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  string(5200) "Most Atlantans likely have a clear image in mind when they hear the term "millennial." A sharp young professional catching an Uber to Krog Street Market. A tech-savvy graduate working in Midtown's growing tech sector. A bearded young artist throwing up another public mural.

??
City and regional leaders have started enlisting the help of these sought-after young people to chart metro Atlanta's path forward on key issues like education and transportation. That's a smart move. The so-called millennial generation, or those of us born after about 1980, is already reshaping the metro region in fundamental ways. Recent efforts like the Atlanta Regional Commission's Millennial Advisory Committee are promising strategies to incorporate our views.

??
For the gambit to have meaning though, Atlanta leaders will need to focus on the needs of the millennial generation as a whole — not just one sought-after sliver. A vision of the region's future that caters to only coveted young professionals and entrepreneurs is woefully incomplete. That's because the typical young Atlantan probably has more in common with the millennial driving the Uber than the one catching it. The single young moms cooking hamburgers and struggling to afford child care are Atlanta millennials, too.

??
Take Danisha, a 28-year-old single mother of three in Peoplestown. Until recently, she earned $9 an hour at a local convenience store, enough to bring home about $18,000 a year when working full-time. She bounced around between family members' couches and spare rooms, unable to afford even basic shelter of her own. That's until she was able to stabilize her situation through a local nonprofit, assistance only a lucky few receive.

??
Or Rahim, a single father in Mechanicsville who was stuck making minimum wage and slipping in and out of homelessness until this year. He now makes $10.50 an hour after a stint of local job training — not a bad start. But at that level of income he can still only afford about $525 a month in housing costs based on a standard measure of affordability, not enough to land in a community with quality amenities and schools.

??
These Atlanta millennials and others like them work hard every day, just trying to get by and maybe one day reach the middle class. The odds are increasingly against them. Incomes are flat, mid-wage jobs are scarce, and housing costs are borderline out-of-control. A two-bedroom apartment in the Old Fourth Ward now runs about $1,650 a month, nearly twice what my wife and I paid upon arriving six years ago. You won't find many working-class millennials these days walking our neighborhood streets.

??
Instead, you'll likely find them in poorer, historically marginalized communities where opportunities for advancement are scarce. Twelve of Atlanta's 17 Neighborhood Planning Units, or NPUs, located along or below I-20 are high-poverty areas, where the poverty rate is at least 20 percent. Low-income communities like these typically lack assets such as quality pre-K and high-performing public schools. And many households also go without a car, disconnecting them from higher-wage jobs in better areas.

??
That economic segregation is closely intertwined with race, not surprising in a city with lingering racial divides. In 2014, more than one in three black households in the city limits didn't make enough income to afford the basics, compared to less than one in 10 of their white counterparts. An estimated 80 percent of black children in Atlanta live in high-poverty neighborhoods, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, versus 43 percent of Latino kids and only 6 percent of white ones.

??
Such disparities make it hard to climb the economic ladder and can harm children and families in ways that last for life. A 2013 study found a metro Atlanta child raised in poverty has only a 4 percent chance of making it to the top of the income scale, worse than any other major American metro area. Less than half will even make it to the middle class.

??
Put another way, millennials who were born poor in Atlanta are likely to remain that way for the rest of their lives. And their children will likely repeat the cycle. Is Atlanta content with that kind of inequality? Or can city and regional leaders build a future where opportunities are more equally distributed, prosperity more broadly shared?

??
The grim reality facing so many Atlantans is unlikely to show up in slick new promotional videos or millennial-themed brochures, yet it's something young people like Danisha and Rahim wake up to every day.

??
Current leaders still have some time left to improve their fate, especially on immediate needs like affordable homes. But the next generation of leaders should plan more boldly and inclusively as we wait in the wings, exploring issues from livable jobs to more equitable schools. Because Atlantans from all walks of life deserve a decent chance to succeed. Millennials should settle for nothing less.

??
Wesley Tharpe lives in the Old Fourth Ward, serves as a senior policy analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, and is a board member for the Center for Working Families. The views expressed are his own."
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  string(5477) "Most Atlantans likely have a clear image in mind when they hear the term "millennial." A sharp young professional catching an Uber to Krog Street Market. A tech-savvy graduate working in Midtown's growing tech sector. A bearded young artist throwing up another public mural.

??
City and regional leaders have started enlisting the help of these sought-after young people to chart metro Atlanta's path forward on key issues like education and transportation. That's a smart move. The so-called millennial generation, or those of us born after about 1980, is already reshaping the metro region in fundamental ways. Recent efforts like the [http://www.atlantaregional.com/about-us/public-involvement/new-voices|Atlanta Regional Commission's Millennial Advisory Committee] are promising strategies to incorporate our views.

??
For the gambit to have meaning though, Atlanta leaders will need to focus on the needs of the millennial generation as a whole — not just one sought-after sliver. A vision of the region's future that caters to only coveted young professionals and entrepreneurs is woefully incomplete. That's because the typical young Atlantan probably has more in common with the millennial ''driving'' the Uber than the one catching it. The single young moms cooking hamburgers and struggling to afford child care are Atlanta millennials, too.

??
Take Danisha, a 28-year-old single mother of three in Peoplestown. Until recently, she earned $9 an hour at a local convenience store, enough to bring home about $18,000 a year when working full-time. She bounced around between family members' couches and spare rooms, unable to afford even basic shelter of her own. That's until she was able to stabilize her situation through a local nonprofit, assistance only a lucky few receive.

??
Or Rahim, a single father in Mechanicsville who was stuck making minimum wage and slipping in and out of homelessness until this year. He now makes $10.50 an hour after a stint of local job training — not a bad start. But at that level of income he can still only afford about $525 a month in housing costs based on a standard measure of affordability, not enough to land in a community with quality amenities and schools.

??
These Atlanta millennials and others like them work hard every day, just trying to get by and maybe one day reach the middle class. The odds are increasingly against them. Incomes are flat, mid-wage jobs are scarce, and housing costs are borderline out-of-control. A two-bedroom apartment in the Old Fourth Ward now runs about $1,650 a month, nearly twice what my wife and I paid upon arriving six years ago. You won't find many working-class millennials these days walking our neighborhood streets.

??
Instead, you'll likely find them in poorer, historically marginalized communities where opportunities for advancement are scarce. Twelve of Atlanta's 17 Neighborhood Planning Units, or NPUs, located along or below I-20 are high-poverty areas, where the poverty rate is at least 20 percent. Low-income communities like these typically lack assets such as quality pre-K and high-performing public schools. And many households also go without a car, disconnecting them from higher-wage jobs in better areas.

??
That economic segregation is closely intertwined with race, not surprising in a city with lingering racial divides. In 2014, more than one in three black households in the city limits didn't make enough income to afford the basics, compared to less than one in 10 of their white counterparts. An estimated 80 percent of black children in Atlanta live in high-poverty neighborhoods, according to the [http://www.aecf.org/blog/as-atlantas-economy-thrives-many-residents-of-color-are-left-behind/|Annie E. Casey Foundation], versus 43 percent of Latino kids and only 6 percent of white ones.

??
Such disparities make it hard to climb the economic ladder and can harm children and families in ways that last for life. A 2013 study found a metro Atlanta child raised in poverty has only a [http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/22/business/in-climbing-income-ladder-location-matters.html?hp&_r=0|4 percent chance] of making it to the top of the income scale, worse than any other major American metro area. Less than half will even make it to the middle class.

??
Put another way, millennials who were born poor in Atlanta are likely to remain that way for the rest of their lives. And their children will likely repeat the cycle. Is Atlanta content with that kind of inequality? Or can city and regional leaders build a future where opportunities are more equally distributed, prosperity more broadly shared?

??
The grim reality facing so many Atlantans is unlikely to show up in slick new promotional videos or millennial-themed brochures, yet it's something young people like Danisha and Rahim wake up to every day.

??
Current leaders still have some time left to improve their fate, especially on immediate needs like affordable homes. But the next generation of leaders should plan more boldly and inclusively as we wait in the wings, exploring issues from livable jobs to more equitable schools. Because Atlantans from all walks of life deserve a decent chance to succeed. Millennials should settle for nothing less.

??
''Wesley Tharpe lives in the Old Fourth Ward, serves as a senior policy analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, and is a board member for the Center for Working Families. The views expressed are his own.''"
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  string(5439) "    Poverty and inequity confront Atlanta's next generation   2015-10-22T08:00:00+00:00 Opinion - The other millennials     2015-10-22T08:00:00+00:00  Most Atlantans likely have a clear image in mind when they hear the term "millennial." A sharp young professional catching an Uber to Krog Street Market. A tech-savvy graduate working in Midtown's growing tech sector. A bearded young artist throwing up another public mural.

??
City and regional leaders have started enlisting the help of these sought-after young people to chart metro Atlanta's path forward on key issues like education and transportation. That's a smart move. The so-called millennial generation, or those of us born after about 1980, is already reshaping the metro region in fundamental ways. Recent efforts like the Atlanta Regional Commission's Millennial Advisory Committee are promising strategies to incorporate our views.

??
For the gambit to have meaning though, Atlanta leaders will need to focus on the needs of the millennial generation as a whole — not just one sought-after sliver. A vision of the region's future that caters to only coveted young professionals and entrepreneurs is woefully incomplete. That's because the typical young Atlantan probably has more in common with the millennial driving the Uber than the one catching it. The single young moms cooking hamburgers and struggling to afford child care are Atlanta millennials, too.

??
Take Danisha, a 28-year-old single mother of three in Peoplestown. Until recently, she earned $9 an hour at a local convenience store, enough to bring home about $18,000 a year when working full-time. She bounced around between family members' couches and spare rooms, unable to afford even basic shelter of her own. That's until she was able to stabilize her situation through a local nonprofit, assistance only a lucky few receive.

??
Or Rahim, a single father in Mechanicsville who was stuck making minimum wage and slipping in and out of homelessness until this year. He now makes $10.50 an hour after a stint of local job training — not a bad start. But at that level of income he can still only afford about $525 a month in housing costs based on a standard measure of affordability, not enough to land in a community with quality amenities and schools.

??
These Atlanta millennials and others like them work hard every day, just trying to get by and maybe one day reach the middle class. The odds are increasingly against them. Incomes are flat, mid-wage jobs are scarce, and housing costs are borderline out-of-control. A two-bedroom apartment in the Old Fourth Ward now runs about $1,650 a month, nearly twice what my wife and I paid upon arriving six years ago. You won't find many working-class millennials these days walking our neighborhood streets.

??
Instead, you'll likely find them in poorer, historically marginalized communities where opportunities for advancement are scarce. Twelve of Atlanta's 17 Neighborhood Planning Units, or NPUs, located along or below I-20 are high-poverty areas, where the poverty rate is at least 20 percent. Low-income communities like these typically lack assets such as quality pre-K and high-performing public schools. And many households also go without a car, disconnecting them from higher-wage jobs in better areas.

??
That economic segregation is closely intertwined with race, not surprising in a city with lingering racial divides. In 2014, more than one in three black households in the city limits didn't make enough income to afford the basics, compared to less than one in 10 of their white counterparts. An estimated 80 percent of black children in Atlanta live in high-poverty neighborhoods, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, versus 43 percent of Latino kids and only 6 percent of white ones.

??
Such disparities make it hard to climb the economic ladder and can harm children and families in ways that last for life. A 2013 study found a metro Atlanta child raised in poverty has only a 4 percent chance of making it to the top of the income scale, worse than any other major American metro area. Less than half will even make it to the middle class.

??
Put another way, millennials who were born poor in Atlanta are likely to remain that way for the rest of their lives. And their children will likely repeat the cycle. Is Atlanta content with that kind of inequality? Or can city and regional leaders build a future where opportunities are more equally distributed, prosperity more broadly shared?

??
The grim reality facing so many Atlantans is unlikely to show up in slick new promotional videos or millennial-themed brochures, yet it's something young people like Danisha and Rahim wake up to every day.

??
Current leaders still have some time left to improve their fate, especially on immediate needs like affordable homes. But the next generation of leaders should plan more boldly and inclusively as we wait in the wings, exploring issues from livable jobs to more equitable schools. Because Atlantans from all walks of life deserve a decent chance to succeed. Millennials should settle for nothing less.

??
Wesley Tharpe lives in the Old Fourth Ward, serves as a senior policy analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, and is a board member for the Center for Working Families. The views expressed are his own.             13085351 15801431                          Opinion - The other millennials "
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Article

Thursday October 22, 2015 04:00 am EDT
Poverty and inequity confront Atlanta's next generation | more...
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Thursday October 15, 2015 04:00 am EDT
Name that banchan, color chef Kevin Gillespie's tattoo, and more | more...
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  string(6112) "Perhaps all of us can remember our sorely lacking sex education in a Southern classroom: How the gym coach/de facto sex educator recited the line, straight from the Georgia code, "Abstinence is the only sure way," before popping Too Young To Be a Dad into the VCR and settling back to plan the next day's lesson on personal hygiene. Anyone who was taught sex education in a Southern classroom should be angry, but no one should be angrier than those who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, polyamorous, queer, genderqueer, female, or trans, because it's likely fundamental elements of their identity and sexual health were overlooked.

??
Well, Marla Renee Stewart, aka "the Sex Architect," and Tia Marie "the Vixen Voyager" Mosley are, by all appearances, not getting angry. In fact, they're doing the opposite. With a crew of dynamic, devoted people, these two women are issuing an open invitation to join them for a three-day sex education adventure at a conference they're calling Sex Down South.

??
Like any other conference, Sex Down South has workshops, presenters, and experts in the field. Unlike any other conference, Sex Down South's workshops have titles such as "Become a Sexual Communication Ninja" and "Masturbation Will Save the World." The presenters are genuine "sex celebs" and the local experts will be delivering SEXxATL Talks (you know, like TED Talks, but sexy!). There will even be education stations where participants can learn and practice sexy skills, and we're not just talking about "put-the-condom-on-the-banana." Stewart and Mosley, the cheerful, dynamic duo behind this conference, are pretty sure that what they're doing is something that hasn't been done before; maybe ever.

??image-1 
"This is definitely the first of its kind," says Stewart, a professional sexologist, sex and intimacy coach, and sexuality educator. "Not only in the South, but in the world." Stewart's studied human sexuality for over 14 years, and now runs her own sexuality education company called Velvet Lips. "This is some real shit," Mosley, a media strategist by day, and by night, a self-described "creature ... at the cross-sections of eroticism, sensuality, and social limits," says in agreement.

??
She and Stewart are certain that Sex Down South stands alone. As the marketing mind of the pair, Mosley knows what it sounds like to most people when they hear the words, "the first of its kind," tossed around, but, she contends, "When we say it, we mean it. This is the only conference of its kind that we know of in existence."

??
That bold claim doesn't seem to be far from the truth. Whereas their conference has elements of things we recognize — the rigor and insights of academic conferences on sex and sexuality attended by researchers in women's and LGBTQ studies, as well as the playful, teach-me practices of sex workshops put on by organizations like Stewart's own Velvet Lips — Sex Down South is, in the end, a mish-mash of both. It also joins a growing number of other organizations and fests (Ladyfest, Atlanta Poly Weekend, and Atlanta Pride come to mind) in the South and in Atlanta in particular that seek to address the needs of a diverse community finding its voice.

??
"There's so many alternative sexual communities in the South," says Stewart, who hails from Sacramento, Calif. "It's fascinating to me that we have this dynamic of explosive social communities that are expressing their sexualities in so many different ways and yet the repression cloud hangs over everything."

??
That repression cloud, even if it doesn't loom so heavily over Atlanta as it may over other regions, is the reason Sex Down South exists. According to a 2015 study by the Guttmacher Institute, sex education in the South is sorely lacking, especially when it comes to addressing the needs of alternative sexual identities. The list of "not requirements" on Georgia's own sex ed laws are extensive. For instance, schools are not required to provide information on contraception, the actual medical accuracy of their claims, or on alternative sexualities and lifestyles. And, of course, when even the barest minimum of information on sexual health is not provided, you can bet that desire is left totally out of the equation. Stewart and Mosley are tenderly, pointedly attempting to repair the damage.

??
"This conference is a gateway to enhance your knowledge of your sexuality and to get rid of that repression, that stigma or shame that comes with it," Stewart says. "It's a way to jack up your relationship, to explore other possibilities in sex and sexuality, and to learn something new about your body and the way that it works."

??
For Stewart and Mosley, that means creating an environment where education and desire can co-exist with one another. To that end, the tone of Sex Down South is alternately playful and serious. Whereas the "Dirty Talk for the Shy" workshop advertises that it will help you, "flirt your way into a memorable predicament at this year's event," there are many serious panels that attempt to address the intersections between sexuality and oppression —s ome of them centering exclusively on the experiences of queer people, non-monogamous people, and people of color.

??
The key to all of this, according to Stewart and Mosley, is fostering acceptance.

??
"If you don't accept yourself or you're carrying around shame, you need to be around people who are accepting of themselves," Mosley says. "To be around someone who likes what you like, or likes something you've never heard of, and they accept themselves — I think that will catch fire."

??
Stewart agrees, adding that there should be more importance placed on sex and sexuality education, and that it should be accessible to everyone.

??
"There is something about having freedom in your sexuality that translates beyond the bedroom," she says. "When you feel sexy and powerful, everything comes into order. So for me the power of sexual energy is something that every single person can embrace and enjoy and use to their advantage to make themselves better and the world a better place.""
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??
Well, Marla Renee Stewart, aka "the Sex Architect," and Tia Marie "the Vixen Voyager" Mosley are, by all appearances, not getting angry. In fact, they're doing the opposite. With a crew of dynamic, devoted people, these two women are issuing an open invitation to join them for a three-day sex education adventure at a conference they're calling [http://sexdownsouth.com/|Sex Down South].

??
Like any other conference, Sex Down South has workshops, presenters, and experts in the field. Unlike any other conference, Sex Down South's workshops have titles such as "Become a Sexual Communication Ninja" and "Masturbation Will Save the World." The presenters are genuine "sex celebs" and the local experts will be delivering SEXxATL Talks (you know, like TED Talks, but sexy!). There will even be education stations where participants can learn and practice sexy skills, and we're not just talking about "put-the-condom-on-the-banana." Stewart and Mosley, the cheerful, dynamic duo behind this conference, are pretty sure that what they're doing is something that hasn't been done before; maybe ever.

??[image-1] 
"This is definitely the first of its kind," says Stewart, a professional sexologist, sex and intimacy coach, and sexuality educator. "Not only in the South, but in the world." Stewart's studied human sexuality for over 14 years, and now runs her own sexuality education company called [http://velvetlipsllc.com/|Velvet Lips]. "This is some real shit," Mosley, a media strategist by day, and by night, a self-described "creature ... at the cross-sections of eroticism, sensuality, and social limits," says in agreement.

??
She and Stewart are certain that Sex Down South stands alone. As the marketing mind of the pair, Mosley knows what it sounds like to most people when they hear the words, "the first of its kind," tossed around, but, she contends, "When we say it, we mean it. This is the only conference of its kind that we know of in existence."

??
That bold claim doesn't seem to be far from the truth. Whereas their conference has elements of things we recognize — the rigor and insights of [http://www.conferencealerts.com/topic-listing?topic=Sexuality and eroticism|academic conferences on sex and sexuality] attended by researchers in women's and LGBTQ studies, as well as the playful, teach-me practices of sex workshops put on by organizations like Stewart's own Velvet Lips — Sex Down South is, in the end, a mish-mash of both. It also joins a growing number of other organizations and fests ([https://ladyfestatlanta.wordpress.com/|Ladyfest], [https://atlantapolyweekend.com/|Atlanta Poly Weekend], and [http://www.atlanta.net/events/detail/atlanta-pride-weekend-45th-annual-atlanta-pride-festival/95198/|Atlanta Pride] come to mind) in the South and in Atlanta in particular that seek to address the needs of a diverse community finding its voice.

??
"There's so many alternative sexual communities in the South," says Stewart, who hails from Sacramento, Calif. "It's fascinating to me that we have this dynamic of explosive social communities that are expressing their sexualities in so many different ways and yet the repression cloud hangs over everything."

??
That repression cloud, even if it doesn't loom so heavily over Atlanta as it may over other regions, is the reason Sex Down South exists. According to a 2015 study by the [https://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_SE.pdf|Guttmacher Institute], sex education in the South is sorely lacking, especially when it comes to addressing the needs of alternative sexual identities. The list of "not requirements" on Georgia's own sex ed laws are extensive. For instance, schools are not required to provide information on contraception, the actual medical accuracy of their claims, or on alternative sexualities and lifestyles. And, of course, when even the barest minimum of information on sexual health is not provided, you can bet that desire is left totally out of the equation. Stewart and Mosley are tenderly, pointedly attempting to repair the damage.

??
"This conference is a gateway to enhance your knowledge of your sexuality and to get rid of that repression, that stigma or shame that comes with it," Stewart says. "It's a way to jack up your relationship, to explore other possibilities in sex and sexuality, and to learn something new about your body and the way that it works."

??
For Stewart and Mosley, that means creating an environment where education and desire can co-exist with one another. To that end, the tone of Sex Down South is alternately playful and serious. Whereas the "Dirty Talk for the Shy" workshop advertises that it will help you, "flirt your way into a memorable predicament at this year's event," there are many serious panels that attempt to address the intersections between sexuality and oppression —s ome of them centering exclusively on the experiences of queer people, non-monogamous people, and people of color.

??
The key to all of this, according to Stewart and Mosley, is fostering acceptance.

??
"If you don't accept yourself or you're carrying around shame, you need to be around people who are accepting of themselves," Mosley says. "To be around someone who likes what you like, or likes something you've never heard of, and they accept themselves — I think that will catch fire."

??
Stewart agrees, adding that there should be more importance placed on sex and sexuality education, and that it should be accessible to everyone.

??
"There is something about having freedom in your sexuality that translates beyond the bedroom," she says. "When you feel sexy and powerful, everything comes into order. So for me the power of sexual energy is something that every single person can embrace and enjoy and use to their advantage to make themselves better and the world a better place.""
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??
Well, Marla Renee Stewart, aka "the Sex Architect," and Tia Marie "the Vixen Voyager" Mosley are, by all appearances, not getting angry. In fact, they're doing the opposite. With a crew of dynamic, devoted people, these two women are issuing an open invitation to join them for a three-day sex education adventure at a conference they're calling Sex Down South.

??
Like any other conference, Sex Down South has workshops, presenters, and experts in the field. Unlike any other conference, Sex Down South's workshops have titles such as "Become a Sexual Communication Ninja" and "Masturbation Will Save the World." The presenters are genuine "sex celebs" and the local experts will be delivering SEXxATL Talks (you know, like TED Talks, but sexy!). There will even be education stations where participants can learn and practice sexy skills, and we're not just talking about "put-the-condom-on-the-banana." Stewart and Mosley, the cheerful, dynamic duo behind this conference, are pretty sure that what they're doing is something that hasn't been done before; maybe ever.

??image-1 
"This is definitely the first of its kind," says Stewart, a professional sexologist, sex and intimacy coach, and sexuality educator. "Not only in the South, but in the world." Stewart's studied human sexuality for over 14 years, and now runs her own sexuality education company called Velvet Lips. "This is some real shit," Mosley, a media strategist by day, and by night, a self-described "creature ... at the cross-sections of eroticism, sensuality, and social limits," says in agreement.

??
She and Stewart are certain that Sex Down South stands alone. As the marketing mind of the pair, Mosley knows what it sounds like to most people when they hear the words, "the first of its kind," tossed around, but, she contends, "When we say it, we mean it. This is the only conference of its kind that we know of in existence."

??
That bold claim doesn't seem to be far from the truth. Whereas their conference has elements of things we recognize — the rigor and insights of academic conferences on sex and sexuality attended by researchers in women's and LGBTQ studies, as well as the playful, teach-me practices of sex workshops put on by organizations like Stewart's own Velvet Lips — Sex Down South is, in the end, a mish-mash of both. It also joins a growing number of other organizations and fests (Ladyfest, Atlanta Poly Weekend, and Atlanta Pride come to mind) in the South and in Atlanta in particular that seek to address the needs of a diverse community finding its voice.

??
"There's so many alternative sexual communities in the South," says Stewart, who hails from Sacramento, Calif. "It's fascinating to me that we have this dynamic of explosive social communities that are expressing their sexualities in so many different ways and yet the repression cloud hangs over everything."

??
That repression cloud, even if it doesn't loom so heavily over Atlanta as it may over other regions, is the reason Sex Down South exists. According to a 2015 study by the Guttmacher Institute, sex education in the South is sorely lacking, especially when it comes to addressing the needs of alternative sexual identities. The list of "not requirements" on Georgia's own sex ed laws are extensive. For instance, schools are not required to provide information on contraception, the actual medical accuracy of their claims, or on alternative sexualities and lifestyles. And, of course, when even the barest minimum of information on sexual health is not provided, you can bet that desire is left totally out of the equation. Stewart and Mosley are tenderly, pointedly attempting to repair the damage.

??
"This conference is a gateway to enhance your knowledge of your sexuality and to get rid of that repression, that stigma or shame that comes with it," Stewart says. "It's a way to jack up your relationship, to explore other possibilities in sex and sexuality, and to learn something new about your body and the way that it works."

??
For Stewart and Mosley, that means creating an environment where education and desire can co-exist with one another. To that end, the tone of Sex Down South is alternately playful and serious. Whereas the "Dirty Talk for the Shy" workshop advertises that it will help you, "flirt your way into a memorable predicament at this year's event," there are many serious panels that attempt to address the intersections between sexuality and oppression —s ome of them centering exclusively on the experiences of queer people, non-monogamous people, and people of color.

??
The key to all of this, according to Stewart and Mosley, is fostering acceptance.

??
"If you don't accept yourself or you're carrying around shame, you need to be around people who are accepting of themselves," Mosley says. "To be around someone who likes what you like, or likes something you've never heard of, and they accept themselves — I think that will catch fire."

??
Stewart agrees, adding that there should be more importance placed on sex and sexuality education, and that it should be accessible to everyone.

??
"There is something about having freedom in your sexuality that translates beyond the bedroom," she says. "When you feel sexy and powerful, everything comes into order. So for me the power of sexual energy is something that every single person can embrace and enjoy and use to their advantage to make themselves better and the world a better place."             13085288 15724807                          Sex Down South hits ATL "
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Thursday October 15, 2015 04:00 am EDT
Two women are changing up the conversation on sexuality with a new conference | more...
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Illustration by Arabella Karamesic
?Original tattoo by Pat Carmack
?(Click here for a downloadable, printable version of the illustration)??
"The wild boar is part of a sleeve I had done of all my memories of growing up in the South. I got it before I moved to Oregon because I didn’t think I was coming back and I wanted to commemorate it. When I was in sixth grade, I went camping with two friends and their dad. We were in the North Carolina mountains where the wild boars are very aggressive and dominant. And they are at their worst at night. So we are staying in this rustic cabin with no bathroom so you had to walk about 100 yards outside to get to the outhouse. It’s the middle of the night and I have to go to the outhouse, so I take a shotgun and run as fast as I can to get there. While I am inside, something starts ramming into the side of it. It finally stopped and I ran back to the house. Just before I got to the house I could feel something right behind me so I swung around and fired my shotgun blindly. I hit the boar! He was about six or seven steps behind me and probably would have killed me. It was very traumatic for a 13-year-old! Of course this woke everyone up and the dad cleaned it and we roasted it and ate it the next day."

??
— Kevin Gillespie, chef/owner, Gunshow and Revival

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''Illustration by Arabella Karamesic''
?''Original tattoo by Pat Carmack''
?[/general/food2015/FoodIssue_TattooColoringPage_illo.png|(Click here for a downloadable, printable version of the illustration)]??
"The wild boar is part of a sleeve I had done of all my memories of growing up in the South. I got it before I moved to Oregon because I didn’t think I was coming back and I wanted to commemorate it. When I was in sixth grade, I went camping with two friends and their dad. We were in the [North Carolina] mountains where the wild boars are very aggressive and dominant. And they are at their worst at night. So we are staying in this rustic cabin with no bathroom so you had to walk about 100 yards outside to get to the outhouse. It’s the middle of the night and I have to go to the outhouse, so I take a shotgun and run as fast as I can to get there. While I am inside, something starts ramming into the side of it. It finally stopped and I ran back to the house. Just before I got to the house I could feel something right behind me so I swung around and fired my shotgun blindly. I hit the boar! He was about six or seven steps behind me and probably would have killed me. It was very traumatic for a 13-year-old! Of course this woke everyone up and the dad cleaned it and we roasted it and ate it the next day."

??
— Kevin Gillespie, chef/owner, Gunshow and Revival

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  string(1611) "    A rendering of the celeb chef's infamous ink for your coloring pleasure   2015-10-15T08:00:00+00:00 Food Issue - Color chef Kevin Gillespie's tattoo     2015-10-15T08:00:00+00:00  ??
Illustration by Arabella Karamesic
?Original tattoo by Pat Carmack
?(Click here for a downloadable, printable version of the illustration)??
"The wild boar is part of a sleeve I had done of all my memories of growing up in the South. I got it before I moved to Oregon because I didn’t think I was coming back and I wanted to commemorate it. When I was in sixth grade, I went camping with two friends and their dad. We were in the North Carolina mountains where the wild boars are very aggressive and dominant. And they are at their worst at night. So we are staying in this rustic cabin with no bathroom so you had to walk about 100 yards outside to get to the outhouse. It’s the middle of the night and I have to go to the outhouse, so I take a shotgun and run as fast as I can to get there. While I am inside, something starts ramming into the side of it. It finally stopped and I ran back to the house. Just before I got to the house I could feel something right behind me so I swung around and fired my shotgun blindly. I hit the boar! He was about six or seven steps behind me and probably would have killed me. It was very traumatic for a 13-year-old! Of course this woke everyone up and the dad cleaned it and we roasted it and ate it the next day."

??
— Kevin Gillespie, chef/owner, Gunshow and Revival

             13085254 15697750                          Food Issue - Color chef Kevin Gillespie's tattoo "
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Thursday October 15, 2015 04:00 am EDT
A rendering of the celeb chef's infamous ink for your coloring pleasure | more...
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  string(5169) "Eddie's Attic

??
One of Atlanta's most venerated singer/songwriter music venues, Eddie's Attic in Decatur has hosted the likes of John Mayer and Sheryl Crow. Eddie's prides itself on fostering a "listening atmosphere," meaning chitchat is prohibited during the artist's performance. But you can order and eat a full-fledged meal during the show. Eddie's has a varied "something-for-everyone" menu ranging from apps such as fried calamari and pulled pork wontons to larger plates like nachos for sharing. If you're torn, go for the crowd-pleasing Attic Burger topped with bleu cheese, spinach, tomato, and caramelized onions. Eddie's offers a number of local and rotating draft and bottled beers. There's no signature craft cocktail menu, but the bartenders at Eddie's can make just about anything from the full bar. The lights dim just before showtime leaving only a spotlight cast onto the stage and barely enough light to see what you're eating in front of you.515 N. McDonough St. Decatur. 404-377-4976. www.eddiesattic.com. — Adjoa Danso

??
The New American Shakespeare Tavern

??
Opened in 1984, Atlanta's Shakespeare Tavern gives patrons the opportunity to experience Shakespeare's masterpieces and other old English plays in a space modeled after Shakespeare's famed Globe Theatre. There are three first-come, first-served seating levels — main floor, box seats, and balcony — that all cost between $15 and $20. Expect standard British pub fare, including Cornish pasties and Shepherd's pie, along with pseudo-European delights such as ratatouille with crispy polenta and a prosciutto, mozzarella, and tapenade sandwich. There's a wide range of draft and bottled brews, and wines include more than the standard red or white. As for the show, it's best to choose something you're familiar with as vintage English can be difficult to understand and follow during a live performance. Shakespeare Tavern does take such liberties as allowing women to play both male and female parts (the horror!). 499 Peachtree St. N.E. Downtown. 404-874-5299. www.shakespearetavern.com. — AD

??
Lips Atlanta

??
Atlanta has always been a city that loves drag queens. RuPaul launched his career here in the '90s, as did Violet Chachki, this year's winner of "RuPaul's Drag Race." It's no surprise, then, that Atlanta is one of four U.S. cities with the super successful drag dinner theater Lips. The glittery, glamorous décor would befit the pyramid of an Egyptian pharaoh who impersonated Cleopatra. The food — such as spinach-artichoke dip and a grilled chicken breast — is mundane, but that's not the point. Open Wednesday through Sunday, the big attraction is the lip-synching divas, especially on Friday and Saturday with host Mr. Charlie Brown, long called the "Bitch of the South" for a tongue sharper than a stiletto heel. Sunday's Gospel Brunch, hosted by longtime favorite Bubba D. Licious, is popular with backsliders of every gender and sexual orientation. Interestingly, though, most of the weekend shows are packed with straight women celebrating their birthdays or a bachelorette party. For weekends, you'll definitely need a reservation, typically two weeks in advance. 3011 Buford Highway N.E. Buford Highway. 404-315-7711. www.lipsatl.com. — Cliff Bostock

??
Nicola's

??
This Lebanese restaurant was opened more than 30 years ago by Nicola H. Ayoub (whose background is in educational psychology). Ayoub's heart is bigger than the stunning platter of meza that every party of four should order as a starter. Entrée standouts are the lamb shank and the chicken à la beef. But you really see Ayoub's passion after 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, when he dances into the dining room with a platter of lit candles atop his head. Belly dancers join him, gyrating until 10:30 or so. And be prepared. The performers will pull you onto the dance floor to do some Lebanese twerking. Prices here are low enough to make the restaurant, a pioneer in the city's Middle Eastern dining scene, a great bargain for groups celebrating special occasions — from engagements to high school graduation and recovery from liposuction. 1602 LaVista Road. Druid Hills/Emory. 404-325-2524. www.nicolas-restaurant.com. — CB

??
Agatha's: A Taste of Mystery

??
Atlanta's longest-running dinner theater production, Agatha's isn't a classic whodunnit à la Murder on the Orient Express. It's a comedy show that happens to involve a murder mystery and dinner. The four-act show consists of just two professional actors; the rest of the cast is you and your compatriots. When you arrive, an actor hands you a speaking or singing part and whatever props you'll need. Tickets, which range from $60 to $70, include a five-course meal and a glass of wine. You make your selections before the show and courses are served between acts. Think hotel banquet. Each of the six entrées, ranging from chicken to pork to fish to beef, is served with veggies and potatoes au gratin. The current show, Hawai'i Five Uh-Oh, is full of puns and pop culture references that are delightfully cheesy and self-aware. 161 Peachtree Center Ave. N.E. Downtown. 404-584-2211. www.agathas.com. — AD"
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??
One of Atlanta's most venerated singer/songwriter music venues, Eddie's Attic in Decatur has hosted the likes of John Mayer and Sheryl Crow. Eddie's prides itself on fostering a "listening atmosphere," meaning chitchat is prohibited during the artist's performance. But you can order and eat a full-fledged meal during the show. Eddie's has a varied "something-for-everyone" menu ranging from apps such as fried calamari and pulled pork wontons to larger plates like nachos for sharing. If you're torn, go for the crowd-pleasing Attic Burger topped with bleu cheese, spinach, tomato, and caramelized onions. Eddie's offers a number of local and rotating draft and bottled beers. There's no signature craft cocktail menu, but the bartenders at Eddie's can make just about anything from the full bar. The lights dim just before showtime leaving only a spotlight cast onto the stage and barely enough light to see what you're eating in front of you.''515 N. McDonough St. Decatur. 404-377-4976. [http://www.eddiesattic.com|www.eddiesattic.com].'' __— Adjoa Danso__

??
__The New American Shakespeare Tavern__

??
Opened in 1984, Atlanta's Shakespeare Tavern gives patrons the opportunity to experience Shakespeare's masterpieces and other old English plays in a space modeled after Shakespeare's famed Globe Theatre. There are three first-come, first-served seating levels — main floor, box seats, and balcony — that all cost between $15 and $20. Expect standard British pub fare, including Cornish pasties and Shepherd's pie, along with pseudo-European delights such as ratatouille with crispy polenta and a prosciutto, mozzarella, and tapenade sandwich. There's a wide range of draft and bottled brews, and wines include more than the standard red or white. As for the show, it's best to choose something you're familiar with as vintage English can be difficult to understand and follow during a live performance. Shakespeare Tavern does take such liberties as allowing women to play both male and female parts (the horror!). ''499 Peachtree St. N.E. Downtown. 404-874-5299. [http://www.shakespearetavern.com|www.shakespearetavern.com].'' __— AD__

??
__Lips Atlanta__

??
Atlanta has always been a city that loves drag queens. RuPaul launched his career here in the '90s, as did Violet Chachki, this year's winner of "RuPaul's Drag Race." It's no surprise, then, that Atlanta is one of four U.S. cities with the super successful drag dinner theater Lips. The glittery, glamorous décor would befit the pyramid of an Egyptian pharaoh who impersonated Cleopatra. The food — such as spinach-artichoke dip and a grilled chicken breast — is mundane, but that's not the point. Open Wednesday through Sunday, the big attraction is the lip-synching divas, especially on Friday and Saturday with host Mr. Charlie Brown, long called the "Bitch of the South" for a tongue sharper than a stiletto heel. Sunday's Gospel Brunch, hosted by longtime favorite Bubba D. Licious, is popular with backsliders of every gender and sexual orientation. Interestingly, though, most of the weekend shows are packed with straight women celebrating their birthdays or a bachelorette party. For weekends, you'll definitely need a reservation, typically two weeks in advance. ''3011 Buford Highway N.E. Buford Highway. 404-315-7711. [http://www.lipsatl.com|www.lipsatl.com].'' __— Cliff Bostock__

??
__Nicola's__

??
This Lebanese restaurant was opened more than 30 years ago by Nicola H. Ayoub (whose background is in educational psychology). Ayoub's heart is bigger than the stunning platter of meza that every party of four should order as a starter. Entrée standouts are the lamb shank and the chicken à la beef. But you really see Ayoub's passion after 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, when he dances into the dining room with a platter of lit candles atop his head. Belly dancers join him, gyrating until 10:30 or so. And be prepared. The performers will pull you onto the dance floor to do some Lebanese twerking. Prices here are low enough to make the restaurant, a pioneer in the city's Middle Eastern dining scene, a great bargain for groups celebrating special occasions — from engagements to high school graduation and recovery from liposuction. ''1602 LaVista Road. Druid Hills/Emory. 404-325-2524. [http://www.nicolas-restaurant.com|www.nicolas-restaurant.com].'' __— CB__

??
__Agatha's: A Taste of Mystery__

??
Atlanta's longest-running dinner theater production, Agatha's isn't a classic whodunnit à la ''Murder on the Orient Express''. It's a comedy show that happens to involve a murder mystery and dinner. The four-act show consists of just two professional actors; the rest of the cast is you and your compatriots. When you arrive, an actor hands you a speaking or singing part and whatever props you'll need. Tickets, which range from $60 to $70, include a five-course meal and a glass of wine. You make your selections before the show and courses are served between acts. Think hotel banquet. Each of the six entrées, ranging from chicken to pork to fish to beef, is served with veggies and potatoes au gratin. The current show, ''Hawai'i Five Uh-Oh'', is full of puns and pop culture references that are delightfully cheesy and self-aware. ''161 Peachtree Center Ave. N.E. Downtown. 404-584-2211. [http://www.agathas.com|www.agathas.com].'' __— AD__"
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??
One of Atlanta's most venerated singer/songwriter music venues, Eddie's Attic in Decatur has hosted the likes of John Mayer and Sheryl Crow. Eddie's prides itself on fostering a "listening atmosphere," meaning chitchat is prohibited during the artist's performance. But you can order and eat a full-fledged meal during the show. Eddie's has a varied "something-for-everyone" menu ranging from apps such as fried calamari and pulled pork wontons to larger plates like nachos for sharing. If you're torn, go for the crowd-pleasing Attic Burger topped with bleu cheese, spinach, tomato, and caramelized onions. Eddie's offers a number of local and rotating draft and bottled beers. There's no signature craft cocktail menu, but the bartenders at Eddie's can make just about anything from the full bar. The lights dim just before showtime leaving only a spotlight cast onto the stage and barely enough light to see what you're eating in front of you.515 N. McDonough St. Decatur. 404-377-4976. www.eddiesattic.com. — Adjoa Danso

??
The New American Shakespeare Tavern

??
Opened in 1984, Atlanta's Shakespeare Tavern gives patrons the opportunity to experience Shakespeare's masterpieces and other old English plays in a space modeled after Shakespeare's famed Globe Theatre. There are three first-come, first-served seating levels — main floor, box seats, and balcony — that all cost between $15 and $20. Expect standard British pub fare, including Cornish pasties and Shepherd's pie, along with pseudo-European delights such as ratatouille with crispy polenta and a prosciutto, mozzarella, and tapenade sandwich. There's a wide range of draft and bottled brews, and wines include more than the standard red or white. As for the show, it's best to choose something you're familiar with as vintage English can be difficult to understand and follow during a live performance. Shakespeare Tavern does take such liberties as allowing women to play both male and female parts (the horror!). 499 Peachtree St. N.E. Downtown. 404-874-5299. www.shakespearetavern.com. — AD

??
Lips Atlanta

??
Atlanta has always been a city that loves drag queens. RuPaul launched his career here in the '90s, as did Violet Chachki, this year's winner of "RuPaul's Drag Race." It's no surprise, then, that Atlanta is one of four U.S. cities with the super successful drag dinner theater Lips. The glittery, glamorous décor would befit the pyramid of an Egyptian pharaoh who impersonated Cleopatra. The food — such as spinach-artichoke dip and a grilled chicken breast — is mundane, but that's not the point. Open Wednesday through Sunday, the big attraction is the lip-synching divas, especially on Friday and Saturday with host Mr. Charlie Brown, long called the "Bitch of the South" for a tongue sharper than a stiletto heel. Sunday's Gospel Brunch, hosted by longtime favorite Bubba D. Licious, is popular with backsliders of every gender and sexual orientation. Interestingly, though, most of the weekend shows are packed with straight women celebrating their birthdays or a bachelorette party. For weekends, you'll definitely need a reservation, typically two weeks in advance. 3011 Buford Highway N.E. Buford Highway. 404-315-7711. www.lipsatl.com. — Cliff Bostock

??
Nicola's

??
This Lebanese restaurant was opened more than 30 years ago by Nicola H. Ayoub (whose background is in educational psychology). Ayoub's heart is bigger than the stunning platter of meza that every party of four should order as a starter. Entrée standouts are the lamb shank and the chicken à la beef. But you really see Ayoub's passion after 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, when he dances into the dining room with a platter of lit candles atop his head. Belly dancers join him, gyrating until 10:30 or so. And be prepared. The performers will pull you onto the dance floor to do some Lebanese twerking. Prices here are low enough to make the restaurant, a pioneer in the city's Middle Eastern dining scene, a great bargain for groups celebrating special occasions — from engagements to high school graduation and recovery from liposuction. 1602 LaVista Road. Druid Hills/Emory. 404-325-2524. www.nicolas-restaurant.com. — CB

??
Agatha's: A Taste of Mystery

??
Atlanta's longest-running dinner theater production, Agatha's isn't a classic whodunnit à la Murder on the Orient Express. It's a comedy show that happens to involve a murder mystery and dinner. The four-act show consists of just two professional actors; the rest of the cast is you and your compatriots. When you arrive, an actor hands you a speaking or singing part and whatever props you'll need. Tickets, which range from $60 to $70, include a five-course meal and a glass of wine. You make your selections before the show and courses are served between acts. Think hotel banquet. Each of the six entrées, ranging from chicken to pork to fish to beef, is served with veggies and potatoes au gratin. The current show, Hawai'i Five Uh-Oh, is full of puns and pop culture references that are delightfully cheesy and self-aware. 161 Peachtree Center Ave. N.E. Downtown. 404-584-2211. www.agathas.com. — AD             13085245 15695210                          Food Issue - Dinner and a show "
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Article

Thursday October 15, 2015 04:00 am EDT
5 Atlanta go-tos for food and live entertainment at the same damn time | more...
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