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?              When Ponce City Market first announced its tenants, they might as well have light-projected a dollar sign into the sky. A mixed-use development with swanky shops and a star-studded, chef-driven food court seems like the last place to find true culture. Yet, one of the first times since PCM opened its doors to the public, it was for a dance performance. Then they started throwing their own house cafeteria shows.??    
?        ??              Now, inside the space stands an art gallery. PCM asked David Baerwalde, an artist-in-residence at the Goat Farm, to do something creative with the empty storefront next to Madewell. So he partnered with fellow artist George Long and the two created Pile, a gallery and installation space throwing events every Friday night until 2016.    ??    
?         ??              Far from being uptight, Pile seems intent on throwing a party that is neither low-brow nor high-brow, just good old fashioned fun. During Pile’s first Friday opening, one corner of the room was taken over by layers of burlap that stretched from floor to ceiling, creating a mountain with a peak that extended into white cotton ball clouds. Wooden sticks of dynamite lay at the mountain’s base, eager to be lit. A mound of wooden cake slices was the centerpiece of the room, their wood-shaving icing so convincing that guests were laughing when they realized it was fake. Jungle-style beats pulsed through the mountain and the PBR flowed. At one point, Long grabbed one of his wooden sculptures to use as a wedge to prop open the gallery’s door. Shoppers, artists, and people who clearly weren't sure what was going on piled into Pile.     ??    
?        ??              Creative Loafing got with Baerwalde to ask him a few questions about Pile:    ??    
?    image-2    ??              Tell me about the decision to put Pile at Ponce City Market, and how the location came about.    ??        ??              
?     David Baerwalde: I was invited by PCM to activate an available space. I asked George Long to join me and we got excited about creating an unexpected experience in the atmosphere of the new market.    ??    
?        ??              What is your vision for the gallery?    ??        ??              
?     D.B.: We are really exploring the space as a platform for collaboration, not just with each other, but with some other artists using different mediums as well. It's not only an exhibition space for our work, but it evolving as our shared studio, where we are spending time and working. My favorite aspect though, I think, has been inviting others to use it as a performance and music venue.    ??    
?        ??              You currently are one of the artists living at the Goat Farm. How has that played a role in opening Pile?    ??        ??              
?     D.B.: Well, maybe in a sense that the Goat Farm, by example, regularly pushes against the typical parameters of perceptions about how and where art can happen.
?              
?              Who are some of the artists you'll be featuring in upcoming events?
?              
?     D.B.: Some other artists that will be joining us in different capacities (a list we are still curating): Rachel K. Garceau, Nude Twins, Beth Malone, William Downs, Nikki Starz, IFLY,  Hiron Roy, and Dan Bailey and Crew are on the schedule … so far.    ??        ?
?              
?              Pile. Free. Gallery hours: Wed.-Sun. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Events: Friday 7-10 p.m. until 2016. 675 Ponce de Leon Ave. N.E. 678-524-2048.    ?
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?              When Ponce City Market first announced its tenants, they might as well have light-projected a dollar sign into the sky. A mixed-use development with swanky shops and a star-studded, chef-driven food court seems like the last place to find true culture. Yet, one of the first times since PCM opened its doors to the public, it was for a [/atlanta/up-right-atlanta-makes-art-of-ponce-city-market/Content?oid=14065543|dance performance]. Then they started throwing their own --house-- cafeteria shows.??    
?        ??              Now, inside the space stands an art gallery. PCM asked David Baerwalde, an artist-in-residence at the Goat Farm, to do something creative with the empty storefront next to Madewell. So he partnered with fellow artist George Long and the two created __[https://www.facebook.com/PILE-926116140808423/?fref=ts|Pile]__, a gallery and installation space throwing events every Friday night until 2016.    ??    
?         ??              Far from being uptight, Pile seems intent on throwing a party that is neither low-brow nor high-brow, just good old fashioned fun. During Pile’s first Friday opening, one corner of the room was taken over by layers of burlap that stretched from floor to ceiling, creating a mountain with a peak that extended into white cotton ball clouds. Wooden sticks of dynamite lay at the mountain’s base, eager to be lit. A mound of wooden cake slices was the centerpiece of the room, their wood-shaving icing so convincing that guests were laughing when they realized it was fake. Jungle-style beats pulsed through the mountain and the PBR flowed. At one point, Long grabbed one of his wooden sculptures to use as a wedge to prop open the gallery’s door. Shoppers, artists, and people who clearly weren't sure what was going on piled into Pile.     ??    
?        ??     ''         Creative Loafing'' got with Baerwalde to ask him a few questions about Pile:    ??    
?    [image-2]    ??              __Tell me about the decision to put Pile at Ponce City Market, and how the location came about.__    ??        ??     __         __
__?     David Baerwalde:__ I was invited by PCM to activate an available space. I asked George Long to join me and we got excited about creating an unexpected experience in the atmosphere of the new market.    ??    
?        ??              __What is your vision for the gallery?__    ??        ??     __         __
__?     D.B.:__ We are really exploring the space as a platform for collaboration, not just with each other, but with some other artists using different mediums as well. It's not only an exhibition space for our work, but it evolving as our shared studio, where we are spending time and working. My favorite aspect though, I think, has been inviting others to use it as a performance and music venue.    ??    
?        ??              __You currently are one of the artists living at the Goat Farm. How has that played a role in opening Pile?__    ??        ??     __         __
__?     D.B.:__ Well, maybe in a sense that the Goat Farm, by example, regularly pushes against the typical parameters of perceptions about how and where art can happen.
?              
?              __Who are some of the artists you'll be featuring in upcoming events?__
?     __         __
__?     D.B.:__ Some other artists that will be joining us in different capacities (a list we are still curating): Rachel K. Garceau, Nude Twins, Beth Malone, William Downs, Nikki Starz, IFLY,  Hiron Roy, and Dan Bailey and Crew are on the schedule … so far.    ??        ?
?              
?              ''[https://www.facebook.com/PILE-926116140808423|Pile]. Free. Gallery hours: Wed.-Sun. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Events: Friday 7-10 p.m. until 2016. 675 Ponce de Leon Ave. N.E. 678-524-2048.''    ?
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  string(3851) "       2015-11-20T15:53:00+00:00 Ponce City Market gives artists a blank slate with Pile, they create a mountain     2015-11-20T15:53:00+00:00  image-1 ?              
?              When Ponce City Market first announced its tenants, they might as well have light-projected a dollar sign into the sky. A mixed-use development with swanky shops and a star-studded, chef-driven food court seems like the last place to find true culture. Yet, one of the first times since PCM opened its doors to the public, it was for a dance performance. Then they started throwing their own house cafeteria shows.??    
?        ??              Now, inside the space stands an art gallery. PCM asked David Baerwalde, an artist-in-residence at the Goat Farm, to do something creative with the empty storefront next to Madewell. So he partnered with fellow artist George Long and the two created Pile, a gallery and installation space throwing events every Friday night until 2016.    ??    
?         ??              Far from being uptight, Pile seems intent on throwing a party that is neither low-brow nor high-brow, just good old fashioned fun. During Pile’s first Friday opening, one corner of the room was taken over by layers of burlap that stretched from floor to ceiling, creating a mountain with a peak that extended into white cotton ball clouds. Wooden sticks of dynamite lay at the mountain’s base, eager to be lit. A mound of wooden cake slices was the centerpiece of the room, their wood-shaving icing so convincing that guests were laughing when they realized it was fake. Jungle-style beats pulsed through the mountain and the PBR flowed. At one point, Long grabbed one of his wooden sculptures to use as a wedge to prop open the gallery’s door. Shoppers, artists, and people who clearly weren't sure what was going on piled into Pile.     ??    
?        ??              Creative Loafing got with Baerwalde to ask him a few questions about Pile:    ??    
?    image-2    ??              Tell me about the decision to put Pile at Ponce City Market, and how the location came about.    ??        ??              
?     David Baerwalde: I was invited by PCM to activate an available space. I asked George Long to join me and we got excited about creating an unexpected experience in the atmosphere of the new market.    ??    
?        ??              What is your vision for the gallery?    ??        ??              
?     D.B.: We are really exploring the space as a platform for collaboration, not just with each other, but with some other artists using different mediums as well. It's not only an exhibition space for our work, but it evolving as our shared studio, where we are spending time and working. My favorite aspect though, I think, has been inviting others to use it as a performance and music venue.    ??    
?        ??              You currently are one of the artists living at the Goat Farm. How has that played a role in opening Pile?    ??        ??              
?     D.B.: Well, maybe in a sense that the Goat Farm, by example, regularly pushes against the typical parameters of perceptions about how and where art can happen.
?              
?              Who are some of the artists you'll be featuring in upcoming events?
?              
?     D.B.: Some other artists that will be joining us in different capacities (a list we are still curating): Rachel K. Garceau, Nude Twins, Beth Malone, William Downs, Nikki Starz, IFLY,  Hiron Roy, and Dan Bailey and Crew are on the schedule … so far.    ??        ?
?              
?              Pile. Free. Gallery hours: Wed.-Sun. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Events: Friday 7-10 p.m. until 2016. 675 Ponce de Leon Ave. N.E. 678-524-2048.    ?
             13085657 16200470                          Ponce City Market gives artists a blank slate with Pile, they create a mountain "
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Article

Friday November 20, 2015 10:53 am EST

image-1 ?
? When Ponce City Market first announced its tenants, they might as well have light-projected a dollar sign into the sky. A mixed-use development with swanky shops and a star-studded, chef-driven food court seems like the last place to find true culture. Yet, one of the first times since PCM opened its doors to the public, it was for a dance performance....

| more...
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  ["title"]=>
  string(32) "Former Pinecones sign to Sub Pop"
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  string(42) "Content:_:Former Pinecones sign to Sub Pop"
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  string(5632) "Arbor Labor Union, the Athens/Atlanta-based outfit formerly known as Pinecones, has signed with Sub Pop. In May 2015, the group crafted a riff-heavy debut, titled Sings For You Now (Arrowhawk Records). There's also an intense live tape, recorded on 90.5 FM/WUOG, titled Plays Cosmic Hits (Southern Vision). Both are essential listens when getting one's head around this group.

??
To put it simply, guitarist Brain Atoms, bass player Ryan Evers, drummer Ben Salie, and singer/guitarist Bo Orr craft driving post-punk and indie rock that taps into a murky and melodic sound that draws comparisons to Slint, Chavez, Lungfish, Hüsker Dü, et al. Keep an eye out for a Sub Pop debut to arrive in spring 2016.

??
When Charles Howard Candler built Callanwolde Estate in 1920, music and horticulture were chief among his family's interests. Nearly a century later, Callanwolde Fine Arts Center is home to one of the largest Aeolian pipe organs in the country with more than 3,700 pipes in the attic. A recent fundraising campaign to raise $2.1 million to renovate three historic buildings on the estate's grounds — the Barn (restorations were completed in August), the Gardener's Cottage, and the Greenhouse — upholds Candler's original vision for the house.

??
The public fundraising phase of the campaign kicked off in September and remains ongoing. Once complete, the refurbished Barn and Gardener's Cottage facilities will house the Rick Baker School of Music and Recording. The Greenhouse will host Callanwolde's School of Horticulture and Culinary Arts.

??
Funds are being raised through a combination of foundation grants and individual donations. A crowd-funding project is set to roll out in mid-November as well. Thus far, Callanwolde has raised $1.5 million.

??
In addition to donating all of the recording equipment for the program, Callanwolde's Director of Music Recording and three-time Grammy winning mixing engineer Phil Tan (Rihanna, Mariah Carey, Ne-Yo, Ludacris, Usher, Janelle Monáe) has created a three-month Music Recording Certificate Program consisting of 24 courses. Students who complete the program are prepared to apply to music recording, mixing, and engineering institutions and colleges around the country. Callanwolde is already working in conjunction with recording programs at Full Sail University, Georgia State, Kennesaw State, and Atlanta Institute of Music.

??
Sad news arrived Mon., Nov. 9, when word spread that Rev. Johnny L. "Hurricane" Jones passed away. Jones was 79 years old. Jones was the vibrant leader of the Second Mt. Olive Baptist Church, and was known for hitting his congregation like a force of nature with a one-two punch of gospel singing and preaching — bursting with the passion of a man eternally in the spirit. In 2010, Dust-to-Digital Records released two compilation LPs of Jones' material: Jesus Christ From A To Z and The Hurricane That Hit Atlanta.

??
In new music news, battling a rare form of cancer hasn't kept Grip Plyaz away from the studio. Between treatments and spending time with his family, the local MC has kept busy recording new material downtown at Castle Hill Studios. Last week, Grip unveiled the first taste of what he's been up to with a new cut titled "Dee Brown."

??
Named after the 1991 NBA Slam Dunk champ, the song embraces Grip's penchant for matching catchy hooks ("They call me Dee Brown/ Trap jumping out the gym") with current trends, which in this case involves the dab dance. Produced by Afriken, the track came about after a conversation with the producer, Grip, and a friend named Deezy, after a day's work at Edgewood Pizza. Afriken told Grip he should "make a song people can dab to."

??
Most tenants of the local music scene recognize Peter Webb as the saxophone player towering over <Faun and A Pan Flute. However, Webb's debut solo album, Liminal Space shows off a more personal side of his moody, acoustic songwriting, downplaying the edgy abstractions of his other musical endeavors. Throughout Liminal Space, songs such as "Spain," "Jared," and "Trees" are filled with spacious melodies, and a slow pace driven by Webb's subdued and strangely down-to-earth analysis of his relationship with the surrounding world.

??
Some of these numbers predate Webb's time playing with Faun, Hello Ocho, Mediocre Machine et al, offering a more holistic look at what he's capable of pulling off with a guitar, his voice, and a solid cast of players, which, for the album, includes John Gregg (drums), Jared Pepper (drums), and Adam Mincey (bass).

??
Earlier this year, folk and chamber pop six-piece Oryx & Crake released its sophomore effort, Marriage. The indie music mainstay employed its penchant for rich string arrangements and bookish lyricism to explore the marriage between members Ryan Peoples and Rebekah Goode-Peoples. The video for album standout "The Show" provides a visual parallel for the bleak way marriage is imagined on the record, but in an even darker context.

??
Lush, slow moving shots reflect the double-edged sword of domesticity: ambivalent embraces in bed, washing dishes, joyless sips of alcohol. Images of smiling children contrast the quiet terror in Peoples' face, and the couple's rings are highlighted like bits of twisted metal weighing down their fingers. The music and visuals build an air of muted melodrama, creating a harrowing story arc worthy of Oryx & Crake's literary heroes.

??
Oryx & Crake plays Fri., Nov. 20 at High Museum with Ruby Velle and the Soulphonics, and again on Thurs., Dec. 3 at Ponce City Market.

??
With additional reporting by Gavin Godfrey and Paul DeMerritt."
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  string(6395) "__Arbor Labor Union__, the Athens/Atlanta-based outfit formerly known as __Pinecones__, has [https://www.subpop.com/news/2015/11/16/arbor_labor_union_fka_pinecones_sign_to_sub_pop|signed with Sub Pop]. In May 2015, the group crafted a riff-heavy debut, titled ''[https://soundcloud.com/arrowhawkrecords/sets/alu_singles|Sings For You Now]'' ([http://www.arrowhawkrecords.com/|Arrowhawk Records]). There's also an intense live tape, recorded on 90.5 FM/WUOG, titled ''[http://arborlaborunion.bandcamp.com/album/plays-cosmic-hits-live-on-radio|Plays Cosmic Hits]'' (Southern Vision). Both are essential listens when getting one's head around this group.

??
To put it simply, guitarist Brain Atoms, bass player Ryan Evers, drummer Ben Salie, and singer/guitarist Bo Orr craft driving post-punk and indie rock that taps into a murky and melodic sound that draws comparisons to Slint, Chavez, Lungfish, Hüsker Dü, et al. Keep an eye out for a Sub Pop debut to arrive in spring 2016.

??
When Charles Howard Candler built Callanwolde Estate in 1920, music and horticulture were chief among his family's interests. Nearly a century later, __Callanwolde Fine Arts Center__ is home to one of the largest Aeolian pipe organs in the country with more than 3,700 pipes in the attic. A recent [http://clatl.com/cribnotes/archives/2015/11/09/callanwolde-pushes-to-raise-21-million-to-renovate-historic-buildings|fundraising campaign to raise $2.1 million] to renovate three historic buildings on the estate's grounds — the Barn (restorations were completed in August), the Gardener's Cottage, and the Greenhouse — upholds Candler's original vision for the house.

??
The public fundraising phase of the campaign kicked off in September and remains ongoing. Once complete, the refurbished Barn and Gardener's Cottage facilities will house the __Rick Baker School of Music and Recording__. The Greenhouse will host Callanwolde's School of Horticulture and Culinary Arts.

??
Funds are being raised through a combination of foundation grants and individual donations. A crowd-funding project is set to roll out in mid-November as well. Thus far, Callanwolde has raised $1.5 million.

??
In addition to donating all of the recording equipment for the program, Callanwolde's Director of Music Recording and three-time Grammy winning mixing engineer __Phil Tan__ (Rihanna, Mariah Carey, Ne-Yo, Ludacris, Usher, Janelle Monáe) has created a three-month Music Recording Certificate Program consisting of 24 courses. Students who complete the program are prepared to apply to music recording, mixing, and engineering institutions and colleges around the country. Callanwolde is already working in conjunction with recording programs at Full Sail University, Georgia State, Kennesaw State, and Atlanta Institute of Music.

??
Sad news arrived Mon., Nov. 9, when word spread that [http://clatl.com/cribnotes/archives/2015/11/10/rip-johnny-l-hurricane-jones-1936-2015|__Rev. Johnny L. "Hurricane" Jones__ passed away]. Jones was 79 years old. Jones was the vibrant leader of the Second Mt. Olive Baptist Church, and was known for hitting his congregation like a force of nature with a one-two punch of gospel singing and preaching — bursting with the passion of a man eternally in the spirit. In 2010, __Dust-to-Digital Records__ released two compilation LPs of Jones' material: ''Jesus Christ From A To Z'' and ''The Hurricane That Hit Atlanta''.

??
In new music news, battling a rare form of cancer hasn't kept __Grip Plyaz__ away from the studio. Between treatments and spending time with his family, the local MC has kept busy recording new material downtown at __Castle Hill Studios__. Last week, Grip unveiled the first taste of what he's been up to with a new cut titled "[http://clatl.com/cribnotes/archives/2015/11/10/premiere-grip-plyaz-drops-dab-heavy-dee-brown|Dee Brown]."

??
Named after the 1991 NBA Slam Dunk champ, the song embraces Grip's penchant for matching catchy hooks ("They call me Dee Brown/ Trap jumping out the gym") with current trends, which in this case involves the dab dance. Produced by __Afriken__, the track came about after a conversation with the producer, Grip, and a friend named Deezy, after a day's work at Edgewood Pizza. Afriken told Grip he should "make a song people can dab to."

??
Most tenants of the local music scene recognize __Peter Webb__ as the saxophone player towering over 
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  string(5871) "    Callanwolde pushes to raise funds and more music news   2015-11-19T09:00:00+00:00 Former Pinecones sign to Sub Pop     2015-11-19T09:00:00+00:00  Arbor Labor Union, the Athens/Atlanta-based outfit formerly known as Pinecones, has signed with Sub Pop. In May 2015, the group crafted a riff-heavy debut, titled Sings For You Now (Arrowhawk Records). There's also an intense live tape, recorded on 90.5 FM/WUOG, titled Plays Cosmic Hits (Southern Vision). Both are essential listens when getting one's head around this group.

??
To put it simply, guitarist Brain Atoms, bass player Ryan Evers, drummer Ben Salie, and singer/guitarist Bo Orr craft driving post-punk and indie rock that taps into a murky and melodic sound that draws comparisons to Slint, Chavez, Lungfish, Hüsker Dü, et al. Keep an eye out for a Sub Pop debut to arrive in spring 2016.

??
When Charles Howard Candler built Callanwolde Estate in 1920, music and horticulture were chief among his family's interests. Nearly a century later, Callanwolde Fine Arts Center is home to one of the largest Aeolian pipe organs in the country with more than 3,700 pipes in the attic. A recent fundraising campaign to raise $2.1 million to renovate three historic buildings on the estate's grounds — the Barn (restorations were completed in August), the Gardener's Cottage, and the Greenhouse — upholds Candler's original vision for the house.

??
The public fundraising phase of the campaign kicked off in September and remains ongoing. Once complete, the refurbished Barn and Gardener's Cottage facilities will house the Rick Baker School of Music and Recording. The Greenhouse will host Callanwolde's School of Horticulture and Culinary Arts.

??
Funds are being raised through a combination of foundation grants and individual donations. A crowd-funding project is set to roll out in mid-November as well. Thus far, Callanwolde has raised $1.5 million.

??
In addition to donating all of the recording equipment for the program, Callanwolde's Director of Music Recording and three-time Grammy winning mixing engineer Phil Tan (Rihanna, Mariah Carey, Ne-Yo, Ludacris, Usher, Janelle Monáe) has created a three-month Music Recording Certificate Program consisting of 24 courses. Students who complete the program are prepared to apply to music recording, mixing, and engineering institutions and colleges around the country. Callanwolde is already working in conjunction with recording programs at Full Sail University, Georgia State, Kennesaw State, and Atlanta Institute of Music.

??
Sad news arrived Mon., Nov. 9, when word spread that Rev. Johnny L. "Hurricane" Jones passed away. Jones was 79 years old. Jones was the vibrant leader of the Second Mt. Olive Baptist Church, and was known for hitting his congregation like a force of nature with a one-two punch of gospel singing and preaching — bursting with the passion of a man eternally in the spirit. In 2010, Dust-to-Digital Records released two compilation LPs of Jones' material: Jesus Christ From A To Z and The Hurricane That Hit Atlanta.

??
In new music news, battling a rare form of cancer hasn't kept Grip Plyaz away from the studio. Between treatments and spending time with his family, the local MC has kept busy recording new material downtown at Castle Hill Studios. Last week, Grip unveiled the first taste of what he's been up to with a new cut titled "Dee Brown."

??
Named after the 1991 NBA Slam Dunk champ, the song embraces Grip's penchant for matching catchy hooks ("They call me Dee Brown/ Trap jumping out the gym") with current trends, which in this case involves the dab dance. Produced by Afriken, the track came about after a conversation with the producer, Grip, and a friend named Deezy, after a day's work at Edgewood Pizza. Afriken told Grip he should "make a song people can dab to."

??
Most tenants of the local music scene recognize Peter Webb as the saxophone player towering over <Faun and A Pan Flute. However, Webb's debut solo album, Liminal Space shows off a more personal side of his moody, acoustic songwriting, downplaying the edgy abstractions of his other musical endeavors. Throughout Liminal Space, songs such as "Spain," "Jared," and "Trees" are filled with spacious melodies, and a slow pace driven by Webb's subdued and strangely down-to-earth analysis of his relationship with the surrounding world.

??
Some of these numbers predate Webb's time playing with Faun, Hello Ocho, Mediocre Machine et al, offering a more holistic look at what he's capable of pulling off with a guitar, his voice, and a solid cast of players, which, for the album, includes John Gregg (drums), Jared Pepper (drums), and Adam Mincey (bass).

??
Earlier this year, folk and chamber pop six-piece Oryx & Crake released its sophomore effort, Marriage. The indie music mainstay employed its penchant for rich string arrangements and bookish lyricism to explore the marriage between members Ryan Peoples and Rebekah Goode-Peoples. The video for album standout "The Show" provides a visual parallel for the bleak way marriage is imagined on the record, but in an even darker context.

??
Lush, slow moving shots reflect the double-edged sword of domesticity: ambivalent embraces in bed, washing dishes, joyless sips of alcohol. Images of smiling children contrast the quiet terror in Peoples' face, and the couple's rings are highlighted like bits of twisted metal weighing down their fingers. The music and visuals build an air of muted melodrama, creating a harrowing story arc worthy of Oryx & Crake's literary heroes.

??
Oryx & Crake plays Fri., Nov. 20 at High Museum with Ruby Velle and the Soulphonics, and again on Thurs., Dec. 3 at Ponce City Market.

??
With additional reporting by Gavin Godfrey and Paul DeMerritt.             13085624 16156961                          Former Pinecones sign to Sub Pop "
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Thursday November 19, 2015 04:00 am EST
Callanwolde pushes to raise funds and more music news | more...
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  string(3019) "In a world of injustice, a message to bring about awareness is always noble. This is the artistic task Lennie Mowris has taken on with her business, Lenspeace, a letterpress initiative in collaboration with local nonprofits and artists that seek to put out a powerful message. "The name is a double entendre," Mowris says. "The 'lens' being a source of vision, also the start to my name as the founder. And 'peace' coming from the bonds and ideas generated that bring people closer together in themselves."

??
The prints Mowris creates aren't any typical, soulless Hallmark fare. Instead, Mowris uses her love of raising awareness and the printing press to produce conscience letterpress printing, a technique often used during World Wars I and II to produce propaganda posters.

??
Lenspeace uses the vintage medium for tactile, textured messages in romantic calligraphy for a slew of salty break-up messages like, "Lose my number," or "You can keep the dog." Conversely, the text often portrays posi, radical messages like, "Critical for the masses: start a revolution." The latter is a phrase that precisely sums up Lenspeace's mission.

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"Lenspeace is a perspective on that which binds us together and tears us apart, as explored through traditional vintage communications media," Mowris says. "It's an intention to leave this world a little lighter through love, humor, empathy, and philanthropy — a spectrum of creative ideas."

??
Its collective work aims to boost environmental awareness and cyclist rights, especially in alliance with the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition.

??
In the midst of its Year of Giving — a campaign supported by 15 local organizations including Southern Center for Human Rights, the Giving Kitchen, and others — Lenspeace plans to donate 50 percent or more of its profits to the drive.

??
In addition to working with nonprofits, creative projects are important to Mowris, who has also collaborated with artists including Miya Bailey, Scott Fuller, and Kevin Byrd.

??
On Lenspeace's site, Mowris reminiscences about working with the Southern Center for Human Rights to raise awareness for the inequality of the incarceration rate of African Americans. Mowris says this project was personal for Denise Brown, another designer who helped hand paint the posters and also had an incarcerated father. "Of every print I've ever made, I've never been as moved by a print as I am this one," Mowris says.

??
Although Mowris' interests range wildly, she says above all else, she wants to convey messages about the human experience. "Life is a pendulum constantly swinging between ecstasies and suffering," she says about a print called Target Practice. "What makes true love special is that it's committed to you ... both. We crave this experience because it alleviates the pain of our existence and celebrates the joys."

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Lenspeace acts as a reminder that change can start with merely an idea, creativity, and a passion for working with others to help those whose voices can't be heard."
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??
The prints Mowris creates aren't any typical, soulless Hallmark fare. Instead, Mowris uses her love of raising awareness and the printing press to produce conscience letterpress printing, a technique often used during World Wars I and II to produce propaganda posters.

??
Lenspeace uses the vintage medium for tactile, textured messages in romantic calligraphy for a slew of salty break-up messages like, "Lose my number," or "You can keep the dog." Conversely, the text often portrays posi, radical messages like, "Critical for the masses: start a revolution." The latter is a phrase that precisely sums up Lenspeace's mission.

??
"Lenspeace is a perspective on that which binds us together and tears us apart, as explored through traditional vintage communications media," Mowris says. "It's an intention to leave this world a little lighter through love, humor, empathy, and philanthropy — a spectrum of creative ideas."

??
Its collective work aims to boost environmental awareness and cyclist rights, especially in alliance with the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition.

??
In the midst of its Year of Giving — a campaign supported by 15 local organizations including Southern Center for Human Rights, the Giving Kitchen, and others — Lenspeace plans to donate 50 percent or more of its profits to the drive.

??
In addition to working with nonprofits, creative projects are important to Mowris, who has also collaborated with artists including Miya Bailey, Scott Fuller, and Kevin Byrd.

??
On Lenspeace's site, Mowris reminiscences about working with the Southern Center for Human Rights to raise awareness for the inequality of the incarceration rate of African Americans. Mowris says this project was personal for Denise Brown, another designer who helped hand paint the posters and also had an incarcerated father. "Of every print I've ever made, I've never been as moved by a print as I am this one," Mowris says.

??
Although Mowris' interests range wildly, she says above all else, she wants to convey messages about the human experience. "Life is a pendulum constantly swinging between ecstasies and suffering," she says about a print called ''Target Practice''. "What makes true love special is that it's committed to you ... both. We crave this experience because it alleviates the pain of our existence and celebrates the joys."

??
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??
The prints Mowris creates aren't any typical, soulless Hallmark fare. Instead, Mowris uses her love of raising awareness and the printing press to produce conscience letterpress printing, a technique often used during World Wars I and II to produce propaganda posters.

??
Lenspeace uses the vintage medium for tactile, textured messages in romantic calligraphy for a slew of salty break-up messages like, "Lose my number," or "You can keep the dog." Conversely, the text often portrays posi, radical messages like, "Critical for the masses: start a revolution." The latter is a phrase that precisely sums up Lenspeace's mission.

??
"Lenspeace is a perspective on that which binds us together and tears us apart, as explored through traditional vintage communications media," Mowris says. "It's an intention to leave this world a little lighter through love, humor, empathy, and philanthropy — a spectrum of creative ideas."

??
Its collective work aims to boost environmental awareness and cyclist rights, especially in alliance with the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition.

??
In the midst of its Year of Giving — a campaign supported by 15 local organizations including Southern Center for Human Rights, the Giving Kitchen, and others — Lenspeace plans to donate 50 percent or more of its profits to the drive.

??
In addition to working with nonprofits, creative projects are important to Mowris, who has also collaborated with artists including Miya Bailey, Scott Fuller, and Kevin Byrd.

??
On Lenspeace's site, Mowris reminiscences about working with the Southern Center for Human Rights to raise awareness for the inequality of the incarceration rate of African Americans. Mowris says this project was personal for Denise Brown, another designer who helped hand paint the posters and also had an incarcerated father. "Of every print I've ever made, I've never been as moved by a print as I am this one," Mowris says.

??
Although Mowris' interests range wildly, she says above all else, she wants to convey messages about the human experience. "Life is a pendulum constantly swinging between ecstasies and suffering," she says about a print called Target Practice. "What makes true love special is that it's committed to you ... both. We crave this experience because it alleviates the pain of our existence and celebrates the joys."

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Lenspeace acts as a reminder that change can start with merely an idea, creativity, and a passion for working with others to help those whose voices can't be heard.             13085611 16152604                          Lennie Mowris" letterpress love "
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Wednesday November 18, 2015 04:00 am EST
Artist's Year in Giving campaign partners with community organizations to get conversations going | more...
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  string(3916) "After overcoming constant moving and homelessness, Sage Guillory admits he's a positive person and manifests his experiences into artwork. Guillory's dreamlike, psychedelic illustrations are shaded with careful line work displayed in pieces such as "Built on the Blues," an illustration alluding to the birth of America being built on the backs of African- and Native Americans. The illustration depicts a blue figure in the forefront lying on his back with a long nose protruding from his face. Swastikas are planted along his body.

??
At 23, the visual artist has gained recognition for doing the album art for young local musicians OG Maco, Key!, and Raury. His success is inspiring considering the path he took. Moving house to house with his mother and brother throughout his childhood, art was Guillory's creative outlet. As a child he was known as the creative one everyone anticipated would do great things. "I realized I can design my own life," he says.

??
He recalls his family constantly being evicted when he was young, and tagging "NOT A HOME" in his grandmother's basement when his family had to move in with her in order to have a roof over their head. Even after breaking away from his family to pursue his own artistic career, he was living couch to couch at friends' places until he was able to make a living off of his art.

??
Guillory says that despite the eerie aesthetic, psychedelics play no part in his art. Guillory spoke to Creative Loafing about life's obstacles and how he measures success.

??
What was it like after people started to see the work that you did for Raury?

??
I had a sketchbook that I carried around for two or three years and I just drew in there and showed all my friends and people I meet in the city, and they'd say, "You're the best artist in Atlanta." I don't like when people say that shit. I don't believe that, but they would say things like that and I thought maybe I should try it, but when it first started coming out, everybody was just on some "it's about time" shit.

??
Do you feel like Atlanta embraces up-and-coming artists?

??
I think so. Raury could've got any artist, but chose me ... Even with everybody trying to make it at the same time, I don't really believe in competition because I feel like everyone can win.

??
What has been the biggest obstacle so far for you as an artist?

??
People knew I did art and knew I was good at it, but they didn't really take me seriously. They didn't say it, but I felt it ... People doubted me, but it wasn't like they doubted me and discouraged me. For me, it was a "you'll see soon" type of thing. I don't really come into obstacles just because I don't see them as obstacles. It's all about perception.

??
Besides being known for your artwork for Raury, what are some other career highlights?

??
J.I.D. and 6lack, and OG Maco, they did a song called "W4R," and one of them asked me to do the artwork for it. People didn't know it was me, and I put it on my Instagram and now people say, "Oh you did this! You did that!" And I did this Gucci drawing of Gucci with a halo above him. I did that and a lot of people got it on their phones and their blogs, but they never knew it was me. So now it's like people are recognizing what I do.

??
What does that feel like for you?

??
It's awesome. It's just cool because I'm giving out the most genuine thing I can give, which is my artwork, and people remember it. People notice it, and that makes me really happy.

??
What's success to you?

??
This is how I measure success. I want to be able to live comfortably, put tons of money into my projects. I want to be able to do million-dollar projects, and also give back. That's my idea of success. I want to have a whole lot of money just because I really want to help people. I really want to give money to communities, because they don't care about us, and I feel like it's going to take us to help us."
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  string(4419) "After overcoming constant moving and homelessness, [http://www.artguillory.com/|Sage Guillory] admits he's a positive person and manifests his experiences into artwork. Guillory's dreamlike, psychedelic illustrations are shaded with careful line work displayed in pieces such as "[http://www.artguillory.com/print-shop/built-on-the-blues|Built on the Blues]," an illustration alluding to the birth of America being built on the backs of African- and Native Americans. The illustration depicts a blue figure in the forefront lying on his back with a long nose protruding from his face. Swastikas are planted along his body.

??
At 23, the visual artist has gained recognition for doing the album art for young local musicians [http://clatl.com/atlanta/is-og-maco-the-next-odb/Content?oid=12915749|OG Maco], [http://clatl.com/cribnotes/archives/2014/09/05/key-im-two-9-forever|Key!], and [http://clatl.com/atlanta/raury-is-atlantas-indigo-child/Content?oid=11393367|Raury]. His success is inspiring considering the path he took. Moving house to house with his mother and brother throughout his childhood, art was Guillory's creative outlet. As a child he was known as the creative one everyone anticipated would do great things. "I realized I can design my own life," he says.

??
He recalls his family constantly being evicted when he was young, and tagging "NOT A HOME" in his grandmother's basement when his family had to move in with her in order to have a roof over their head. Even after breaking away from his family to pursue his own artistic career, he was living couch to couch at friends' places until he was able to make a living off of his art.

??
Guillory says that despite the eerie aesthetic, psychedelics play no part in his art. Guillory spoke to ''Creative Loafing'' about life's obstacles and how he measures success.

??
__What was it like after people started to see [http://greenlabel.com/art/guillory-double-tapped/|the work that you did for Raury]?__

??
I had a sketchbook that I carried around for two or three years and I just drew in there and showed all my friends and people I meet in the city, and they'd say, "You're the best artist in Atlanta." I don't like when people say that shit. I don't believe that, but they would say things like that and I thought maybe I should try it, but when it first started coming out, everybody was just on some "it's about time" shit.

??
__Do you feel like Atlanta embraces up-and-coming artists?__

??
I think so. Raury could've got any artist, but chose me ... Even with everybody trying to make it at the same time, I don't really believe in competition because I feel like everyone can win.

??
__What has been the biggest obstacle so far for you as an artist?__

??
People knew I did art and knew I was good at it, but they didn't really take me seriously. They didn't say it, but I felt it ... People doubted me, but it wasn't like they doubted me and discouraged me. [For me,] it was a "you'll see soon" type of thing. I don't really come into obstacles just because I don't see them as obstacles. It's all about perception.

??
__Besides being known for your artwork for Raury, what are some other career highlights?__

??
J.I.D. and 6lack, and OG Maco, they did a song called "[https://soundcloud.com/jidsv/w4r-ft-og-maco-alkebulan-prod-by-deko|W4R]," and one of them asked me to do the artwork for it. People didn't know it was me, and I put it on my Instagram and now people say, "Oh you did this! You did that!" And I did this [http://www.artguillory.com/work-avenue/|Gucci drawing] of Gucci with a halo above him. I did that and a lot of people got it on their phones and their blogs, but they never knew it was me. So now it's like people are recognizing what I do.

??
__What does that feel like for you?__

??
It's awesome. It's just cool because I'm giving out the most genuine thing I can give, which is my artwork, and people remember it. People notice it, and that makes me really happy.

??
__What's success to you?__

??
This is how I measure success. I want to be able to live comfortably, put tons of money into my projects. I want to be able to do million-dollar projects, and also give back. That's my idea of success. I want to have a whole lot of money just because I really want to help people. I really want to give money to communities, because they don't care about us, and I feel like it's going to take us to help us."
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  string(4184) "    Meet the once-homeless artist working with your favorite musicians   2015-11-16T09:00:00+00:00 Sage Guillory's unlikely path to success     2015-11-16T09:00:00+00:00  After overcoming constant moving and homelessness, Sage Guillory admits he's a positive person and manifests his experiences into artwork. Guillory's dreamlike, psychedelic illustrations are shaded with careful line work displayed in pieces such as "Built on the Blues," an illustration alluding to the birth of America being built on the backs of African- and Native Americans. The illustration depicts a blue figure in the forefront lying on his back with a long nose protruding from his face. Swastikas are planted along his body.

??
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??
He recalls his family constantly being evicted when he was young, and tagging "NOT A HOME" in his grandmother's basement when his family had to move in with her in order to have a roof over their head. Even after breaking away from his family to pursue his own artistic career, he was living couch to couch at friends' places until he was able to make a living off of his art.

??
Guillory says that despite the eerie aesthetic, psychedelics play no part in his art. Guillory spoke to Creative Loafing about life's obstacles and how he measures success.

??
What was it like after people started to see the work that you did for Raury?

??
I had a sketchbook that I carried around for two or three years and I just drew in there and showed all my friends and people I meet in the city, and they'd say, "You're the best artist in Atlanta." I don't like when people say that shit. I don't believe that, but they would say things like that and I thought maybe I should try it, but when it first started coming out, everybody was just on some "it's about time" shit.

??
Do you feel like Atlanta embraces up-and-coming artists?

??
I think so. Raury could've got any artist, but chose me ... Even with everybody trying to make it at the same time, I don't really believe in competition because I feel like everyone can win.

??
What has been the biggest obstacle so far for you as an artist?

??
People knew I did art and knew I was good at it, but they didn't really take me seriously. They didn't say it, but I felt it ... People doubted me, but it wasn't like they doubted me and discouraged me. For me, it was a "you'll see soon" type of thing. I don't really come into obstacles just because I don't see them as obstacles. It's all about perception.

??
Besides being known for your artwork for Raury, what are some other career highlights?

??
J.I.D. and 6lack, and OG Maco, they did a song called "W4R," and one of them asked me to do the artwork for it. People didn't know it was me, and I put it on my Instagram and now people say, "Oh you did this! You did that!" And I did this Gucci drawing of Gucci with a halo above him. I did that and a lot of people got it on their phones and their blogs, but they never knew it was me. So now it's like people are recognizing what I do.

??
What does that feel like for you?

??
It's awesome. It's just cool because I'm giving out the most genuine thing I can give, which is my artwork, and people remember it. People notice it, and that makes me really happy.

??
What's success to you?

??
This is how I measure success. I want to be able to live comfortably, put tons of money into my projects. I want to be able to do million-dollar projects, and also give back. That's my idea of success. I want to have a whole lot of money just because I really want to help people. I really want to give money to communities, because they don't care about us, and I feel like it's going to take us to help us.             13085596 16096582                          Sage Guillory's unlikely path to success "
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Monday November 16, 2015 04:00 am EST
Meet the once-homeless artist working with your favorite musicians | more...
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Friday November 13, 2015 03:26 pm EST

image-1
? I took this photograph of the Annual Ashura Procession. When I was Downtown the previous afternoon, I met two men who were preparing banners for the march. They reminded me that it was that time for the event again. I knew that it would be cloudy, and possibly rainy, so the light would be amazing for photography. I had to attend.
?
? There were more than 100 participants in the...

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