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Roll Call - DJ/Producer Stan Zeff

The London native talks about his house music party, Tambor, and more

Stan Zeff.59c000b63d422
Photo credit: COURTESY OF STAN ZEFF
HEY DJ: Stan Zeff at the turntables during one of his Tambor events
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More By This Writer

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  string(675) "At long last, former mayoral candidate Cathy Woolard has made an endorsement in the Atlanta mayoral race: councilwoman Mary Norwood.

The move comes just six days before the runoff election, when Atlanta voters will choose between Norwood and her city council colleague Keisha Lance Bottoms.

Woolard, who is also the city's former council president, said she made her decision based on concerns about corruption at City Hall, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. She said, "The lack of transparency at City Hall has crushed the spirit of our city, and I feel like we need a clean break with this administration and a new start here with fresh players."


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  string(791) "At long last, former mayoral candidate Cathy Woolard has made an endorsement in the Atlanta mayoral race: councilwoman Mary Norwood.

The move comes just six days before the runoff election, when Atlanta voters will choose between Norwood and her city council colleague Keisha Lance Bottoms.

Woolard, who is also the city's former council president, said she made her decision based on concerns about corruption at City Hall, [http://www.ajc.com/news/local-govt--politics/woolard-back-norwood-runoff-for-atlanta-mayor/P7jiW6XCCY4WbF05qXvecK|according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution]. She said, "The lack of transparency at City Hall has crushed the spirit of our city, and I feel like we need a clean break with this administration and a new start here with fresh players."


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Article

Wednesday November 29, 2017 06:18 pm EST
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Monday October 2, 2017 03:26 pm EDT
The cerebral and suspense-filled drama takes the stage Oct. 6-29 | more...
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  ["title"]=>
  string(20) "FEATURED: Art battle"
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  string(170) "The expansion of public art was put in jeopardy when City officials reintroduced an ordinance that would make it more difficult to put murals on privately owned property."
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  string(4364) "Thanks to local art advocates like Monica Campana, executive director of Living Walls, and artists like Fabian Williams, Greg Mike and Peter Ferrari, among others, Atlanta has become a hotbed for street art. These days, in neighborhoods across the city, dozens of formerly "naked" buildings have been adorned with eye-catching, often-giant-size murals painted in a variety of styles with more being added on a regular basis. But the expansion of public art was put in jeopardy this year when City officials reintroduced an ordinance that would make it more difficult to put murals on privately owned property. The move shocked folks in the creative community, but it didn't paralyze them. Instead of packing up their paintbrushes and calling it quits, they put up their metaphoric dukes.

Round One

This most recent art-centric tussle started earlier this summer after the City began the process of reimplementing a public art ordinance that dated back decades. The ordinance called for local artists and business owners to get murals currently placed on privately owned buildings approved by June 9, 2017 or risk seeing their work taken down. And, per the ordinance, future public art would have to undergo a lengthy approval process, which included getting the consent from the Office of Transportation, the Urban Design Commission, the Office of Cultural Arts, City Council and then the mayor. The ordinance also included disciplinary action for artists who wouldn't comply with the approval process. So any artist who wasn't lockstep with the ordinance could face criminal prosecution.

The immediate response to the City's effort came from a concerted group of attorneys, business owners and artists including Williams and Ferrari who subsequently sued the city. The complaint claimed the ordinance was unconstitutional and violated their First Amendment-protected freedom of speech and expression. Gerry Weber, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit, told Creative Loafing at that time: "City officials will be picking and choosing what kinds of topics can occur in the public sphere and public debate, and governments aren't supposed to do that."

When CL reached out to the City for comment, a spokesperson said: "The City is currently negotiating with the plaintiffs in this dispute to resolve the matter in a manner that is favorable to all." The spokesperson added that they could not comment on the status or content of the discussions, but the City recognizes the importance of public art and artistic expression. Officials closed their statement by stating that the City had no plans to remove any existing artwork on June 9 or any other date.

Eventually, the lawsuit was settled after the City agreed to not enforce the ordinance. But the drama continued.

Round Two

In July, City Council member Joyce Sheperd decided to resurrect the debate, proposing a substitute to the mural art legislation. Under her proposal, approval for murals would no longer include the mayor's office or the City Council; however, applications would still have to be passed through the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Urban Design Commission and the Office of Traffic and Transportation. Then applications must be presented at a meeting of the Neighborhood Planning Unit in the community where the mural is proposed. Sheperd also called for the time frame to approve or deny public art to be 10 days.

Back then, CL scribe Kimberly Lawson posed this question: Considering the unpopularity with the city's proposal to have artists go through several loop holes to get permission to participate in their artistic work on private property, why would Sheperd still be pushing forward with the permitting process? Through a spokesperson, Sheperd responded, saying that the legislation was taken out of context and that their legal department is examining the new language. She added, "I'm confident these changes will resolve the issues of constitutionality."

But Weber didn't agree. "These murals ... are really part of the cultural fabric of Atlanta, and one of the things I'm most proud of about this city."

Sheperd's proposal is still unfolding, but based on the battle they waged this summer, don't expect Atlanta's artists and activists to roll over and play dead.

Additional reporting was provided by Kimberly Lawson and Carlton Hargro."
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__Round One__

This most recent art-centric tussle started earlier this summer after the City began the process of reimplementing a public art ordinance that dated back decades. The ordinance called for local artists and business owners to get murals currently placed on privately owned buildings approved by June 9, 2017 or risk seeing their work taken down. And, per the ordinance, future public art would have to undergo a lengthy approval process, which included getting the consent from the Office of Transportation, the Urban Design Commission, the Office of Cultural Arts, City Council and then the mayor. The ordinance also included disciplinary action for artists who wouldn't comply with the approval process. So any artist who wasn't lockstep with the ordinance could face criminal prosecution.

The immediate response to the City's effort came from a concerted group of attorneys, business owners and artists including Williams and Ferrari who subsequently sued the city. The complaint claimed the ordinance was unconstitutional and violated their First Amendment-protected freedom of speech and expression. Gerry Weber, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit, told ''Creative Loafing'' at that time: "City officials will be picking and choosing what kinds of topics can occur in the public sphere and public debate, and governments aren't supposed to do that."

When ''CL'' reached out to the City for comment, a spokesperson said: "The City is currently negotiating with the plaintiffs in this dispute to resolve the matter in a manner that is favorable to all." The spokesperson added that they could not comment on the status or content of the discussions, but the City recognizes the importance of public art and artistic expression. Officials closed their statement by stating that the City had no plans to remove any existing artwork on June 9 or any other date.

Eventually, the lawsuit was settled after the City agreed to not enforce the ordinance. But the drama continued.

__Round Two__

In July, City Council member Joyce Sheperd decided to resurrect the debate, proposing a substitute to the mural art legislation. Under her proposal, approval for murals would no longer include the mayor's office or the City Council; however, applications would still have to be passed through the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Urban Design Commission and the Office of Traffic and Transportation. Then applications must be presented at a meeting of the Neighborhood Planning Unit in the community where the mural is proposed. Sheperd also called for the time frame to approve or deny public art to be 10 days.

Back then, ''CL'' scribe Kimberly Lawson posed this question: Considering the unpopularity with the city's proposal to have artists go through several loop holes to get permission to participate in their artistic work on private property, why would Sheperd still be pushing forward with the permitting process? Through a spokesperson, Sheperd responded, saying that the legislation was taken out of context and that their legal department is examining the new language. She added, "I'm confident these changes will resolve the issues of constitutionality."

But Weber didn't agree. "These murals ... are really part of the cultural fabric of [https://local.creativeloafing.com/Atlanta|Atlanta], and one of the things I'm most proud of about this city."

Sheperd's proposal is still unfolding, but based on the battle they waged this summer, don't expect Atlanta's artists and activists to roll over and play dead.

''Additional reporting was provided by Kimberly Lawson and Carlton Hargro.''"
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  string(4840) "    The expansion of public art was put in jeopardy when City officials reintroduced an ordinance that would make it more difficult to put murals on privately owned property.   2017-09-15T01:11:00+00:00 FEATURED: Art battle clint@thenetworkedplanet.com Clint Bergst Jahmair Stewart  2017-09-15T01:11:00+00:00  Thanks to local art advocates like Monica Campana, executive director of Living Walls, and artists like Fabian Williams, Greg Mike and Peter Ferrari, among others, Atlanta has become a hotbed for street art. These days, in neighborhoods across the city, dozens of formerly "naked" buildings have been adorned with eye-catching, often-giant-size murals painted in a variety of styles with more being added on a regular basis. But the expansion of public art was put in jeopardy this year when City officials reintroduced an ordinance that would make it more difficult to put murals on privately owned property. The move shocked folks in the creative community, but it didn't paralyze them. Instead of packing up their paintbrushes and calling it quits, they put up their metaphoric dukes.

Round One

This most recent art-centric tussle started earlier this summer after the City began the process of reimplementing a public art ordinance that dated back decades. The ordinance called for local artists and business owners to get murals currently placed on privately owned buildings approved by June 9, 2017 or risk seeing their work taken down. And, per the ordinance, future public art would have to undergo a lengthy approval process, which included getting the consent from the Office of Transportation, the Urban Design Commission, the Office of Cultural Arts, City Council and then the mayor. The ordinance also included disciplinary action for artists who wouldn't comply with the approval process. So any artist who wasn't lockstep with the ordinance could face criminal prosecution.

The immediate response to the City's effort came from a concerted group of attorneys, business owners and artists including Williams and Ferrari who subsequently sued the city. The complaint claimed the ordinance was unconstitutional and violated their First Amendment-protected freedom of speech and expression. Gerry Weber, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit, told Creative Loafing at that time: "City officials will be picking and choosing what kinds of topics can occur in the public sphere and public debate, and governments aren't supposed to do that."

When CL reached out to the City for comment, a spokesperson said: "The City is currently negotiating with the plaintiffs in this dispute to resolve the matter in a manner that is favorable to all." The spokesperson added that they could not comment on the status or content of the discussions, but the City recognizes the importance of public art and artistic expression. Officials closed their statement by stating that the City had no plans to remove any existing artwork on June 9 or any other date.

Eventually, the lawsuit was settled after the City agreed to not enforce the ordinance. But the drama continued.

Round Two

In July, City Council member Joyce Sheperd decided to resurrect the debate, proposing a substitute to the mural art legislation. Under her proposal, approval for murals would no longer include the mayor's office or the City Council; however, applications would still have to be passed through the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Urban Design Commission and the Office of Traffic and Transportation. Then applications must be presented at a meeting of the Neighborhood Planning Unit in the community where the mural is proposed. Sheperd also called for the time frame to approve or deny public art to be 10 days.

Back then, CL scribe Kimberly Lawson posed this question: Considering the unpopularity with the city's proposal to have artists go through several loop holes to get permission to participate in their artistic work on private property, why would Sheperd still be pushing forward with the permitting process? Through a spokesperson, Sheperd responded, saying that the legislation was taken out of context and that their legal department is examining the new language. She added, "I'm confident these changes will resolve the issues of constitutionality."

But Weber didn't agree. "These murals ... are really part of the cultural fabric of Atlanta, and one of the things I'm most proud of about this city."

Sheperd's proposal is still unfolding, but based on the battle they waged this summer, don't expect Atlanta's artists and activists to roll over and play dead.

Additional reporting was provided by Kimberly Lawson and Carlton Hargro.       0,0,10      20975675         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/09/poets_feature_mural_featured.59baf0ca833ac.png                  FEATURED: Art battle "
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Article

Thursday September 14, 2017 09:11 pm EDT
The expansion of public art was put in jeopardy when City officials reintroduced an ordinance that would make it more difficult to put murals on privately owned property. | more...
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  string(4426) "Thanks to local art advocates like Mónica Campana, executive director of Living Walls, and artists like Fabian Williams, Greg Mike and Peter Ferrari, among others, Atlanta has become a hotbed for street art. These days, in neighborhoods across the city, dozens of formerly “naked” buildings have been adorned with eye-catching, often-giant-size murals painted in a variety of styles — with more being added on a regular basis. But the expansion of public art was put in jeopardy this year when City officials reintroduced an ordinance that would make it more difficult to put murals on privately owned property. The move shocked folks in the creative community, but it didn’t paralyze them. Instead of packing up their paintbrushes and calling it quits, they put up their metaphoric dukes.

Round One

This most recent art-centric tussle started earlier this summer after the City began the process of reimplementing a public art ordinance that dated back decades. The ordinance called for local artists and business owners to get murals currently placed on privately owned buildings approved by June 9, 2017 — or risk seeing their work taken down. And, per the ordinance, future public art would have to undergo a lengthy approval process, which included getting the consent from the Office of Transportation, the Urban Design Commission, the Office of Cultural Arts, City Council and then the mayor. The ordinance also included disciplinary action for artists who wouldn’t comply with the approval process. So any artist who wasn’t lockstep with the ordinance could face criminal prosecution.

The immediate response to the City’s effort came from a concerted group of attorneys, business owners and artists — including Williams and Ferrari — who subsequently sued the city. The complaint claimed the ordinance was unconstitutional and violated their First Amendment-protected freedom of speech and expression. Gerry Weber, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit, told Creative Loafing at that time: “City officials will be picking and choosing what kinds of topics can occur in the public sphere and public debate, and governments aren’t supposed to do that.”

When CL reached out to the City for comment, a spokesperson said: “The City is currently negotiating with the plaintiffs in this dispute to resolve the matter in a manner that is favorable to all.” The spokesperson added that they could not comment on the status or content of the discussions, but the City recognizes the importance of public art and artistic expression. Officials closed their statement by stating that the City had no plans to remove any existing artwork on June 9 or any other date.

Eventually, the lawsuit was settled after the City agreed to not enforce the ordinance. But the drama continued.

Round Two

In July, City Council member Joyce Sheperd decided to resurrect the debate, proposing a substitute to the mural art legislation. Under her proposal, approval for murals would no longer include the mayor’s office or the City Council; however, applications would still have to be passed through the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Urban Design Commission and the Office of Traffic and Transportation. Then applications must be presented at a meeting of the Neighborhood Planning Unit in the community where the mural is proposed. Sheperd also called for the time frame to approve or deny public art to be 10 days.

Back then, CL scribe Kimberly Lawson posed this question: Considering the unpopularity with the city’s proposal to have artists go through several loop holes to get permission to participate in their artistic work on private property, why would Sheperd still be pushing forward with the permitting process? Through a spokesperson, Sheperd responded, saying that the legislation was taken out of context and that their legal department is examining the new language. She added, “I’m confident these changes will resolve the issues of constitutionality.”

But Weber didn’t agree. “These murals … are really part of the cultural fabric of Atlanta, and one of the things I’m most proud of about this city.”

Sheperd’s proposal is still unfolding, but based on the battle they waged this summer, don’t expect Atlanta’s artists and activists to roll over and play dead.

Additional reporting was provided by Kimberly Lawson and Carlton Hargro."
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__Round One__

This most recent art-centric tussle started earlier this summer after the City began the process of reimplementing a public art ordinance that dated back decades. The ordinance called for local artists and business owners to get murals currently placed on privately owned buildings approved by June 9, 2017 — or risk seeing their work taken down. And, per the ordinance, future public art would have to undergo a lengthy approval process, which included getting the consent from the Office of Transportation, the Urban Design Commission, the Office of Cultural Arts, City Council and then the mayor. The ordinance also included disciplinary action for artists who wouldn’t comply with the approval process. So any artist who wasn’t lockstep with the ordinance could face criminal prosecution.

The immediate response to the City’s effort came from a concerted group of attorneys, business owners and artists — including Williams and Ferrari — who subsequently sued the city. The complaint claimed the ordinance was unconstitutional and violated their First Amendment-protected freedom of speech and expression. Gerry Weber, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit, told ''Creative Loafing'' at that time: “City officials will be picking and choosing what kinds of topics can occur in the public sphere and public debate, and governments aren’t supposed to do that.”

When ''CL'' reached out to the City for comment, a spokesperson said: “The City is currently negotiating with the plaintiffs in this dispute to resolve the matter in a manner that is favorable to all.” The spokesperson added that they could not comment on the status or content of the discussions, but the City recognizes the importance of public art and artistic expression. Officials closed their statement by stating that the City had no plans to remove any existing artwork on June 9 or any other date.

Eventually, the lawsuit was settled after the City agreed to not enforce the ordinance. But the drama continued.

__Round Two__

In July, City Council member Joyce Sheperd decided to resurrect the debate, proposing a substitute to the mural art legislation. Under her proposal, approval for murals would no longer include the mayor’s office or the City Council; however, applications would still have to be passed through the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Urban Design Commission and the Office of Traffic and Transportation. Then applications must be presented at a meeting of the Neighborhood Planning Unit in the community where the mural is proposed. Sheperd also called for the time frame to approve or deny public art to be 10 days.

Back then, ''CL'' scribe Kimberly Lawson posed this question: Considering the unpopularity with the city’s proposal to have artists go through several loop holes to get permission to participate in their artistic work on private property, why would Sheperd still be pushing forward with the permitting process? Through a spokesperson, Sheperd responded, saying that the legislation was taken out of context and that their legal department is examining the new language. She added, “I’m confident these changes will resolve the issues of constitutionality.”

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Sheperd’s proposal is still unfolding, but based on the battle they waged this summer, don’t expect Atlanta’s artists and activists to roll over and play dead.

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  string(4788) " Poets Feature Mural Featured  2017-09-14T00:10:42+00:00 poets_feature_mural_featured.jpg     A brief history of the City's most recent war on public art 1015  2017-09-14T00:11:43+00:00 Art battle jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris By Jahmair Stewart  2017-09-14T00:11:43+00:00  Thanks to local art advocates like Mónica Campana, executive director of Living Walls, and artists like Fabian Williams, Greg Mike and Peter Ferrari, among others, Atlanta has become a hotbed for street art. These days, in neighborhoods across the city, dozens of formerly “naked” buildings have been adorned with eye-catching, often-giant-size murals painted in a variety of styles — with more being added on a regular basis. But the expansion of public art was put in jeopardy this year when City officials reintroduced an ordinance that would make it more difficult to put murals on privately owned property. The move shocked folks in the creative community, but it didn’t paralyze them. Instead of packing up their paintbrushes and calling it quits, they put up their metaphoric dukes.

Round One

This most recent art-centric tussle started earlier this summer after the City began the process of reimplementing a public art ordinance that dated back decades. The ordinance called for local artists and business owners to get murals currently placed on privately owned buildings approved by June 9, 2017 — or risk seeing their work taken down. And, per the ordinance, future public art would have to undergo a lengthy approval process, which included getting the consent from the Office of Transportation, the Urban Design Commission, the Office of Cultural Arts, City Council and then the mayor. The ordinance also included disciplinary action for artists who wouldn’t comply with the approval process. So any artist who wasn’t lockstep with the ordinance could face criminal prosecution.

The immediate response to the City’s effort came from a concerted group of attorneys, business owners and artists — including Williams and Ferrari — who subsequently sued the city. The complaint claimed the ordinance was unconstitutional and violated their First Amendment-protected freedom of speech and expression. Gerry Weber, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit, told Creative Loafing at that time: “City officials will be picking and choosing what kinds of topics can occur in the public sphere and public debate, and governments aren’t supposed to do that.”

When CL reached out to the City for comment, a spokesperson said: “The City is currently negotiating with the plaintiffs in this dispute to resolve the matter in a manner that is favorable to all.” The spokesperson added that they could not comment on the status or content of the discussions, but the City recognizes the importance of public art and artistic expression. Officials closed their statement by stating that the City had no plans to remove any existing artwork on June 9 or any other date.

Eventually, the lawsuit was settled after the City agreed to not enforce the ordinance. But the drama continued.

Round Two

In July, City Council member Joyce Sheperd decided to resurrect the debate, proposing a substitute to the mural art legislation. Under her proposal, approval for murals would no longer include the mayor’s office or the City Council; however, applications would still have to be passed through the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Urban Design Commission and the Office of Traffic and Transportation. Then applications must be presented at a meeting of the Neighborhood Planning Unit in the community where the mural is proposed. Sheperd also called for the time frame to approve or deny public art to be 10 days.

Back then, CL scribe Kimberly Lawson posed this question: Considering the unpopularity with the city’s proposal to have artists go through several loop holes to get permission to participate in their artistic work on private property, why would Sheperd still be pushing forward with the permitting process? Through a spokesperson, Sheperd responded, saying that the legislation was taken out of context and that their legal department is examining the new language. She added, “I’m confident these changes will resolve the issues of constitutionality.”

But Weber didn’t agree. “These murals … are really part of the cultural fabric of Atlanta, and one of the things I’m most proud of about this city.”

Sheperd’s proposal is still unfolding, but based on the battle they waged this summer, don’t expect Atlanta’s artists and activists to roll over and play dead.

Additional reporting was provided by Kimberly Lawson and Carlton Hargro.    Joeff Davis/CL File   0,0,10                                 Art battle "
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Wednesday September 13, 2017 08:11 pm EDT
A brief history of the City's most recent war on public art | more...
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  string(2451) "DJ Ape aka April Mills is an up and coming DJ from Atlanta. Born in Decatur, and raised in Stone Mountain, she's heard trap rap all her life. Growing up listening to the likes of Outkast and T.I. to name a few, and working with producers from the City, Mills has seen and learned how to make an impact in the rap world. Creating her own mark in the rap game has led her to become DJ Ape. When we asked her what makes her different as a DJ she said, "I'm able to tell a story through mixing different rappers and making it sound different. That's what makes my content so unique." If you've ever heard her content, then you know it's filled with trap rappers from the ATL. So we hit her up to hear who she ranks in her top 5 trap rappers from Atlanta.

5. Young Thug - "Thug is another trendsetter in the game. He literally does not care what anyone thinks about what he says in his songs, what he wears, or things he may say in general. So many people tried to take his sound. The way he raps and piece his lyrics together makes it hard to forget. And he switches his flows so much. He's talented and knows how to make hits by just being himself."

4. Migos - "Migos paved their own way in the trap game as a whole. So many other artist have tried to rap like them to gain popularity. The Migos are one-of-a-kind. Period. Each of them contribute to each song in their own way, each takes turns on who will do the hook etc. Their logic behind everything they do is why I have them in my top 5."

3. Gucci Mane - "I think Gucci was the first trap rapper I ever started listening to. I was probably like 11 or 12. Gucci's play on words along with the explicitness of his lyrics are ridiculously fire. He's an east Atlanta OG, and on of the first to start trap music, so it's only right for someone from Atlanta like myself to appreciate his contributions to rap."

2. 21 Savage - "21 Savage's music is raw as well. The simple mix of his calm voice with trap beats makes his music so hard. It's like you can feel what he feels through his music. He stays true to where he came from as a "street n*gga" and thats what makes him as an artist even more."

1. Future - "Future is probably my favorite Atlanta trap rapper, because his music is so raw and unfiltered. He remains true to himself and where he came from, no matter how big he has came up. The combination of his unique melodic flows and crazy production makes his music 10x more catchy.""
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5. Young Thug - "Thug is another trendsetter in the game. He literally does not care what anyone thinks about what he says in his songs, what he wears, or things he may say in general. So many people tried to take his sound. The way he raps and piece his lyrics together makes it hard to forget. And he switches his flows so much. He's talented and knows how to make hits by just being himself."

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Article

Wednesday September 6, 2017 08:20 am EDT
Local spinner on the rise ranks her favorite trap rappers | more...
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