawing of a steaming cup and saucer decorates a torn and tattered curtain, as does a floral-printed fish-shaped patch. A reflection of the city's architecture can be seen in the glass, adding yet another layer of visual texture.

"Bowling Green, Virginia," also a photo of a window, shows an ornate frame and a graphic advertising 5-cent ice cream cones. By focusing on the graphic, Sekaer transforms an everyday encounter into a subject worthy of artistic treatment — something Andy Warhol would later become famous for with his paintings of soup cans.

"Family Shelling Pecans, Austin, Texas"  represents its subjects with quiet respect. Despite their obvious poverty, the three generations of the family do not demand our sympathy. They are focused on the task at hand, which they approach matter-of-factly. Sekaer recorded the ages of the family's members and the amount of work they had to do to earn 30-36 cents a day cracking pecans. His notes reveal the artist's awareness of his subjects' situation, and, in a way, his photograph accords them the dignity denied them by their circumstances. 

Although the world Sekaer recorded is long gone, his photographs remain relevant to contemporary life. His interest in the images and texts found on urban walls resonates amid the current local excitement over graffiti and other forms of street and public art, while his portraits of the homeless and impoverished are especially haunting in the context of our own recessionary economy. The High Museum has done well to rescue this artist from obscurity."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-24T22:11:17+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-24T22:11:17+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "631"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "631"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13053271"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(7) "1718215"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(581)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(244)
    [2]=>
    int(581)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(244)
    [1]=>
    int(581)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "P"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(12) "Photographer"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item180158"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "180158"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(3501) "       2010-07-15T19:00:00+00:00 Photographer Peter Sekaer finds a home at the High   Deanna Sirlin 1306460 2010-07-15T19:00:00+00:00  The High Museum's Signs of Life: Photographs by Peter Sekaer is the sleeper photographic exhibition of the summer. A contemporary of Walker Evans and a student of Berenice Abbott, Sekaer was well-known in the 1930s and '40s but slipped through the cracks after his death in 1950, only to be rediscovered in the last few decades. Under its outgoing curator of photography, Julian Cox, the High has amassed the largest and most significant collection of the artist's work in the United States.

Sekaer, represented in this exhibition by 75 vintage prints, traveled the country and produced a significant body of Depression-era photographs while working as a photographer for U.S. government agencies such as the Housing Authority and the Rural Electrification Administration. The images reflect his considerable compositional skills, the intense compassion he felt for his subjects, and his own quirky perspective.

Sekaer came to the U.S. from Denmark at age 17. He arrived after the First World War and owned a successful poster and silkscreen business — an interest that resurfaces in his later photographs, which often include screened and painted graphics on the sides of buildings. Sekaer's attraction to the graphic art that littered early 20th-century urban landscape gives his small prints a visual verve comparable to that of paintings by his contemporary Stuart Davis, who used advertisements in ways that anticipated pop art.

Sekaer's "Restaurant Window, South Carolina," like all of the works in the exhibition, is a black-and-white print no larger than a foot in any direction. The seemingly simple image plays with the juxtaposition of two- and three-dimensional elements: A cartoonish drawing of a steaming cup and saucer decorates a torn and tattered curtain, as does a floral-printed fish-shaped patch. A reflection of the city's architecture can be seen in the glass, adding yet another layer of visual texture.

"Bowling Green, Virginia," also a photo of a window, shows an ornate frame and a graphic advertising 5-cent ice cream cones. By focusing on the graphic, Sekaer transforms an everyday encounter into a subject worthy of artistic treatment — something Andy Warhol would later become famous for with his paintings of soup cans.

"Family Shelling Pecans, Austin, Texas"  represents its subjects with quiet respect. Despite their obvious poverty, the three generations of the family do not demand our sympathy. They are focused on the task at hand, which they approach matter-of-factly. Sekaer recorded the ages of the family's members and the amount of work they had to do to earn 30-36 cents a day cracking pecans. His notes reveal the artist's awareness of his subjects' situation, and, in a way, his photograph accords them the dignity denied them by their circumstances. 

Although the world Sekaer recorded is long gone, his photographs remain relevant to contemporary life. His interest in the images and texts found on urban walls resonates amid the current local excitement over graffiti and other forms of street and public art, while his portraits of the homeless and impoverished are especially haunting in the context of our own recessionary economy. The High Museum has done well to rescue this artist from obscurity.             13053271 1718215                          Photographer Peter Sekaer finds a home at the High "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(232) "Photographer Peter Sekaer finds a home at the High"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Thursday July 15, 2010 03:00 pm EDT
The High Museum's Signs of Life: Photographs by Peter Sekaer is the sleeper photographic exhibition of the summer. A contemporary of Walker Evans and a student of Berenice Abbott, Sekaer was well-known in the 1930s and '40s but slipped through the cracks after his death in 1950, only to be rediscovered in the last few decades. Under its outgoing curator of photography, Julian Cox, the High has... | more...
Search for more by Deanna Sirlin

[Admin link: Jiha Moon's candy coated chaos]