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Speakeasy with Marshall Chiles

Image Few people will ever understand the world of stand-up comedy like Marshall Chiles. Arguably the most consistent and influential presence in the Atlanta comedy scene for the last decade, Chiles is not only a comedian, he also fosters a burgeoning local scene by booking, managing and owning two prominent Atlanta clubs, the Funny Farm and Laughing Skull Lounge. This weekend, the man of many hats sat down with CL to talk about the industry, and why he is headlining the Funny Farm from May 13-15.

When and where did you start doing stand-up?
I started in Athens, GA around January 2001.

Is it harder to do stand-up, or run a comedy club?
Hmmm... I would say being a comedian is harder than being a club owner, but ask me tomorrow and I will probably change my mind.

How has running a comedy club affected you as a comedian, for better and/or worse?
Well, I think it has helped me grow as a comedian because I know I can say and do whatever I want and still be on the next show. So many comedians have to worry about impressing the owner/booker in order to get more stage time. I have always encouraged comedians to use my stage to grow just like I do... you don't have to kill, you just have to be an artist.

How do you decide when it’s time to book yourself for a weekend? How do you fight off the urge to give yourself endless amounts of stage-time?
I usually do the "Marshall Chiles and Friends" around weekends where we expect to be slow. I use lots of locals and don't have to bring in a headliner, etc. But to headline the whole show myself, I usually wait until we have a last minute drop out so I can just do that weekend.

Who is the one comedian, dead or alive, that would be a dream booking for your club?
Without question, Lenny Bruce

Is your priority your own career, or helping find young talent and developing young comedians? Is it difficult to manage the two separate responsibilities?
These days, I would rather support and nurture the local scene. I am married with two young kids- yes that gives me lots of material, but it also means I do not do the road as much as I used to. So I would rather help the guy who is doing new stuff, working tons, and trying to make it.

What got you into stand-up, both performing and owning clubs?
I always wanted to do stand up since I was 7 years old because I knew how to make people laugh in order to a) be accepted, and b) not get my ass kicked. I finally got the balls at age 30 after a failed dot com... after doing the road for a few years, I got the opportunity to manage The Funny Farm, then bought it. By then, I already knew the road was a very tough life.

How much of the business side of comedy do comedians and audiences know nothing about?
They know only about 2% of what it takes to really make a club. They know you book and promote, but those two responsibilities have 1,000 pieces go into them.

If you had any words of wisdom for a young person about to pursue a career in comedy?
Learn internet marketing- you can do it from any hotel in the world.



More By This Writer

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  string(2877) "The Boston Comedy Festival is one of the biggest comedy festivals in the country, and this year an Atlanta comic won the whole thing. Landry, who was also named Atlanta’s Best Comic at last year’s Atlanta Stands Up Awards, took top prize as the prestigious competition, and recently spoke with CL about the experience and what he hopes to come out of the win.

Tell me about the festival and the win?
It was just crazy man. I did the World Series of Comedy back in September and finished in 2nd place there, so I had good momentum going into Boston. I really felt like I had a good enough set to win the World Series of Comedy and just came up a little short, so I just got really motivated and started writing new material. Most of the material I did at the boston Comedy Festival was new stuff that I had just been doing for about a month. My goal was just to make the finals, but obviously winning the whole thing was amazing.https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/landry-on-stage-at-the-boston-comedy-festi/u/original/4275384/1321547429-landry_2.jpg
*http://clatl.com/atlanta/ImageArchives?by=1223504
*Landry on stage at the Boston Comedy Festival


How many rounds were there, and how long of a set did you get to perform in each round?
There were three rounds. The first round we got five minutes, then for the semi-finals everyone got to do eight minutes, and then for the finals it went back down to five minutes a piece.

How many festivals and competitions do you try to do a year?
Well this year I’ve done three - the World Series of Comedy, the Asheville Comedy Festival and now the Boston Comedy Festival.

What did you win, and what are you hoping will come out of this as a result?
Well there was $10,000 in prize money that the finalists split, and I’m getting a lot of work out of it. I got 21 weeks of work out of the World Series of Comedy, and the festivals always help you get work, but I’m basically just going to take this credit, now that I finally have a credit, and try to move on to my next goal, which is the Montreal Just For Laughs Festival.

Who did you meet at the Boston Comedy Festival that you were excited about meeting?
Oh man, Bill Burr! He’s my favorite comic. Like, he’s the one that made me want to do this comedy, and he was getting an award for Comedian of the Year the same night that I won the festival, so for me that was like, ‘whoa.’

What are your next immediate plans?
I’m actually flying up to Canada for two weeks to do some weekends at this comedy chain up there called Yuk Yuk’s.

Where do you like to perform when you’re back in Atlanta?
Well I’m out of town at least two weeks of every month, but the Punchline is definitely my home club. I’m the type of comedian that, I’ll do any room in the city, but the Punchline is definitely where I got the stage time that got me to where I am now."
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  string(3294) "{img src="https://media1.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/atlanta-comic-scores-big-win-at-national-f/u/original/4275382/1321547348-landry.jpg"}The Boston Comedy Festival is one of the biggest comedy festivals in the country, and this year an Atlanta comic won the whole thing. __[http://clatl.com/culturesurfing/archives/2010/11/23/atl-comic-profile-landry|Landry]__, who was also named Atlanta’s Best Comic at last year’s Atlanta Stands Up Awards, took top prize as the prestigious competition, and recently spoke with CL about the experience and what he hopes to come out of the win.

__Tell me about the festival and the win?__
It was just crazy man. I did the World Series of Comedy back in September and finished in 2nd place there, so I had good momentum going into Boston. I really felt like I had a good enough set to win the World Series of Comedy and just came up a little short, so I just got really motivated and started writing new material. Most of the material I did at the boston Comedy Festival was new stuff that I had just been doing for about a month. My goal was just to make the finals, but obviously winning the whole thing was amazing.[https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/landry-on-stage-at-the-boston-comedy-festi/u/original/4275384/1321547429-landry_2.jpg|{img src="https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/landry-on-stage-at-the-boston-comedy-festi/u/original/4275384/1321547429-landry_2.jpg"}]
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*Landry on stage at the Boston Comedy Festival


__How many rounds were there, and how long of a set did you get to perform in each round?__
There were three rounds. The first round we got five minutes, then for the semi-finals everyone got to do eight minutes, and then for the finals it went back down to five minutes a piece.

__How many festivals and competitions do you try to do a year?__
Well this year I’ve done three - the World Series of Comedy, the Asheville Comedy Festival and now the Boston Comedy Festival.

__What did you win, and what are you hoping will come out of this as a result?__
Well there was $10,000 in prize money that the finalists split, and I’m getting a lot of work out of it. I got 21 weeks of work out of the World Series of Comedy, and the festivals always help you get work, but I’m basically just going to take this credit, now that I finally have a credit, and try to move on to my next goal, which is the Montreal Just For Laughs Festival.

__Who did you meet at the Boston Comedy Festival that you were excited about meeting?__
Oh man, Bill Burr! He’s my favorite comic. Like, he’s the one that made me want to do this [comedy], and he was getting an award for Comedian of the Year the same night that I won the festival, so for me that was like, ‘whoa.’

__What are your next immediate plans?__
I’m actually flying up to Canada for two weeks to do some weekends at this comedy chain up there called Yuk Yuk’s.

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Well I’m out of town at least two weeks of every month, but the [http://punchline.com/|Punchline] is definitely my home club. I’m the type of comedian that, I’ll do any room in the city, but the Punchline is definitely where I got the stage time that got me to where I am now."
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Tell me about the festival and the win?
It was just crazy man. I did the World Series of Comedy back in September and finished in 2nd place there, so I had good momentum going into Boston. I really felt like I had a good enough set to win the World Series of Comedy and just came up a little short, so I just got really motivated and started writing new material. Most of the material I did at the boston Comedy Festival was new stuff that I had just been doing for about a month. My goal was just to make the finals, but obviously winning the whole thing was amazing.https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/landry-on-stage-at-the-boston-comedy-festi/u/original/4275384/1321547429-landry_2.jpg
*http://clatl.com/atlanta/ImageArchives?by=1223504
*Landry on stage at the Boston Comedy Festival


How many rounds were there, and how long of a set did you get to perform in each round?
There were three rounds. The first round we got five minutes, then for the semi-finals everyone got to do eight minutes, and then for the finals it went back down to five minutes a piece.

How many festivals and competitions do you try to do a year?
Well this year I’ve done three - the World Series of Comedy, the Asheville Comedy Festival and now the Boston Comedy Festival.

What did you win, and what are you hoping will come out of this as a result?
Well there was $10,000 in prize money that the finalists split, and I’m getting a lot of work out of it. I got 21 weeks of work out of the World Series of Comedy, and the festivals always help you get work, but I’m basically just going to take this credit, now that I finally have a credit, and try to move on to my next goal, which is the Montreal Just For Laughs Festival.

Who did you meet at the Boston Comedy Festival that you were excited about meeting?
Oh man, Bill Burr! He’s my favorite comic. Like, he’s the one that made me want to do this comedy, and he was getting an award for Comedian of the Year the same night that I won the festival, so for me that was like, ‘whoa.’

What are your next immediate plans?
I’m actually flying up to Canada for two weeks to do some weekends at this comedy chain up there called Yuk Yuk’s.

Where do you like to perform when you’re back in Atlanta?
Well I’m out of town at least two weeks of every month, but the Punchline is definitely my home club. I’m the type of comedian that, I’ll do any room in the city, but the Punchline is definitely where I got the stage time that got me to where I am now.             13064386 4275377                          Atlanta Comic Scores Big Win at National Festival "
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Article

Thursday November 17, 2011 11:32 am EST

The Boston Comedy Festival is one of the biggest comedy festivals in the country, and this year an Atlanta comic won the whole thing. Landry, who was also named Atlanta’s Best Comic at last year’s Atlanta Stands Up Awards, took top prize as the prestigious competition, and recently spoke with CL about the experience and what he hopes to come out of the win.

Tell me about the festival and the...

| more...
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This will be the third time in a little more than a year that you’re performing at Atlanta’s Relapse Theatre. What is it about the venue that keeps bringing you back there?
Well this whole tour was actually inspired by those first two shows at the Relapse, both of those shows having been about 90% improv. I really only get to do shows like that every so often. Those shows made me want to put together a tour after the album, where I can do material from the album, but also be free to just do improv.

So is the tour more to promote your album, or to be free to improvise?
It’s a mix of both. Originally I just wanted to improvise every single show start to finish, but it’s going to depend on the environment. I would like to use this tour to get out of my comfort zone though.

How do you know when it’s going to be an improv show versus a more standard show?
It definitely has to do with the set-up of the room. The first time I did Relapse the room was so fun, and it just felt very comfortable. There was no stage, the crowd was just there. The second time I did it there was a stage and it affected me because it didn’t feel like a living room performance, but I’m trying to get better about not letting the room or crowd control me.

Is not knowing what you’re going to do always fun for you, or is it occasionally to nerve-racking to enjoy?
I would say the majority of the shows I do I enjoy. That’s not always the audience having fun necessarily, but I have a great time the majority of the time.

Was improv an expansion of your stand-up or something you did altogether separately?
When I started doing stand-up in D.C., I was taking improv classes. So anytime I didn’t have improv, I was at open mics just trying to get on stage. I was doing improv before I even got stage time for stand-up, so by the time I got to do stand-up I already had started to develop improv skills, so it just became a part of my style. It helps though, I’ve definitely gotten myself out of shitty situations on stage because of improv.

Since this is your first album, is it a cumulation of your best jokes from over the years, or just the best hour of material you’re doing right now?
That was a big debate I had with myself, but most of the album is just the stuff I’m doing right now. But I definitely think the album is reflective of what I do, so there are some moments that are super slow that sort of make me cringe, but that’s sort of where I’m at right now professionally. There are still moments in my act that I’m working out. There are sounds of clinked glass and tables clearing in the background, and I felt dishonest not leaving those in there because that’s where I’m at right now in my career, and those are still the venues that I do most of the time. There are some older jokes on the album though, because the only way you can move away from material is to just kind of stop doing it, and I felt like the jokes that I want to move away from, it would be nice to have some of these recorded before I just throw them away and stop doing; and it kind of feels good to use them as a benchmark, knowing this is where I was, and I have something new to work towards now that the album is done.

The show beings at 8 p.m., tickets are $10."
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  string(3842) "{img src="https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/speakeasy-with-rory-scovel/u/original/4251302/1321033995-med255.jpg"}__Rory Scovel__ is one of comedy's rapidly rising stars, and arguably the most original act currently working the circuit. While he’s a gifted joke writer and story teller, it’s his other-worldly improv skills that makes each of his truly unique performances stand out in the world of stand-up. On __Saturday, Nov. 12__, Scovel is bringing his ''Dilated Imagination Tour'' to Atlanta’s __Relapse Theatre__.

__This will be the third time in a little more than a year that you’re performing at Atlanta’s Relapse Theatre. What is it about the venue that keeps bringing you back there?__
Well this whole tour was actually inspired by those first two shows at the Relapse, both of those shows having been about 90% improv. I really only get to do shows like that every so often. Those shows made me want to put together a tour after the album, where I can do material from the album, but also be free to just do improv.

__So is the tour more to promote your album, or to be free to improvise?__
It’s a mix of both. Originally I just wanted to improvise every single show start to finish, but it’s going to depend on the environment. I would like to use this tour to get out of my comfort zone though.

__How do you know when it’s going to be an improv show versus a more standard show?__
It definitely has to do with the set-up of the room. The first time I did Relapse the room was so fun, and it just felt very comfortable. There was no stage, the crowd was just there. The second time I did it there was a stage and it affected me because it didn’t feel like a living room performance, but I’m trying to get better about not letting the room or crowd control me.

__Is not knowing what you’re going to do always fun for you, or is it occasionally to nerve-racking to enjoy?__
I would say the majority of the shows I do I enjoy. That’s not always the audience having fun necessarily, but I have a great time the majority of the time.

__Was improv an expansion of your stand-up or something you did altogether separately?__
When I started doing stand-up in D.C., I was taking improv classes. So anytime I didn’t have improv, I was at open mics just trying to get on stage. I was doing improv before I even got stage time for stand-up, so by the time I got to do stand-up I already had started to develop improv skills, so it just became a part of my style. It helps though, I’ve definitely gotten myself out of shitty situations on stage because of improv.

__Since this is your first album, is it a cumulation of your best jokes from over the years, or just the best hour of material you’re doing right now?__
That was a big debate I had with myself, but most of the album is just the stuff I’m doing right now. But I definitely think the album is reflective of what I do, so there are some moments that are super slow that sort of make me cringe, but that’s sort of where I’m at right now professionally. There are still moments in my act that I’m working out. There are sounds of clinked glass and tables clearing in the background, and I felt dishonest not leaving those in there because that’s where I’m at right now in my career, and those are still the venues that I do most of the time. There are some older jokes on the album though, because the only way you can move away from material is to just kind of stop doing it, and I felt like the jokes that I want to move away from, it would be nice to have some of these recorded before I just throw them away and stop doing; and it kind of feels good to use them as a benchmark, knowing this is where I was, and I have something new to work towards now that the album is done.

''The show beings at 8 p.m., tickets are $10.''"
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This will be the third time in a little more than a year that you’re performing at Atlanta’s Relapse Theatre. What is it about the venue that keeps bringing you back there?
Well this whole tour was actually inspired by those first two shows at the Relapse, both of those shows having been about 90% improv. I really only get to do shows like that every so often. Those shows made me want to put together a tour after the album, where I can do material from the album, but also be free to just do improv.

So is the tour more to promote your album, or to be free to improvise?
It’s a mix of both. Originally I just wanted to improvise every single show start to finish, but it’s going to depend on the environment. I would like to use this tour to get out of my comfort zone though.

How do you know when it’s going to be an improv show versus a more standard show?
It definitely has to do with the set-up of the room. The first time I did Relapse the room was so fun, and it just felt very comfortable. There was no stage, the crowd was just there. The second time I did it there was a stage and it affected me because it didn’t feel like a living room performance, but I’m trying to get better about not letting the room or crowd control me.

Is not knowing what you’re going to do always fun for you, or is it occasionally to nerve-racking to enjoy?
I would say the majority of the shows I do I enjoy. That’s not always the audience having fun necessarily, but I have a great time the majority of the time.

Was improv an expansion of your stand-up or something you did altogether separately?
When I started doing stand-up in D.C., I was taking improv classes. So anytime I didn’t have improv, I was at open mics just trying to get on stage. I was doing improv before I even got stage time for stand-up, so by the time I got to do stand-up I already had started to develop improv skills, so it just became a part of my style. It helps though, I’ve definitely gotten myself out of shitty situations on stage because of improv.

Since this is your first album, is it a cumulation of your best jokes from over the years, or just the best hour of material you’re doing right now?
That was a big debate I had with myself, but most of the album is just the stuff I’m doing right now. But I definitely think the album is reflective of what I do, so there are some moments that are super slow that sort of make me cringe, but that’s sort of where I’m at right now professionally. There are still moments in my act that I’m working out. There are sounds of clinked glass and tables clearing in the background, and I felt dishonest not leaving those in there because that’s where I’m at right now in my career, and those are still the venues that I do most of the time. There are some older jokes on the album though, because the only way you can move away from material is to just kind of stop doing it, and I felt like the jokes that I want to move away from, it would be nice to have some of these recorded before I just throw them away and stop doing; and it kind of feels good to use them as a benchmark, knowing this is where I was, and I have something new to work towards now that the album is done.

The show beings at 8 p.m., tickets are $10.             13064263 4251295                          Speakeasy with Rory Scovel "
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Article

Friday November 11, 2011 12:55 pm EST

Rory Scovel is one of comedy's rapidly rising stars, and arguably the most original act currently working the circuit. While he’s a gifted joke writer and story teller, it’s his other-worldly improv skills that makes each of his truly unique performances stand out in the world of stand-up. On Saturday, Nov. 12, Scovel is bringing his Dilated Imagination Tour to Atlanta’s Relapse Theatre.

This...

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I don’t get a rush anymore. The rush is a double edged-sword; it has a good side and a bad side. It’s a lot like a relationship you know, in the beginning you’re having all those feelings, and there’s extreme highs and lows, but then you get to a point where you just settle in. You don’t live and die by every performance, you just know you’re supposed to go in and do a good job. So now I’m not ringing my hands with worry hours before a show, or flying home so happy saying I killed it. I can remember being more nervous auditioning for Party Pals to get paid $60 to dress up like a clown then I am now stepping on stage in front of 2,000 people."
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__You’ve been on hit television shows, written a best-selling book, currently host the most downloaded podcast on the internet, "The Adam Carolla Show," and run ACE Broadcasting. Why are you still touring the country doing stand-up?__
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Wednesday September 28, 2011 01:13 pm EDT

Adam Carolla has made quite a career for himself in stand-up, radio, and television, as the comedic voice of the working man. This Friday he will be bringing his intelligent, unfiltered mix of observations, rants and story-telling to the Tabernacle.


You’ve been on hit television shows, written a best-selling book, currently host the most downloaded podcast on the internet, "The Adam Carolla...

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  string(3591) "Kyle Kinane is an unmotivated, self-aware misanthrope. He's also one of the best comedians on the planet. CL recently spoke with Kinane, who will be headlining Comedy Gold at the Buckhead Theatre on Saturday, May 7, about his start in comedy, his career trajectory, and why he should be nicer to audiences.

You're performing at the Buckhead Theatre on May 7, but you also did the Star Bar last Monday. Do you still do small local rooms and dive-bar comedy nights frequently?
Well, the only reason I got to this point is because of rooms like that. Any bigger opportunity that comes along is exciting, but those kinda rooms and dive bars are how I started out and they're still the most fun for me.

Is it to practice just commanding the stage under difficult, distracting circumstances- like at a loud bar with a less attentive audience, some of whom might not have even been there for a comedy show?
I actually think it’s harder to command a stage at a comedy club when people walk in just thinking it's for everyone, no matter who the comedian or crowd is, just because they're at a comedy club. Like, people don't do that with music. They don't go to a concert not knowing who they're going to see or what type of music it is, and assume that because it's music, they'll like it; they do their research and know who they're going to see. But sometimes at the comedy clubs, you get people who just decided they want to go out and laugh, and think that any comedian should be funny for them.

When and where did you start doing stand-up?
I started out in Chicago. I was there from '99-'03, then I moved out to LA.

Did you get called out to LA with projects lined up, or did you just decide to move out there and go for it?
I just jumped off the plank. I didn't have any real reason or plan, I was just like, 'I can either go to LA instead of working the road from Chicago, or... eehhhh, I’ll try it out.'

So when you got out to LA how quickly did things happen for you? You've had a great last few years, and you're really gaining a lot of passionate fans and getting good work, but was it a grind at first in LA, or did the move make everything happen that much quicker?
Well when I got there, it's not like I was making any money or just getting awesome shows, but I knew I was becoming a better comedian and getting good feedback. As long as I’m getting positive reinforcement I’ll keep doing what I’m doing, I had no problem playing the slow game.

So much of your comedy is from a cynical, careless slacker's perspective. As your success grows, and you naturally become happier and busier and more ambitious, are you worried that that's going to change your act, or persona?
I think it’s one of those, “as long as you’re being who you are on stage” kind of things. You change as a human being, you know. I don’t have a shitty day job anymore, so I don't go on stage bitching about my job, but that's not to say I've changed as a comedian. Stand-up one of the true things that I honestly care about. It’s one of those things I would do for free, I basically did it for free, or next to nothing, for ten years. So to me it's about the process and just using stand-up to talk about whatever is going on in my life or what I'm thinking about.

What's one thing you're still working on, or trying to improve as a comedian?
I think I could be a little more amicable towards the audience. I get really bristle with the audience quickly. I shouldn't be mean to the hecklers off the bat, but I just hate walking into a place and feeling like I need to be a baby-sitter."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
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__You're performing at the Buckhead Theatre on May 7, but you also did the Star Bar last Monday. Do you still do small local rooms and dive-bar comedy nights frequently?__
Well, the only reason I got to this point is because of rooms like that. Any bigger opportunity that comes along is exciting, but those kinda rooms and dive bars are how I started out and they're still the most fun for me.

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__When and where did you start doing stand-up?__
I started out in Chicago. I was there from '99-'03, then I moved out to LA.

__Did you get called out to LA with projects lined up, or did you just decide to move out there and go for it?__
I just jumped off the plank. I didn't have any real reason or plan, I was just like, 'I can either go to LA instead of working the road from Chicago, or... eehhhh, I’ll try it out.'

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Well when I got there, it's not like I was making any money or just getting awesome shows, but I knew I was becoming a better comedian and getting good feedback. As long as I’m getting positive reinforcement I’ll keep doing what I’m doing, I had no problem playing the slow game.

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__What's one thing you're still working on, or trying to improve as a comedian?__
I think I could be a little more amicable towards the audience. I get really bristle with the audience quickly. I shouldn't be mean to the hecklers off the bat, but I just hate walking into a place and feeling like I need to be a baby-sitter."
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  string(3788) "       2011-05-05T17:31:00+00:00 Speakeasy with Kyle Kinane   Noah Gardenswartz 1306445 2011-05-05T17:31:00+00:00  Kyle Kinane is an unmotivated, self-aware misanthrope. He's also one of the best comedians on the planet. CL recently spoke with Kinane, who will be headlining Comedy Gold at the Buckhead Theatre on Saturday, May 7, about his start in comedy, his career trajectory, and why he should be nicer to audiences.

You're performing at the Buckhead Theatre on May 7, but you also did the Star Bar last Monday. Do you still do small local rooms and dive-bar comedy nights frequently?
Well, the only reason I got to this point is because of rooms like that. Any bigger opportunity that comes along is exciting, but those kinda rooms and dive bars are how I started out and they're still the most fun for me.

Is it to practice just commanding the stage under difficult, distracting circumstances- like at a loud bar with a less attentive audience, some of whom might not have even been there for a comedy show?
I actually think it’s harder to command a stage at a comedy club when people walk in just thinking it's for everyone, no matter who the comedian or crowd is, just because they're at a comedy club. Like, people don't do that with music. They don't go to a concert not knowing who they're going to see or what type of music it is, and assume that because it's music, they'll like it; they do their research and know who they're going to see. But sometimes at the comedy clubs, you get people who just decided they want to go out and laugh, and think that any comedian should be funny for them.

When and where did you start doing stand-up?
I started out in Chicago. I was there from '99-'03, then I moved out to LA.

Did you get called out to LA with projects lined up, or did you just decide to move out there and go for it?
I just jumped off the plank. I didn't have any real reason or plan, I was just like, 'I can either go to LA instead of working the road from Chicago, or... eehhhh, I’ll try it out.'

So when you got out to LA how quickly did things happen for you? You've had a great last few years, and you're really gaining a lot of passionate fans and getting good work, but was it a grind at first in LA, or did the move make everything happen that much quicker?
Well when I got there, it's not like I was making any money or just getting awesome shows, but I knew I was becoming a better comedian and getting good feedback. As long as I’m getting positive reinforcement I’ll keep doing what I’m doing, I had no problem playing the slow game.

So much of your comedy is from a cynical, careless slacker's perspective. As your success grows, and you naturally become happier and busier and more ambitious, are you worried that that's going to change your act, or persona?
I think it’s one of those, “as long as you’re being who you are on stage” kind of things. You change as a human being, you know. I don’t have a shitty day job anymore, so I don't go on stage bitching about my job, but that's not to say I've changed as a comedian. Stand-up one of the true things that I honestly care about. It’s one of those things I would do for free, I basically did it for free, or next to nothing, for ten years. So to me it's about the process and just using stand-up to talk about whatever is going on in my life or what I'm thinking about.

What's one thing you're still working on, or trying to improve as a comedian?
I think I could be a little more amicable towards the audience. I get really bristle with the audience quickly. I shouldn't be mean to the hecklers off the bat, but I just hate walking into a place and feeling like I need to be a baby-sitter.             13060161 3168464                          Speakeasy with Kyle Kinane "
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Thursday May 5, 2011 01:31 pm EDT

Kyle Kinane is an unmotivated, self-aware misanthrope. He's also one of the best comedians on the planet. CL recently spoke with Kinane, who will be headlining Comedy Gold at the Buckhead Theatre on Saturday, May 7, about his start in comedy, his career trajectory, and why he should be nicer to audiences.

You're performing at the Buckhead Theatre on May 7, but you also did the Star Bar last...

| more...
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Wednesday April 27, 2011 03:59 pm EDT
This weekend, College Humor's Adam Newman and Trevor Williams will be in Atlanta, co-headlining the Laughing Skull Lounge. Newman, who was recently a semi-finalist in the 2011 Laughing Skull Comedy Festival will be recording the performances for his first comedy album. The show will be a mix of stand-up and sketch characters that the duo has popularized over the years on CH. Watch one of their... | more...
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