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Article

Thursday September 10, 2015 10:51 am EDT

image-1
? As a first-time attendee at Dragon Con, I had only a general idea of what to expect. I expected seeing costumes that ranged further than my imagination could go and intricate make-up and props that took months to prepare. But I hadn’t expected there to be so much humor. The cleverness of some of these costumes is what really set Dragon Con's Downtown parade apart from others. With...

| more...
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  string(5127) "Felecia Christian's demand of Atlanta Police Chief George Turner last week was simple: transparency.

??
Four months since her 26-year-old daughter Alexia was shot and killed in the back of an Atlanta Police squad car after being arrested, the case remains under internal investigation and tapes of the incident, along with other information, have not been made public.

??
Now demands for more details about what happened on the day Alexia was killed are growing louder amidst activists' allegation that APD is covering up wrongdoing. But officer-involved shooting probes, including this case, which is now being reviewed by Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard, can drag on.

??
Police officials say Alexia initiated the shooting from the backseat, shooting two or three times through the vehicle's plexiglass and missing the officers sitting in the front. Officers fired a total of 10 rounds in return. Alexia died at Grady Memorial Hospital later that day.

??
On Sept. 1, Felecia and supporters read a list of demands to Turner outside an unrelated community event where the chief was meeting with Greenbriar neighborhood residents.

??
"I write to you on behalf of my daughter, who cannot speak for herself," Felecia read when confronting Turner. "As a mother, I deserve to know what happened to Alexia."

??
Surrounded by supporting protesters, Felecia requested that Turner release all footage from the dash cameras and nearby street surveillance cameras within one week's time. Turner agreed to meet briefly in private with the family. But he refused to agree to release the tapes, background on the two officers involved, and all versions of the police reports contained in the APD's investigation file.

??
According to APD, the internal investigation that follows a police-involved shooting includes a criminal investigation, conducted by APD's homicide unit and then by Howard, and an internal investigation into rule violations.

??
On the same day Felecia confronted Turner, APD sent the file to Howard for the investigation's next phase. Capt. Michael O'Connor, commander of the APD homicide unit, says, "If and when the findings become public, it will be because DA Howard chooses to do so."

??
But Felecia and supporting activists view APD's unwillingness to answer questions now as more than simply following protocol.

??
"We've seen around the nation with the many police murders that have occurred that cops lie to cover up their murders," says Dean Steed of Women on the Rise, pointing to the 2006 killing of a 92-year-old woman by APD officers during a botched drug raid. "We know that APD has a history of lying. We know this because of the case of Kathryn Johnston."

??
Activists have questioned officers' actions and raised questions about APD's actions and inconsistencies in various reports of the incident. Those include early reports, apparently based on a "police source" who told WSB-TV after Alexia's death that police found marijuana. APD confirmed this week that no drugs were involved. Activists also question why officers did not bring Alexia to a precinct across the street to be searched.

??
APD Spokesperson Elizabeth Espy said the investigation has been "handled in an appropriate manner by the Atlanta Police Department from the beginning. We held a press conference within hours of the incident and have been as forthcoming as we possibly can. The case is now at the Fulton District Attorney's office and we will not be commenting any further on this open investigation until they conclude their findings."

??
Whether or not Alexia was properly searched is part of the ongoing investigation, though Turner stated in a press conference the day after her death that "it was clear to us the officer did not search her before putting her in the back of the car."

??
Activists describe Alexia as a thin woman of 110 pounds, "wearing tight leggings and a mesh top" at the time of her arrest. Police claim she used a weapon from the stolen vehicle when she fired at the officers, which would mean the gun was overlooked in the search, if one was conducted.

??
It's unclear whether Officers Jeffrey Cook, with 18 years experience at the time of the shooting, and Omar Thyme, with 10 months, are back on duty after being placed on routine administrative leave following Alexia's death. O'Connor says he has "no indication that they are not back on duty — we the homicide unit certainly aren't keeping them from being back."

??
Steed asked Turner to stop "hiding evidence that would allow us to know the truth about what happened to Alexia Christian" at the Sept. 1press conference. "We want Atlanta police and Chief Turner to be held accountable for what happened."

??
It appears that APD will leave these questions unanswered for the time being, saying the ball is now in Howard's court.

??
"The thing to remember is, there is no statute of limitations on these types of issues, so the file could really be held open for whatever reason as long as Paul Howard wants to look at it," O'Connor says.

??
When asked about this possibility, Turner replied: "That's the process.""
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  string(5133) "Felecia Christian's demand of Atlanta Police Chief George Turner last week was simple: transparency.

??
Four months since her 26-year-old daughter Alexia was shot and killed in the back of an Atlanta Police squad car after being arrested, the case remains under internal investigation and tapes of the incident, along with other information, have not been made public.

??
Now demands for more details about what happened on the day Alexia was killed are growing louder amidst activists' allegation that APD is covering up wrongdoing. But officer-involved shooting probes, including this case, which is now being reviewed by Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard, can drag on.

??
Police officials say Alexia initiated the shooting from the backseat, shooting two or three times through the vehicle's plexiglass and missing the officers sitting in the front. Officers fired a total of 10 rounds in return. Alexia died at Grady Memorial Hospital later that day.

??
On Sept. 1, Felecia and supporters read a list of demands to Turner outside an unrelated community event where the chief was meeting with Greenbriar neighborhood residents.

??
"I write to you on behalf of my daughter, who cannot speak for herself," Felecia read when confronting Turner. "As a mother, I deserve to know what happened to Alexia."

??
Surrounded by supporting protesters, Felecia requested that Turner release all footage from the dash cameras and nearby street surveillance cameras within one week's time. Turner agreed to meet briefly in private with the family. But he refused to agree to release the tapes, background on the two officers involved, and all versions of the police reports contained in the APD's investigation file.

??
According to APD, the internal investigation that follows a police-involved shooting includes a criminal investigation, conducted by APD's homicide unit and then by Howard, and an internal investigation into rule violations.

??
On the same day Felecia confronted Turner, APD sent the file to Howard for the investigation's next phase. Capt. Michael O'Connor, commander of the APD homicide unit, says, "[If] and when [the findings] become public, it will be because DA Howard chooses to do so."

??
But Felecia and supporting activists view APD's unwillingness to answer questions now as more than simply following protocol.

??
"We've seen around the nation with the many police murders that have occurred that cops lie to cover up their murders," says Dean Steed of Women on the Rise, pointing to the 2006 killing of a 92-year-old woman by APD officers during a botched drug raid. "We know that APD has a history of lying. We know this because of the case of Kathryn Johnston."

??
Activists have questioned officers' actions and raised questions about APD's actions and inconsistencies in various reports of the incident. Those include early reports, apparently based on a "police source" who told WSB-TV after Alexia's death that police found marijuana. APD confirmed this week that no drugs were involved. Activists also question why officers did not bring Alexia to a precinct across the street to be searched.

??
APD Spokesperson Elizabeth Espy said the investigation has been "handled in an appropriate manner by the Atlanta Police Department from the beginning. We held a press conference within hours of the incident and have been as forthcoming as we possibly can. The case is now at the Fulton District Attorney's office and we will not be commenting any further on this open investigation until they conclude their findings."

??
Whether or not Alexia was properly searched is part of the ongoing investigation, though Turner stated in a press conference the day after her death that "it was clear to us the officer did not search her before putting her in the back of the car."

??
Activists describe Alexia as a thin woman of 110 pounds, "wearing tight leggings and a mesh top" at the time of her arrest. Police claim she used a weapon from the stolen vehicle when she fired at the officers, which would mean the gun was overlooked in the search, if one was conducted.

??
It's unclear whether Officers Jeffrey Cook, with 18 years experience at the time of the shooting, and Omar Thyme, with 10 months, are back on duty after being placed on routine administrative leave following Alexia's death. O'Connor says he has "no indication that they are not back on duty — we [the homicide unit] certainly aren't keeping them from being back."

??
Steed asked Turner to stop "hiding evidence that would allow us to know the truth about what happened to Alexia Christian" at the Sept. 1press conference. "We want Atlanta police and Chief Turner to be held accountable for what happened."

??
It appears that APD will leave these questions unanswered for the time being, saying the ball is now in Howard's court.

??
"The thing to remember is, there is no statute of limitations on these types of issues, so the file could really be held open for whatever reason as long as Paul Howard wants to look at it," O'Connor says.

??
When asked about this possibility, Turner replied: "That's the process.""
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??
Four months since her 26-year-old daughter Alexia was shot and killed in the back of an Atlanta Police squad car after being arrested, the case remains under internal investigation and tapes of the incident, along with other information, have not been made public.

??
Now demands for more details about what happened on the day Alexia was killed are growing louder amidst activists' allegation that APD is covering up wrongdoing. But officer-involved shooting probes, including this case, which is now being reviewed by Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard, can drag on.

??
Police officials say Alexia initiated the shooting from the backseat, shooting two or three times through the vehicle's plexiglass and missing the officers sitting in the front. Officers fired a total of 10 rounds in return. Alexia died at Grady Memorial Hospital later that day.

??
On Sept. 1, Felecia and supporters read a list of demands to Turner outside an unrelated community event where the chief was meeting with Greenbriar neighborhood residents.

??
"I write to you on behalf of my daughter, who cannot speak for herself," Felecia read when confronting Turner. "As a mother, I deserve to know what happened to Alexia."

??
Surrounded by supporting protesters, Felecia requested that Turner release all footage from the dash cameras and nearby street surveillance cameras within one week's time. Turner agreed to meet briefly in private with the family. But he refused to agree to release the tapes, background on the two officers involved, and all versions of the police reports contained in the APD's investigation file.

??
According to APD, the internal investigation that follows a police-involved shooting includes a criminal investigation, conducted by APD's homicide unit and then by Howard, and an internal investigation into rule violations.

??
On the same day Felecia confronted Turner, APD sent the file to Howard for the investigation's next phase. Capt. Michael O'Connor, commander of the APD homicide unit, says, "If and when the findings become public, it will be because DA Howard chooses to do so."

??
But Felecia and supporting activists view APD's unwillingness to answer questions now as more than simply following protocol.

??
"We've seen around the nation with the many police murders that have occurred that cops lie to cover up their murders," says Dean Steed of Women on the Rise, pointing to the 2006 killing of a 92-year-old woman by APD officers during a botched drug raid. "We know that APD has a history of lying. We know this because of the case of Kathryn Johnston."

??
Activists have questioned officers' actions and raised questions about APD's actions and inconsistencies in various reports of the incident. Those include early reports, apparently based on a "police source" who told WSB-TV after Alexia's death that police found marijuana. APD confirmed this week that no drugs were involved. Activists also question why officers did not bring Alexia to a precinct across the street to be searched.

??
APD Spokesperson Elizabeth Espy said the investigation has been "handled in an appropriate manner by the Atlanta Police Department from the beginning. We held a press conference within hours of the incident and have been as forthcoming as we possibly can. The case is now at the Fulton District Attorney's office and we will not be commenting any further on this open investigation until they conclude their findings."

??
Whether or not Alexia was properly searched is part of the ongoing investigation, though Turner stated in a press conference the day after her death that "it was clear to us the officer did not search her before putting her in the back of the car."

??
Activists describe Alexia as a thin woman of 110 pounds, "wearing tight leggings and a mesh top" at the time of her arrest. Police claim she used a weapon from the stolen vehicle when she fired at the officers, which would mean the gun was overlooked in the search, if one was conducted.

??
It's unclear whether Officers Jeffrey Cook, with 18 years experience at the time of the shooting, and Omar Thyme, with 10 months, are back on duty after being placed on routine administrative leave following Alexia's death. O'Connor says he has "no indication that they are not back on duty — we the homicide unit certainly aren't keeping them from being back."

??
Steed asked Turner to stop "hiding evidence that would allow us to know the truth about what happened to Alexia Christian" at the Sept. 1press conference. "We want Atlanta police and Chief Turner to be held accountable for what happened."

??
It appears that APD will leave these questions unanswered for the time being, saying the ball is now in Howard's court.

??
"The thing to remember is, there is no statute of limitations on these types of issues, so the file could really be held open for whatever reason as long as Paul Howard wants to look at it," O'Connor says.

??
When asked about this possibility, Turner replied: "That's the process."             13084739 15328663                          Still no answers "
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Thursday September 10, 2015 04:00 am EDT
Family of Alexia Christian, activists want videotapes released in police shooting | more...
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?  Atlanta Ballet's [http://www.atlantaballet.com/wabi-sabi|Wabi Sabi] recently performed at the High Museum of Art in conjunction with the ''''[http://www.high.org/Art/Exhibitions/Los-Trompos-Spinning-Tops.aspx|''Los Trompos ''installation].The free event included four different ballet pieces entitled "IDYLL," "Between," "Fields Magnetic," and "The Swimmer." The dances were performed in multiple spots around the High, allowing guests to be involved in the movement of the pieces, and following the dancers to the different performance areas on the lawn. "Wabi Sabi," stems from a worldview centered around acceptance of imperfections and the simplicity in life. Wabi Sabi's next set of pop-up performances include the Atlanta Ballet Block Party on Sat., Aug. 29, and at Woodruff Art Center this November. 
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Monday August 24, 2015 03:54 pm EDT

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? 
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Thursday August 20, 2015 11:07 am EDT

image-1I'm the kind of person who loves it when streets are used for anything besides cars, be it festivals or block parties or soapbox derbies. So when there's the opportunity to turn a popular congested section of East Atlanta Village into a bicycle racetrack, count me in.
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  string(4043) "On Aug. 17, 1915, a Northern-born Jewish factory supervisor named Leo Frank died in Marietta with a noose gnarling his neck.

??
Convicted in a widely criticized trial of killing a 13-year-old factory girl, Frank had been serving life in a Milledgeville prison before a mob organized by some of Cobb County's most prominent residents stole him from his cell in the night.

??
Why would such leaders — "elites of the society," as former Gov. Roy Barnes describes them — take part in the act, now considered to be among the most grievous miscarriages of justice in Georgia history? The answer, most feel sure, is anti-Semitism and a deep-seated hatred of Northerners in the wake of the Civil War.

??
This month, as the 100th anniversary draws the case back into view, many are working to ensure the memory of the sordid episode lives on.

??
"For all thoughtful people, this is something to remember to make sure that it's never repeated," says Barnes, who's helped create an exhibit on the case opening Mon., Aug. 17 at Kennesaw's Southern Museum of Civil War & Locomotive History. "In my view, it was a travesty of justice."

??
As a boy growing up in Cobb, Barnes heard the case often "talked about in hushed tones." None of the adults would tell him the whole story. Later in life, when Barnes, an attorney, had hours to pore over court documents, he found the affair a "dark stain" on Southern history.

??
It began on April 26, 1913, with the death of Mary Phagan, who worked for Frank at Atlanta's National Pencil Company. Hours before she was found strangled and beaten, she had picked up her week's pay from Frank.

??
Frank's conviction later was based largely on the testimony of a black factory worker, Jim Conley, who many now consider her likely killer. That the white authorities believed a black man in the racial climate of the early 1900s illustrates how deep the anti-Semitism went, many believe.

??
Frank was sentenced to death. His appeals went as high as the U.S. Supreme Court and earned national headlines. Then-Gov. John Slaton, believing the evidence to be inconclusive, commuted the sentence to life.

??
The brazen nature of the raid that followed to abduct Frank is among the reasons the case is still so remarkable, says Steve Oney, author of "And The Dead Shall Rise: The Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank," considered the definitive account of the case.

??
"There was never another lynching like this," says Oney, who is speaking on the case at Marietta's Earl Smith Strand Theatre on Aug. 13."Frank was abducted not from a county jail poorly defended by a sheriff's deputy — he was abducted from the state prison." 

??
Phagan's killing and Frank's lynching also helped revive the Ku Klux Klan. Three months after Frank's hanging, the KKK, which the federal government had suppressed decades earlier, reappeared with a cross-burning at Stone Mountain.

??
Today, Marietta, Cobb, and metro Atlanta are left with a burden, a stain to wash away, a sore to endure, and, for many, shame.

??
"The question I don't have an answer to — and that always haunts me — is, 'How did the best of the society do this?'" wonders Barnes, whose wife's grandfather was among the group that abducted Frank. "You had sheriffs, you had a judge, the solicitor general — prominent members of the community that went and got him." 

??
That question is partly what keeps Barnes and others coming back to the case, even as time has left Marietta a place where many don't know the name Leo Frank. Without an acceptable answer, Barnes will keep talking. The episode came up this week when he had lunch with some interns at his Marietta law office. One of his paralegals discovered their lack of knowledge on local history.

??
"'Well, you've gotta tell them about Leo Frank,'" Barnes recalls the paralegal saying. "And I told them the story about Leo Frank," he says. "They should know, because you don't know what form prejudice and hate is going to take in the next generation or the next generation.""
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  string(4209) "On Aug. 17, 1915, a Northern-born Jewish factory supervisor named Leo Frank died in Marietta with a noose gnarling his neck.

??
Convicted in a widely criticized trial of killing a 13-year-old factory girl, Frank had been serving life in a Milledgeville prison before a mob organized by some of Cobb County's most prominent residents [http://forward.com/news/182399/leo-frank-case-stirs-debate-100-years-after-jewish/|stole him] from his cell in the night.

??
Why would such leaders — "elites of the society," as former Gov. Roy Barnes describes them — take part in the act, now considered to be among the most grievous miscarriages of justice in Georgia history? The answer, most feel sure, is anti-Semitism and a deep-seated hatred of Northerners in the wake of the Civil War.

??
This month, as the 100th anniversary draws the [http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/leo-frank-case|case] back into view, many are working to ensure the memory of the sordid episode lives on.

??
"For all thoughtful people, this is something to remember to make sure that it's never repeated," says Barnes, who's helped create an exhibit on the case opening Mon., Aug. 17 at Kennesaw's Southern Museum of Civil War & Locomotive History. "In my view, it was a travesty of justice."

??
As a boy growing up in Cobb, Barnes heard the case often "talked about in hushed tones." None of the adults would tell him the whole story. Later in life, when Barnes, an attorney, had hours to pore over court documents, he found the affair a "dark stain" on Southern history.

??
It began on April 26, 1913, with the death of Mary Phagan, who worked for Frank at Atlanta's National Pencil Company. Hours before she was found strangled and beaten, she had picked up her week's pay from Frank.

??
Frank's conviction later was based largely on the testimony of a black factory worker, Jim Conley, who many now consider her likely killer. That the white authorities believed a black man in the racial climate of the early 1900s illustrates how deep the anti-Semitism went, many believe.

??
Frank was sentenced to death. His appeals went as high as the U.S. Supreme Court and earned national headlines. Then-Gov. John Slaton, believing the evidence to be inconclusive, commuted the sentence to life.

??
The brazen nature of the raid that followed to abduct Frank is among the reasons the case is still so remarkable, says Steve Oney, author of "And The Dead Shall Rise: The Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank," considered the definitive account of the case.

??
"There was never another lynching like this," says Oney, who is speaking on the case at Marietta's Earl Smith Strand Theatre on Aug. 13."Frank was abducted not from a county jail poorly defended by a sheriff's deputy — he was abducted from the state prison." 

??
Phagan's killing and Frank's lynching also helped revive the Ku Klux Klan. Three months after Frank's hanging, the KKK, which the federal government had suppressed decades earlier, reappeared with a cross-burning at Stone Mountain.

??
Today, Marietta, Cobb, and metro Atlanta are left with a burden, a stain to wash away, a sore to endure, and, for many, shame.

??
"The question I don't have an answer to — and that always haunts me — is, 'How did the best of the society do this?'" wonders Barnes, whose wife's grandfather was among the group that abducted Frank. "You had sheriffs, you had a judge, the solicitor general — prominent members of the community that went and got him." 

??
That question is partly what keeps Barnes and others coming back to the case, even as time has left Marietta a place where many don't know the name Leo Frank. Without an acceptable answer, Barnes will keep talking. The episode came up this week when he had lunch with some interns at his Marietta law office. One of his paralegals discovered their lack of knowledge on local history.

??
"'Well, you've gotta tell them about Leo Frank,'" Barnes recalls the paralegal saying. "And I told them the story about Leo Frank," he says. "They should know, because you don't know what form prejudice and hate is going to take in the next generation or the next generation.""
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  string(4352) "    What we still learn from an unsolved Marietta killing committed in broad daylight   2015-08-13T08:00:00+00:00 Remembering the lynching of Leo Frank 100 years later     2015-08-13T08:00:00+00:00  On Aug. 17, 1915, a Northern-born Jewish factory supervisor named Leo Frank died in Marietta with a noose gnarling his neck.

??
Convicted in a widely criticized trial of killing a 13-year-old factory girl, Frank had been serving life in a Milledgeville prison before a mob organized by some of Cobb County's most prominent residents stole him from his cell in the night.

??
Why would such leaders — "elites of the society," as former Gov. Roy Barnes describes them — take part in the act, now considered to be among the most grievous miscarriages of justice in Georgia history? The answer, most feel sure, is anti-Semitism and a deep-seated hatred of Northerners in the wake of the Civil War.

??
This month, as the 100th anniversary draws the case back into view, many are working to ensure the memory of the sordid episode lives on.

??
"For all thoughtful people, this is something to remember to make sure that it's never repeated," says Barnes, who's helped create an exhibit on the case opening Mon., Aug. 17 at Kennesaw's Southern Museum of Civil War & Locomotive History. "In my view, it was a travesty of justice."

??
As a boy growing up in Cobb, Barnes heard the case often "talked about in hushed tones." None of the adults would tell him the whole story. Later in life, when Barnes, an attorney, had hours to pore over court documents, he found the affair a "dark stain" on Southern history.

??
It began on April 26, 1913, with the death of Mary Phagan, who worked for Frank at Atlanta's National Pencil Company. Hours before she was found strangled and beaten, she had picked up her week's pay from Frank.

??
Frank's conviction later was based largely on the testimony of a black factory worker, Jim Conley, who many now consider her likely killer. That the white authorities believed a black man in the racial climate of the early 1900s illustrates how deep the anti-Semitism went, many believe.

??
Frank was sentenced to death. His appeals went as high as the U.S. Supreme Court and earned national headlines. Then-Gov. John Slaton, believing the evidence to be inconclusive, commuted the sentence to life.

??
The brazen nature of the raid that followed to abduct Frank is among the reasons the case is still so remarkable, says Steve Oney, author of "And The Dead Shall Rise: The Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank," considered the definitive account of the case.

??
"There was never another lynching like this," says Oney, who is speaking on the case at Marietta's Earl Smith Strand Theatre on Aug. 13."Frank was abducted not from a county jail poorly defended by a sheriff's deputy — he was abducted from the state prison." 

??
Phagan's killing and Frank's lynching also helped revive the Ku Klux Klan. Three months after Frank's hanging, the KKK, which the federal government had suppressed decades earlier, reappeared with a cross-burning at Stone Mountain.

??
Today, Marietta, Cobb, and metro Atlanta are left with a burden, a stain to wash away, a sore to endure, and, for many, shame.

??
"The question I don't have an answer to — and that always haunts me — is, 'How did the best of the society do this?'" wonders Barnes, whose wife's grandfather was among the group that abducted Frank. "You had sheriffs, you had a judge, the solicitor general — prominent members of the community that went and got him." 

??
That question is partly what keeps Barnes and others coming back to the case, even as time has left Marietta a place where many don't know the name Leo Frank. Without an acceptable answer, Barnes will keep talking. The episode came up this week when he had lunch with some interns at his Marietta law office. One of his paralegals discovered their lack of knowledge on local history.

??
"'Well, you've gotta tell them about Leo Frank,'" Barnes recalls the paralegal saying. "And I told them the story about Leo Frank," he says. "They should know, because you don't know what form prejudice and hate is going to take in the next generation or the next generation."             13084398 15113735                          Remembering the lynching of Leo Frank 100 years later "
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Thursday August 13, 2015 04:00 am EDT
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