Loading...
 

Content is needed



More By This Writer

array(76) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(77) "Let's talk: Atlanta-bred artist returns to discuss the city's creative future"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-04-30T03:18:41+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-09T14:23:58+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-09T16:19:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(77) "Let's talk: Atlanta-bred artist returns to discuss the city's creative future"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-09T16:19:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(87) "Content:_:Let's talk: Atlanta-bred artist returns to discuss the city's creative future"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(2546) "image-2
    From the definition of public art vs. graffiti to ways the city can better support local creatives, it seems there’s always a buzz surrounding Atlanta’s art scene. Brooklyn-based artist Annika Connor (an Atlanta dweller until age 18) aims to spark her own arts-centric dialogue when she brings her event, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/creative-conversations-active-ideas-art-talk-tickets-20906887062Creative Conversation: Active Ideas Art Talk, to General Assembly Wed., Feb. 17. Topics to be discussed include: how artists and entrepreneurs can link together to engage the imagination both inside and out of the traditional art world, how the DIY movement sweeping across the art world can be more effective, and potential reasons why many artists have moved back to the traditional book format in an age of primarily digital consumption.
    
    That last topic is especially relevant to Connor, who last year released her own tome, The Point Suite Contemporary Art Book, along with artist Nicholas Papadakis. The book’s aim is to highlight and share works from a smattering of artists whom Connor says are “really brilliant” but “underrepresented.” All attendees will be treated to their own signed copy of the book.
    
 
       After growing up in Atlanta, Connor made her way Chicago, then Barcelona and, eventually, settled in New York. Along with working on contemporary romantic paintings in her studio, she also heads up Active Ideas Productions, an org which aims to support the education and development of emerging artists. “The arts are a huge part of the American economy,” Connor says. “I think facilitating conversations like this and discussing how we can grow rather than limit the arts is incredibly important.” 
    
    As for what attendees can expect from her event, “I’m structuring these nights so that the bulk of the discussion is centered on a dialogue with the audience,” says says. “ I'm interested in discussing how business owners can more effectively manage their creatives, and how artists can establish themselves to survive on their art through new channels outside of the traditional gallery structure. I also want to discuss how the arts, entrepreneurs, and the tech communities across the country can work more together.” You know what they say: teamwork makes the dream work.
    
     image-1
    Creative Conversation: Active Ideas Art Talk at General Assembly Atlanta, Wed., Feb. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 (includes glass of wine and signed book)
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(2958) "[image-2]
    From the definition of public art vs. graffiti to ways the city can better support local creatives, it seems there’s always a buzz surrounding Atlanta’s art scene. Brooklyn-based artist [http://www.annikaconnor.com/|__Annika Connor__] (an Atlanta dweller until age 18) aims to spark her own arts-centric dialogue when she brings her event, [https://www.eventbrite.com/e/creative-conversations-active-ideas-art-talk-tickets-20906887062|][https://generalassemb.ly/education/creative-conversations-active-ideas-art-talk/new-york-city/20129|____]__[/atlanta/creative-conversations-active-ideas-art-talk/Event?oid=16853383|Creative Conversation: Active Ideas Art Talk]__, to General Assembly Wed., Feb. 17. Topics to be discussed include: how artists and entrepreneurs can link together to engage the imagination both inside and out of the traditional art world, how the DIY movement sweeping across the art world can be more effective, and potential reasons why many artists have moved back to the traditional book format in an age of primarily digital consumption.
    
    That last topic is especially relevant to Connor, who last year released her own tome, ''The Point Suite Contemporary Art Book'', along with artist Nicholas Papadakis. The book’s aim is to highlight and share works from a smattering of artists whom Connor says are “really brilliant” but “underrepresented.” All attendees will be treated to their own signed copy of the book.
    
 
       After growing up in Atlanta, Connor made her way Chicago, then Barcelona and, eventually, settled in New York. Along with working on contemporary romantic paintings in her studio, she also heads up Active Ideas Productions, an org which aims to support the education and development of emerging artists. “The arts are a huge part of the American economy,” Connor says. “I think facilitating conversations like this and discussing how we can grow rather than limit the arts is incredibly important.” 
    
    As for what attendees can expect from her event, “I’m structuring these nights so that the bulk of the discussion is centered on a dialogue with the audience,” says says. “ I'm interested in discussing how business owners can more effectively manage their creatives, and how artists can establish themselves to survive on their art through new channels outside of the traditional gallery structure. I [also] want to discuss how the arts, entrepreneurs, and the tech communities across the country can work more together.” You know what they say: teamwork makes the dream work.
    
     [image-1]
    ''__[/atlanta/creative-conversations-active-ideas-art-talk/Event?oid=16853383|Creative Conversation: Active Ideas Art Talk at General Assembly Atlanta]__, Wed., Feb. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. [https://www.eventbrite.com/e/creative-conversations-active-ideas-art-talk-tickets-20906887062|Tickets are $20] (includes glass of wine and signed book)''
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T22:01:02+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-19T23:44:05+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "654"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "654"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13086341"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(8) "16945455"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(63) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/029155_ac_0455.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "L"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(5) "Let's"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item219496"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "219496"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(2885) "       2016-02-09T16:19:00+00:00 Let's talk: Atlanta-bred artist returns to discuss the city's creative future     2016-02-09T16:19:00+00:00  image-2
    From the definition of public art vs. graffiti to ways the city can better support local creatives, it seems there’s always a buzz surrounding Atlanta’s art scene. Brooklyn-based artist Annika Connor (an Atlanta dweller until age 18) aims to spark her own arts-centric dialogue when she brings her event, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/creative-conversations-active-ideas-art-talk-tickets-20906887062Creative Conversation: Active Ideas Art Talk, to General Assembly Wed., Feb. 17. Topics to be discussed include: how artists and entrepreneurs can link together to engage the imagination both inside and out of the traditional art world, how the DIY movement sweeping across the art world can be more effective, and potential reasons why many artists have moved back to the traditional book format in an age of primarily digital consumption.
    
    That last topic is especially relevant to Connor, who last year released her own tome, The Point Suite Contemporary Art Book, along with artist Nicholas Papadakis. The book’s aim is to highlight and share works from a smattering of artists whom Connor says are “really brilliant” but “underrepresented.” All attendees will be treated to their own signed copy of the book.
    
 
       After growing up in Atlanta, Connor made her way Chicago, then Barcelona and, eventually, settled in New York. Along with working on contemporary romantic paintings in her studio, she also heads up Active Ideas Productions, an org which aims to support the education and development of emerging artists. “The arts are a huge part of the American economy,” Connor says. “I think facilitating conversations like this and discussing how we can grow rather than limit the arts is incredibly important.” 
    
    As for what attendees can expect from her event, “I’m structuring these nights so that the bulk of the discussion is centered on a dialogue with the audience,” says says. “ I'm interested in discussing how business owners can more effectively manage their creatives, and how artists can establish themselves to survive on their art through new channels outside of the traditional gallery structure. I also want to discuss how the arts, entrepreneurs, and the tech communities across the country can work more together.” You know what they say: teamwork makes the dream work.
    
     image-1
    Creative Conversation: Active Ideas Art Talk at General Assembly Atlanta, Wed., Feb. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 (includes glass of wine and signed book)
             13086341 16945455        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/029155_ac_0455.png                  Let's talk: Atlanta-bred artist returns to discuss the city's creative future "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(269) "Let's talk: Atlanta-bred artist returns to discuss the city's creative future"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Tuesday February 9, 2016 11:19 am EST

image-2
From the definition of public art vs. graffiti to ways the city can better support local creatives, it seems there’s always a buzz surrounding Atlanta’s art scene. Brooklyn-based artist Annika Connor (an Atlanta dweller until age 18) aims to spark her own arts-centric dialogue when she brings her event,...

| more...
array(76) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(94) "Atlanta's zoning code, a key factor in making a better city, is getting a much-needed overhaul"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-04-30T11:50:20+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-09T14:23:58+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-08T16:35:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(94) "Atlanta's zoning code, a key factor in making a better city, is getting a much-needed overhaul"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-08T16:35:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(104) "Content:_:Atlanta's zoning code, a key factor in making a better city, is getting a much-needed overhaul"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(8463) "image-1On a recent Monday night at Atlanta Metropolitan State College near Capitol View, Atlanta Planning Commissioner told the packed crowd a simple truth about zoning, the most exciting of topics.
  
  "If we're going to grow," Keane said, "we're going to have to develop in a way that more people can walk… A lot of this zoning in the 1960's and 70's imagined a future where everything would be monolithic and huge, and we would drive everywhere.”
   
   That idea — making the city more accessible for people other than motorists — is the core philosophy at the heart of the Department of Planning and Community Development's current "Zoning Ordinance Diagnostic." 
  
  To most, the topic of zoning ordinances and building codes is a pretty mundane affair at best, but it’s a hot topic right now in Atlanta, and for good reason. As more people move into the city (and more expected to follow), the public is beginning to understand the significance of zoning. Zoning isn’t just how a city regulates private property; it’s the way citizens collectively decide the blueprint for how we grow cities.
 
  To gain more feedback and public input, the DPCD hosted its first public hearings on their Zoning Ordinance Diagnostic, an approximately six-month process to evaluate and make recommendations for new zoning codes and to see what Atlantans think of initial evaluations of Atlanta's current set of regulations. (Here's a presentation of a recent meeting.)
 
 
 
     Conducted by local firms Tunnell-Spangler-Walsh, the Canvas Planning Group, and the Zoeckler Firm, the process is simply a look at what regulations can be improved. And considering the regulations haven't been touched since the last zoning rewrite more than three decades ago, when Atlanta was a different place, there's a good bit to do. 
  
  "Our uses are very different now than they were in 1980," said Caleb Racicot of TSW.
   
  Atlanta has what's called a hybrid approach to zoning; the zoning code applies different regulations to different districts, or types of areas. More suburban style areas adhere to “conventional” planning, like strip shopping centers, while more urban areas like Atlantic Station or the Old Fourth Ward follow different rules. 
  
  The conventional style of planning, Racicot said, is what leads to suburban sprawl. Such ordinances distinguish zoning districts based on building use — a shopping center, single-family housing, light industrial, etc. Form-based planning, however, emphasizes the efficient use of urban spaces and how buildings relate to the surrounding community. Think about the differences between Portland, Oregon and West Orange, New Jersey. Or driving through an arterial suburban road in North Fulton vs. walking in Inman Quarter, for example.
   
  The firms and Keane’s department analyzed zoning ordinances in Denver, Raleigh, Philadelphia, and Miami to establish a list of “best practices” with the aim of increasing housing density, creating better access to transportation options, boosting walkability, and preserving the aesthetics of historic neighborhoods.
   
  The regulatory strategies the planning firms focused on are transitioning from a hybrid zoning code to more form-based (but still hybrid) code, establishing metrics other than FAR (Floor Area Ratio) for judging development plans, lowering parking requirements, and more.
  
  The planners claim that the new code will also be easier to interpret with simpler, more unified definitions and graphical illustrations to better explain regulations — and if the changes go through, the new rules could have tremendous effects.
   
image-2Atlanta currently requires developers provide one and a half parking spaces per residential unit for multi-unit buildings. Lowering or even removing the number of required parking spaces for certain types of developments, such as small-scale multi-unit housing, opens the door for much more, much denser infill development, the planners said. Under current regulations, they said, smaller-scale buildings can't be built because of costs of or lack of space for parking. 
  
  With more Atlantans choosing to ride MARTA, bike, and walk to work instead of driving, and with the looming arrival of autonomous cars that could all but evaporate any need for residential parking, the 1.5-spaces-per-unit rule does in some cases seem more than enough. Lowering parking requirements for developments could also help assuage fears from neighborhoods worried about the increased traffic that typically comes with new developments, the planners added.
   
  Transitioning to a more form-based zoning code could help preserve the identities of historic intown neighborhoods — another major goal — by requiring developers and planners to propose projects that jibe with the design rules required for certain neighborhoods such as Candler Park’s bungalow style houses or Inman Park’s Victorian homes, for example. 

By focusing more on the "urban form" – the layout of the area around a planned project, the height or setback of buildings from the street, where parking needs to be located, etc. – than the uses of individual buildings, the zoning ordinances will promote a greater design identity that the city traditionally lacks due to the dwindling number of historic structures. In many cases, the planners said, new developments under form-based planning regimes actually enhance the identities of their neighborhoods.
   
  A hybrid of the two strategies is increasingly common in many American cities that are working to revitalize their downtowns and urban areas but have largely suburban surrounding metro areas. Hybrid codes are better suited for more suburban cities with dense downtowns and sprawling neighborhoods like those in Raleigh, Philadelphia, and Denver because they offer more flexibility for developers and planners while also promoting better urban form. Miami is the only city the planning group studied with a fully form-based zoning code.
   
  The firms also worked with the DPCD to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the current zoning ordinance. But according to Aaron Fortner of Canvas Planning, there seem to be a lot more of the latter than the former. 
   
  That isn't to say that everything about Atlanta's current zoning ordinances are busted, Fortner said, but there is a lot that could be improved. The planners commended the city's requirement for urban greenspaces, the high level of neighborhood involvement in planning decisions, and the push for new districts with low or no parking requirements. 
 
 But the weaknesses definitely outweigh the strengths: “Parking requirements can result in the demolition or under-utilization of historic buildings,” “FAR is poor at regulating the form of development,” “The various procedures and committees within the city is confusing and inconsistent." The list was two slides long, but you get the idea.
 
image-3
So how long will this process take? When Keane spoke last month at Georgia Tech's College of Architecture on "the kind of city Atlanta is," he noted that other cities’ zoning overhauls typically take between five and seven years to fully implement. He’s hinted that there could be action to advance some of these goals sooner, such as reducing parking requirements. "There's a lot of things that need to happen in Atlanta sooner," he said. 
  
 Informing the zoning rewrite will be the Atlanta City Design Project, an 18-month citywide project that Keane hopes will help Atlanta finally determine its design identity and how it should evolve. Ryan Gravel, the visionary who dreamed up the Beltline as a Georgia Tech graduate student, has been hired to help produce the effort.   
  
  For Keane, whom the planning community has applauded since coming on board last July, bringing the city’s zoning ordinances up to date is not just a way to seal his legacy, it's the best way to cement his ideas and planning expertise in Atlanta's future. After Mayor Kasim Reed's second and final term ends in January 2018, Keane could be replaced as planning commissioner by the new mayor. Or he could be kept on to serve under the next administration. By developing a modern zoning ordinance, he has the opportunity to set smarter planning practices in stone. 
 
 To offer input on the zoning code and view the presentation, head to the website the city has created to support the effort. 
 
 
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(8598) "[image-1]On a recent Monday night at Atlanta Metropolitan State College near Capitol View, Atlanta Planning Commissioner told the packed crowd a simple truth about zoning, the most exciting of topics.
  
  "If we're going to grow," Keane said, "we're going to have to develop in a way that more people can walk… A lot of this zoning in the 1960's and 70's imagined a future where everything would be monolithic and huge, and we would drive everywhere.”
   
   That idea — making the city more accessible for people other than motorists — is the core philosophy at the heart of the Department of Planning and Community Development's current "Zoning Ordinance Diagnostic." 
  
  To most, the topic of zoning ordinances and building codes is a pretty mundane affair at best, but it’s a hot topic right now in Atlanta, and for good reason. As more people move into the city (and more expected to follow), the public is beginning to understand the significance of zoning. Zoning isn’t just how a city regulates private property; it’s the way citizens collectively decide the blueprint for how we grow cities.
 
  To gain more feedback and public input, the DPCD hosted its first public hearings on their Zoning Ordinance Diagnostic, an approximately six-month process to evaluate and make recommendations for new zoning codes and to see what Atlantans think of initial evaluations of Atlanta's current set of regulations. ([https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/46351250/ATL Zoning Diagnostic Presentation (January 2016).pdf|Here's a presentation of a recent meeting].)
 
 
 
     Conducted by local firms Tunnell-Spangler-Walsh, the Canvas Planning Group, and the Zoeckler Firm, the process is simply a look at what regulations can be improved. And considering the regulations haven't been touched since the last zoning rewrite more than three decades ago, when Atlanta was a different place, there's a good bit to do. 
  
  "Our uses are very different now than they were in 1980," said Caleb Racicot of TSW.
   
  Atlanta has what's called a hybrid approach to zoning; the zoning code applies different regulations to different districts, or types of areas. More suburban style areas adhere to “conventional” planning, like strip shopping centers, while more urban areas like Atlantic Station or the Old Fourth Ward follow different rules. 
  
  The conventional style of planning, Racicot said, is what leads to suburban sprawl. Such ordinances distinguish zoning districts based on building use — a shopping center, single-family housing, light industrial, etc. Form-based planning, however, emphasizes the efficient use of urban spaces and how buildings relate to the surrounding community. Think about the differences between Portland, Oregon and West Orange, New Jersey. Or driving through an arterial suburban road in North Fulton vs. walking in Inman Quarter, for example.
   
  The firms and Keane’s department analyzed zoning ordinances in Denver, Raleigh, Philadelphia, and Miami to establish a list of “best practices” with the aim of increasing housing density, creating better access to transportation options, boosting walkability, and preserving the aesthetics of historic neighborhoods.
   
  The regulatory strategies the planning firms focused on are transitioning from a hybrid zoning code to more form-based (but still hybrid) code, establishing metrics other than FAR (Floor Area Ratio) for judging development plans, lowering parking requirements, and more.
  
  The planners claim that the new code will also be easier to interpret with simpler, more unified definitions and graphical illustrations to better explain regulations — and if the changes go through, the new rules could have tremendous effects.
   
[image-2]Atlanta currently requires developers provide one and a half parking spaces per residential unit for multi-unit buildings. Lowering or even removing the number of required parking spaces for certain types of developments, such as small-scale multi-unit housing, opens the door for much more, much denser infill development, the planners said. Under current regulations, they said, smaller-scale buildings can't be built because of costs of or lack of space for parking. 
  
  With more Atlantans choosing to ride MARTA, bike, and walk to work instead of driving, and with the looming arrival of autonomous cars that could all but evaporate any need for residential parking, the 1.5-spaces-per-unit rule does in some cases seem more than enough. Lowering parking requirements for developments could also help assuage fears from neighborhoods worried about the increased traffic that typically comes with new developments, the planners added.
   
  Transitioning to a more form-based zoning code could help preserve the identities of historic intown neighborhoods — another major goal — by requiring developers and planners to propose projects that jibe with the design rules required for certain neighborhoods such as Candler Park’s bungalow style houses or Inman Park’s Victorian homes, for example. 

By focusing more on the "urban form" – the layout of the area around a planned project, the height or setback of buildings from the street, where parking needs to be located, etc. – than the uses of individual buildings, the zoning ordinances will promote a greater design identity that the city traditionally lacks due to the dwindling number of historic structures. In many cases, the planners said, new developments under form-based planning regimes actually enhance the identities of their neighborhoods.
   
  A hybrid of the two strategies is increasingly common in many American cities that are working to revitalize their downtowns and urban areas but have largely suburban surrounding metro areas. Hybrid codes are better suited for more suburban cities with dense downtowns and sprawling neighborhoods like those in Raleigh, Philadelphia, and Denver because they offer more flexibility for developers and planners while also promoting better urban form. Miami is the only city the planning group studied with a fully form-based zoning code.
   
  The firms also worked with the DPCD to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the current zoning ordinance. But according to Aaron Fortner of Canvas Planning, there seem to be a lot more of the latter than the former. 
   
  That isn't to say that everything about Atlanta's current zoning ordinances are busted, Fortner said, but there is a lot that could be improved. The planners commended the city's requirement for urban greenspaces, the high level of neighborhood involvement in planning decisions, and the push for new districts with low or no parking requirements. 
 
 But the weaknesses definitely outweigh the strengths: “Parking requirements can result in the demolition or under-utilization of historic buildings,” “FAR is poor at regulating the form of development,” “The various procedures and committees within the city is confusing and inconsistent." The list was two slides long, but you get the idea.
 
[image-3]
So how long will this process take? When Keane spoke last month at Georgia Tech's College of Architecture on "the kind of city Atlanta is," he noted that other cities’ zoning overhauls typically take between five and seven years to fully implement. He’s hinted that there could be action to advance some of these goals sooner, such as reducing parking requirements. "There's a lot of things that need to happen in Atlanta sooner," he said. 
  
 Informing the zoning rewrite will be the Atlanta City Design Project, an 18-month citywide project that Keane hopes will help Atlanta finally determine its design identity and how it should evolve. Ryan Gravel, the visionary who dreamed up the Beltline as a Georgia Tech graduate student, has been hired to help produce the effort.   
  
  For Keane, whom the planning community has applauded since coming on board last July, bringing the city’s zoning ordinances up to date is not just a way to seal his legacy, it's the best way to cement his ideas and planning expertise in Atlanta's future. After Mayor Kasim Reed's second and final term ends in January 2018, Keane could be replaced as planning commissioner by the new mayor. Or he could be kept on to serve under the next administration. By developing a modern zoning ordinance, he has the opportunity to set smarter planning practices in stone. 
 
 To offer input on the zoning code and view the presentation, [http://www.zoningatl.com/|head to the website the city has created to support the effort]. 
 
 
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T22:01:02+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-19T23:44:05+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "654"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "654"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13086314"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(8) "16917435"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(84) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/029049_broad_and_poplar_streets_071.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "A"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(9) "Atlanta's"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item219490"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "219490"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(8857) "       2016-02-08T16:35:00+00:00 Atlanta's zoning code, a key factor in making a better city, is getting a much-needed overhaul     2016-02-08T16:35:00+00:00  image-1On a recent Monday night at Atlanta Metropolitan State College near Capitol View, Atlanta Planning Commissioner told the packed crowd a simple truth about zoning, the most exciting of topics.
  
  "If we're going to grow," Keane said, "we're going to have to develop in a way that more people can walk… A lot of this zoning in the 1960's and 70's imagined a future where everything would be monolithic and huge, and we would drive everywhere.”
   
   That idea — making the city more accessible for people other than motorists — is the core philosophy at the heart of the Department of Planning and Community Development's current "Zoning Ordinance Diagnostic." 
  
  To most, the topic of zoning ordinances and building codes is a pretty mundane affair at best, but it’s a hot topic right now in Atlanta, and for good reason. As more people move into the city (and more expected to follow), the public is beginning to understand the significance of zoning. Zoning isn’t just how a city regulates private property; it’s the way citizens collectively decide the blueprint for how we grow cities.
 
  To gain more feedback and public input, the DPCD hosted its first public hearings on their Zoning Ordinance Diagnostic, an approximately six-month process to evaluate and make recommendations for new zoning codes and to see what Atlantans think of initial evaluations of Atlanta's current set of regulations. (Here's a presentation of a recent meeting.)
 
 
 
     Conducted by local firms Tunnell-Spangler-Walsh, the Canvas Planning Group, and the Zoeckler Firm, the process is simply a look at what regulations can be improved. And considering the regulations haven't been touched since the last zoning rewrite more than three decades ago, when Atlanta was a different place, there's a good bit to do. 
  
  "Our uses are very different now than they were in 1980," said Caleb Racicot of TSW.
   
  Atlanta has what's called a hybrid approach to zoning; the zoning code applies different regulations to different districts, or types of areas. More suburban style areas adhere to “conventional” planning, like strip shopping centers, while more urban areas like Atlantic Station or the Old Fourth Ward follow different rules. 
  
  The conventional style of planning, Racicot said, is what leads to suburban sprawl. Such ordinances distinguish zoning districts based on building use — a shopping center, single-family housing, light industrial, etc. Form-based planning, however, emphasizes the efficient use of urban spaces and how buildings relate to the surrounding community. Think about the differences between Portland, Oregon and West Orange, New Jersey. Or driving through an arterial suburban road in North Fulton vs. walking in Inman Quarter, for example.
   
  The firms and Keane’s department analyzed zoning ordinances in Denver, Raleigh, Philadelphia, and Miami to establish a list of “best practices” with the aim of increasing housing density, creating better access to transportation options, boosting walkability, and preserving the aesthetics of historic neighborhoods.
   
  The regulatory strategies the planning firms focused on are transitioning from a hybrid zoning code to more form-based (but still hybrid) code, establishing metrics other than FAR (Floor Area Ratio) for judging development plans, lowering parking requirements, and more.
  
  The planners claim that the new code will also be easier to interpret with simpler, more unified definitions and graphical illustrations to better explain regulations — and if the changes go through, the new rules could have tremendous effects.
   
image-2Atlanta currently requires developers provide one and a half parking spaces per residential unit for multi-unit buildings. Lowering or even removing the number of required parking spaces for certain types of developments, such as small-scale multi-unit housing, opens the door for much more, much denser infill development, the planners said. Under current regulations, they said, smaller-scale buildings can't be built because of costs of or lack of space for parking. 
  
  With more Atlantans choosing to ride MARTA, bike, and walk to work instead of driving, and with the looming arrival of autonomous cars that could all but evaporate any need for residential parking, the 1.5-spaces-per-unit rule does in some cases seem more than enough. Lowering parking requirements for developments could also help assuage fears from neighborhoods worried about the increased traffic that typically comes with new developments, the planners added.
   
  Transitioning to a more form-based zoning code could help preserve the identities of historic intown neighborhoods — another major goal — by requiring developers and planners to propose projects that jibe with the design rules required for certain neighborhoods such as Candler Park’s bungalow style houses or Inman Park’s Victorian homes, for example. 

By focusing more on the "urban form" – the layout of the area around a planned project, the height or setback of buildings from the street, where parking needs to be located, etc. – than the uses of individual buildings, the zoning ordinances will promote a greater design identity that the city traditionally lacks due to the dwindling number of historic structures. In many cases, the planners said, new developments under form-based planning regimes actually enhance the identities of their neighborhoods.
   
  A hybrid of the two strategies is increasingly common in many American cities that are working to revitalize their downtowns and urban areas but have largely suburban surrounding metro areas. Hybrid codes are better suited for more suburban cities with dense downtowns and sprawling neighborhoods like those in Raleigh, Philadelphia, and Denver because they offer more flexibility for developers and planners while also promoting better urban form. Miami is the only city the planning group studied with a fully form-based zoning code.
   
  The firms also worked with the DPCD to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the current zoning ordinance. But according to Aaron Fortner of Canvas Planning, there seem to be a lot more of the latter than the former. 
   
  That isn't to say that everything about Atlanta's current zoning ordinances are busted, Fortner said, but there is a lot that could be improved. The planners commended the city's requirement for urban greenspaces, the high level of neighborhood involvement in planning decisions, and the push for new districts with low or no parking requirements. 
 
 But the weaknesses definitely outweigh the strengths: “Parking requirements can result in the demolition or under-utilization of historic buildings,” “FAR is poor at regulating the form of development,” “The various procedures and committees within the city is confusing and inconsistent." The list was two slides long, but you get the idea.
 
image-3
So how long will this process take? When Keane spoke last month at Georgia Tech's College of Architecture on "the kind of city Atlanta is," he noted that other cities’ zoning overhauls typically take between five and seven years to fully implement. He’s hinted that there could be action to advance some of these goals sooner, such as reducing parking requirements. "There's a lot of things that need to happen in Atlanta sooner," he said. 
  
 Informing the zoning rewrite will be the Atlanta City Design Project, an 18-month citywide project that Keane hopes will help Atlanta finally determine its design identity and how it should evolve. Ryan Gravel, the visionary who dreamed up the Beltline as a Georgia Tech graduate student, has been hired to help produce the effort.   
  
  For Keane, whom the planning community has applauded since coming on board last July, bringing the city’s zoning ordinances up to date is not just a way to seal his legacy, it's the best way to cement his ideas and planning expertise in Atlanta's future. After Mayor Kasim Reed's second and final term ends in January 2018, Keane could be replaced as planning commissioner by the new mayor. Or he could be kept on to serve under the next administration. By developing a modern zoning ordinance, he has the opportunity to set smarter planning practices in stone. 
 
 To offer input on the zoning code and view the presentation, head to the website the city has created to support the effort. 
 
 
             13086314 16917435        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/029049_broad_and_poplar_streets_071.png                  Atlanta's zoning code, a key factor in making a better city, is getting a much-needed overhaul "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(281) "Atlanta's zoning code, a key factor in making a better city, is getting a much-needed overhaul"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Monday February 8, 2016 11:35 am EST

image-1On a recent Monday night at Atlanta Metropolitan State College near Capitol View, Atlanta Planning Commissioner told the packed crowd a simple truth about zoning, the most exciting of topics.

"If we're going to grow," Keane said, "we're going to have to develop in a way that more people can walk… A lot of this zoning in the 1960's and 70's imagined a future where everything would be...

| more...
array(75) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(30) "Atlanta food events: Feb. 8-14"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-19T23:44:05+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-10T13:38:18+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
    [1]=>
    string(5) "admin"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-08T15:01:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(30) "Atlanta food events: Feb. 8-14"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-08T15:01:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(40) "Content:_:Atlanta food events: Feb. 8-14"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(2914) "image-1 
Wine dinner? Beer tasting? Cooking class? Let us know. Create a CL account and submit your Food and Drink happs here.

   Monday
   
   The Melting Pot Mon., Feb. 8, 4-10 p.m. Galentine's Day Gather your best gals together for an epic evening of fondue, friends, and more fondue to celebrate Galentine’s Day. Details          Tuesday
   
   Meehan's Public House - Vinings Tues., Feb. 9, 11:30 a.m.-midnight. Mardi Gras on the Bayou Chef Heather Murray will put a Georgia twist on some cajun favorites with a specialty menu all day & night long. Details

  Cook Hall Tues., Feb. 9, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Fat Tuesday Chef David Gross has created Mardi Gras Blackboard Specials for guests to indulge in. Guests will get in the full Mardi Gras spirit with special $5 craft Hurricane and Sazerac cocktails. Details 
  
  Serpas True Food Tues., Feb. 9, 6-9:30 p.m. 7th Annual Mardi Gras Bash Join Serpas for the best Mardi Gras party outside of the Big Easy, featuring live music, heavy hors d'oeuvres, and an all-you-can-eat buffet. Details
  
  Bellina Alimentari Tues., Feb. 9, 6-7 p.m. Chocolate Workshop Learn more about the world of chocolate with Cacao Atlanta, a local craft chocolate supplier. Details      Sweet Auburn Barbecue Tues., Feb. 9, 6-10 p.m. Ring In the Year of the Monkey Enjoy a special menu of Chinese-inspired dishes, a featured Monday Night beer, and lion dancers. Details
  
  Thursday
  
  Bellina Alimentari Thurs., Feb. 11, 6-7:30 p.m. Pasta Date Night for Two Spend a night with your partner and learn how easy it is to make your own fresh pasta at home. Details
  
  Saturday
  
  Park Tavern Sat., Feb. 13, 1-11 p.m. Oysterfest 2016 Enjoy live music from local bands, DJs, cold beer and other tasty beverages, and tons of fresh raw, steamed, and fried oysters. Details
  
  Lure Sat., Feb. 13, 5-11 p.m. Valentine's Day at Lure Couples can take in a romantic “steak for two” option featuring a bone-in ribeye and sides, including ricotta gnocchi, butter poached lobster, and a citrus vinegar arugula salad with Parmigiano Reggiano. Details
  
  Ecco Sat., Feb. 13, 5:30-11 p.m. Valentine's Day at Ecco Enjoy a creative spin on “his and hers” menus during Valentine’s Day weekend with “Mars & Venus” specials – named after the famous Italian Renaissance painting by Sandro Botticelli. Details
  
  Sunday
  
  Second Self Beer Company Sun., Feb. 14, 1 p.m. Bend and Brew Join Second Self in their tasting room on Valentine's Day for an all-levels yoga class with instructor Veronica Lewinger and evolation Yoga. After class, guests are invited to reward themselves with a private brewery tour. Details
  
  Joe's on Juniper Sun., Feb. 14. Valentine's Day Dinner and Karaoke For a casual night, head to Joe's on Juniper for Love Karaoke. Guests will enjoy a steak and shrimp dinner plus salad, sides, and choice of wine or bubbles. Details
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4319) "[image-1] 
Wine dinner? Beer tasting? Cooking class? Let us know. Create a CL ''account and [http://clatl.com/atlanta/Events/AddEvent|submit your Food and Drink happs here].''
''''
   __Monday__
__   __
__   [/atlanta/the_melting_pot/Location?oid=7279553|The Melting Pot] __Mon., Feb. 8, 4-10 p.m. __Galentine's Day__ Gather your best gals together for an epic evening of fondue, friends, and more fondue to celebrate Galentine’s Day. [/atlanta/galentines-day/Event?oid=16757401|Details %%%     %%%    ]__Tuesday__
__   __
__   [/atlanta/meehan_s_public_house_vinings/Location?oid=1305529|Meehan's Public House - Vinings]__ Tues., Feb. 9, 11:30 a.m.-midnight. __Mardi Gras on the Bayou__ Chef Heather Murray will put a Georgia twist on some cajun favorites with a specialty menu all day & night long. [/atlanta/mardi-gras-on-the-bayou/Event?oid=16859185|Details]

  __[/atlanta/cook_hall/Location?oid=6987241|Cook Hall] __Tues., Feb. 9, 5:30-8:30 p.m. __Fat Tuesday__ Chef David Gross has created Mardi Gras Blackboard Specials for guests to indulge in. Guests will get in the full Mardi Gras spirit with special $5 craft Hurricane and Sazerac cocktails. [/atlanta/fat-tuesday/Event?oid=16697736|Details] 
  
  __[/atlanta/serpas_true_food/Location?oid=5572060|Serpas True Food] __Tues., Feb. 9, 6-9:30 p.m. __7th Annual Mardi Gras Bash __Join Serpas for the best Mardi Gras party outside of the Big Easy, featuring live music, heavy hors d'oeuvres, and an all-you-can-eat buffet. [/atlanta/7th-annual-mardi-gras-bash/Event?oid=16886715|Details]
  
  __[/atlanta/bellina_alimentari/Location?oid=15784019|Bellina Alimentari] __Tues., Feb. 9, 6-7 p.m. __Chocolate Workshop__ Learn more about the world of chocolate with Cacao Atlanta, a local craft chocolate supplier. [/atlanta/chocolate-workshop/Event?oid=16899132|Details %%%    %%% ]__[/atlanta/sweet_auburn_barbecue/Location?oid=10596882|Sweet Auburn Barbecue] __Tues., Feb. 9, 6-10 p.m. __Ring In the Year of the Monkey__ Enjoy a special menu of Chinese-inspired dishes, a featured Monday Night beer, and lion dancers. [/atlanta/ring-in-the-year-of-the-monkey/Event?oid=16899124|Details]
  
  __Thursday__
__  __
__  [/atlanta/bellina_alimentari/Location?oid=15784019|Bellina Alimentari] __Thurs., Feb. 11, 6-7:30 p.m. __Pasta Date Night for Two__ Spend a night with your partner and learn how easy it is to make your own fresh pasta at home. [/atlanta/pasta-date-night-for-two/Event?oid=16899144|Details]
  
  __Saturday__
  
  [/atlanta/park_tavern/Location?oid=1296369|Park Tavern]__ __Sat., Feb. 13, 1-11 p.m. __Oysterfest 2016 __Enjoy live music from local bands, DJs, cold beer and other tasty beverages, and tons of fresh raw, steamed, and fried oysters. [/atlanta/oysterfest-2016/Event?oid=16553792|Details]
  
  [/atlanta/lure/Location?oid=6232914|Lure]__ __Sat., Feb. 13, 5-11 p.m. __Valentine's Day at Lure __Couples can take in a romantic “steak for two” option featuring a bone-in ribeye and sides, including ricotta gnocchi, butter poached lobster, and a citrus vinegar arugula salad with Parmigiano Reggiano. [/atlanta/valentines-day-at-lure/Event?oid=16892369|Details]
  
  __[/atlanta/ecco/Location?oid=1294459|Ecco] __Sat., Feb. 13, 5:30-11 p.m. __Valentine's Day at Ecco__ Enjoy a creative spin on “his and hers” menus during Valentine’s Day weekend with “Mars & Venus” specials – named after the famous Italian Renaissance painting by Sandro Botticelli. [/atlanta/valentines-day-at-ecco/Event?oid=16892110|Details]
  
  __Sunday__
__  __
__  [/atlanta/second_self_beer_company/Location?oid=12603856|Second Self Beer Company] __Sun., Feb. 14, 1 p.m. __Bend and Brew__ Join Second Self in their tasting room on Valentine's Day for an all-levels yoga class with instructor Veronica Lewinger and evolation Yoga. After class, guests are invited to reward themselves with a private brewery tour. [/atlanta/bend-and-brew/Event?oid=16851339|Details]
  
  [/atlanta/joe_s_on_juniper/Location?oid=1291169|Joe's on Juniper]__ __Sun., Feb. 14. __Valentine's Day Dinner and Karaoke__ For a casual night, head to Joe's on Juniper for Love Karaoke. Guests will enjoy a steak and shrimp dinner plus salad, sides, and choice of wine or bubbles. [/atlanta/valentines-day-dinner-and-karaoke/Event?oid=16850836|Details]
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T22:01:02+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-19T23:44:05+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13086325"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(8) "16921251"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(68) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/023761_events_illo2.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "A"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(7) "Atlanta"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item229875"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "229875"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(3164) "       2016-02-08T15:01:00+00:00 Atlanta food events: Feb. 8-14     2016-02-08T15:01:00+00:00  image-1 
Wine dinner? Beer tasting? Cooking class? Let us know. Create a CL account and submit your Food and Drink happs here.

   Monday
   
   The Melting Pot Mon., Feb. 8, 4-10 p.m. Galentine's Day Gather your best gals together for an epic evening of fondue, friends, and more fondue to celebrate Galentine’s Day. Details          Tuesday
   
   Meehan's Public House - Vinings Tues., Feb. 9, 11:30 a.m.-midnight. Mardi Gras on the Bayou Chef Heather Murray will put a Georgia twist on some cajun favorites with a specialty menu all day & night long. Details

  Cook Hall Tues., Feb. 9, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Fat Tuesday Chef David Gross has created Mardi Gras Blackboard Specials for guests to indulge in. Guests will get in the full Mardi Gras spirit with special $5 craft Hurricane and Sazerac cocktails. Details 
  
  Serpas True Food Tues., Feb. 9, 6-9:30 p.m. 7th Annual Mardi Gras Bash Join Serpas for the best Mardi Gras party outside of the Big Easy, featuring live music, heavy hors d'oeuvres, and an all-you-can-eat buffet. Details
  
  Bellina Alimentari Tues., Feb. 9, 6-7 p.m. Chocolate Workshop Learn more about the world of chocolate with Cacao Atlanta, a local craft chocolate supplier. Details      Sweet Auburn Barbecue Tues., Feb. 9, 6-10 p.m. Ring In the Year of the Monkey Enjoy a special menu of Chinese-inspired dishes, a featured Monday Night beer, and lion dancers. Details
  
  Thursday
  
  Bellina Alimentari Thurs., Feb. 11, 6-7:30 p.m. Pasta Date Night for Two Spend a night with your partner and learn how easy it is to make your own fresh pasta at home. Details
  
  Saturday
  
  Park Tavern Sat., Feb. 13, 1-11 p.m. Oysterfest 2016 Enjoy live music from local bands, DJs, cold beer and other tasty beverages, and tons of fresh raw, steamed, and fried oysters. Details
  
  Lure Sat., Feb. 13, 5-11 p.m. Valentine's Day at Lure Couples can take in a romantic “steak for two” option featuring a bone-in ribeye and sides, including ricotta gnocchi, butter poached lobster, and a citrus vinegar arugula salad with Parmigiano Reggiano. Details
  
  Ecco Sat., Feb. 13, 5:30-11 p.m. Valentine's Day at Ecco Enjoy a creative spin on “his and hers” menus during Valentine’s Day weekend with “Mars & Venus” specials – named after the famous Italian Renaissance painting by Sandro Botticelli. Details
  
  Sunday
  
  Second Self Beer Company Sun., Feb. 14, 1 p.m. Bend and Brew Join Second Self in their tasting room on Valentine's Day for an all-levels yoga class with instructor Veronica Lewinger and evolation Yoga. After class, guests are invited to reward themselves with a private brewery tour. Details
  
  Joe's on Juniper Sun., Feb. 14. Valentine's Day Dinner and Karaoke For a casual night, head to Joe's on Juniper for Love Karaoke. Guests will enjoy a steak and shrimp dinner plus salad, sides, and choice of wine or bubbles. Details
             13086325 16921251        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/023761_events_illo2.png                  Atlanta food events: Feb. 8-14 "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(212) "Atlanta food events: Feb. 8-14"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Monday February 8, 2016 10:01 am EST

image-1
Wine dinner? Beer tasting? Cooking class? Let us know. Create a CL account and submit your Food and Drink happs here.

Monday

The Melting Pot Mon., Feb. 8, 4-10 p.m. Galentine's Day Gather your best gals together for an epic evening of fondue, friends, and more fondue to celebrate Galentine’s Day. Details Tuesday

Meehan's Public House - Vinings Tues., Feb. 9,...

| more...
array(76) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(54) "ATLwood: Yes, 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' is a real thing"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2020-04-11T22:39:54+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-09T14:23:58+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-05T20:04:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(54) "ATLwood: Yes, 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' is a real thing"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-05T20:04:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(64) "Content:_:ATLwood: Yes, 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' is a real thing"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(1445) "embed-1 What's Happening?
  
======>> The 2016 Georgia Entertainment Gala is taking place on Sat. Feb.6., at The Georgia World Congress Center. Artists and entertainers will be honored for their achievements and good looks. Even better: all the proceeds from the event go to the Atlanta Children’s Shelter and Angels Among Us Pet Rescue organization. You're invited.
  
  >> Celebrate Black History Month through film at Onyxcon Sankofa 2016 on Sat. Feb. 13. Artists and creators of  film and other media "with a focus on African Diaspora culture, concepts, interests, and general markets" will present their work and have conversations. Go get cultured!
  
  >> FYI: The Atlanta Jewish Film Festival is still happening and it's kind of a big deal...have you gone yet?
  
  Film Updates

  >>Tyler Perry has been sharing updates from his Boo! A Madea Halloween set here in Georgia. The film is slated for release on October 21, 2016 and will feature family matriarch Madea fighting off ghosts and ghouls. 
    
>> Atlanta isn't known for its beaches but the 2017 Baywatch revival movie starring Zac Efron and Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson will be filming in and around the Atlanta and Savannah areas. Get your swimsuits ready!
  
  Casting Calls
  
>> Be a part of the 'Neftlix & Chill' phenomenon.
  
>> You're a survivor. This role is meant for you. 
  
>> Get paid to act athletic. 
  
  
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(2076) "[embed-1] ===__What's Happening?__===
===____  ===
======>> __The 2016 Georgia Entertainment Gala__ is taking place on Sat. Feb.6., at The Georgia World Congress Center. Artists and entertainers will be honored for their achievements and good looks. Even better: all the proceeds from the event go to the Atlanta Children’s Shelter and Angels Among Us Pet Rescue organization. [http://www.gaentertainmentgala.com/|You're invited].
  
  >> Celebrate Black History Month through film at [http://www.onyxcon.com/|__Onyxcon Sankofa 2016__] on Sat. Feb. 13. Artists and creators of  film and other media "with a focus on African Diaspora culture, concepts, interests, and general markets" will present their work and have conversations. Go get cultured!
  
  >> FYI: [http://ajff.org/|__The Atlanta Jewish Film Festival__ ]is still happening and [http://ajff.org/history|it's kind of a big deal]...have you gone yet?
  
  ===__Film Updates__===
===____===
  >>Tyler Perry has been sharing updates from his __[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5325452/|Boo! A Madea Halloween] __set here in Georgia. The film is slated for release on October 21, 2016 and will feature family matriarch Madea fighting off ghosts and ghouls. 
    
>> Atlanta isn't known for its beaches but the 2017 __[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1469304/|Baywatch ]__revival movie starring Zac Efron and Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson will be filming in and around the Atlanta and Savannah areas. Get your swimsuits ready!
  
  __===Casting Calls===__
____  
>>[http://www.projectcasting.com/casting-calls-acting-auditions/netflixs-stranger-things-atlanta-casting-call-for-new-recurring-roles| Be a part of the 'Neftlix & Chill' phenomenon].
  
>> [http://www.thesoutherncastingcall.com/2016/02/05/hylton-casting-for-the-television-series-survivors-remorse-season-3-casting-the-following-specialty-extra-role-atlanta-ga/|You're a survivor. This role is meant for you.] 
  
>> [http://www.projectcasting.com/casting-calls-acting-auditions/300day-sports-commercial-atlanta-casting-call|Get paid to act athletic. ]
  
  
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T22:01:02+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-19T23:44:05+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "654"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "654"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "995"
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene_text"]=>
  string(3) "995"
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13086319"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(8) "16919450"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
    [1]=>
    int(995)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(5) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(654)
    [2]=>
    int(564)
    [3]=>
    int(201)
    [4]=>
    int(995)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(201)
    [1]=>
    int(995)
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "A"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(7) "ATLwood"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item219492"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "219492"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(1675) "       2016-02-05T20:04:00+00:00 ATLwood: Yes, 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' is a real thing     2016-02-05T20:04:00+00:00  embed-1 What's Happening?
  
======>> The 2016 Georgia Entertainment Gala is taking place on Sat. Feb.6., at The Georgia World Congress Center. Artists and entertainers will be honored for their achievements and good looks. Even better: all the proceeds from the event go to the Atlanta Children’s Shelter and Angels Among Us Pet Rescue organization. You're invited.
  
  >> Celebrate Black History Month through film at Onyxcon Sankofa 2016 on Sat. Feb. 13. Artists and creators of  film and other media "with a focus on African Diaspora culture, concepts, interests, and general markets" will present their work and have conversations. Go get cultured!
  
  >> FYI: The Atlanta Jewish Film Festival is still happening and it's kind of a big deal...have you gone yet?
  
  Film Updates

  >>Tyler Perry has been sharing updates from his Boo! A Madea Halloween set here in Georgia. The film is slated for release on October 21, 2016 and will feature family matriarch Madea fighting off ghosts and ghouls. 
    
>> Atlanta isn't known for its beaches but the 2017 Baywatch revival movie starring Zac Efron and Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson will be filming in and around the Atlanta and Savannah areas. Get your swimsuits ready!
  
  Casting Calls
  
>> Be a part of the 'Neftlix & Chill' phenomenon.
  
>> You're a survivor. This role is meant for you. 
  
>> Get paid to act athletic. 
  
  
             13086319 16919450                          ATLwood: Yes, 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' is a real thing "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(246) "ATLwood: Yes, 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' is a real thing"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Friday February 5, 2016 03:04 pm EST

embed-1 What's Happening?

======>> The 2016 Georgia Entertainment Gala is taking place on Sat. Feb.6., at The Georgia World Congress Center. Artists and entertainers will be honored for their achievements and good looks. Even better: all the proceeds from the event go to the Atlanta Children’s Shelter and Angels Among Us Pet Rescue organization. You're invited.

>> Celebrate Black...

| more...
array(76) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(67) "Atlanta pol wants gun locks, policy fix for background-check system"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-04-30T11:52:20+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-09T14:23:58+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-05T16:22:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(67) "Atlanta pol wants gun locks, policy fix for background-check system"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2016-02-05T16:22:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(77) "Content:_:Atlanta pol wants gun locks, policy fix for background-check system"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(3203) "image-1  Georgia GOP leaders traditionally have one response to any piece of legislation that comes close to curtailing Georgians' gun rights: no way. More often they're looking to increase the number of places a person can carry their shooting irons, including college campuses. 
  
  Despite that the majority party's stance and the odds of passage in a GOP-controlled General Assembly, state Sen. Elena Parent, D-Atlanta, is pushing for gun-control bills she calls “common sense solutions to protect our children and others from unintended violence.”
     
     The first, Senate Bill 303, would require retailers to provide a gun lock with each firearm purchase. Parent says the devices would "protect children from deadly and tragic accidents" and "giving parents the tools to keep guns inaccessible to unsupervised children.”  Jerry Henry, executive director of Georgia Carry, one of the state's most vocal advocates for gun owners, says the group stands against the bill. He says most new firearms come with safety locks that are never used anyway, and add to the cost for both customer and retailer.
  
     "Even the pamphlets that come with the firearm will tell you, 'Locking your firearm might result in your death death due to slow accessibility,'" Henry says. "What good is a firearm than you cannot use?  People who want to use gun safety locks can purchase them for themselves and use them as they wish."Parent's second measure, Senate Bill 304, would address a policy gap that allows people who have been involuntarily hospitalized in the past to be able to purchase firearms. Currently, if a person has been involuntarily committed for mental illness, they can still buy a gun in Georgia. That’s because, according to state law, after five years, the person's record will be purged by the Georgia Crime Information Center and not show up in background checks. Approximately 500 Georgians' records were removed from the Georgia Crime Information Center in 2015.     "We can prevent those suffering from a mental illness and found to be a danger to themselves or others from buying guns," Parent says. "This bill ensures that people found by a judge to be a danger to themselves and others from purchasing guns. The debate can continue, but Georgia should act. That’s just common sense.”  Henry says Georgia Carry has no problem eliminating the automatic erasures portion of the law. He believes, however, that there should be "due process for restoring a persons' rights 5 years after the involuntary hospitalization," and GCO has offered suggested changes to the bill. He says if courts find a person to no longer suffer from the mental health condition that led to their involuntary hospitalization, these persons should be considered to have their rights restored. Currently, those requests are considered by the State Board of Pardons and Paroles. 

Parent is not the only Democratic lawmaker to introduce gun-control measures this legislative session. State Rep. Keisha Waites, D-Atlanta, wants gun owners to be required to undergo safety training. And state Rep. Mary-Margaret Oliver, D-Decatur, introduced a controversial proposal banning assault weapons.
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(3465) "[image-1]  Georgia GOP leaders traditionally have one response to any piece of legislation that comes close to curtailing Georgians' gun rights: no way. More often they're looking to increase the number of places a person can carry their shooting irons, including college campuses. 
  
  Despite that the majority party's stance and the odds of passage in a GOP-controlled General Assembly, state Sen. Elena Parent, D-Atlanta, is pushing for gun-control bills she calls “common sense solutions to protect our children and others from unintended violence.”
     
     The first, [http://www.legis.ga.gov/Legislation/en-US/display/20152016/SB/303|Senate Bill 303], would require retailers to provide a gun lock with each firearm purchase. Parent says the devices would "protect children from deadly and tragic accidents" and "giving parents the tools to keep guns inaccessible to unsupervised children.”  Jerry Henry, executive director of [http://www.georgiacarry.org|Georgia Carry], one of the state's most vocal advocates for gun owners, says the group stands against the bill. He says most new firearms come with safety locks that are never used anyway, and add to the cost for both customer and retailer.
  
     "Even the pamphlets that come with the firearm will tell you, 'Locking your firearm might result in your death death due to slow accessibility,'" Henry says. "What good is a firearm than you cannot use?  People who want to use gun safety locks can purchase them for themselves and use them as they wish."Parent's second measure, [http://www.legis.ga.gov/Legislation/en-US/display/20152016/SB/304|Senate Bill 304], would address a policy gap that allows people who have been involuntarily hospitalized in the past to be able to purchase firearms. Currently, if a person has been involuntarily committed for mental illness, they can still buy a gun in Georgia. That’s because, according to state law, after five years, the person's record will be purged by the Georgia Crime Information Center and not show up in background checks. [http://www.myajc.com/news/news/local/georgia-clears-way-for-mentally-ill-to-buy-guns/nppWY/|Approximately 500 Georgians' records were removed from the Georgia Crime Information Center] in 2015.     "We can prevent those suffering from a mental illness and found to be a danger to themselves or others from buying guns," Parent says. "This bill ensures that people found by a judge to be a danger to themselves and others from purchasing guns. The debate can continue, but Georgia should act. That’s just common sense.”  Henry says Georgia Carry has no problem eliminating the automatic erasures portion of the law. He believes, however, that there should be "due process for restoring a persons' rights 5 years after the involuntary hospitalization," and GCO has offered suggested changes to the bill. He says if courts find a person to no longer suffer from the mental health condition that led to their involuntary hospitalization, these persons should be considered to have their rights restored. Currently, those requests are considered by the State Board of Pardons and Paroles. 

Parent is not the only Democratic lawmaker to introduce gun-control measures this legislative session. State Rep. Keisha Waites, D-Atlanta, wants gun owners to be required to undergo safety training. And state Rep. Mary-Margaret Oliver, D-Decatur, introduced a controversial proposal banning assault weapons.
"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-20T22:01:02+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-19T23:44:05+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "654"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "654"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "13086287"
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyContentID"]=>
  string(8) "16898746"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(73) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/0233ec_picparentelena768.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(654)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "A"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(7) "Atlanta"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item219487"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "219487"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(3532) "       2016-02-05T16:22:00+00:00 Atlanta pol wants gun locks, policy fix for background-check system     2016-02-05T16:22:00+00:00  image-1  Georgia GOP leaders traditionally have one response to any piece of legislation that comes close to curtailing Georgians' gun rights: no way. More often they're looking to increase the number of places a person can carry their shooting irons, including college campuses. 
  
  Despite that the majority party's stance and the odds of passage in a GOP-controlled General Assembly, state Sen. Elena Parent, D-Atlanta, is pushing for gun-control bills she calls “common sense solutions to protect our children and others from unintended violence.”
     
     The first, Senate Bill 303, would require retailers to provide a gun lock with each firearm purchase. Parent says the devices would "protect children from deadly and tragic accidents" and "giving parents the tools to keep guns inaccessible to unsupervised children.”  Jerry Henry, executive director of Georgia Carry, one of the state's most vocal advocates for gun owners, says the group stands against the bill. He says most new firearms come with safety locks that are never used anyway, and add to the cost for both customer and retailer.
  
     "Even the pamphlets that come with the firearm will tell you, 'Locking your firearm might result in your death death due to slow accessibility,'" Henry says. "What good is a firearm than you cannot use?  People who want to use gun safety locks can purchase them for themselves and use them as they wish."Parent's second measure, Senate Bill 304, would address a policy gap that allows people who have been involuntarily hospitalized in the past to be able to purchase firearms. Currently, if a person has been involuntarily committed for mental illness, they can still buy a gun in Georgia. That’s because, according to state law, after five years, the person's record will be purged by the Georgia Crime Information Center and not show up in background checks. Approximately 500 Georgians' records were removed from the Georgia Crime Information Center in 2015.     "We can prevent those suffering from a mental illness and found to be a danger to themselves or others from buying guns," Parent says. "This bill ensures that people found by a judge to be a danger to themselves and others from purchasing guns. The debate can continue, but Georgia should act. That’s just common sense.”  Henry says Georgia Carry has no problem eliminating the automatic erasures portion of the law. He believes, however, that there should be "due process for restoring a persons' rights 5 years after the involuntary hospitalization," and GCO has offered suggested changes to the bill. He says if courts find a person to no longer suffer from the mental health condition that led to their involuntary hospitalization, these persons should be considered to have their rights restored. Currently, those requests are considered by the State Board of Pardons and Paroles. 

Parent is not the only Democratic lawmaker to introduce gun-control measures this legislative session. State Rep. Keisha Waites, D-Atlanta, wants gun owners to be required to undergo safety training. And state Rep. Mary-Margaret Oliver, D-Decatur, introduced a controversial proposal banning assault weapons.
             13086287 16898746        http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/02/0233ec_picparentelena768.png                  Atlanta pol wants gun locks, policy fix for background-check system "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(249) "Atlanta pol wants gun locks, policy fix for background-check system"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Friday February 5, 2016 11:22 am EST

image-1 Georgia GOP leaders traditionally have one response to any piece of legislation that comes close to curtailing Georgians' gun rights: no way. More often they're looking to increase the number of places a person can carry their shooting irons, including college campuses. 

Despite that the majority party's stance and the odds of passage in a GOP-controlled General Assembly, state...

| more...
Search for more by

[Admin link: ]