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  string(6275) "To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: Chris Childs.

??image-1
?According to musician and artist Ian Cone, one of the best things about Atlanta is that if you are proactive about doing a creative project, nothing can stop you. (Heck, we like to think that too.)
?
?Cone is starting to get serious about blending his expertise in film and sound to make experimental side projects. "I have a curious mind which gets me in trouble a lot," he says. "When an idea comes to me I often become a victim of it." His installation for the Best of Atlanta Block Party, “Chroma Future,” is a short film about utopian and dystopian narratives accompanied with improvised musical performances. It’ll be weird, satirical, and futuristic — just the kind of thing we expect from Mr. Cone. He spoke to CL about challenging concepts of time and space, and his love for OutKast.
?
????Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?
I am a creative person and a technical person. I work primarily as a freelance cinematographer, camera operator, lighting technician, documentarian, and producer of short video content. I spread myself even more thin with experimental sound and visual art projects which is something I have become more serious about lately. I have been able to occupy more of my time with these projects through some grants and residency programs and also I have taken more risks this year. Some were successful and some weren't, but I have heard that failure is success in disguise. 
?
?As far as my creative endeavors are concerned I work in many mediums. I work as a cinematographer for some up-and coming production companies in town; Play improvised experimental noise music as a continuation of having made absurd sounds since I was a young lad; experiment with scientific equipment to make solar astrophotography which was a part of a recent exhibition called Solar Heresies (curated by Meredith Kooi and John Hannah).   
?
?I have a curious mind which gets me in trouble a lot. When an idea comes to me I often become a victim of it. For example while working a job installing lighting for the new studios at the Weather Channel I became more aware of the functionality of current makes and models of color-changing LED lights. My mind wanders outside of the box pretty quickly so I started conceptualizing ways to compose music with color-changing lights. I will often collaborate with friends who are interested in the concept and may have more knowledge of the subject. That is how I began a project called "Synaesthesia" with my friend Mason Brown which is a project in which we used color-changing LED lights instead of sheet music to compose a cacophonous symphony of guitar players to create live drone music compositions.
?
?What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
?My piece is called "Chroma Future." It is a tongue-in-cheek experimental short film that comments on classic fiction and Hollywood portrayals of the future and places them in different local contexts ranging from "Dystopian" to "Utopian" and beyond.  
?
?How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
?Broad street inspired my concept because it is just at the beginning stages of its transformation as a new art district in Atlanta. There are many areas of Atlanta that are changing and being developed right now. Some areas are being slightly overdeveloped and the rapid change has caused a whole lot of displacement for a lot of Atlanta natives. The whole situation has a lot of positive and negative impact on the city that time will mend. The changes the city has gone through in the past four years feel more drastic than those of the past decade combined. 
?
?I have been around this city since the the '90s. I would come hang out at DIY hardcore punk shows at people's houses in Home Park and in the West End at what is now the Metropolitan Lofts. I see a lot of younger kids in the music and art scene taking the DIY ethic in a new direction and I find it very inspiring! The buildings at Broad Street have mostly been vacant for a long time and it is great to see what Mammal Gallery, Murmur, the Goat Farm, Broad Street Visitors Center, and Eyedrum (around the corner on Forsyth) are doing with the blank canvas that is South Downtown. The community that is emerging in South Downtown will become a sustainable community for a new generation of artists and creatives.  
?
?Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?My installation is a satirical commentary on preconceived notions about the future. Classic fiction and Hollywood Cinema can depict some very concrete politically infused ideas about the future. My installation offers generic examples of our potential future and then offers another future example in which growth, opportunity, and possibilities are limitless.  
?
?What is the best thing about Atlanta?
?The best thing about Atlanta is Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and OutKast. Also, another thing I love about Atlanta is that I have seen so many creative people build something out of nothing and become very successful just by working hard and creating interesting things. NYC and L.A. are very systematized in that there are a lot of required credentials and networking skills in order to do anything at all and everyone gets caught in the hustle. If you are proactive about doing a creative project in Atlanta you can just do it without having to conquer the social hierarchy. 
?
?CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
"
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''''
??[image-1]
?According to musician and artist Ian Cone, one of the best things about Atlanta is that if you are proactive about doing a creative project, nothing can stop you. (Heck, we like to think that too.)
?
?Cone is starting to get serious about blending his expertise in film and sound to make experimental side projects. "I have a curious mind which gets me in trouble a lot," he says. "When an idea comes to me I often become a victim of it." His installation for the Best of Atlanta Block Party, “Chroma Future,” is a short film about utopian and dystopian narratives accompanied with improvised musical performances. It’ll be weird, satirical, and futuristic — just the kind of thing we expect from Mr. Cone. He spoke to ''CL'' about challenging concepts of time and space, and his love for OutKast.
?
????__Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?__
____I am a creative person and a technical person. I work primarily as a freelance cinematographer, camera operator, lighting technician, documentarian, and producer of short video content. I spread myself even more thin with experimental sound and visual art projects which is something I have become more serious about lately. I have been able to occupy more of my time with these projects through some grants and residency programs and also I have taken more risks this year. Some were successful and some weren't, but I have heard that failure is success in disguise. 
?
?As far as my creative endeavors are concerned I work in many mediums. I work as a cinematographer for some up-and coming production companies in town; Play improvised experimental noise music as a continuation of having made absurd sounds since I was a young lad; experiment with scientific equipment to make solar astrophotography which was a part of a recent exhibition called ''Solar Heresies'' (curated by Meredith Kooi and John Hannah).   
?
?I have a curious mind which gets me in trouble a lot. When an idea comes to me I often become a victim of it. For example while working a job installing lighting for the new studios at the Weather Channel I became more aware of the functionality of current makes and models of color-changing LED lights. My mind wanders outside of the box pretty quickly so I started conceptualizing ways to compose music with color-changing lights. I will often collaborate with friends who are interested in the concept and may have more knowledge of the subject. That is how I began a project called [http://www.bangarts.com/process-and-collaboration/color-drone-project-mason-brown-ian-cone|"Synaesthesia]" with my friend Mason Brown which is a project in which we used color-changing LED lights instead of sheet music to compose a cacophonous symphony of guitar players to create live drone music compositions.
?
?__What is the title of your piece and please describe it.__
?My piece is called "Chroma Future." It is a tongue-in-cheek experimental short film that comments on classic fiction and Hollywood portrayals of the future and places them in different local contexts ranging from "Dystopian" to "Utopian" and beyond.  
?
?__How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?__
?Broad street inspired my concept because it is just at the beginning stages of its transformation as a new art district in Atlanta. There are many areas of Atlanta that are changing and being developed right now. Some areas are being slightly overdeveloped and the rapid change has caused a whole lot of displacement for a lot of Atlanta natives. The whole situation has a lot of positive and negative impact on the city that time will mend. The changes the city has gone through in the past four years feel more drastic than those of the past decade combined. 
?
?I have been around this city since the the '90s. I would come hang out at DIY hardcore punk shows at people's houses in Home Park and in the West End at what is now the Metropolitan Lofts. I see a lot of younger kids in the music and art scene taking the DIY ethic in a new direction and I find it very inspiring! The buildings at Broad Street have mostly been vacant for a long time and it is great to see what [/atlanta/the-mammal-gallery-brings-humans-to-downtown/Content?oid=10152993|Mammal] [Gallery], [/atlanta/atlanta-zine-fest-is-back-and-bigger-than-ever/Content?oid=14776516|Murmur], the Goat Farm, Broad Street Visitors Center, and Eyedrum (around the corner on Forsyth) are doing with the blank canvas that is South Downtown. The community that is emerging in South Downtown will become a sustainable community for a new generation of artists and creatives.  
?
?__Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?__
?My installation is a satirical commentary on preconceived notions about the future. Classic fiction and Hollywood Cinema can depict some very concrete politically infused ideas about the future. My installation offers generic examples of our potential future and then offers another future example in which growth, opportunity, and possibilities are limitless.  
?
?__What is the best thing about Atlanta?__
?The best thing about Atlanta is Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and [/atlanta/straight-outta-stankonia/Content?oid=10895134|OutKast]. Also, another thing I love about Atlanta is that I have seen so many creative people build something out of nothing and become very successful just by working hard and creating interesting things. NYC and L.A. are very systematized in that there are a lot of required credentials and networking skills in order to do anything at all and everyone gets caught in the hustle. If you are proactive about doing a creative project in Atlanta you can just do it without having to conquer the social hierarchy. 
?
?''[/atlanta/iCreativeLoafingisBestofAtlanta2015BlockParty/Page|CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.]''
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  string(6473) "       2015-09-24T17:31:00+00:00 Best of ATL Block Party: Meet Ian Cone     2015-09-24T17:31:00+00:00  To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: Chris Childs.

??image-1
?According to musician and artist Ian Cone, one of the best things about Atlanta is that if you are proactive about doing a creative project, nothing can stop you. (Heck, we like to think that too.)
?
?Cone is starting to get serious about blending his expertise in film and sound to make experimental side projects. "I have a curious mind which gets me in trouble a lot," he says. "When an idea comes to me I often become a victim of it." His installation for the Best of Atlanta Block Party, “Chroma Future,” is a short film about utopian and dystopian narratives accompanied with improvised musical performances. It’ll be weird, satirical, and futuristic — just the kind of thing we expect from Mr. Cone. He spoke to CL about challenging concepts of time and space, and his love for OutKast.
?
????Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?
I am a creative person and a technical person. I work primarily as a freelance cinematographer, camera operator, lighting technician, documentarian, and producer of short video content. I spread myself even more thin with experimental sound and visual art projects which is something I have become more serious about lately. I have been able to occupy more of my time with these projects through some grants and residency programs and also I have taken more risks this year. Some were successful and some weren't, but I have heard that failure is success in disguise. 
?
?As far as my creative endeavors are concerned I work in many mediums. I work as a cinematographer for some up-and coming production companies in town; Play improvised experimental noise music as a continuation of having made absurd sounds since I was a young lad; experiment with scientific equipment to make solar astrophotography which was a part of a recent exhibition called Solar Heresies (curated by Meredith Kooi and John Hannah).   
?
?I have a curious mind which gets me in trouble a lot. When an idea comes to me I often become a victim of it. For example while working a job installing lighting for the new studios at the Weather Channel I became more aware of the functionality of current makes and models of color-changing LED lights. My mind wanders outside of the box pretty quickly so I started conceptualizing ways to compose music with color-changing lights. I will often collaborate with friends who are interested in the concept and may have more knowledge of the subject. That is how I began a project called "Synaesthesia" with my friend Mason Brown which is a project in which we used color-changing LED lights instead of sheet music to compose a cacophonous symphony of guitar players to create live drone music compositions.
?
?What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
?My piece is called "Chroma Future." It is a tongue-in-cheek experimental short film that comments on classic fiction and Hollywood portrayals of the future and places them in different local contexts ranging from "Dystopian" to "Utopian" and beyond.  
?
?How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
?Broad street inspired my concept because it is just at the beginning stages of its transformation as a new art district in Atlanta. There are many areas of Atlanta that are changing and being developed right now. Some areas are being slightly overdeveloped and the rapid change has caused a whole lot of displacement for a lot of Atlanta natives. The whole situation has a lot of positive and negative impact on the city that time will mend. The changes the city has gone through in the past four years feel more drastic than those of the past decade combined. 
?
?I have been around this city since the the '90s. I would come hang out at DIY hardcore punk shows at people's houses in Home Park and in the West End at what is now the Metropolitan Lofts. I see a lot of younger kids in the music and art scene taking the DIY ethic in a new direction and I find it very inspiring! The buildings at Broad Street have mostly been vacant for a long time and it is great to see what Mammal Gallery, Murmur, the Goat Farm, Broad Street Visitors Center, and Eyedrum (around the corner on Forsyth) are doing with the blank canvas that is South Downtown. The community that is emerging in South Downtown will become a sustainable community for a new generation of artists and creatives.  
?
?Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?My installation is a satirical commentary on preconceived notions about the future. Classic fiction and Hollywood Cinema can depict some very concrete politically infused ideas about the future. My installation offers generic examples of our potential future and then offers another future example in which growth, opportunity, and possibilities are limitless.  
?
?What is the best thing about Atlanta?
?The best thing about Atlanta is Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and OutKast. Also, another thing I love about Atlanta is that I have seen so many creative people build something out of nothing and become very successful just by working hard and creating interesting things. NYC and L.A. are very systematized in that there are a lot of required credentials and networking skills in order to do anything at all and everyone gets caught in the hustle. If you are proactive about doing a creative project in Atlanta you can just do it without having to conquer the social hierarchy. 
?
?CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
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Article

Thursday September 24, 2015 01:31 pm EDT
To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before.... | more...
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  string(3675) "To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: Meet Second Story.
?  
?  image-1
? Finding a location for a 25-plus-person orchestra for a the year’s Best of Atlanta Block Party seems daunting. Standing atop the roof of Eyedrum around 9:30 p.m., musician Chris Childs Orchestra will be debuting “\ˈsīlən(t)s\.” a three movement work for chamber orchestra.
?  
?  CL spoke to Childs, a conductor and director, about the process of orchestrating (pun intended) this group and how he might be hanging up his tuxedo forever.
?
????    Please tell me your name and what your hood you're from.
?  My name is Chris Childs and I lay my head in East Atlanta Village.
?  
?  Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?
?  I am spinning a lot of plates these days. The big ones are Faun and a Pan Flute, Hello Ocho, and my own stuff like the Chris Childs Orchestra. All of that keeps me very busy, not to mention I still have to work day jobs/night jobs to stay afloat. 
?  
?  What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
?  The piece is called "\ˈsīlən(t)s\." It is a three-movement work for chamber orchestra. The title is the link to what inspired me to write the music in the first place, and that was a piece of visual art by Brian Egan of the same title. Brian's piece was centered around these "poems" that were all written out phonetically, which I found visually captivating, and I thought it'd be fun to hear an operatic style vocalist singing these words. In the music, our soprano vocalist, Jeanette Simpson, will be singing those words. She doesn't appear often throughout the course of the music but when she does, the moment hits very hard. 
?  
?  How did South Broad Street inspire your concept? 
?  South Broad is a daily inspiration to me. Mammal Gallery and Broad Street Visitors Center exist, and that acts as a constant reminder that this larger community that I am a part of is truly leaving a mark in this city's timeline, and I'm proud and honored to have some sort of role in that. 
?  
?  Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?  I hope that this performance is the first baby step taken towards being able to do this more often. I love the idea of Atlanta having an orchestra that plays for lots of people while not wearing tuxedos. 
?  
?Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourself? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? 
?  All of this is so new to me that I'm learning a lot along the way. I've never really been on the conductor/director side of things, but it is a role I feel very comfortable in. It's hard to pinpoint right now what exactly is being sparked during this whole process; I feel like that will become clearer as time continues moving forward, but for what it's worth, this feels significant. I suppose time will tell. 
? 
? CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
"
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?  
?  [image-1]
? Finding a location for a 25-plus-person orchestra for a the year’s Best of Atlanta Block Party seems daunting. Standing atop the roof of Eyedrum around 9:30 p.m., musician Chris Childs Orchestra will be debuting “\ˈsīlən(t)s\.” a three movement work for chamber orchestra.
?  
?  ''CL ''spoke to Childs, a conductor and director, about the process of orchestrating (pun intended) this group and how he might be hanging up his tuxedo forever.
?
????   __ Please tell me your name and what your hood you're from.__
?  My name is Chris Childs and I lay my head in East Atlanta Village.
?  
? __ Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?__
?  I am spinning a lot of plates these days. The big ones are Faun and a Pan Flute, Hello Ocho, and my own stuff like the Chris Childs Orchestra. All of that keeps me very busy, not to mention I still have to work day jobs/night jobs to stay afloat. 
?  
? __ What is the title of your piece and please describe it.__
?  The piece is called "\ˈsīlən(t)s\." It is a three-movement work for chamber orchestra. The title is the link to what inspired me to write the music in the first place, and that was a piece of visual art by Brian Egan of the same title. Brian's piece was centered around these "poems" that were all written out phonetically, which I found visually captivating, and I thought it'd be fun to hear an operatic style vocalist singing these words. In the music, our soprano vocalist, Jeanette Simpson, will be singing those words. She doesn't appear often throughout the course of the music but when she does, the moment hits very hard. 
?  
? __ How did South Broad Street inspire your concept? __
?  South Broad is a daily inspiration to me. Mammal Gallery and Broad Street Visitors Center exist, and that acts as a constant reminder that this larger community that I am a part of is truly leaving a mark in this city's timeline, and I'm proud and honored to have some sort of role in that. 
?  
? __ Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?__
?  I hope that this performance is the first baby step taken towards being able to do this more often. I love the idea of Atlanta having an orchestra that plays for lots of people while ''not'' wearing tuxedos. 
?  
?__Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourself? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? __
?  All of this is so new to me that I'm learning a lot along the way. I've never really been on the conductor/director side of things, but it is a role I feel very comfortable in. It's hard to pinpoint right now what exactly is being sparked during this whole process; I feel like that will become clearer as time continues moving forward, but for what it's worth, this feels significant. I suppose time will tell. 
? 
? ''[/atlanta/iCreativeLoafingisBestofAtlanta2015BlockParty/Page|__CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.__]''
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  string(3881) "       2015-09-23T14:30:00+00:00 Best of ATL Block Party: Meet Chris Childs     2015-09-23T14:30:00+00:00  To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: Meet Second Story.
?  
?  image-1
? Finding a location for a 25-plus-person orchestra for a the year’s Best of Atlanta Block Party seems daunting. Standing atop the roof of Eyedrum around 9:30 p.m., musician Chris Childs Orchestra will be debuting “\ˈsīlən(t)s\.” a three movement work for chamber orchestra.
?  
?  CL spoke to Childs, a conductor and director, about the process of orchestrating (pun intended) this group and how he might be hanging up his tuxedo forever.
?
????    Please tell me your name and what your hood you're from.
?  My name is Chris Childs and I lay my head in East Atlanta Village.
?  
?  Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?
?  I am spinning a lot of plates these days. The big ones are Faun and a Pan Flute, Hello Ocho, and my own stuff like the Chris Childs Orchestra. All of that keeps me very busy, not to mention I still have to work day jobs/night jobs to stay afloat. 
?  
?  What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
?  The piece is called "\ˈsīlən(t)s\." It is a three-movement work for chamber orchestra. The title is the link to what inspired me to write the music in the first place, and that was a piece of visual art by Brian Egan of the same title. Brian's piece was centered around these "poems" that were all written out phonetically, which I found visually captivating, and I thought it'd be fun to hear an operatic style vocalist singing these words. In the music, our soprano vocalist, Jeanette Simpson, will be singing those words. She doesn't appear often throughout the course of the music but when she does, the moment hits very hard. 
?  
?  How did South Broad Street inspire your concept? 
?  South Broad is a daily inspiration to me. Mammal Gallery and Broad Street Visitors Center exist, and that acts as a constant reminder that this larger community that I am a part of is truly leaving a mark in this city's timeline, and I'm proud and honored to have some sort of role in that. 
?  
?  Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?  I hope that this performance is the first baby step taken towards being able to do this more often. I love the idea of Atlanta having an orchestra that plays for lots of people while not wearing tuxedos. 
?  
?Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourself? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? 
?  All of this is so new to me that I'm learning a lot along the way. I've never really been on the conductor/director side of things, but it is a role I feel very comfortable in. It's hard to pinpoint right now what exactly is being sparked during this whole process; I feel like that will become clearer as time continues moving forward, but for what it's worth, this feels significant. I suppose time will tell. 
? 
? CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
             13085030 15473700                          Best of ATL Block Party: Meet Chris Childs "
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Article

Wednesday September 23, 2015 10:30 am EDT
To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before.... | more...
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  string(7607) "To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in a way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: "Meet Rebecca Makus." 
?  
 image-1Second Story is an innovative design studio full of imagineers actively working towards a more experiential future. By day they work with major brands to design high tech environments and experiences, and by moonlight they take on fun projects like the BOA block party to grace us with their expertise and application. 
?  
?  They had a lot to say about their concept “Free Zone,” a series of environmental signage that raises questions about the human costs of technological evolution. Using municipal signs as a canvas and speculative sci-fi as their inspiration, this installation will have you pondering about the imminent possibilities of our not-so-far-off-future:
?  
?  Tell me more about Second Story. Who are you and what do you all do?
Second Story is a design studio focused on creating responsive environments — we augment physical spaces to automatically (and delightfully) respond to human behavior. We design these bespoke interactive installations for clients in both cultural and brand spaces. In Atlanta, you can see some of our work at the World of Coca-Cola, the Porsche Experience Center, Whole Foods Avalon, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. Our studio is highly collaborative and interdisciplinary, comprised of many creative disciplines — visual and experience designers, animators, writers, coders, architects and industrial designers. We are highly experimental and prototype driven, with a lab-based approach to design.
?  
?  What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
As we began to contemplate the themes of time and tech, we saw environmental signage as a really potent vehicle to convey the behavior of our future society and it’s underlying technologies. In the urban environment signs are omnipresent — they help us to find our way around, warn us of danger, tell us what (and what not) to do. But signs also provide insight into the social norms of a particular time and place (example: “whites only" signs from the ’50s), and offer clues to the technologies in use (example: surveillance camera signs). You could infer a lot about our future world based on it’s signs.
?  
?  Our piece, “Free Zone,” uses the format of signs to raise questions about the human costs of technological evolution. As we embrace new technologies meant to minimize discomfort, distress, and inconvenience, do we risk losing the very things that make us human? Using municipal signs as a canvas, this exercise in immersive design fiction will establish South Broad Street as a "dark" zone in a technologically pervasive, constantly measured society where we have traded privacy for gains in security, comfort, and convenience. We imagine what might happen to a city block in a surveillance society where grassroots hackers repurpose city signs to inform people about electronic freedom. The Free Zone is a place to the enjoy the liberties we might crave in the near future—an era ruled by the quantified self.
?  
?  How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
In most people’s minds, South Broad Street is a gritty, neglected part of town where the left-behind congregate, and human vice abounds. We were inspired to embrace and champion this outcast status — turning it into something triumphantly flawed. A sort of red-light district of the future, where it’s only because of the bad that you can experience the good. We imagined South Broad as one of the last remaining places in the city that hasn’t been anesthetized by our pursuit of clean, comfortable, and convenient. It’s messy, chaotic, and redemptively human.
?  
?  Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
The installation projects the future of all technology-driven societies, not just Atlanta. But the way infrastructure is janked nods to Atlanta’s mischievous side. It echoes our tendency to make progress on our own terms rather than accepted standards.
?  
?  Atlanta has always been an enterprising city, eager to embrace change and commerce in pursuit of progress and growth. While the desire to evolve and improve is overwhelmingly positive, it also raises the specter of unchecked development. With Atlanta on course to experience continued population growth, many decisions lay before us that will chart our city’s future. How will we define “progress,” and at what cost? Because there is always a cost.
?  
?  What is the best thing about Atlanta?
Unlike saturated markets like New York and Los Angeles, Atlanta feels wide open for thoughtful, ambitious, impassioned souls to make their mark. It’s a young and impressionable city in a lot of ways. You get the sense that you can really make an impact here. It’s also more affordable than larger markets for those in creative fields, so hopefully the city will continue to find a way to attract and retain top creative talent who will apply innovative thinking to a wide range of city issues.
?  
?  Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourselves? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? 

?  Early on when we were tossing around this concept, we talked a lot about how power and resistance would operate in the future.  We asked questions like, “What does it mean to work for the greater good?” The piece doesn’t take sides—quite the opposite. It celebrates the chaos of competing voices and values—the things that make people and places interesting—keeps them evolving, moving, unresolved, uncontrollable.
?  
?  When it came to fabrication, our team was really keen on creating the fixtures and elements of the installation in a credible, authentic way. By partnering with The Goat Farm and MASS Collective, we’re living up to our goal of creating an experience for a fictional narrative using strictly non-fictional processes. A big part of how we see this future involves heavy use of digital design tools and desktop small-scale fabrication. High-low tech in a future where people are coping with their relationship to information technology.
?  
?  We also really enjoyed playing upon event attendees’ existing perceptions of South Broad Street — as a forsaken zone that lies beyond the limits of city consciousness — to create an unsettling "border crossing" experience as you enter the party/Free Zone. In our distributed narrative approach each interaction stands alone, but you can experience the entire narrative arc by engaging with each individual sign. We wanted to create a future that felt realistic and possible but still fantastical and speculative. To walk that line, we needed to create a fiction that was developed enough to feel authentic, while allowing for the casual interaction of party-goers.
?
?CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
"
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''?  ''
'''' [image-1]Second Story is an innovative design studio full of imagineers actively working towards a more experiential future. By day they work with major brands to design high tech environments and experiences, and by moonlight they take on fun projects like the BOA block party to grace us with their expertise and application. 
?  
?  They had a lot to say about their concept “Free Zone,” a series of environmental signage that raises questions about the human costs of technological evolution. Using municipal signs as a canvas and speculative sci-fi as their inspiration, this installation will have you pondering about the imminent possibilities of our not-so-far-off-future:
?  
?  __Tell me more about Second Story. Who are you and what do you all do?__
____Second Story is a design studio focused on creating responsive environments — we augment physical spaces to automatically (and delightfully) respond to human behavior. We design these bespoke interactive installations for clients in both cultural and brand spaces. In Atlanta, you can see some of our work at the World of Coca-Cola, the Porsche Experience Center, Whole Foods Avalon, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. Our studio is highly collaborative and interdisciplinary, comprised of many creative disciplines — visual and experience designers, animators, writers, coders, architects and industrial designers. We are highly experimental and prototype driven, with a lab-based approach to design.
?  
?  __What is the title of your piece and please describe it.__
____As we began to contemplate the themes of time and tech, we saw environmental signage as a really potent vehicle to convey the behavior of our future society and it’s underlying technologies. In the urban environment signs are omnipresent — they help us to find our way around, warn us of danger, tell us what (and what not) to do. But signs also provide insight into the social norms of a particular time and place (example: “whites only" signs from the ’50s), and offer clues to the technologies in use (example: surveillance camera signs). You could infer a lot about our future world based on it’s signs.
?  
?  Our piece, “Free Zone,” uses the format of signs to raise questions about the human costs of technological evolution. As we embrace new technologies meant to minimize discomfort, distress, and inconvenience, do we risk losing the very things that make us human? Using municipal signs as a canvas, this exercise in immersive design fiction will establish South Broad Street as a "dark" zone in a technologically pervasive, constantly measured society where we have traded privacy for gains in security, comfort, and convenience. We imagine what might happen to a city block in a surveillance society where grassroots hackers repurpose city signs to inform people about electronic freedom. The Free Zone is a place to the enjoy the liberties we might crave in the near future—an era ruled by the quantified self.
?  
?  __How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?__
____In most people’s minds, South Broad Street is a gritty, neglected part of town where the left-behind congregate, and human vice abounds. We were inspired to embrace and champion this outcast status — turning it into something triumphantly flawed. A sort of red-light district of the future, where it’s only because of the bad that you can experience the good. We imagined South Broad as one of the last remaining places in the city that hasn’t been anesthetized by our pursuit of clean, comfortable, and convenient. It’s messy, chaotic, and redemptively human.
?  
?  __Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?__
____The installation projects the future of all technology-driven societies, not just Atlanta. But the way infrastructure is janked nods to Atlanta’s mischievous side. It echoes our tendency to make progress on our own terms rather than accepted standards.
?  
?  Atlanta has always been an enterprising city, eager to embrace change and commerce in pursuit of progress and growth. While the desire to evolve and improve is overwhelmingly positive, it also raises the specter of unchecked development. With Atlanta on course to experience continued population growth, many decisions lay before us that will chart our city’s future. How will we define “progress,” and at what cost? Because there is always a cost.
?  
?  __What is the best thing about Atlanta?__
____Unlike saturated markets like New York and Los Angeles, Atlanta feels wide open for thoughtful, ambitious, impassioned souls to make their mark. It’s a young and impressionable city in a lot of ways. You get the sense that you can really make an impact here. It’s also more affordable than larger markets for those in creative fields, so hopefully the city will continue to find a way to attract and retain top creative talent who will apply innovative thinking to a wide range of city issues.
?  
?  __Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourselves? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? __
____
?  Early on when we were tossing around this concept, we talked a lot about how power and resistance would operate in the future.  We asked questions like, “What does it mean to work for the greater good?” The piece doesn’t take sides—quite the opposite. It celebrates the chaos of competing voices and values—the things that make people and places interesting—keeps them evolving, moving, unresolved, uncontrollable.
?  
?  When it came to fabrication, our team was really keen on creating the fixtures and elements of the installation in a credible, authentic way. By partnering with The Goat Farm and MASS Collective, we’re living up to our goal of creating an experience for a fictional narrative using strictly non-fictional processes. A big part of how we see this future involves heavy use of digital design tools and desktop small-scale fabrication. High-low tech in a future where people are coping with their relationship to information technology.
?  
?  We also really enjoyed playing upon event attendees’ existing perceptions of South Broad Street — as a forsaken zone that lies beyond the limits of city consciousness — to create an unsettling "border crossing" experience as you enter the party/Free Zone. In our distributed narrative approach each interaction stands alone, but you can experience the entire narrative arc by engaging with each individual sign. We wanted to create a future that felt realistic and possible but still fantastical and speculative. To walk that line, we needed to create a fiction that was developed enough to feel authentic, while allowing for the casual interaction of party-goers.
?
?''[/atlanta/iCreativeLoafingisBestofAtlanta2015BlockParty/Page|__CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.__]''
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  string(7813) "       2015-09-21T14:40:00+00:00 Best of ATL Block Party: Meet Second Story     2015-09-21T14:40:00+00:00  To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in a way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: "Meet Rebecca Makus." 
?  
 image-1Second Story is an innovative design studio full of imagineers actively working towards a more experiential future. By day they work with major brands to design high tech environments and experiences, and by moonlight they take on fun projects like the BOA block party to grace us with their expertise and application. 
?  
?  They had a lot to say about their concept “Free Zone,” a series of environmental signage that raises questions about the human costs of technological evolution. Using municipal signs as a canvas and speculative sci-fi as their inspiration, this installation will have you pondering about the imminent possibilities of our not-so-far-off-future:
?  
?  Tell me more about Second Story. Who are you and what do you all do?
Second Story is a design studio focused on creating responsive environments — we augment physical spaces to automatically (and delightfully) respond to human behavior. We design these bespoke interactive installations for clients in both cultural and brand spaces. In Atlanta, you can see some of our work at the World of Coca-Cola, the Porsche Experience Center, Whole Foods Avalon, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. Our studio is highly collaborative and interdisciplinary, comprised of many creative disciplines — visual and experience designers, animators, writers, coders, architects and industrial designers. We are highly experimental and prototype driven, with a lab-based approach to design.
?  
?  What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
As we began to contemplate the themes of time and tech, we saw environmental signage as a really potent vehicle to convey the behavior of our future society and it’s underlying technologies. In the urban environment signs are omnipresent — they help us to find our way around, warn us of danger, tell us what (and what not) to do. But signs also provide insight into the social norms of a particular time and place (example: “whites only" signs from the ’50s), and offer clues to the technologies in use (example: surveillance camera signs). You could infer a lot about our future world based on it’s signs.
?  
?  Our piece, “Free Zone,” uses the format of signs to raise questions about the human costs of technological evolution. As we embrace new technologies meant to minimize discomfort, distress, and inconvenience, do we risk losing the very things that make us human? Using municipal signs as a canvas, this exercise in immersive design fiction will establish South Broad Street as a "dark" zone in a technologically pervasive, constantly measured society where we have traded privacy for gains in security, comfort, and convenience. We imagine what might happen to a city block in a surveillance society where grassroots hackers repurpose city signs to inform people about electronic freedom. The Free Zone is a place to the enjoy the liberties we might crave in the near future—an era ruled by the quantified self.
?  
?  How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
In most people’s minds, South Broad Street is a gritty, neglected part of town where the left-behind congregate, and human vice abounds. We were inspired to embrace and champion this outcast status — turning it into something triumphantly flawed. A sort of red-light district of the future, where it’s only because of the bad that you can experience the good. We imagined South Broad as one of the last remaining places in the city that hasn’t been anesthetized by our pursuit of clean, comfortable, and convenient. It’s messy, chaotic, and redemptively human.
?  
?  Going off the loose theme of time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
The installation projects the future of all technology-driven societies, not just Atlanta. But the way infrastructure is janked nods to Atlanta’s mischievous side. It echoes our tendency to make progress on our own terms rather than accepted standards.
?  
?  Atlanta has always been an enterprising city, eager to embrace change and commerce in pursuit of progress and growth. While the desire to evolve and improve is overwhelmingly positive, it also raises the specter of unchecked development. With Atlanta on course to experience continued population growth, many decisions lay before us that will chart our city’s future. How will we define “progress,” and at what cost? Because there is always a cost.
?  
?  What is the best thing about Atlanta?
Unlike saturated markets like New York and Los Angeles, Atlanta feels wide open for thoughtful, ambitious, impassioned souls to make their mark. It’s a young and impressionable city in a lot of ways. You get the sense that you can really make an impact here. It’s also more affordable than larger markets for those in creative fields, so hopefully the city will continue to find a way to attract and retain top creative talent who will apply innovative thinking to a wide range of city issues.
?  
?  Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourselves? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? 

?  Early on when we were tossing around this concept, we talked a lot about how power and resistance would operate in the future.  We asked questions like, “What does it mean to work for the greater good?” The piece doesn’t take sides—quite the opposite. It celebrates the chaos of competing voices and values—the things that make people and places interesting—keeps them evolving, moving, unresolved, uncontrollable.
?  
?  When it came to fabrication, our team was really keen on creating the fixtures and elements of the installation in a credible, authentic way. By partnering with The Goat Farm and MASS Collective, we’re living up to our goal of creating an experience for a fictional narrative using strictly non-fictional processes. A big part of how we see this future involves heavy use of digital design tools and desktop small-scale fabrication. High-low tech in a future where people are coping with their relationship to information technology.
?  
?  We also really enjoyed playing upon event attendees’ existing perceptions of South Broad Street — as a forsaken zone that lies beyond the limits of city consciousness — to create an unsettling "border crossing" experience as you enter the party/Free Zone. In our distributed narrative approach each interaction stands alone, but you can experience the entire narrative arc by engaging with each individual sign. We wanted to create a future that felt realistic and possible but still fantastical and speculative. To walk that line, we needed to create a fiction that was developed enough to feel authentic, while allowing for the casual interaction of party-goers.
?
?CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
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Article

Monday September 21, 2015 10:40 am EDT
To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in a way that has never been done before.... | more...
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  string(6433) "To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in a way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: "Meet Mimi Hart Silver." 
?  
?   image-2Rebecca Makus is co-creator/co-founder of Ipomoea, an interactive performance laboratory making it’s debut at the Goat Farm Arts Center in 2017. For Creative Loafing's Best of Atlanta Block Party, she and her team are presenting Ipomoea:Grass — an installation environment incorporating light, sculpture, and performance art that utilizes gesture and movement-recognition technology. Grass is an impromptu story of light and sound emerging from the collected data of interacting participants.
?   
?  What hood are you from?
I live in Marietta behind the Walmart and right around the corner from the Big Chicken. I’m creating the work with two other artists: Elly Jessop Nattinger, who lives in Mountain View, Calif., and Peter Torpey of Boston, Mass. 
?  
?  Tell me more about Ipomoea, who y'all are, and what you all do?
?  Makus: I’m an associate professor in theatre and performance studies at Kennesaw State University. I’m exploring how technology collaborates in the development of new work. Working with directors, choreographers, and artists, I create objects that can be manipulated by the performers and examine how these objects become a driving factor in the development of movement, text, and visual aesthetics.
?  
?  Peter Torpey: I am an independent media experience artist based in Boston. My work is inspired by the power of abstract representations, from visual music to synchromist paintings from the early 20th century. These abstract forms communicate emotionally expressive and intangible concepts. I assemble them, using technology as a mediator and translator, to create immersive multimodal experiences.
?  
?  Elly Jessop Nattinger: I am an artist working in performance and technology; in my day job, I’m an experience engineer at Google in California.  My work is inspired by the power of technology to extend the expressive potential of the human body and voice. I give a performer the power to infuse the expressive power of her movement into sound, image, and light. 
?  
?  Please describe Ipomoea:Grass. 
?  It is an interactive sculpture and installation crafted from man-made and recycled materials that takes the form of a synthetic urban garden.  We’ve created these hanging pallets of “grass” made from yarn and rope that are embedded with LEDs and sensors. Using gesture and movement recognition technology, Ipomoea:Grass responds with color and sound to your presence and touch. Through interaction with Ipomoea:Grass, you create a world of light and music. Ipomoea:Grass is excerpted from a larger installation and interactive performance space, Ipomoea, to be presented in Atlanta in 2017. 
?  
?   image-1How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
South Broad Street is an intensely urban area with a striking lack of usable public green space.  Ipomoea:Grass, as well as our full installation Ipomoea, highlights the juxtaposition of our largely urban technological existence and our desire for organic natural spaces. By reclaiming an abandoned space and filling it with natural forms (though a synthetically created version of nature), we explore the contrast inherent in the “urban garden.”
?  
?  Going off the loose theme of Time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?  
?    ???    There is an expanding movement in Atlanta to repurpose abandoned or empty industrial spaces and reinvent them as arts and cultural venues and public green spaces. The reinvigoration of discarded spaces has actively involved local communities and artists as participants and leaders in redefining the use and shape of their environments. This movement is something we are paralleling conceptually with Ipomoea:Grass
?  
?  The experience of Ipomoea:Grass encourages participants of all kinds to craft an artistic experience. This is not art that you just sit back and observe, but art that is shaped and brought to life through your active participation with it.  It puts the agency in the hands of the individual.  This model parallels the future of Atlanta’s urban development.
?  
?   image-3What is the best thing about Atlanta?
The cultural diversity with its attendant diversity of restaurants. I’m a big foodie and love discovering new flavors and cuisines. I’ve really enjoyed sharing these experiences with Peter and Elly when they visit. Another aspect of Atlanta’s cultural diversity that we are all big fans of is its thriving multidisciplinary arts community.
?  
?  Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourselves? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? 
?  We met while working on “Death and the Powers,” an innovative ‘robot opera’ showcasing visionary MIT Media Lab performance technologies. This included techniques developed by Elly and Peter to translate a performer’s offstage presence into an expressively animated stage, a musical chandelier, and a chorus of robots. I worked as associate lighting designer and collaborated with Elly and Peter to help integrate the lighting design into the immersive stage environment.
?  
?  Inspired by our many conversations during this process, we began exploring the role of interactive technology in shaping theatrical performance. This evolved into a discussion of how spaces (venues) influence the performances inside them. Through Ipomoea, we want to use technology to create an interactive environment that responds to the person or performance inhabiting it. We want to discover how such an environment can shape the development of new or established work.
?  
?  CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
"
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?  
?   [image-2]Rebecca Makus is co-creator/co-founder of ''Ipomoea,'' an interactive performance laboratory making it’s debut at the Goat Farm Arts Center in 2017. For ''Creative Loafing'''s Best of Atlanta Block Party, she and her team are presenting ''Ipomoea:Grass'' — an installation environment incorporating light, sculpture, and performance art that utilizes gesture and movement-recognition technology. ''Grass'' is an impromptu story of light and sound emerging from the collected data of interacting participants.
?   
?  __What hood are you from?__
____I live in Marietta behind the Walmart and right around the corner from the Big Chicken. I’m creating the work with two other artists: Elly Jessop Nattinger, who lives in Mountain View, Calif., and Peter Torpey of Boston, Mass. 
?  
?  __Tell me more about ''Ipomoea'', who y'all are, and what you all do?__
__?  Makus:__ I’m an associate professor in theatre and performance studies at Kennesaw State University. I’m exploring how technology collaborates in the development of new work. Working with directors, choreographers, and artists, I create objects that can be manipulated by the performers and examine how these objects become a driving factor in the development of movement, text, and visual aesthetics.
?  
?  __Peter Torpey:__ I am an independent media experience artist based in Boston. My work is inspired by the power of abstract representations, from visual music to synchromist paintings from the early 20th century. These abstract forms communicate emotionally expressive and intangible concepts. I assemble them, using technology as a mediator and translator, to create immersive multimodal experiences.
?  
?  __Elly Jessop Nattinger:__ I am an artist working in performance and technology; in my day job, I’m an experience engineer at Google in California.  My work is inspired by the power of technology to extend the expressive potential of the human body and voice. I give a performer the power to infuse the expressive power of her movement into sound, image, and light. 
?  
?  __Please describe __''__Ipomoea:Grass__''. 
?  It is an interactive sculpture and installation crafted from man-made and recycled materials that takes the form of a synthetic urban garden.  We’ve created these hanging pallets of “grass” made from yarn and rope that are embedded with LEDs and sensors. Using gesture and movement recognition technology, ''Ipomoea:Grass'' responds with color and sound to your presence and touch. Through interaction with ''Ipomoea:Grass'', you create a world of light and music. ''Ipomoea:Grass'' is excerpted from a larger installation and interactive performance space, Ipomoea, to be presented in Atlanta in 2017. 
?  
?   [image-1]__How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?__
____South Broad Street is an intensely urban area with a striking lack of usable public green space.  ''Ipomoea:Grass'', as well as our full installation ''Ipomoea'', highlights the juxtaposition of our largely urban technological existence and our desire for organic natural spaces. By reclaiming an abandoned space and filling it with natural forms (though a synthetically created version of nature), we explore the contrast inherent in the “urban garden.”
?  
?  __Going off the loose theme of Time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?__
?  
?    ???    There is an expanding movement in Atlanta to repurpose abandoned or empty industrial spaces and reinvent them as arts and cultural venues and public green spaces. The reinvigoration of discarded spaces has actively involved local communities and artists as participants and leaders in redefining the use and shape of their environments. This movement is something we are paralleling conceptually with ''Ipomoea:Grass''
?  
?  The experience of ''Ipomoea:Grass'' encourages participants of all kinds to craft an artistic experience. This is not art that you just sit back and observe, but art that is shaped and brought to life through your active participation with it.  It puts the agency in the hands of the individual.  This model parallels the future of Atlanta’s urban development.
?  
?   [image-3]__What is the best thing about Atlanta?__
____The cultural diversity with its attendant diversity of restaurants. I’m a big foodie and love discovering new flavors and cuisines. I’ve really enjoyed sharing these experiences with Peter and Elly when they visit. Another aspect of Atlanta’s cultural diversity that we are all big fans of is its thriving multidisciplinary arts community.
?  
?  __Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourselves? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? __
?  We met while working on “Death and the Powers,” an innovative ‘robot opera’ showcasing visionary MIT Media Lab performance technologies. This included techniques developed by Elly and Peter to translate a performer’s offstage presence into an expressively animated stage, a musical chandelier, and a chorus of robots. I worked as associate lighting designer and collaborated with Elly and Peter to help integrate the lighting design into the immersive stage environment.
?  
?  Inspired by our many conversations during this process, we began exploring the role of interactive technology in shaping theatrical performance. This evolved into a discussion of how spaces (venues) influence the performances inside them. Through ''Ipomoea'', we want to use technology to create an interactive environment that responds to the person or performance inhabiting it. We want to discover how such an environment can shape the development of new or established work.
?  
?  ''[/atlanta/iCreativeLoafingisBestofAtlanta2015BlockParty/Page|__CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.__]''
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?  
?   image-2Rebecca Makus is co-creator/co-founder of Ipomoea, an interactive performance laboratory making it’s debut at the Goat Farm Arts Center in 2017. For Creative Loafing's Best of Atlanta Block Party, she and her team are presenting Ipomoea:Grass — an installation environment incorporating light, sculpture, and performance art that utilizes gesture and movement-recognition technology. Grass is an impromptu story of light and sound emerging from the collected data of interacting participants.
?   
?  What hood are you from?
I live in Marietta behind the Walmart and right around the corner from the Big Chicken. I’m creating the work with two other artists: Elly Jessop Nattinger, who lives in Mountain View, Calif., and Peter Torpey of Boston, Mass. 
?  
?  Tell me more about Ipomoea, who y'all are, and what you all do?
?  Makus: I’m an associate professor in theatre and performance studies at Kennesaw State University. I’m exploring how technology collaborates in the development of new work. Working with directors, choreographers, and artists, I create objects that can be manipulated by the performers and examine how these objects become a driving factor in the development of movement, text, and visual aesthetics.
?  
?  Peter Torpey: I am an independent media experience artist based in Boston. My work is inspired by the power of abstract representations, from visual music to synchromist paintings from the early 20th century. These abstract forms communicate emotionally expressive and intangible concepts. I assemble them, using technology as a mediator and translator, to create immersive multimodal experiences.
?  
?  Elly Jessop Nattinger: I am an artist working in performance and technology; in my day job, I’m an experience engineer at Google in California.  My work is inspired by the power of technology to extend the expressive potential of the human body and voice. I give a performer the power to infuse the expressive power of her movement into sound, image, and light. 
?  
?  Please describe Ipomoea:Grass. 
?  It is an interactive sculpture and installation crafted from man-made and recycled materials that takes the form of a synthetic urban garden.  We’ve created these hanging pallets of “grass” made from yarn and rope that are embedded with LEDs and sensors. Using gesture and movement recognition technology, Ipomoea:Grass responds with color and sound to your presence and touch. Through interaction with Ipomoea:Grass, you create a world of light and music. Ipomoea:Grass is excerpted from a larger installation and interactive performance space, Ipomoea, to be presented in Atlanta in 2017. 
?  
?   image-1How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
South Broad Street is an intensely urban area with a striking lack of usable public green space.  Ipomoea:Grass, as well as our full installation Ipomoea, highlights the juxtaposition of our largely urban technological existence and our desire for organic natural spaces. By reclaiming an abandoned space and filling it with natural forms (though a synthetically created version of nature), we explore the contrast inherent in the “urban garden.”
?  
?  Going off the loose theme of Time — a future or passage of time from present toward the future — what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?  
?    ???    There is an expanding movement in Atlanta to repurpose abandoned or empty industrial spaces and reinvent them as arts and cultural venues and public green spaces. The reinvigoration of discarded spaces has actively involved local communities and artists as participants and leaders in redefining the use and shape of their environments. This movement is something we are paralleling conceptually with Ipomoea:Grass
?  
?  The experience of Ipomoea:Grass encourages participants of all kinds to craft an artistic experience. This is not art that you just sit back and observe, but art that is shaped and brought to life through your active participation with it.  It puts the agency in the hands of the individual.  This model parallels the future of Atlanta’s urban development.
?  
?   image-3What is the best thing about Atlanta?
The cultural diversity with its attendant diversity of restaurants. I’m a big foodie and love discovering new flavors and cuisines. I’ve really enjoyed sharing these experiences with Peter and Elly when they visit. Another aspect of Atlanta’s cultural diversity that we are all big fans of is its thriving multidisciplinary arts community.
?  
?  Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourselves? Anything in particular that was sparked working with this project? 
?  We met while working on “Death and the Powers,” an innovative ‘robot opera’ showcasing visionary MIT Media Lab performance technologies. This included techniques developed by Elly and Peter to translate a performer’s offstage presence into an expressively animated stage, a musical chandelier, and a chorus of robots. I worked as associate lighting designer and collaborated with Elly and Peter to help integrate the lighting design into the immersive stage environment.
?  
?  Inspired by our many conversations during this process, we began exploring the role of interactive technology in shaping theatrical performance. This evolved into a discussion of how spaces (venues) influence the performances inside them. Through Ipomoea, we want to use technology to create an interactive environment that responds to the person or performance inhabiting it. We want to discover how such an environment can shape the development of new or established work.
?  
?  CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
             13084994 15434153                          Best of ATL Block Party: Meet Rebecca Makus "
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Article

Friday September 18, 2015 11:39 am EDT
To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in a way that has never been done before.... | more...
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  string(3233) "To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before. The installations for BOA do not deal with the past, but rather what is on the horizon. We'll be posting interviews with the participating artists leading up to the event. Previous: Meet S. Bedford.
? 
?  image-1
?   Mimi Hart Silver is best known for her 2D work, but the prompt for BOA had her step out of the canvas comfort zone in a serious way. We spoke with the Downtown resident about her inspiration to build "The monuments of our future," a monolithic fortress of hundreds of sandbags.
?    
?    Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?
?    This is a tough question.  I just turned thirty, which is a pretty significant accomplishment considering I never thought I would live to be twenty-seven.  I'm not so interested in myself these days; I just want to have some kind of positive impact in the world.
?    
?    What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
?    "The monuments of our future" is a monolithic wall of orange sandbags.  It is my vision of a post-apocalyptic future in which the crude devices constructed to preserve the art, artifacts, and architecture of our past become the monuments of our future.  Think modern day Monuments Men.    
?    
? How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
?    A connection to South Broad Street came after the project's inception and was honestly a happy accident that I can take no credit for.  Sometimes the artist is just a sieve I guess. Goat Farm Director of Operations Mark DiNatale pointed out that South Broad is the heart of Atlanta and divides the city both socioeconomically and racially.  The north-facing side of the installation is a fortress and the south-facing side a memorial.  It is a pretty bold statement in this context and a lot more interesting than the heady conceptual stuff I was mulling over in the beginning.
?     
?  Going off the loose theme of time, what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?    I don't think my piece is specific to the future of Atlanta.  Every city is experiencing similar crises.  Maybe if we imagine the future's landscape we will be more concerned with changing the now.
?    
?    What is the best thing about Atlanta?
?    I love my friends here and the Clermont Lounge.
?    
?    Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourself?
?    I am most interested in racial relationships in the South and this country and globally, so I am pleased that this dialogue entered the project unintentionally.  I heard an artist when asked in an interview what motivates his work say so simply that he has to do what he would die for.  Those are my words to live by right now.
?    
?    CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
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''? ''
''?  ''[image-1]
?   [http://www.mimihartsilver.com/|Mimi Hart Silver] is best known for her 2D work, but the prompt for BOA had her step out of the canvas comfort zone in a serious way. We spoke with the Downtown resident about her inspiration to build "The monuments of our future," a monolithic fortress of hundreds of sandbags.
?    
?    __Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?__
?    This is a tough question.  I just turned thirty, which is a pretty significant accomplishment considering I never thought I would live to be twenty-seven.  I'm not so interested in myself these days; I just want to have some kind of positive impact in the world.
?    
?    __What is the title of your piece and please describe it.__
?    "The monuments of our future" is a monolithic wall of orange sandbags.  It is my vision of a post-apocalyptic future in which the crude devices constructed to preserve the art, artifacts, [and] architecture of our past become the monuments of our future.  Think modern day [http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/true-story-monuments-men-180949569/?no-ist|Monuments Men].    
?    ____
__? How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?__
?    A connection to South Broad Street came after the project's inception and was honestly a happy accident that I can take no credit for.  Sometimes the artist is just a sieve I guess. [Goat Farm Director of Operations] Mark DiNatale pointed out that South Broad is the heart of Atlanta and divides the city both socioeconomically and racially.  The north-facing side of the installation is a fortress and the south-facing side a memorial.  It is a pretty bold statement in this context and a lot more interesting than the heady conceptual stuff I was mulling over in the beginning.
?     ____
__?  Going off the loose theme of time, what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?__
?    I don't think my piece is specific to the future of Atlanta.  Every city is experiencing similar crises.  Maybe if we imagine the future's landscape we will be more concerned with changing the now.
?    
?    __What is the best thing about Atlanta?__
?    I love my friends here and the Clermont Lounge.
?    
?    __Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourself?__
?    I am most interested in racial relationships in the South and this country and globally, so I am pleased that this dialogue entered the project unintentionally.  I heard an artist when asked in an interview what motivates his work say so simply that he has to do what he would die for.  Those are my words to live by right now.
?    
?    ''[http://clatl.com/atlanta/iCreativeLoafingisBestofAtlanta2015BlockParty/Page|CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.]''
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? 
?  image-1
?   Mimi Hart Silver is best known for her 2D work, but the prompt for BOA had her step out of the canvas comfort zone in a serious way. We spoke with the Downtown resident about her inspiration to build "The monuments of our future," a monolithic fortress of hundreds of sandbags.
?    
?    Tell me more about yourself  — who are you and what do you all do?
?    This is a tough question.  I just turned thirty, which is a pretty significant accomplishment considering I never thought I would live to be twenty-seven.  I'm not so interested in myself these days; I just want to have some kind of positive impact in the world.
?    
?    What is the title of your piece and please describe it.
?    "The monuments of our future" is a monolithic wall of orange sandbags.  It is my vision of a post-apocalyptic future in which the crude devices constructed to preserve the art, artifacts, and architecture of our past become the monuments of our future.  Think modern day Monuments Men.    
?    
? How did South Broad Street inspire your concept?
?    A connection to South Broad Street came after the project's inception and was honestly a happy accident that I can take no credit for.  Sometimes the artist is just a sieve I guess. Goat Farm Director of Operations Mark DiNatale pointed out that South Broad is the heart of Atlanta and divides the city both socioeconomically and racially.  The north-facing side of the installation is a fortress and the south-facing side a memorial.  It is a pretty bold statement in this context and a lot more interesting than the heady conceptual stuff I was mulling over in the beginning.
?     
?  Going off the loose theme of time, what does your installation have to do with the future of Atlanta?
?    I don't think my piece is specific to the future of Atlanta.  Every city is experiencing similar crises.  Maybe if we imagine the future's landscape we will be more concerned with changing the now.
?    
?    What is the best thing about Atlanta?
?    I love my friends here and the Clermont Lounge.
?    
?    Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about yourself?
?    I am most interested in racial relationships in the South and this country and globally, so I am pleased that this dialogue entered the project unintentionally.  I heard an artist when asked in an interview what motivates his work say so simply that he has to do what he would die for.  Those are my words to live by right now.
?    
?    CL's Best of Atlanta 2015 Block Party. Free. Fri., Sep. 25, from 6-11 p.m. South Broad Street, between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and and Mitchell Street.
             13084976 15408621                          Best of ATL Block Party: Meet Mimi Hart Silver "
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Article

Wednesday September 16, 2015 09:56 am EDT
To celebrate CL's annual Best of Atlanta issue, and our forthcoming Block Party, the Goat Farm Arts Center curated a physical manifestation of the best the city has to offer. The six chosen installations will imagine a future world based on plausible present technologies, ideas, or milieus. Expect an ambitious cyberpunk-inspired future Atlanta presented in way that has never been done before.... | more...
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