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Food - The Turnip Truck brings the farm to the table

Atlanta's indie produce distributor bets on local

Let's just get this out of the way now: Yes, the Turnip Truck, Atlanta's go-to independent distributor of local, farm-fresh produce, does at times actually carry turnips. And no, owner Michael Schenck did not recently fall off of it.

After working in kitchens for most of his life, the 34-year-old Greensboro, N.C., native began sourcing and delivering local produce to top Atlanta restaurants nearly five years ago.

"Back then, you'd see the same farmers at the same places all the time," Schenck says, "I'd go the markets at 3 p.m. on a Saturday, and the farmers had been there since 6 a.m., sweating and tired. I thought, 'What if we could consolidate some of that energy?'"

At a time when Atlanta chefs were beginning to request more local product than ever before — far more than what was being offered by large distributors — Schenck also noticed that the way in which farmers got their products to restaurants was often a logistical nightmare. Farmers at big, conventional operations weren't keen on leaving their fields unattended to face Atlanta traffic one delivery at a time. That's when Schenck discovered his niche. He quickly set out to become the local guy's middleman, allowing farmers to focus on tending to their bounty and providing chefs with enough local produce to sustain Atlanta's burgeoning farm-to-table dining scene.

"I wanted to be a food service distributor that the chefs would be accustomed to. We keep the produce in stock. Whenever they need it, the chefs call us," Schenck says. "We tried to bring the standards and efficiencies of traditional food service distribution to the local side, but we wanted to offer products that the bigger guys can't touch."

These days, it's not unusual to see one of Schenck's three trucks parked outside the likes of Miller Union, Empire State South, Cakes & Ale, Rathbun's, Leon's Full Service, and many others. Local chefs say several have failed at what Schenck seems to do effortlessly — combining meaningful relationships in the kitchen and in the field with running an local-only produce delivery service in Atlanta. Playing at this level, Schenck's Turnip Truck is the only game in town.

"He's consistent," says Ryan Smith, Empire State South's executive chef. Smith orders anywhere from $800-$1,000 worth of produce from Turnip Truck — daily.

"Michael is a liaison and can seek out things that I specifically want grown for me, or grown in a certain way," Smith says. "He is really good at giving feedback to farmers, and finding new farms that aren't big enough to come to the city."

Schenck sources from certified organic or certified naturally grown farms in the area, along with a few that are working toward certification, such as Crystal Organics (Turnip Truck's largest vegetable supplier), Serenbe Farms, Love is Love Farm at Gaia Gardens, and Le Tre Lune in Douglasville. This time of year, Schenck's three trucks are loaded with veggies: baby carrots, radishes, and kale. He's got strawberries and chard. Some ramps and wild mushrooms, too.

"Nicolas Donck from Crystal Organics dropped off 50 cases this morning," Schenck says during our interview. "About 20 of those cases are already on their way out to chefs around town." Most conventional produce will linger for one to two weeks in coolers and on trucks before seeing a chef's hands. "Our method is fresher tastes better and helps retain nutrient content."

Farmers like Justin Dansby at Serenbe Farms trust Schenck. "It's hard to let your product go into another set of hands. Michael keeps Serenbe's name with it," Dansby says. He notes an unfortunately common practice called "green washing," where big distributors will buy a small quantity from a local farm, then mix it with conventional product and verbally brand it as the indie farmer's.

Schenck is committed to local food — not as an idea, but as a way of life. He, Dansby, and Smith all individually acknowledged how easy it is for commercial distributors to slap on the buzzword without anything to back it up. The Turnip Truck offers transparency and the opportunity to build relationships and support local businesses. Schenck has recently expanded deliveries from intown Atlanta to East Cobb, Roswell, and Athens. A partnership with Georgia Organics aimed at reaching school food service programs and establishing a retail CSA is also in the works.

For Schenck, it's all about taking back our food supply. "These are people that we actually know who are doing it the right way, growing in sustainable, organic methods," Schenck said. He's an advocate for more awareness and more accountability surrounding food. "I'm a father of three kids under the age of 4. To have a safe food supply, we literally need to know who is growing it and where it's coming from."



More By This Writer

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  string(7505) "{HTML()}At a recent food conference in Savannah, chef Deborah VanTrece had an all too familiar encounter. “A white male chef told me I didn’t belong there, and to go back to Atlanta,” she recalls. The incident was just the latest on an endless list of silent stares, overt comments, and outright dismissals that she’s experienced throughout her career as a black female chef. All convey the same myth: Women don’t belong in professional kitchens, and the opportunities available to marquee chefs belong mostly to white guys.

VanTrece’s experience is not unique. Personal chef and cookbook author Jennifer Hill Booker and mixologist Tiffanie Barriere recount similar instances throughout their careers. The three women connected after being jointly featured in an NBC News article that highlighted their participation at the Atlanta Food & Wine Festival in 2017 (and all three sit on the festival’s recently announced all-female advisory council for 2018). In the months that followed, mutual frustrations and a desire to move the needle led them to launch the collaborative dining series, Cast Iron Chronicles, late last year.

The series began with two local events over the past several months that challenged stereotypes about soul food and encouraged timely conversations about racial and gender inequality in professional kitchens and the food industry at large. It’s a big conversation — so big that the group is taking its act to the James Beard Foundation’s famed Beard House in New York City on Feb. 21, where they’ll conclude the three-part series. The dinner is a long-held dream come true.

Six courses with cocktail pairings are inspired by Southern tradition and bounty and the ensemble’s African-American heritage: think fried chicken liver with peach confiture on crostini, black pepper biscuits with pimento cheese spoonbread, catfish goujonnettes with buttermilk hominy grits and red-eye gravy, and oxtail rillettes with foie gras mousse, pickled Vidalia onions, and muscadine gelée. Barriere’s drinks include the Green-Eyed Bandit (freshly juiced collard greens, gin, and aloe liqueur), and with dessert, the apropos Black Girl Magic — an all-black cocktail featuring Cathead Hoodoo chicory liqueur, Cynar, and ruby port, marked with edible gold pieces.

Collectively, the three women boast more than 55 years in the industry. VanTrece is the owner and head chef at Twisted Soul Cookhouse and & Pours; Barriere is a freelance bartender known for her creative beverage development (Southern National in Mobile, Alabama; the launch of One Flew South’s bar program); Hill Booker has gained a reputation for her globally-minded takes on Southern cuisine, as detailed in her cookbook, ''Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent.'' That mastery will be on display for Beard House diners — the bar, as they say, is set high.

The James Beard Foundation represents the preeminent honor in American culinary arts; to host a dinner in the Greenwich Village dining room is to reach a pinnacle moment. For one, a chef doesn’t just book a Beard House event; she must be invited by a selection committee that considers noted chefs throughout the U.S. She receives this invitation only after review of her skill, reputation, and expertise, among other criteria. Current and former Atlanta-based chefs who’ve made the trek include Mihoko Obunai and Joseph Truex, Matthew Basford, Todd Richards, Drew Belline, Adam Evans, Jonathan Fox, Duane Nutter, and Todd Ginsberg.
 
On a recent phone call, VanTrece expressed gratitude. “It means the world,” she began, pausing to acknowledge that she was still deeply moved. For years, she recalls watching as contemporaries received invitations — often those peers were male. She began to wonder if such an honor was available to her as a black woman chef, an underrepresented group in fine dining. Hill Booker could relate. A Georgia Grown executive chef, she says she was devastated to not represent at the Beard House with the group in 2015. Their journey to the Beard House is meaningful not just because of the professional honor, but because they’re doing it together.

VanTrece, Hill Booker, and Barriere all wish to be judged by the quality of their offerings — they are in service to food, drink, and people. But achievements of this nature are important to observe because doing so recognizes that part of the culinary conversation has been sorely missing. That’s why Cast Iron Chronicles aims to “debunk myths about soul food,” Hill Booker says. “It’s not all cafeteria-style meat-and-threes, fried, and covered in gravy. We’re talking about a cuisine that was created by enslaved Africans, who incorporated their West African cooking traditions and those of their French, German, and Spanish owners.”

Hill Booker studied and cooked professionally in Germany and France in the late ’90s, and notes: “People don’t like to talk about where this food comes from, but we are cooking the food of our ancestors.” The need for this dialogue is crucial, the trio says, especially when women and people of color have to overcome unfairness in funding and investments for restaurants, gaps in competitive pay, poor recruitment efforts at festivals and conferences, lack of mentorship, and sometimes open hostility.

“It’s been interesting to see how ‘soul food’ was appropriated as ‘Southern food,’ where I look up and people are talking about an ‘elevated’ cuisine,” VanTrece says. It’s language that can be heard from restaurant cooking lines to “Top Chef''.” ''The underlying logic, whether intended or not, can convey that a bowl of chitterlings bears less culinary value than pâté en croûte. Cast Iron Chronicles provides a space to question what that assumption means, especially when black chefs are systematically left out of the conversation, despite having originated so much of the history.

It’s true that much of the soul food lexicon derived from people who didn’t have much — collard green potlikker and cornmeal, innovating with meat cuts rejected by white landowners. But what often gets dropped from the narrative is the cooking expertise that Africans brought with them and adapted throughout slavery, Reconstruction, the Jim Crow era, and the Great Migration — from plantation kitchens to segregated hotels and train cars, and so on. These were touted professionals before they were credited as such, and their skills weren’t confined to their jobs; they came home with them, too. Haricot verts in béchamel sauce were just as easily served at a black family’s Sunday dinner as the cook’s white employer’s soirée. Adrian Miller’s latest book, ''The President's Kitchen Cabinet: The Story of the African Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families, from the Washingtons to the Obamas'','' ''explores how this history showed up in the country’s highest office. This is all part of the soul food story.

Cast Iron Chronicles’ invitation to the Beard House is a hallmark that bestows the type of respect chefs want most — the kind they get from heroes and peers. “We’ve always been here,” Barriere says, both of crafting classic drinks and feeling some ownership of Southern food and hospitality. “To go to the Beard House like this, it means they see us for who we are.”{HTML} " ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=> string(25) "2018-02-05T01:02:45+00:00" ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=> string(25) "2018-02-05T14:59:48+00:00" ["tracker_field_photos"]=> string(4) "2499" ["tracker_field_contentPhotoCredit"]=> string(12) "Shelby Light" ["tracker_field_contentPhotoTitle"]=> string(165) "WOMEN ON TOP: The Cast Iron Chronicles team is made up of long-time industry professionals (from left) Jennifer Hill Booker, Deborah VanTrece, and Tiffanie Barriere." ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(3) "706" [1]=> string(3) "536" } ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=> string(7) "706 536" ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=> array(0) { } ["tracker_field_scene"]=> array(0) { } ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=> array(0) { } ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(0) "" } ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(0) "" } ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(0) "" } ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=> string(8) "20990356" ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=> int(0) ["tracker_field_section"]=> array(0) { } ["language"]=> string(7) "unknown" ["attachments"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(4) "2499" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["categories"]=> array(2) { [0]=> int(536) [1]=> int(706) } ["deep_categories"]=> array(4) { [0]=> int(242) [1]=> int(536) [2]=> int(245) [3]=> int(706) } ["categories_under_28"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_28"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_1"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_1"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_177"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_177"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_209"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_209"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_163"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_163"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_171"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_171"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_153"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_153"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_242"]=> array(1) { [0]=> int(536) } ["deep_categories_under_242"]=> array(3) { [0]=> int(536) [1]=> int(245) [2]=> int(706) } ["categories_under_564"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_564"]=> array(0) { } ["categories_under_1182"]=> array(0) { } ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=> array(0) { } ["freetags"]=> array(0) { } ["geo_located"]=> string(1) "n" ["allowed_groups"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(6) "Admins" [1]=> string(9) "Anonymous" } ["allowed_users"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com" } ["relations"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(26) "tiki.file.attach:file:2499" [1]=> string(60) "tiki.wiki.linkeditem.invert:wiki page:Content:_:Iron maidens" } ["relation_objects"]=> array(0) { } ["relation_types"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "tiki.file.attach" [1]=> string(27) "tiki.wiki.linkeditem.invert" } ["relation_count"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(18) "tiki.file.attach:1" [1]=> string(29) "tiki.wiki.linkeditem.invert:1" } ["title_initial"]=> string(1) "I" ["title_firstword"]=> string(4) "Iron" ["searchable"]=> string(1) "y" ["url"]=> string(10) "item270391" ["object_type"]=> string(11) "trackeritem" ["object_id"]=> string(6) "270391" ["contents"]=> string(651) " Cast Iron Chronicles 1 Photos By Shelby Light 1 .5a6b861aacce8 2018-02-05T02:21:59+00:00 Cast_Iron_Chronicles_1_Photos_by_Shelby_Light__1_.5a6b861aacce8.jpg Cast Iron Chronicles heads to the Beard House, challenging myths around soul food, gender, and race in the food industry 2499 2018-02-05T00:59:28+00:00 Iron maidens ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Osayi Endolyn 2018-02-05T00:59:28+00:00   Shelby Light WOMEN ON TOP: The Cast Iron Chronicles team is made up of long-time industry professionals (from left) Jennifer Hill Booker, Deborah VanTrece, and Tiffanie Barriere. 20990356 Iron maidens " ["score"]=> float(0) ["_index"]=> string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main" ["objectlink"]=> string(194) "Iron maidens" ["photos"]=> string(183) "Cast Iron Chronicles 1 Photos By Shelby Light 1 .5a6b861aacce8 " ["desc"]=> string(129) "Cast Iron Chronicles heads to the Beard House, challenging myths around soul food, gender, and race in the food industry" ["eventDate"]=> string(129) "Cast Iron Chronicles heads to the Beard House, challenging myths around soul food, gender, and race in the food industry" ["noads"]=> string(10) "y" }

Article

Sunday February 4, 2018 07:59 pm EST
Cast Iron Chronicles heads to the Beard House, challenging myths around soul food, gender, and race in the food industry | more...
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  string(40) "Food - Q&A with local farmer Bobby Britt"
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  string(59) "Talking 'slow food' and 'slow tech' with the Decatur native"
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  string(3690) "You and I might say "tomatoes." As in, the last syllable sounds like the toes on your feet. Farmer Bobby Britt says "tuh-mayt-as," as in, born and raised in the not-too-distant country nook of southeast Decatur. Since 2006, Britt has cultivated quite the professional garden on Besmaid Garden's 1.645 acres, supplying some of the city's best restaurants with a range of organic, fresh-picked produce throughout the year.

Even if you've never seen Britt's Moses-like towering frame at the farmers markets, or caught a glimpse while he makes his own restaurant deliveries, his green thumbprint can be found all over. His crops have graced the plates at Cakes & Ale, 246, 4th & Swift, Woodfire Grill, Haven, Valenza, Empire State South, Serpas, One Eared Stag, Holeman & Finch, Fig Jam, and our dearly departed Pura Vida. The man certainly has a way about him. But Britt isn't all that concerned with flash. He's got his knees in the dirt and his eyes on the future, hoping that the farm he inherited from his dad will sustain itself for the next generation.

Where did you get your green thumb?

Back in the '60s my father bought this property as a farm lot. He was just out of the Marine Corps and raising a family. He cleared the land all by axe, starting in the late '60s, early '70s, just doing it for the family. I picked it up in the early '80s.

When did you decide to become a professional farmer?

In 2006. I had been working in construction, home theater companies. My employer was about to lay everybody off. I remember he told me it wasn't a good time to buy a tractor.

That was bad advice.

Well, I got my first tractor — my only tractor so far — and the garden has grown leaps and bounds since then. I get to work with some nice restaurants. But the most important thing is that you have to grow it. You don't have it growing, the chef does not know your name.

Where did you start selling your produce?

I started my first market in Dunwoody at Spruill Center for the Arts. I just showed up one day with a basket full of okra. The lady was like, "You'll need a table and a tent." When I moved to the Decatur market, Billy Allin at Cakes & Ale was the first restaurant that bought from me.

What do you grow throughout the year?

I grow four seasons. I try to grow arugula year-round. I've got squash, zucchini, beans, okra, and tomatoes in the summer, and a lot of pimento. In the fall time, I start with kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, tatsoi. In the winter time, I continue with broccoli, cauliflower, and so on. In the spring, Swiss chard, spinach, beets, leeks. The sky's the limit. You just try to grow the most and the best.

Surely you've got some extra hands on deck now.

I have a helper who has been here for two seasons. I'm 53 and I've noticed how much slower I've gotten since I was 42. I'm trying to install the belief in young people and I want them to take it over. I need to expand if I can find the property, because there's a demand for fresh-picked — there's a world of difference between "fresh" and "fresh-picked." I've told chefs and restaurant owners, "I'm Bobby Britt, I'm a farmer, and my clean clothes have dirt on them!"

I have, in fact, seen you and your produce make some vivid appearances.

I go in there looking like Pig-Pen! But I just want to be the farmer. I want to grow stuff. I'm slow tech. I'm into slow food and slow tech.

Your family has had this farm for more than 30 years. Do you ever think about leaving a legacy?

My father passed at 87 years old in 2007. He told me to keep the garden growing. He said I was doing a good thing. I've just tried to develop this place to make it my field of dreams. "
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(3752) "You and I might say "tomatoes." As in, the last syllable sounds like the toes on your feet. Farmer Bobby Britt says "tuh-mayt-as," as in, born and raised in the not-too-distant country nook of southeast Decatur. Since 2006, Britt has cultivated quite the professional garden on [http://besmaidgarden.com/|Besmaid Garden]'s 1.645 acres, supplying some of the city's best restaurants with a range of organic, fresh-picked produce throughout the year.

Even if you've never seen Britt's Moses-like towering frame at the farmers markets, or caught a glimpse while he makes his own restaurant deliveries, his green thumbprint can be found all over. His crops have graced the plates at Cakes & Ale, 246, 4th & Swift, Woodfire Grill, Haven, Valenza, Empire State South, Serpas, One Eared Stag, Holeman & Finch, Fig Jam, and our dearly departed Pura Vida. The man certainly has a way about him. But Britt isn't all that concerned with flash. He's got his knees in the dirt and his eyes on the future, hoping that the farm he inherited from his dad will sustain itself for the next generation.

__Where did you get your green thumb?__

Back in the '60s my father bought this property as a farm lot. He was just out of the Marine Corps and raising a family. He cleared the land all by axe, starting in the late '60s, early '70s, just doing it for the family. I picked it up in the early '80s.

__When did you decide to become a professional farmer?__

In 2006. I had been working in construction, home theater companies. My employer was about to lay everybody off. I remember he told me it wasn't a good time to buy a tractor.

__That was bad advice.__

Well, I got my first tractor — my only tractor so far — and the garden has grown leaps and bounds since then. I get to work with some nice restaurants. But the most important thing is that you have to grow it. You don't have it growing, the chef does not know your name.

__Where did you start selling your produce?__

I started my first market in Dunwoody at Spruill [Center for the Arts]. I just showed up one day with a basket full of okra. The lady was like, "You'll need a table and a tent." When I moved to the Decatur market, Billy Allin at Cakes & Ale was the first restaurant that bought from me.

__What do you grow throughout the year?__

I grow four seasons. I try to grow arugula year-round. I've got squash, zucchini, beans, okra, and tomatoes in the summer, and a lot of pimento. In the fall time, I start with kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, tatsoi. In the winter time, I continue with broccoli, cauliflower, and so on. In the spring, Swiss chard, spinach, beets, leeks. The sky's the limit. You just try to grow the most and the best.

__Surely you've got some extra hands on deck now.__

I have a helper who has been here for two seasons. I'm 53 and I've noticed how much slower I've gotten since I was 42. I'm trying to install the belief in young people and I want them to take it over. I need to expand if I can find the property, because there's a demand for fresh-picked — there's a world of difference between "fresh" and "fresh-picked." I've told chefs and restaurant owners, "I'm Bobby Britt, I'm a farmer, and my clean clothes have dirt on them!"

__I have, in fact, seen you and your produce make some vivid appearances.__

I go in there looking like Pig-Pen! But I just want to be the farmer. I want to grow stuff. I'm slow tech. I'm into slow food and slow tech.

__Your family has had this farm for more than 30 years. Do you ever think about leaving a legacy?__

My father passed at 87 years old in 2007. He told me to keep the garden growing. He said I was doing a good thing. I've just tried to develop this place to make it my field of dreams. "
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  string(3970) "    Talking 'slow food' and 'slow tech' with the Decatur native   2013-03-13T08:00:00+00:00 Food - Q&A with local farmer Bobby Britt   Osayi Endolyn 7771190 2013-03-13T08:00:00+00:00  You and I might say "tomatoes." As in, the last syllable sounds like the toes on your feet. Farmer Bobby Britt says "tuh-mayt-as," as in, born and raised in the not-too-distant country nook of southeast Decatur. Since 2006, Britt has cultivated quite the professional garden on Besmaid Garden's 1.645 acres, supplying some of the city's best restaurants with a range of organic, fresh-picked produce throughout the year.

Even if you've never seen Britt's Moses-like towering frame at the farmers markets, or caught a glimpse while he makes his own restaurant deliveries, his green thumbprint can be found all over. His crops have graced the plates at Cakes & Ale, 246, 4th & Swift, Woodfire Grill, Haven, Valenza, Empire State South, Serpas, One Eared Stag, Holeman & Finch, Fig Jam, and our dearly departed Pura Vida. The man certainly has a way about him. But Britt isn't all that concerned with flash. He's got his knees in the dirt and his eyes on the future, hoping that the farm he inherited from his dad will sustain itself for the next generation.

Where did you get your green thumb?

Back in the '60s my father bought this property as a farm lot. He was just out of the Marine Corps and raising a family. He cleared the land all by axe, starting in the late '60s, early '70s, just doing it for the family. I picked it up in the early '80s.

When did you decide to become a professional farmer?

In 2006. I had been working in construction, home theater companies. My employer was about to lay everybody off. I remember he told me it wasn't a good time to buy a tractor.

That was bad advice.

Well, I got my first tractor — my only tractor so far — and the garden has grown leaps and bounds since then. I get to work with some nice restaurants. But the most important thing is that you have to grow it. You don't have it growing, the chef does not know your name.

Where did you start selling your produce?

I started my first market in Dunwoody at Spruill Center for the Arts. I just showed up one day with a basket full of okra. The lady was like, "You'll need a table and a tent." When I moved to the Decatur market, Billy Allin at Cakes & Ale was the first restaurant that bought from me.

What do you grow throughout the year?

I grow four seasons. I try to grow arugula year-round. I've got squash, zucchini, beans, okra, and tomatoes in the summer, and a lot of pimento. In the fall time, I start with kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, tatsoi. In the winter time, I continue with broccoli, cauliflower, and so on. In the spring, Swiss chard, spinach, beets, leeks. The sky's the limit. You just try to grow the most and the best.

Surely you've got some extra hands on deck now.

I have a helper who has been here for two seasons. I'm 53 and I've noticed how much slower I've gotten since I was 42. I'm trying to install the belief in young people and I want them to take it over. I need to expand if I can find the property, because there's a demand for fresh-picked — there's a world of difference between "fresh" and "fresh-picked." I've told chefs and restaurant owners, "I'm Bobby Britt, I'm a farmer, and my clean clothes have dirt on them!"

I have, in fact, seen you and your produce make some vivid appearances.

I go in there looking like Pig-Pen! But I just want to be the farmer. I want to grow stuff. I'm slow tech. I'm into slow food and slow tech.

Your family has had this farm for more than 30 years. Do you ever think about leaving a legacy?

My father passed at 87 years old in 2007. He told me to keep the garden growing. He said I was doing a good thing. I've just tried to develop this place to make it my field of dreams.              13072779 7771192                          Food - Q&A with local farmer Bobby Britt "
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Article

Wednesday March 13, 2013 04:00 am EDT
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