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EXPLOSURE brings the world home (1)

In photographer Tierney Gearon's latest series EXPLOSURE, currently on view at Jackson Fine Art, boulders are rendered lighter than air, shadows crawl toward the sun, and ghostly forms cheerfully mingle with the living. "Frame 18" watches two worlds collide within a single image: A gray-haired businessman gasps as the sidewalk dematerializes into thin air, while a bikini-clad swimmer stands unaware that her local pool has just merged realities with Wall Street. Double-vision continues throughout the series as each photo unites two scenes shot in different locations ranging from Cape Town, South Africa, to Kanchipuram, India.

A busy single mother and internationally known artist, Gearon took a recess from her life traveling the globe to give a sold-out lecture at the High Museum during last month's Atlanta Celebrates Photography festival. The Atlanta native caused a stir in 2001 with her exhibit I Am a Camera at London’s Saatchi Gallery. Some viewers bristled at the work, which included shots of her children playing in the nude, while other voices including the Guardian newspaper, launched campaigns to protect her from censorship.

Continue Reading "EXPLOSURE brings the world home"

(Photo Courtesy Tierney Gearon)



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    Ten Panthers of Kwangtung begins with Anderson's “Frederick Douglas Self-Defense Manual,” a series of drawings of six fictitious fighting techniques secretly developed by slaves on Southern plantations. The crinkled, artificially aged pages each bear a ridiculous title, such as "2nd Technique: Fetch'n Calamus Root and Chinkapins" and "6th Technique: Duck'n Behind dis Here Oak so'as Patter-rollers Don't Sees Me." The turns of phrase poke fun at stereotypes of black speech, and situate Anderson's Asian fantasy within a familiar black history. The figure in "3rd Technique: Negro Picks Cotton" strikes a praying mantis pose; his fingers gather to a deadly point, turning a lowly plantation chore into a proud weapon of liberation.

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Friday December 4, 2009 10:04 pm EST

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Through an adventurous combination of kung fu heroism, Civil Rights struggle, pop culture humor, and political self-empowerment, Dawolu Jabari Anderson’s current exhibit at Saltworks Gallery creates a fictional story that’ll make you think twice about real-world history.

Ten Panthers of Kwangtung begins with Anderson's “Frederick Douglas Self-Defense...

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Friday December 4, 2009 04:00 pm EST
Ten Panthers of Kwangtung combines kung fu, Civil Rights and pop culture | more...
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 Double exposure provides an admirable handicap; it's hard to anticipate what the print will ultimately look like. But the unpredictability also prevents Gearon from planning themes in advance. Individually, her compositions succeed as self-contained conversations on motherhood and, to a lesser extent, questions of class and race. 

 "Frame 1" shows a meeting between two potential playmates, one black and one white. The double exposure inserts a phantom wall between them, creating the illusion that the girl in the foreground is walking through a prophetically open door. But the image has little to say beyond a hinted promise of racial equality. Its value has more to do with a delight in the accidental and the play of light and pure color. 

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 A photographer without borders, Gearon dares to imagine a world unbound by the physics of time and space. EXPLOSURE is dynamic and smart, even without a highly developed theme. By cutting her safety net, Gearon substitutes control for visual punch. 

 EXPLOSURE Through Jan. 16. Free. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Jackson Fine Art, 3115 E. Shadowlawn Ave. 404-233-3739. www.jacksonfineart.com."
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 A busy single mother and internationally known artist, Gearon took a recess from her life traveling the globe to give a sold-out lecture at the High Museum during last month's Atlanta Celebrates Photography festival. The Atlanta native caused a stir in 2001 with her exhibit I Am a Camera at London’s Saatchi Gallery. Some viewers bristled at the work, which included shots of her children playing in the nude, while other voices including the Guardian newspaper, launched campaigns to protect her from censorship.  

 Less intimate and more global in scale, the reality-defying vision in EXPLOSURE has been rightfully called hallucinogenic. The work could also be called athletic, since the images weren’t digitally manipulated. Gearon created the final compositions inside the camera by double-exposing the film, a process that required exhaustive travel. Scenes such as "Frame 13," which depicts a pack of stuffed grizzly bears alongside two girls twirling in the sun, radiates kinetic energy. It's the signature of a photographer constantly on the move. 

 Double exposure provides an admirable handicap; it's hard to anticipate what the print will ultimately look like. But the unpredictability also prevents Gearon from planning themes in advance. Individually, her compositions succeed as self-contained conversations on motherhood and, to a lesser extent, questions of class and race. 

 "Frame 1" shows a meeting between two potential playmates, one black and one white. The double exposure inserts a phantom wall between them, creating the illusion that the girl in the foreground is walking through a prophetically open door. But the image has little to say beyond a hinted promise of racial equality. Its value has more to do with a delight in the accidental and the play of light and pure color. 

 Another skillfully managed accident, "Frame 18," resembles a diagram from a geology textbook, where different strata of rock represent different ages of the earth. Two ladies in red dresses stand in matching red pumps. Their expressions look almost cynical compared to the saccharine tableau shown below: two girls with golden locks clutching an ephemeral mushroom cloud of party balloons. Gearon cooks up a metaphor for the stages of womanhood, served on a candy platter. 

 A photographer without borders, Gearon dares to imagine a world unbound by the physics of time and space. EXPLOSURE is dynamic and smart, even without a highly developed theme. By cutting her safety net, Gearon substitutes control for visual punch. 

 EXPLOSURE Through Jan. 16. Free. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Jackson Fine Art, 3115 E. Shadowlawn Ave. 404-233-3739. www.jacksonfineart.com.             13030941 1284818                          EXPLOSURE brings the world home "
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Monday November 16, 2009 09:00 am EST
In photographer Tierney Gearon's latest series EXPLOSURE, currently on view at Jackson Fine Art, boulders are rendered lighter than air, shadows crawl toward the sun, and ghostly forms cheerfully mingle with the living. "Frame 18" watches two worlds collide within a single image: A gray-haired businessman gasps as the sidewalk dematerializes into thin air, while a bikini-clad swimmer stands... | more...
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    The official ACP blog reports that What's Happening Now: A Cell Phone Photography Project will be the festival's second largest exhibition this year in terms of artist participation. That means: more than 45 photographers + camera phones = lots of cool photos.

    Coproduced by Christian Bradley West and Susan Todd-Raque, the show is limited exclusively to images shot "on the go" that were contributed over the course of eight weeks of episodic "homework" assignments. What's Happening Now debuts at Cherrylion Studios this Sat. Sept. 19, from 5-10 p.m. Click here for directions.

    Meanwhile, Christian Bradley West's CelphPortrait at Eyedrum is another cell phone project, albeit of a more focused and introspective kind. The show returns to Eyedrum's Small Gallery this weekend,  and continues through Oct. 10.

    (Photo courtesy ChristianBradleyWest.com)"
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    The [http://www.acpinfo.org/blog/2009/09/14/christian-bradley-wests-cellphportraits/|official ACP blog] reports that ''What's Happening Now: A Cell Phone Photography Project'' will be the festival's second largest exhibition this year in terms of artist participation. That means: more than 45 photographers + camera phones = lots of cool photos.

    Coproduced by Christian Bradley West and Susan Todd-Raque, the show is limited exclusively to images shot "on the go" that were contributed over the course of [http://www.christianbwest.com/cellphoneproject/|eight weeks of episodic "homework" assignments]. ''What's Happening Now'' debuts at __Cherrylion Studios this Sat. Sept. 19, from 5-10 p.m__. [http://maps.google.com/maps?q=889 morris st nw 30318&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&ie=UTF8&split=0&gl=us&ei=ZQixSpfPK8ittgfrs520CA&ll=33.807323,-84.408817&spn=0.027743,0.046864&z=14&iwloc=r0|Click here for directions].

    Meanwhile, Christian Bradley West's ''CelphPortrait'' at Eyedrum is another cell phone project, albeit of a more focused and introspective kind. The show returns to __Eyedrum's Small Gallery this weekend__, [http://www.pd.org/~eyedrum/calendar/index.php?id=2399| and continues through Oct. 10].

    (Photo courtesy [http://www.christianbwest.com/cellphoneproject/|ChristianBradleyWest.com])"
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    The official ACP blog reports that What's Happening Now: A Cell Phone Photography Project will be the festival's second largest exhibition this year in terms of artist participation. That means: more than 45 photographers + camera phones = lots of cool photos.

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Wednesday September 16, 2009 06:19 pm EDT

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The official ACP blog reports that What's Happening Now: A Cell Phone Photography Project will be the festival's second largest exhibition this year in terms of artist participation. That means: more than 45 photographers + camera phones = lots of cool photos.

Coproduced by Christian Bradley West and Susan Todd-Raque, the show is limited exclusively to images shot "on the go"...

| more...
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    Art recommendations can be tricky. The hardest part is finding events that will both entertain and educate, that is, art shows that are genuinely fun without compromising standards of taste. You shouldn't have to check yer' brain at the door, nor should we needlessly, endlessly suffer for the sake of "civilized" culture.

    With that caveat in mind, I can confidently direct you towards two openings on the Westside this Friday. Saltworks Gallery and Get This! Gallery are literal next-door neighbors, located in a grayish block of storefronts on 11th Street near Georgia Tech (across the street from Six Feet Under, the popular pub and fish house). The two venues jump-start the fall visual arts season this weekend with a Friday double feature: Get This! opens Bill Daniel's solo exhibition, Ground Score, alongside Everything In-between, a new group show at Saltworks."
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    Art recommendations can be tricky. The hardest part is finding events that will both entertain and educate, that is, art shows that are genuinely fun without compromising standards of taste. You shouldn't have to check yer' brain at the door, nor should we needlessly, endlessly suffer for the sake of "civilized" culture.

    With that caveat in mind, I can confidently direct you towards two openings on the Westside this Friday. [http://www.saltworksgallery.com/|Saltworks Gallery] and [http://getthisgallery.com/|Get This! Gallery] are literal next-door neighbors, located in a grayish block of storefronts on 11th Street near Georgia Tech (across the street from Six Feet Under, the popular pub and fish house). The two venues jump-start the fall visual arts season this weekend with a Friday double feature: Get This! opens Bill Daniel's solo exhibition, ''Ground Score'', alongside ''Everything In-between'', a new group show at Saltworks."
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  string(1130) "       2009-09-14T20:23:00+00:00 Get This!/Saltworks Gallery double feature Friday   Jeremy Abernathy 1306449 2009-09-14T20:23:00+00:00  image-1

    Art recommendations can be tricky. The hardest part is finding events that will both entertain and educate, that is, art shows that are genuinely fun without compromising standards of taste. You shouldn't have to check yer' brain at the door, nor should we needlessly, endlessly suffer for the sake of "civilized" culture.

    With that caveat in mind, I can confidently direct you towards two openings on the Westside this Friday. Saltworks Gallery and Get This! Gallery are literal next-door neighbors, located in a grayish block of storefronts on 11th Street near Georgia Tech (across the street from Six Feet Under, the popular pub and fish house). The two venues jump-start the fall visual arts season this weekend with a Friday double feature: Get This! opens Bill Daniel's solo exhibition, Ground Score, alongside Everything In-between, a new group show at Saltworks.             13043472 1442699                          Get This!/Saltworks Gallery double feature Friday "
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Article

Monday September 14, 2009 04:23 pm EDT

image-1

Art recommendations can be tricky. The hardest part is finding events that will both entertain and educate, that is, art shows that are genuinely fun without compromising standards of taste. You shouldn't have to check yer' brain at the door, nor should we needlessly, endlessly suffer for the sake of "civilized" culture.

With that caveat in mind, I can confidently direct you...

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