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Cutlure

Culture


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  string(1482) "We all remember the rise and fall of one Michael Vick.https://media1.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/bens-sports-take-hes-baaaaackdid-you/u/original/2128170/1285134738-1285105548-441px-michael-vick_jets-vs-eagles-sept-3-2009_post-game-in.jpg

Drafted number one overall in the 2001 NFL Draft, Vick quickly became the city's most recognizable athlete thanks to his thrilling play on the field and his undeniable marketability off it.

 One not-so-clever prescription alias, one failed drug-smuggling attempt and one obscene gesture later, the former Falcons quarterback found himself on the proverbial hot seat here in Atlanta.

But before Vick had the opportunity to win back a fan base that he once held in the palm of his hand, authorities in Virginia discovered Vick's illegal operation and funding of Bad Newz Kennels—perhaps the most infamous dog fighting ring in American history.

On December 11, 2007, Vick was sentenced to 23 months in federal prison and subsequently exiled from the Falcons organization.

Nearly three years later, Vick has resurfaced in Philadelphia and following an impressive performance this past Sunday—his first NFL start since December 31, 2006—was named as the Eagles starting quarterback.

Vick, now 30 years old, is trying to resurrect a football career, and personal life, that just about every person with the ability to voice their own opinion agreed was undeniably irreparable.

The question is: Will you root for Vick to prove us all wrong?"
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Drafted number one overall in the 2001 NFL Draft, Vick quickly became the city's most recognizable athlete thanks to his thrilling play on the field and his undeniable marketability off it.

[http://www.debbieschlussel.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/ronmexicojersey.jpg| One not-so-clever prescription alias], [http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2735061|one failed drug-smuggling attempt] and [http://posterous.com/getfile/files.posterous.com/import-ypwj/EADwCGvwvjHfBkHEFpJDosisdaFBAFlqfvzdomfgGydsGtjqjxahmologdJo/media_httpphotos1bloggercomxblogger1414632400391385vickjpg_zpcdGralCFjGDnE.jpg.scaled500.jpg|one obscene gesture] later, the former Falcons quarterback found himself on the proverbial hot seat here in Atlanta.

But before Vick had the opportunity to win back a fan base that he once held in the palm of his hand, authorities in Virginia discovered Vick's illegal operation and funding of Bad Newz Kennels—perhaps the most infamous dog fighting ring in American history.

On December 11, 2007, Vick was sentenced to 23 months in federal prison and subsequently exiled from the Falcons organization.

Nearly three years later, Vick has resurfaced in Philadelphia and following an impressive performance this past Sunday—his first NFL start since December 31, 2006—was named as the Eagles starting quarterback.

Vick, now 30 years old, is trying to resurrect a football career, and personal life, that just about every person with the ability to voice their own opinion agreed was undeniably irreparable.

The question is: Will you root for Vick to prove us all wrong?"
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Drafted number one overall in the 2001 NFL Draft, Vick quickly became the city's most recognizable athlete thanks to his thrilling play on the field and his undeniable marketability off it.

 One not-so-clever prescription alias, one failed drug-smuggling attempt and one obscene gesture later, the former Falcons quarterback found himself on the proverbial hot seat here in Atlanta.

But before Vick had the opportunity to win back a fan base that he once held in the palm of his hand, authorities in Virginia discovered Vick's illegal operation and funding of Bad Newz Kennels—perhaps the most infamous dog fighting ring in American history.

On December 11, 2007, Vick was sentenced to 23 months in federal prison and subsequently exiled from the Falcons organization.

Nearly three years later, Vick has resurfaced in Philadelphia and following an impressive performance this past Sunday—his first NFL start since December 31, 2006—was named as the Eagles starting quarterback.

Vick, now 30 years old, is trying to resurrect a football career, and personal life, that just about every person with the ability to voice their own opinion agreed was undeniably irreparable.

The question is: Will you root for Vick to prove us all wrong?             13055331 2123975                          Ben's Sports Take: He's baaaaack...did you miss him? "
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Article

Wednesday September 22, 2010 12:49 pm EDT

We all remember the rise and fall of one Michael Vick.https://media1.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/bens-sports-take-hes-baaaaackdid-you/u/original/2128170/1285134738-1285105548-441px-michael-vick_jets-vs-eagles-sept-3-2009_post-game-in.jpg

Drafted number one overall in the 2001 NFL Draft, Vick quickly became the city's most recognizable athlete thanks to his thrilling play on the field and his...

| more...
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  string(579) "The Atlanta Braves' away game  last night versus the Philadelphia Phillies was interrupted during the seventh inning when a fan wearing a red bodysuit and mask stormed the field. 

Stadium officials gave chase but couldn't catch up to the imaginative character. Luckily, Braves outfield Matt Diaz knew how to gracefully put an end to the madness.

UPDATE: The previous version was pulled. Let's see how long this one stays up:



Diaz told the Associated Press after the game, which the Braves lost 3-1: ""I wanted to spear him so bad, but I didn't want to hurt him or get hurt.""
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Stadium officials gave chase but couldn't catch up to the imaginative character. Luckily, Braves outfield Matt Diaz knew how to gracefully put an end to the madness.

__UPDATE__: The previous version was pulled. Let's see how long this one stays up:



Diaz [http://scores.espn.go.com/mlb/recap?gameId=300920122&teams=atlanta-braves-vs-philadelphia-phillies|told] the Associated Press after the game, which the Braves lost 3-1: ""I wanted to spear him so bad, but I didn't want to hurt him or get hurt.""
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Stadium officials gave chase but couldn't catch up to the imaginative character. Luckily, Braves outfield Matt Diaz knew how to gracefully put an end to the madness.

UPDATE: The previous version was pulled. Let's see how long this one stays up:



Diaz told the Associated Press after the game, which the Braves lost 3-1: ""I wanted to spear him so bad, but I didn't want to hurt him or get hurt."             13055320 2122893                          Braves' Matt Diaz trips creature in red bodysuit, gives fans reason to rejoice regardless of loss "
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Article

Tuesday September 21, 2010 11:33 am EDT

The Atlanta Braves' away game last night versus the Philadelphia Phillies was interrupted during the seventh inning when a fan wearing a red bodysuit and mask stormed the field.

Stadium officials gave chase but couldn't catch up to the imaginative character. Luckily, Braves outfield Matt Diaz knew how to gracefully put an end to the madness.

UPDATE: The previous version was pulled. Let's...

| more...
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Black Angels Over Tuskegee (Sep. 23-Oct 10). A touring production from Lamman Rucker's Black Gents of Hollywood, this 2009 NAACP Best Ensemble Award-winner explores the story of six of the Tuskegee Airmen, the famed African-American World War II aviators. Written and directed by Layon Gray.

Madam (Sep. 16-Oct. 3). Paul L. Johnson composes the music and Adriana Rogers wrote the book and lyrics for this musical about the life of Madam C.J. Walker, who became America's first black woman millionaire thanks to her hair care and beauty products. Directed by Herman LeVern Jones for the black box theater.

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''Black Angels Over Tuskegee'' (Sep. 23-Oct 10). A touring production from Lamman Rucker's [http://theblackgents.homestead.com/|Black Gents of Hollywood], this 2009 NAACP Best Ensemble Award-winner explores the story of six of the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuskegee_Airmen|Tuskegee Airmen], the famed African-American World War II aviators. Written and directed by Layon Gray.
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The line-up also includes ''Ghost Stories of the Blacksmith Curse'' by Billy Graham (Oct./Nov.); ''High Priestess of Dark Alley'' by Jackie Aexander, featuring Nicoye Banks (Nov.); and A Gift of Love by ''James Cokerham''."
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Black Angels Over Tuskegee (Sep. 23-Oct 10). A touring production from Lamman Rucker's Black Gents of Hollywood, this 2009 NAACP Best Ensemble Award-winner explores the story of six of the Tuskegee Airmen, the famed African-American World War II aviators. Written and directed by Layon Gray.

Madam (Sep. 16-Oct. 3). Paul L. Johnson composes the music and Adriana Rogers wrote the book and lyrics for this musical about the life of Madam C.J. Walker, who became America's first black woman millionaire thanks to her hair care and beauty products. Directed by Herman LeVern Jones for the black box theater.

The line-up also includes Ghost Stories of the Blacksmith Curse by Billy Graham (Oct./Nov.); High Priestess of Dark Alley by Jackie Aexander, featuring Nicoye Banks (Nov.); and A Gift of Love by James Cokerham.             13055089 2113632                          TheatreSouth Atlanta takes residency at Porter Sanford Center "
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Friday September 17, 2010 04:01 pm EDT

TheatreSouth Atlanta become a resident theater company at the Porter Sanford III Performing Arts and Community Center, which includes both a 500-seat mainstage and a 150-seat black box theater. Founded in 2007 by Herman LaVern Jones, TheatreSouth has announced its line-up through the December holidays:

Black Angels Over Tuskegee (Sep. 23-Oct 10). A touring production from Lamman Rucker's...

| more...

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Friday September 17, 2010 03:30 pm EDT
Comedian Donnell Rawlings, best known for his role as Ashy Larry on Comedy Central's "Chappelle's Show," is in town performing at the Funny Farm all weekend. Today he stopped by Creative Loafing's Another Comedy Podcast to explain the meaning of his newly-trademarked acronym T.I.T.F, try to get me in trouble with the N-word, and recall the time a gay heckler almost ruined his career. | more...
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Friday September 17, 2010 10:41 am EDT

  • Michael Oliveri



Shipping containers become a pop-up gallery on Krog St. this weekend while the Westside Arts District packs in a schedule of speakers. More after the jump.

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  string(4942) "The Alliance Theatre's Twist, a riff on Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist, bears the subtitle An American Musical. This could be to readily distinguish the new play from Oliver!, the beloved British musical which stormed stage and screen in the 1960s. Director/choreographer Debbie Allen, book writer William F. Brown, and Grammy-winning lyricist Tena Clark, who co-wrote the music with Gary Prim, transplant the Dickensian orphan from 1830s London to Prohibition-era New Orleans.

You can see why the creators would want to put a lot of daylight between Twist and Oliver!, rather than face unflattering comparisons with Lionel Bart's beloved musical. When Twist features a group of ragamuffins singing praise to "Meat on the Bone," flashbacks to "Food, Glorious Food!" are unavoidable, to Twist's detriment. But Twist's world premiere struggles with bigger problems, despite stupendous dance numbers and powerful voices.

Twist begins with not just a bang, but a rap-a-tap-tap with "Back By Demand" — an unqualified showstopper that the rest of the evening never matches. We meet the vaudeville tap-dancing duo Boston (Matthew Johnson) and Roosevelt (Jared Grimes) in a jubilant New Orleans performance, with Grimes in particular proving to be spectacularly athletic and graceful. Backstage afterward, however, the African-American twosome breaks up when Roosevelt leaves to elope with his pregnant white girlfriend Angela (Aijia Lise).

Roosevelt and Angela croon blandly about how "Love Lives in Everyone," and then disaster strikes. Next thing you know, Angela's goes into labor on the floor of a local orphanage, where the callous Miss Cotton (Shawna M. Hamic) sings "Breath and Push" until Angela gives birth to a plastic baby doll and dies on stage. Twist seems to consistently take the approach that Dickens' original story wasn't sentimental or manipulative enough. The likes of Oliver! and Les Miserables prove there's nothing wrong with melodrama in stage musicals, but Twist clumsily toys with its audience's emotions.

Nine years later, the child called Twist (Alaman Diadhiou) toils as the orphanage's "scrub-boy" and faces scorn for being a mulatto. Justly honored as a tap-dancing prodigy by Cookie magazine, Diadhiou's cuteness goes off the charts, although the play occasionally puts too much demand on his vocal abilities. Frequently, the show gives him soggy solos, including one number with the lyrical low point, "Why did God make me a color no one likes?" (Coincidentally, the last play on the Alliance's mainstage, Musical-Dramatic Arts Inc.'s I Dream, featured a young boy crooning a comparably schmaltzy tune about "Magic Shoes." What's next? A musical about puppies and kittens?)

Twist presents provocative images of America's racial legacy, including the murder of an African-American man by figures in Klu Klux Klan robes and the recurring motif of the boy being bought and sold. Twist's white uncle Lucius (an over-the-top Pat McRoberts) connives to find and kill Twist to secure an inheritance, and sings some of the show's worst lines: "What kind of family tree bears such fruit?/He's not worth a nickel, much less my loot!" The play's themes of biracial prejudice seem at odds with New Orleans' diverse cultural heritage, but if Twist intends to challenge the Crescent City's reputation for tolerance, the provocative notion peters out. The Alliance's Jelly's Last Jam delivered on a more nuanced, jazz-flavored version of New Orleans with even more inventive spectacle.

One gets the impression that Twist's creators picked New Orleans as a handy pretext for numbers built around jazz funerals, Fat Tuesday parades and even a voodoo dream. The Mardi Gras number "High Cotton" couldn't be more generic — it's like everything HBO's New Orleans drama "Treme" hated all at once — but admittedly includes clever outfits, including a Josephine Baker look-a-like and a reveler bouncing on stilts. As one expects from a big musical at the Alliance, Todd Rosenthal's set gorgeously emulates the curlicued balconies of the French Quarter, although Emilio Sosa's costumes make occasional missteps, like the eyesore color scheme of the young scofflaws.

Juke-joint singer Della (Olivia-Diane Joseph), Twist's equivalent to the original's nurturing saloon-gal Nancy, won jubilant opening night applause with every sustained climactic note. As the Fagin figure, Boston emerges not as a shadowy criminal but a dashing if morally conflicted bootlegger who strikes sparks with Della. Tracy Kennedy practically rejoices in the unalloyed villainy of flamboyant undertaker Crazah Chesterfield.

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Nine years later, the child called Twist (Alaman Diadhiou) toils as the orphanage's "scrub-boy" and faces scorn for being a mulatto. Justly honored as a tap-dancing prodigy by Cookie magazine, Diadhiou's cuteness goes off the charts, although the play occasionally puts too much demand on his vocal abilities. Frequently, the show gives him soggy solos, including one number with the lyrical low point, "Why did God make me a color no one likes?" (Coincidentally, the last play on the Alliance's mainstage, Musical-Dramatic Arts Inc.'s I Dream, featured a young boy crooning a comparably schmaltzy tune about "Magic Shoes." What's next? A musical about puppies and kittens?)

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Juke-joint singer Della (Olivia-Diane Joseph), Twist's equivalent to the original's nurturing saloon-gal Nancy, won jubilant opening night applause with every sustained climactic note. As the Fagin figure, Boston emerges not as a shadowy criminal but a dashing if morally conflicted bootlegger who strikes sparks with Della. Tracy Kennedy practically rejoices in the unalloyed villainy of flamboyant undertaker Crazah Chesterfield.

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Friday September 17, 2010 04:00 am EDT
The Alliance Theatre's Twist, a riff on Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist, bears the subtitle An American Musical. This could be to readily distinguish the new play from Oliver!, the beloved British musical which stormed stage and screen in the 1960s. Director/choreographer Debbie Allen, book writer William F. Brown, and Grammy-winning lyricist Tena Clark, who co-wrote the music with Gary Prim,... | more...
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The 2010 college football season is now underway, but it isn't electrifying touchdowns or bone-jarring tackles that has fans talking, coaches complaining and players watching their collective backs.

No, the most talked about storyline of this year's college football season has been the one thing that the players aren't allowed to have, but somehow always seem to get: Money.

Georgia Bulldogs wide receiver A.J. Green will miss the next three games after he accepted it.

Former USC running back Reggie Bush had to ship his Heisman Trophy back to New York after his family didn't have to spend it.

The University of North Carolina football team had to play in the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff Classic here in Atlanta without their best player—defensive tackle Marvin Austin—because of his illicit pursuit of it.

And that's just in the last two weeks.

Over the past decade, there have been numerous cases involving some high-profile programs and players that have resulted in exhaustive investigations, mass suspensions and ultimate probation.

Although collegiate athletes have been redefining the term "amateur athlete" for years, it appears that now, more than ever, the question has to be asked: Should college athletes be paid?"
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  string(1648) "{img src="http://clatl.com/images/blogimages/2010/08/06/1281070224-cl_column_2.jpg"}[http://twitter.com/share|Tweet] 

The 2010 college football season is now underway, but it isn't electrifying touchdowns or bone-jarring tackles that has fans talking, coaches complaining and players watching their collective backs.

No, the most talked about storyline of this year's college football season has been the one thing that the players aren't allowed to have, but somehow always seem to get: Money.

[http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2010/09/10/dow-aj-greens-entrepreneurial-spirit|Georgia Bulldogs wide receiver A.J. Green will miss the next three games after he accepted it].

[http://www.sdnn.com/sandiego/2010-06-10/sports/ncaa-smacks-down-usc-after-finding-reggie-bush-took-money-gifts|Former USC running back Reggie Bush had to ship his Heisman Trophy back to New York after his family didn't have to spend it].

[http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Sources-Marvin-Austin-expected-to-be-suspended-by-NCAA.html|The University of North Carolina football team had to play in the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff Classic here in Atlanta without their best player—defensive tackle Marvin Austin—because of his illicit pursuit of it].

And that's just in the last two weeks.

Over the past decade, there have been numerous cases involving some high-profile programs and players that have resulted in exhaustive investigations, mass suspensions and ultimate probation.

Although collegiate athletes have been redefining the term "amateur athlete" for years, it appears that now, more than ever, the question has to be asked: Should college athletes be paid?"
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  string(1497) "       2010-09-15T17:13:00+00:00 Ben's Sports Take: College athletes...to pay or not to pay?   Ben Bussard 1435282 2010-09-15T17:13:00+00:00  Tweet 

The 2010 college football season is now underway, but it isn't electrifying touchdowns or bone-jarring tackles that has fans talking, coaches complaining and players watching their collective backs.

No, the most talked about storyline of this year's college football season has been the one thing that the players aren't allowed to have, but somehow always seem to get: Money.

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And that's just in the last two weeks.

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Although collegiate athletes have been redefining the term "amateur athlete" for years, it appears that now, more than ever, the question has to be asked: Should college athletes be paid?             13054895 2081763                          Ben's Sports Take: College athletes...to pay or not to pay? "
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Wednesday September 15, 2010 01:13 pm EDT

Tweet

The 2010 college football season is now underway, but it isn't electrifying touchdowns or bone-jarring tackles that has fans talking, coaches complaining and players watching their collective backs.

No, the most talked about storyline of this year's college football season has been the one thing that the players aren't allowed to have, but somehow always seem to get: Money.

Georgia...

| more...
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*Brittany Parris
*Jeremy Abernathy, founder of BURNAWAY
The future of arts writing in Atlanta just got a lot rosier. Our friends at BURNAWAY and ArtsCriticATL as well as veteran critic Jerry Cullum were just named recipients of $30,000 grants from a brand new arts foundation, Possible Futures. 

The foundation is yet another project from Louis Corrigan, best known as the founder of Flux Projects. In the press release, he says,

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*Brittany Parris
*Jeremy Abernathy, founder of BURNAWAY
The future of arts writing in Atlanta just got a lot rosier. Our friends at [http://www.burnaway.org/|BURNAWAY] and [http://www.artscriticatl.com/|ArtsCriticATL] as well as veteran critic [http://www.counterforces.blogspot.com/|Jerry Cullum] were just named recipients of $30,000 grants from a brand new arts foundation, Possible Futures. 

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“The arts are an essential expression of our humanity, and thus their own end,[...] but they are also necessary for a civil society because they help us see new and better possibilities for how we might live. Meaningful arts criticism is vital in that it challenges artists to do their best work and helps a broad audience understand and appreciate that work.”
 
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  string(1692) "       2010-09-14T18:14:00+00:00 Arts writers in Atlanta get a big boost from Possible Futures   Wyatt Williams 1306426 2010-09-14T18:14:00+00:00  
*Brittany Parris
*Jeremy Abernathy, founder of BURNAWAY
The future of arts writing in Atlanta just got a lot rosier. Our friends at BURNAWAY and ArtsCriticATL as well as veteran critic Jerry Cullum were just named recipients of $30,000 grants from a brand new arts foundation, Possible Futures. 

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“It’s my hope that the foundation’s recognition of these important critical voices will help validate their efforts so that they attract more widespread support."             13055007 2099583                          Arts writers in Atlanta get a big boost from Possible Futures "
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Article

Tuesday September 14, 2010 02:14 pm EDT

  • Brittany Parris
  • Jeremy Abernathy, founder of BURNAWAY

The future of arts writing in Atlanta just got a lot rosier. Our friends at BURNAWAY and ArtsCriticATL as well as veteran critic Jerry Cullum were just named recipients of $30,000 grants from a brand new arts foundation, Possible Futures.

The foundation is yet another project from Louis Corrigan, best known as the founder of Flux...

| more...
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  string(52) "A&E Q&A - Choreographer George Staib faces the music"
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  string(92) "Staibdance performs with Vega String Quartet and pianist William Ransom at Emory Sept. 23-25"
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  string(6294) "Iranian-American choreographer George Staib recalls his mother telling him "Boys don't do ballet" when he was a child living in Tehran. In 1977, when Staib was 10 years old, Staib's family immigrated to America, where he discovered a productive career as a dancer, choreographer and Emory University professor. He founded Staibdance in 2007, which has become one of Atlanta's most acclaimed and original modern dance companies. From Sept. 23-25, Staibdance presents another live, collaborative performance with Emory's Vega String Quartet, along with pianist William Ransom.

How did you first get interested in dance?

Throughout high school, I danced nominally in things like the show choir. In my freshman year of college, a for-real dancer asked me to do a duet with her in the student dance troupe. It was a disaster — a teacher called it "The Care Bears go to Hollywood." I planned to either pursue acting or go to law school after college and saw dancing as this little diversion, but I kept it up and took modern classes and summer programs with the Philadelphia Youth Ballet.

Do Iranian dance traditions inform your work?

There are some Armenian and Persian traditions that made their way — to a small degree — into a piece I did in January. Not so much in the work I've been doing lately, but my next piece after this show will involve movement traditions based on Persian dancing at parties.

As a teacher, do you ever find it difficult to put ideas about dance into words?

It's so hard to describe feeling, content and mood with dance. It's like telling a joke when you have to say, "You had to be there." Even teaching choreography class, when I give one kind of feedback to one person, I have to completely negate it based on another's approach and abilities.

Why did you found Staibdance?

At Emory, the faculty has a lot of creative freedom, and I've known for a long time that I really wanted my own company to do my own work. I want to make work with a consistent group of people, so the dancers can create a more homogenous style. And it helps facilitate my career at Emory. The more I do my own choreography work, or what we call "choreography research," the more I share with my students.

Do ideas for choreography come exclusively from the music, or from notions you've developed independently? Do you change things based on the skills of your dancers?

It's a little bit of everything. For I while, I couldn't make anything without knowing the music first. Lately, especially with this show, it's been a comfort to look at an idea first, and find the music later. In this show, one of the dancers is very thoughtful and emotional, so I'll move things around based on her abilities. Having the idea first is very liberating. Sometimes, if the music has a strong, eight-count structure, I can feel boxed in.



Once more, Staibdance will be performing live with the Vega String Quartet, with whom you collaborated in 2009. Do the dancers and musicians rehearse together?

The first time around we had more interactions. This time is more challenging because of the quartet's performance schedule. We won't get together until 10 days before the show. It's a little nerve-wracking, but we do have recordings of them performing the same music. The first time, we discovered there were major differences between what we the dancers rehearsed and what they were going to play. I explained to the musicians what I wanted, and within 24 hours, they came back with the music sounding and feeling the way we expected. They're phenomenal people, and so gentle and humble and dynamic.

How are you approaching the collaboration differently the second time?

This go-round is hopefully more sophisticated in terms of the work and the musical variation. Some of the music we're using is more familiar, like Rachmaninoff's "Vocalise" and the "Adagio for Strings," so the popularity of the music is scarier to me, choreographically.

Why is it scarier?

For example, we're doing a Samuel Barber piece that's a really popular piece of music, and people have probably heard it or seen other dances to it. I was originally not going to choreograph it, but I realized that I have these three men in the company, so I'd try a men's trio. The more popular a piece is, the more preconceptions people may have about what should happen in it. It's like when they re-did Willy Wonka. It's hard to battle or live up to people's expectations.

Kendall Simpson will be premiering a new composition, "Island," at this show. How is it different choreographing a new piece of music, compared to something classical?

He is great. Because we've worked together so long, he created a piece that challenged me, but resides in a place that's comfortable and feels very cozy. The challenge is to create a dance that feels very consistent in these three drastically different sections. It appeals to the mathematical side of me, the side that likes to solve problems. I've been asking them to hold notes longer, to make more connections between the sections, and he's jumping in with that. We're both getting our hands dirty.

Earlier this year, you told local arts blog ArtsCriticATL.com, "Lately, with dance, if there isn't something I can draw from in my own experience and somehow make universal, it's a lot harder for me." Is that still true?

That is the case. I'm not sure why. I find myself on this bridge, away from making pretty dances to pretty music, and trying to make something with more meaning. We're doing this lively Schumann piece, and it bothered me that it doesn't have content. I started thinking about the oddities of family members and the ones you talk about when they're not there, like "Uncle so-and-so and his drinking." So that inspired the choreography.

How old are you, and how much do you dance these days?

I'm 43. I dance as much as I can, although I'm nursing a painful back. I have herniated discs, which I guess came from dancing, but is a pretty common injury. My physical therapist says it may have come from a specific dance injury in Philadelphia 20 years ago. But whenever my colleague Greg Catellier has a performance, I usually participate, and I do work with my fiancée Kathleen Wessel. When this show is over, I should be dancing fairly consistently. "
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__How did you first get interested in dance?__

Throughout high school, I danced nominally in things like the show choir. In my freshman year of college, a for-real dancer asked me to do a duet with her in the student dance troupe. It was a disaster — a teacher called it "The Care Bears go to Hollywood." I planned to either pursue acting or go to law school after college and saw dancing as this little diversion, but I kept it up and took modern classes and summer programs with the Philadelphia Youth Ballet.

__Do Iranian dance traditions inform your work?__

There are some Armenian and Persian traditions that made their way — to a small degree — into a piece I did in January. Not so much in the work I've been doing lately, but my next piece after this show will involve movement traditions based on Persian dancing at parties.

__As a teacher, do you ever find it difficult to put ideas about dance into words?__

It's so hard to describe feeling, content and mood with dance. It's like telling a joke when you have to say, "You had to be there." Even teaching choreography class, when I give one kind of feedback to one person, I have to completely negate it based on another's approach and abilities.

__Why did you found Staibdance?__

At Emory, the faculty has a lot of creative freedom, and I've known for a long time that I really wanted my own company to do my own work. I want to make work with a consistent group of people, so the dancers can create a more homogenous style. And it helps facilitate my career at Emory. The more I do my own choreography work, or what we call "choreography research," the more I share with my students.

__Do ideas for choreography come exclusively from the music, or from notions you've developed independently? Do you change things based on the skills of your dancers?__

It's a little bit of everything. For I while, I couldn't make anything without knowing the music first. Lately, especially with this show, it's been a comfort to look at an idea first, and find the music later. In this show, one of the dancers is very thoughtful and emotional, so I'll move things around based on her abilities. Having the idea first is very liberating. Sometimes, if the music has a strong, eight-count structure, I can feel boxed in.



__Once more, Staibdance will be performing live with the Vega String Quartet, with whom you collaborated in 2009. Do the dancers and musicians rehearse together?__

The first time around we had more interactions. This time is more challenging because of the quartet's performance schedule. We won't get together until 10 days before the show. It's a little nerve-wracking, but we do have recordings of them performing the same music. The first time, we discovered there were major differences between what we [the dancers] rehearsed and what they were going to play. I explained to the musicians what I wanted, and within 24 hours, they came back with the music sounding and feeling the way we expected. They're phenomenal people, and so gentle and humble and dynamic.

__How are you approaching the collaboration differently the second time?__

This go-round is hopefully more sophisticated in terms of the work and the musical variation. Some of the music we're using is more familiar, like Rachmaninoff's "Vocalise" and the "Adagio for Strings," so the popularity of the music is scarier to me, choreographically.

__Why is it scarier?__

For example, we're doing a Samuel Barber piece that's a really popular piece of music, and people have probably heard it or seen other dances to it. I was originally not going to choreograph it, but I realized that I have these three men in the company, so I'd try a men's trio. The more popular a piece is, the more preconceptions people may have about what should happen in it. It's like when they re-did ''Willy Wonka''. It's hard to battle or live up to people's expectations.

__Kendall Simpson will be premiering a new composition, "Island," at this show. How is it different choreographing a new piece of music, compared to something classical?__

He is great. Because we've worked together so long, he created a piece that challenged me, but resides in a place that's comfortable and feels very cozy. The challenge is to create a dance that feels very consistent in these three drastically different sections. It appeals to the mathematical side of me, the side that likes to solve problems. I've been asking them to hold notes longer, to make more connections between the sections, and he's jumping in with that. We're both getting our hands dirty.

__Earlier this year, you told local arts blog [http://www.artscriticatl.com/2010/01/choreographer-george-staib-talks-about-culture-and-identity-for-staibdance-debut/|ArtsCriticATL.com], "Lately, with dance, if there isn't something I can draw from in my own experience and somehow make universal, it's a lot harder for me." Is that still true?__

That is the case. I'm not sure why. I find myself on this bridge, away from making pretty dances to pretty music, and trying to make something with more meaning. We're doing this lively Schumann piece, and it bothered me that it doesn't have content. I started thinking about the oddities of family members and the ones you talk about when they're not there, like "Uncle so-and-so and his drinking." So that inspired the choreography.

__How old are you, and how much do you dance these days?__

I'm 43. I dance as much as I can, although I'm nursing a painful back. I have herniated discs, which I guess came from dancing, but is a pretty common injury. My physical therapist says it may have come from a specific dance injury in Philadelphia 20 years ago. But whenever my colleague Greg Catellier has a performance, I usually participate, and I do work with my fiancée Kathleen Wessel. When this show is over, I should be dancing fairly consistently. "
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  string(6633) "    Staibdance performs with Vega String Quartet and pianist William Ransom at Emory Sept. 23-25   2010-09-14T12:00:00+00:00 A&E Q&A - Choreographer George Staib faces the music   Curt Holman Curt Holman 2010-09-14T12:00:00+00:00  Iranian-American choreographer George Staib recalls his mother telling him "Boys don't do ballet" when he was a child living in Tehran. In 1977, when Staib was 10 years old, Staib's family immigrated to America, where he discovered a productive career as a dancer, choreographer and Emory University professor. He founded Staibdance in 2007, which has become one of Atlanta's most acclaimed and original modern dance companies. From Sept. 23-25, Staibdance presents another live, collaborative performance with Emory's Vega String Quartet, along with pianist William Ransom.

How did you first get interested in dance?

Throughout high school, I danced nominally in things like the show choir. In my freshman year of college, a for-real dancer asked me to do a duet with her in the student dance troupe. It was a disaster — a teacher called it "The Care Bears go to Hollywood." I planned to either pursue acting or go to law school after college and saw dancing as this little diversion, but I kept it up and took modern classes and summer programs with the Philadelphia Youth Ballet.

Do Iranian dance traditions inform your work?

There are some Armenian and Persian traditions that made their way — to a small degree — into a piece I did in January. Not so much in the work I've been doing lately, but my next piece after this show will involve movement traditions based on Persian dancing at parties.

As a teacher, do you ever find it difficult to put ideas about dance into words?

It's so hard to describe feeling, content and mood with dance. It's like telling a joke when you have to say, "You had to be there." Even teaching choreography class, when I give one kind of feedback to one person, I have to completely negate it based on another's approach and abilities.

Why did you found Staibdance?

At Emory, the faculty has a lot of creative freedom, and I've known for a long time that I really wanted my own company to do my own work. I want to make work with a consistent group of people, so the dancers can create a more homogenous style. And it helps facilitate my career at Emory. The more I do my own choreography work, or what we call "choreography research," the more I share with my students.

Do ideas for choreography come exclusively from the music, or from notions you've developed independently? Do you change things based on the skills of your dancers?

It's a little bit of everything. For I while, I couldn't make anything without knowing the music first. Lately, especially with this show, it's been a comfort to look at an idea first, and find the music later. In this show, one of the dancers is very thoughtful and emotional, so I'll move things around based on her abilities. Having the idea first is very liberating. Sometimes, if the music has a strong, eight-count structure, I can feel boxed in.



Once more, Staibdance will be performing live with the Vega String Quartet, with whom you collaborated in 2009. Do the dancers and musicians rehearse together?

The first time around we had more interactions. This time is more challenging because of the quartet's performance schedule. We won't get together until 10 days before the show. It's a little nerve-wracking, but we do have recordings of them performing the same music. The first time, we discovered there were major differences between what we the dancers rehearsed and what they were going to play. I explained to the musicians what I wanted, and within 24 hours, they came back with the music sounding and feeling the way we expected. They're phenomenal people, and so gentle and humble and dynamic.

How are you approaching the collaboration differently the second time?

This go-round is hopefully more sophisticated in terms of the work and the musical variation. Some of the music we're using is more familiar, like Rachmaninoff's "Vocalise" and the "Adagio for Strings," so the popularity of the music is scarier to me, choreographically.

Why is it scarier?

For example, we're doing a Samuel Barber piece that's a really popular piece of music, and people have probably heard it or seen other dances to it. I was originally not going to choreograph it, but I realized that I have these three men in the company, so I'd try a men's trio. The more popular a piece is, the more preconceptions people may have about what should happen in it. It's like when they re-did Willy Wonka. It's hard to battle or live up to people's expectations.

Kendall Simpson will be premiering a new composition, "Island," at this show. How is it different choreographing a new piece of music, compared to something classical?

He is great. Because we've worked together so long, he created a piece that challenged me, but resides in a place that's comfortable and feels very cozy. The challenge is to create a dance that feels very consistent in these three drastically different sections. It appeals to the mathematical side of me, the side that likes to solve problems. I've been asking them to hold notes longer, to make more connections between the sections, and he's jumping in with that. We're both getting our hands dirty.

Earlier this year, you told local arts blog ArtsCriticATL.com, "Lately, with dance, if there isn't something I can draw from in my own experience and somehow make universal, it's a lot harder for me." Is that still true?

That is the case. I'm not sure why. I find myself on this bridge, away from making pretty dances to pretty music, and trying to make something with more meaning. We're doing this lively Schumann piece, and it bothered me that it doesn't have content. I started thinking about the oddities of family members and the ones you talk about when they're not there, like "Uncle so-and-so and his drinking." So that inspired the choreography.

How old are you, and how much do you dance these days?

I'm 43. I dance as much as I can, although I'm nursing a painful back. I have herniated discs, which I guess came from dancing, but is a pretty common injury. My physical therapist says it may have come from a specific dance injury in Philadelphia 20 years ago. But whenever my colleague Greg Catellier has a performance, I usually participate, and I do work with my fiancée Kathleen Wessel. When this show is over, I should be dancing fairly consistently.              13054978 2096792                          A&E Q&A - Choreographer George Staib faces the music "
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Tuesday September 14, 2010 08:00 am EDT
Staibdance performs with Vega String Quartet and pianist William Ransom at Emory Sept. 23-25 | more...
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Gilbert Lawand is a likeably odd mix of things. Born in Iraq and raised in Warm Springs, Georgia, he is a comedian, and an accountant. Despite freelance consulting by day, the oxy-moronic Lawand plays a pivotal role in Atlanta's comedy scene at night. He runs the Comedy Gold room out of the Landmark Diner in Buckhead every Friday and Saturday; he also organizes a monthly Comedy Gold show at the Warren. The UGA alum ('98) received his MBA from Emory University in '04, and his worlds collided when he was named the "South's Funniest Accountant" by Accountants One at the 2009 contest, held at Center Stage. Lawand performs regularly at local rooms around town.

ATLien since: 1998
 
Comedian since: 2007

A lil' joke: "I did a show recently in a city I dislike.  I don't want to offend anyone so I'll just say that it's 2 hours north of Atlanta. And it's Chattanooga. I was walking to my car after the show, and a huge redneck angrily yelled 'Hey man, you're one funny Mexican!'  That's the first time I was proud to be Mexican.  But then again, I've only been Mexican since September 12, 2001. Most people know exactly where they were when that tragedy occurred. I was at Home Depot, figuring out my new culture."

Upcoming performances:
Sep 14 - Seriously Funny Show - Smith's Olde Bar - Atlanta, GA
Sep 15 - Atypical Southern Comedy Quartet - The Warren - Atlanta, GA
Sep 17 - Comedy Gold - Landmark Diner - Atlanta, GA
Sep 18 - Comedy Gold - Landmark Diner - Atlanta, GA
 
Contact info:
facebook.com/ComedianGilbert
atlantacomedygold.com

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__Gilbert Lawand __is a likeably odd mix of things. Born in Iraq and raised in Warm Springs, Georgia, he is a comedian, and an accountant. Despite freelance consulting by day, the oxy-moronic Lawand plays a pivotal role in Atlanta's comedy scene at night. He runs the __Comedy Gold __room out of the Landmark Diner in Buckhead every Friday and Saturday; he also organizes a monthly Comedy Gold show at the Warren. The UGA alum ('98) received his MBA from Emory University in '04, and his worlds collided when he was named the "South's Funniest Accountant" by Accountants One at the 2009 contest, held at Center Stage. Lawand performs regularly at local rooms around town.

__ATLien since:__ 1998
 
__Comedian since:__ 2007

__A lil' joke:__ "I did a show recently in a city I dislike.  I don't want to offend anyone so I'll just say that it's 2 hours north of Atlanta. And it's Chattanooga. I was walking to my car after the show, and a huge redneck angrily yelled 'Hey man, you're one funny Mexican!'  That's the first time I was proud to be Mexican.  But then again, I've only been Mexican since September 12, 2001. Most people know exactly where they were when that tragedy occurred. I was at Home Depot, figuring out my new culture."

__Upcoming performances:__
Sep 14 - Seriously Funny Show - Smith's Olde Bar - Atlanta, GA
Sep 15 - Atypical Southern Comedy Quartet - The Warren - Atlanta, GA
Sep 17 - Comedy Gold - Landmark Diner - Atlanta, GA
Sep 18 - Comedy Gold - Landmark Diner - Atlanta, GA
 
__Contact info:__
[http://facebook.com/ComedianGilbert|facebook.com/ComedianGilbert]
[http://atlantacomedygold.com|atlantacomedygold.com]

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Gilbert Lawand is a likeably odd mix of things. Born in Iraq and raised in Warm Springs, Georgia, he is a comedian, and an accountant. Despite freelance consulting by day, the oxy-moronic Lawand plays a pivotal role in Atlanta's comedy scene at night. He runs the Comedy Gold room out of the Landmark Diner in Buckhead every Friday and Saturday; he also organizes a monthly Comedy Gold show at the Warren. The UGA alum ('98) received his MBA from Emory University in '04, and his worlds collided when he was named the "South's Funniest Accountant" by Accountants One at the 2009 contest, held at Center Stage. Lawand performs regularly at local rooms around town.

ATLien since: 1998
 
Comedian since: 2007

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Upcoming performances:
Sep 14 - Seriously Funny Show - Smith's Olde Bar - Atlanta, GA
Sep 15 - Atypical Southern Comedy Quartet - The Warren - Atlanta, GA
Sep 17 - Comedy Gold - Landmark Diner - Atlanta, GA
Sep 18 - Comedy Gold - Landmark Diner - Atlanta, GA
 
Contact info:
facebook.com/ComedianGilbert
atlantacomedygold.com

             13054983 2096943                          ATL Comic Profile: Gilbert Lawand "
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Monday September 13, 2010 02:22 pm EDT



Gilbert Lawand is a likeably odd mix of things. Born in Iraq and raised in Warm Springs, Georgia, he is a comedian, and an accountant. Despite freelance consulting by day, the oxy-moronic Lawand plays a pivotal role in Atlanta's comedy scene at night. He runs the Comedy Gold room out of the Landmark Diner in Buckhead every Friday and Saturday; he also organizes a monthly Comedy Gold show at...

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  string(72) "'Convergent Frequencies' transforms the corner of Krog and Irwin streets"
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  string(83) "A pop-up gallery made of 4-ton steel shipping containers? We're not making this up."
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  string(5941) "On the front porch of Whitespace Gallery owner Susan Bridge's Inman Park home, the three artists of "Convergent Frequencies" are gathered in white wicker chairs. Danny Davis, a production manager Bridges calls "the bulldog of the project," arrives with a round of beers, the clear bottles sweating in the late summer heat. Soon enough, the artists will be the ones sweating, transforming a gravel- and weed-speckled vacant lot at the corner of Krog and Irwin streets into a pop-up gallery; a multimedia installation primarily constructed of 45-foot-long, 4-ton steel shipping containers. This night, though, they pass around the bottle opener and sip beer, reclined and shaded from the heat.

Bridges, who speaks in a cultivated Southern accent that might belie her impeccable taste in contemporary art, lives just a few blocks from that vacant lot. "I drive by that corner about five times a day, every day, and it's just crying for something," she says. In between playful giggles, she continues, "Then God told me in a dream that we needed to have shipping containers." The dream, Bridges explains, was to build a gallery from the same containers that pass through the rail yards along DeKalb Avenue.

Late last spring, Bridges contacted Matt Gilbert, Matt Haffner, and Nat Slaughter, the artists now sitting on her porch, and they began collaborating. When "Convergent Frequencies" premieres Fri., Sept. 17, Haffner's narrative wheatpastes will adorn the containers' exteriors, while stereo systems inside them will play Slaughter's Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points field recordings. Gilbert will project videos onto a swath of an adjacent warehouse roughly the size of a small movie theater. Musicians from Oryx and Crake and dancers including Helen Hale of Dance Truck will perform on top of the containers. A food truck will sell hot dogs and refreshments. The entire art gallery will appear and disappear in a matter of days.

It's easy to believe that all this came from a dream.

"Convergent Frequencies" is the latest project from i45, a collective of galleries from Inman Park, the Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points. Bridges notes that the group, which includes Barbara Archer Gallery, Henley Studios, WM Turner Gallery, and Whitespace, doesn't do the "walks and talks" that have become the norm for Atlanta's gallery-driven neighborhoods. "We'd rather have happenings like this," she says.

Through distinctly varied mediums, Gilbert, Haffner, and Slaughter's works have absorbed the landscapes and lives of the surrounding neighborhoods. Haffner's wheatpastes use the shapes of local architecture (an abandoned gas station, the Cotton Mill stacks) as the backgrounds for his subtle scenes. "I feel like I'm always recording little moments. It doesn't need to be a single, groundbreaking event, it can just be the way a person hands someone a piece of paper or maybe some drugs or their phone number to get together later," he says.

Slaughter's field recordings were made on walks in the Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points at various moments throughout the night and day. "In certain pockets of these neighborhoods, there isn't very much of a difference between 2 o'clock in the morning and 2 o'clock in the afternoon," he says. A narrative, a kind of performance even, emerges while listening to the sounds of Slaughter's footsteps as he approaches the chatter of a bar or shuffles through the overgrowth along the Beltline.

Gilbert's video projections for "Convergent Frequencies" digest the surroundings in more abstract terms. Using fractured digital video that combines the movements of cellist Matt Jarrard and violinist Karyn Lu with images of Atlanta, Gilbert's videos simultaneously resemble distorted satellite television and evoke what he calls "the charged energy" between neighborhoods and cultures in the city.

The collective work is neither focused on nor ignorant of the history of these neighborhoods. A number of Slaughter's recordings take place at the site of intersections that no longer exist. "Because of things like the Freedom Parkway and this Robert Moses kind of urban design mind-set that Atlanta went through that was like, 'We need to move these white people that live on the periphery through the city with any sort of connection.' They tore down all these houses and they took intersections and created dead ends. So, those pieces are about these intersections that used to be but aren't anymore," Slaughter says.

Haffner has a direct personal connection to the pop-up gallery's location. Ten years ago, the street artist moved to Atlanta and put up a wheatpaste on the now-demolished building that occupied the vacant corner at Krog and Irwin.

"I wouldn't just slap up wheatpastes. I was never about just a tag, getting the name out there. It was about finding the right architecture, making a composition and using the bricked-up window as a patina, and using a rusted or broken downspout as this aesthetic element that would carry the line of sight, and using bits of wire or stained wall as elements for the overall composition," he says.

Haffner's wheatpaste process sounds like a metaphor for "Convergent Frequencies" — a way to make art that is as much for the location as it is about the location. The project, along with other recent public works such as John Q's Memory Flash and the Paper Twins' Beltline installation The Wanderers, reflects the growing tendency among local artists to offer meditations on Atlanta's spaces.

On the front porch, the bottles are empty and the summer sky is now dark. The group's eager to get the shipping containers on the ground and find out what factors they haven't planned for or can't control. With public art Gilbert says, "At some point, you just have to admit that you can't predict what it's going to look like. That's actually really exciting — you haven't made all the decisions and decisions will be made for you." "
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Bridges, who speaks in a cultivated Southern accent that might belie her impeccable taste in contemporary art, lives just a few blocks from that vacant lot. "I drive by that corner about five times a day, every day, and it's just crying for something," she says. In between playful giggles, she continues, "Then God told me in a dream that we needed to have shipping containers." The dream, Bridges explains, was to build a gallery from the same containers that pass through the rail yards along DeKalb Avenue.

Late last spring, Bridges contacted Matt Gilbert, Matt Haffner, and Nat Slaughter, the artists now sitting on her porch, and they began collaborating. When "Convergent Frequencies" premieres Fri., Sept. 17, Haffner's narrative wheatpastes will adorn the containers' exteriors, while stereo systems inside them will play Slaughter's Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points field recordings. Gilbert will project videos onto a swath of an adjacent warehouse roughly the size of a small movie theater. Musicians from Oryx and Crake and dancers including Helen Hale of Dance Truck will perform on top of the containers. A food truck will sell hot dogs and refreshments. The entire art gallery will appear and disappear in a matter of days.

It's easy to believe that all this came from a dream.

"Convergent Frequencies" is the latest project from i45, a collective of galleries from Inman Park, the Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points. Bridges notes that the group, which includes Barbara Archer Gallery, Henley Studios, WM Turner Gallery, and Whitespace, doesn't do the "walks and talks" that have become the norm for Atlanta's gallery-driven neighborhoods. "We'd rather have happenings like this," she says.

Through distinctly varied mediums, Gilbert, Haffner, and Slaughter's works have absorbed the landscapes and lives of the surrounding neighborhoods. Haffner's wheatpastes use the shapes of local architecture (an abandoned gas station, the Cotton Mill stacks) as the backgrounds for his subtle scenes. "I feel like I'm always recording little moments. It doesn't need to be a single, groundbreaking event, it can just be the way a person hands someone a piece of paper or maybe some drugs or their phone number to get together later," he says.

Slaughter's field recordings were made on walks in the Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points at various moments throughout the night and day. "In certain pockets of these neighborhoods, there isn't very much of a difference between 2 o'clock in the morning and 2 o'clock in the afternoon," he says. A narrative, a kind of performance even, emerges while listening to the sounds of Slaughter's footsteps as he approaches the chatter of a bar or shuffles through the overgrowth along the Beltline.

Gilbert's video projections for "Convergent Frequencies" digest the surroundings in more abstract terms. Using fractured digital video that combines the movements of cellist Matt Jarrard and violinist Karyn Lu with images of Atlanta, Gilbert's videos simultaneously resemble distorted satellite television and evoke what he calls "the charged energy" between neighborhoods and cultures in the city.

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Haffner has a direct personal connection to the pop-up gallery's location. Ten years ago, the street artist moved to Atlanta and put up a wheatpaste on the now-demolished building that occupied the vacant corner at Krog and Irwin.

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Haffner's wheatpaste process sounds like a metaphor for "Convergent Frequencies" — a way to make art that is as much for the location as it is about the location. The project, along with other recent public works such as John Q's ''[http://clatl.com/atlanta/gay-atlanta-remembered/Content?oid=1431064|Memory Flash]'' and the Paper Twins' Beltline installation ''[http://clatl.com/culturesurfing/archives/2010/06/02/preview-paper-twins-beltline-project-behind-mint-gallery|The Wanderers]'', reflects the growing tendency among local artists to offer meditations on Atlanta's spaces.

On the front porch, the bottles are empty and the summer sky is now dark. The group's eager to get the shipping containers on the ground and find out what factors they haven't planned for or can't control. With public art Gilbert says, "At some point, you just have to admit that you can't predict what it's going to look like. That's actually really exciting — you haven't made all the decisions and decisions will be made for you." "
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Bridges, who speaks in a cultivated Southern accent that might belie her impeccable taste in contemporary art, lives just a few blocks from that vacant lot. "I drive by that corner about five times a day, every day, and it's just crying for something," she says. In between playful giggles, she continues, "Then God told me in a dream that we needed to have shipping containers." The dream, Bridges explains, was to build a gallery from the same containers that pass through the rail yards along DeKalb Avenue.

Late last spring, Bridges contacted Matt Gilbert, Matt Haffner, and Nat Slaughter, the artists now sitting on her porch, and they began collaborating. When "Convergent Frequencies" premieres Fri., Sept. 17, Haffner's narrative wheatpastes will adorn the containers' exteriors, while stereo systems inside them will play Slaughter's Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points field recordings. Gilbert will project videos onto a swath of an adjacent warehouse roughly the size of a small movie theater. Musicians from Oryx and Crake and dancers including Helen Hale of Dance Truck will perform on top of the containers. A food truck will sell hot dogs and refreshments. The entire art gallery will appear and disappear in a matter of days.

It's easy to believe that all this came from a dream.

"Convergent Frequencies" is the latest project from i45, a collective of galleries from Inman Park, the Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points. Bridges notes that the group, which includes Barbara Archer Gallery, Henley Studios, WM Turner Gallery, and Whitespace, doesn't do the "walks and talks" that have become the norm for Atlanta's gallery-driven neighborhoods. "We'd rather have happenings like this," she says.

Through distinctly varied mediums, Gilbert, Haffner, and Slaughter's works have absorbed the landscapes and lives of the surrounding neighborhoods. Haffner's wheatpastes use the shapes of local architecture (an abandoned gas station, the Cotton Mill stacks) as the backgrounds for his subtle scenes. "I feel like I'm always recording little moments. It doesn't need to be a single, groundbreaking event, it can just be the way a person hands someone a piece of paper or maybe some drugs or their phone number to get together later," he says.

Slaughter's field recordings were made on walks in the Old Fourth Ward and Little Five Points at various moments throughout the night and day. "In certain pockets of these neighborhoods, there isn't very much of a difference between 2 o'clock in the morning and 2 o'clock in the afternoon," he says. A narrative, a kind of performance even, emerges while listening to the sounds of Slaughter's footsteps as he approaches the chatter of a bar or shuffles through the overgrowth along the Beltline.

Gilbert's video projections for "Convergent Frequencies" digest the surroundings in more abstract terms. Using fractured digital video that combines the movements of cellist Matt Jarrard and violinist Karyn Lu with images of Atlanta, Gilbert's videos simultaneously resemble distorted satellite television and evoke what he calls "the charged energy" between neighborhoods and cultures in the city.

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Haffner has a direct personal connection to the pop-up gallery's location. Ten years ago, the street artist moved to Atlanta and put up a wheatpaste on the now-demolished building that occupied the vacant corner at Krog and Irwin.

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Haffner's wheatpaste process sounds like a metaphor for "Convergent Frequencies" — a way to make art that is as much for the location as it is about the location. The project, along with other recent public works such as John Q's Memory Flash and the Paper Twins' Beltline installation The Wanderers, reflects the growing tendency among local artists to offer meditations on Atlanta's spaces.

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Monday September 13, 2010 04:00 am EDT
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*Courtesy Marcia Wood
*Timothy McDowell


New work from some Atlanta's most talented opens this weekend. Ann-Marie Manker, Blake Beckham, and others deliver the goods. More after the jump."
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  • Courtesy Marcia Wood
  • Timothy McDowell



New work from some Atlanta's most talented opens this weekend. Ann-Marie Manker, Blake Beckham, and others deliver the goods. More after the jump.

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Although it came as no surprise to yours truly, the Atlanta Braves have relinquished their 99-day reservation atop the National League's Eastern Division—and it doesn't appear that they'll be reclaiming it anytime soon.

The team's ultimate descent can be attributed to a plethora of issues that have, until now, been nullified thanks to the team's overachieving All-Stars and surprisingly effective first-year contributors.

Omar Infante is a good singles hitter, Troy Glaus had a good month, Nate McLouth had a good game and Martin Prado isn't nearly as valuable of a No. 3 hitter as he was in the leadoff spot.

No longer is Jonny Venters the unhittable left-hander upon whom Bobby Cox can rely to come into a ballgame and shut the other team's best hitters down as he did earlier in the year.

Not to mention the injuries to pitcher Kris Medlen and Mr. Brave Chipper Jones, who would both be key contributors and nice pieces to have in the lineup this time of year.

Those realizations of player worth combined with the underwhelming trade acquisitions of Derrek Lee, Rick Ankiel and Kyle Farnsworth and the Phillies' summer-long ineptitude are no longer so easily swept under the rug and forgotten about.

Winners of 10 of their last 13 ballgames, the two-time defending NL Champion Philadelphia Phillies have seemingly remembered they are—making Atlanta's task of winning the NL East for the first time since 2005 even more challenging.

In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the Braves—losers of five of their last six games—miss the 2010 playoffs entirely. 

INSERT ARGUMENT HERE"
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[http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2010/08/27/dow-the-braves-rocky-mountain-meltdown-and-ultimate-fate|Although it came as no surprise to yours truly], the Atlanta Braves have relinquished their 99-day reservation atop the National League's Eastern Division—and it doesn't appear that they'll be reclaiming it anytime soon.

The team's ultimate descent can be attributed to a plethora of issues that have, until now, been nullified thanks to the team's overachieving All-Stars and surprisingly effective first-year contributors.

Omar Infante is a good singles hitter, Troy Glaus had a good month, Nate McLouth had a good game and Martin Prado isn't nearly as valuable of a No. 3 hitter as he was in the leadoff spot.

No longer is Jonny Venters the unhittable left-hander upon whom Bobby Cox can rely to come into a ballgame and shut the other team's best hitters down as he did earlier in the year.

Not to mention the injuries to pitcher [http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2010/07/22/braves-pitcher-kris-medlen-is-hiding-somethinguntil-now|Kris Medlen] and [http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2010/08/13/dowchipper-jones-the-end-of-an-era-and-old-guy-jokes|Mr. Brave Chipper Jones], who would both be key contributors and nice pieces to have in the lineup this time of year.

Those realizations of player worth combined with the underwhelming trade acquisitions of Derrek Lee, Rick Ankiel and Kyle Farnsworth and the Phillies' summer-long ineptitude are no longer so easily swept under the rug and forgotten about.

Winners of 10 of their last 13 ballgames, the two-time defending NL Champion Philadelphia Phillies have seemingly remembered they are—making Atlanta's task of winning the NL East for the first time since 2005 even more challenging.

In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the Braves—losers of five of their last six games—miss the 2010 playoffs entirely. 

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  string(1882) "       2010-09-08T17:47:00+00:00 Ben's Sports Take: Braves flounder, but fear not...it's football season   Ben Bussard 1435282 2010-09-08T17:47:00+00:00  Tweet 

Although it came as no surprise to yours truly, the Atlanta Braves have relinquished their 99-day reservation atop the National League's Eastern Division—and it doesn't appear that they'll be reclaiming it anytime soon.

The team's ultimate descent can be attributed to a plethora of issues that have, until now, been nullified thanks to the team's overachieving All-Stars and surprisingly effective first-year contributors.

Omar Infante is a good singles hitter, Troy Glaus had a good month, Nate McLouth had a good game and Martin Prado isn't nearly as valuable of a No. 3 hitter as he was in the leadoff spot.

No longer is Jonny Venters the unhittable left-hander upon whom Bobby Cox can rely to come into a ballgame and shut the other team's best hitters down as he did earlier in the year.

Not to mention the injuries to pitcher Kris Medlen and Mr. Brave Chipper Jones, who would both be key contributors and nice pieces to have in the lineup this time of year.

Those realizations of player worth combined with the underwhelming trade acquisitions of Derrek Lee, Rick Ankiel and Kyle Farnsworth and the Phillies' summer-long ineptitude are no longer so easily swept under the rug and forgotten about.

Winners of 10 of their last 13 ballgames, the two-time defending NL Champion Philadelphia Phillies have seemingly remembered they are—making Atlanta's task of winning the NL East for the first time since 2005 even more challenging.

In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the Braves—losers of five of their last six games—miss the 2010 playoffs entirely. 

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Article

Wednesday September 8, 2010 01:47 pm EDT

Tweet

Although it came as no surprise to yours truly, the Atlanta Braves have relinquished their 99-day reservation atop the National League's Eastern Division—and it doesn't appear that they'll be reclaiming it anytime soon.

The team's ultimate descent can be attributed to a plethora of issues that have, until now, been nullified thanks to the team's overachieving All-Stars and surprisingly...

| more...
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  string(7328) "Atlanta photographer and painter Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier almost became an artist ensconced in the wine-and-cheese museum crowd. But her career took a left turn, the artist choosing instead to work in small communities, mostly in the rural South, excavating the hidden local histories that often go overlooked.

Her current project, Mapping the Present Just Went By, at the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center in Madison, Ga., is part art installation, part archival research project and part community activism. With Madison resident Ollie Rivers acting as her guide to the local culture, Marshall-Linnemeier unearthed the story of Anna Charleston, among others. Charleston was a black slave whose children were fathered by John Orr, a white man. By all accounts, the relationship was mutual. Though not the norm, such relationships weren't unheard of.

Charleston's descendants still live in the area, and their story is covered in a short documentary shot and edited by Atlanta documentary filmmaker Taryn Lee Crenshaw. Another centerpiece of the exhibit is the "Agan," a large mass of fabric strips made by Marshall-Linnemeier and the residents of Madison. The names of black slaves discovered in the Madison town archives are sewn into the work, which is designed as a costume to be danced in.

The room is punctuated with the paintings of Madison artist Eugene Swain. They're made in a flat, illustrative folk style reminiscent of Benny Andrews, another Madison native son, and chronicle intimate scenes of Madison life, past and present.

These artifacts and art works combine to create a narrative of black Madison, a story all but invisible even in Madison itself. It's a thoroughly American story: The confrontation of races that's sometimes a dance and sometimes a battle, and the power of understanding ancestry through personal family histories. Here Marshall-Linnemeier and Rivers discuss the project.

Tell me about the genesis of this project.

Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier: The first project that I worked on like this started in 1989. It was in Mound Bayou, Miss. I was working on a collaborative project with Duke's Center for Documentary Studies, the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at Ole Miss — University of Mississippi, and Jackson State's Mass Communication Project. It was called Mississippi Self-Portrait. I had to travel all throughout the state of Mississippi meeting with African-American families, recording their stories. I wound up in a town in the Delta called Mound Bayou. It's the largest African-American town in the United States. I wound up there with restaurant owner Milburn Crowe, who had this amazing photographic collection. So he became a mentor.

That's the basis for the "Journey" projects. ... I would go in, and in the case of Mound Bayou, I photographed and came back with a series called Sanctuary. That is now at the High Museum; they have it in their permanent collection.

From there I went to use the same paradigm: I'm going to go into a community, going to meet folks, get a mentor, meet people in the community, talk to people, take photographs, develop a narrative, and put the exhibit up in the community. That's the key. So people would come.

Why are you interested in the South?

LML: I'm a GRITS — Girl Raised in the South. And it's where I'm very comfortable. I just love this region. I never tried to get away from it. I claim it. I think it has the most interesting history behind it. I think that in order to understand the fabric of America you really have to understand this really critical piece of cloth, which is the American South. If we can get the South figured out, then everything else falls into place.

Tell me about the issue of interracial relationships in early Southern history, which your project explores.

LML: Basically, it's like this stereotypical narrative that we're kind of taught, especially in terms of interracial relationships. The rape narrative. We can't get outside that rape narrative, we don't learn that people actually did have relationships during slavery, that there were some narratives that were outside of the norm. In fact quite a few of them, probably, were outside of that rape narrative. As is one case here in Madison where a white man lived with his African-American wife and refused to leave her. That narrative was repeated throughout the South. That there were often times white men had two families, a black family and a white family. African-Americans don't look like the colors of the rainbow for no reason. And rape was not always the case in many of these relationships. As is the case with Anna Charleston and John Orr, who fathered her daughter and five of her children.

Clearly, there was rape. I'm not trying to deny that, but in order to understand history you got to be able to bring in other components of it and other ways of looking at it, 'cause otherwise you just get this one-sided, monotone history. And I think that as people we're so much more complicated than that.

How has the project affected the community?

Ollie Rivers: Blacks in Morgan County didn't feel comfortable at the Cultural Center. Like, "I'm not going there." But when Lynn came with this project, it brought them all; it brought all the black people out. I've never seen so many black people at the Cultural Center ever. And we need the little ones to come up feeling like it's OK for them to be here. They have a right to come here just like anybody else.

You also did a project in Australia, Lynn. How was that different?

LML: The aboriginal community was real different because you're dealing with racism on a different kind of level. It's a racism that's based on skin color, but you're dealing with indigenous people. So that's one of the first things: This is their land. It would be very much like doing the same thing with the Native American community: You're on their land. So, some of the same dynamics were operating over there, interracial relationships are different in Australia than here. In Australia, at one point in time, the policy of the Australian government was to "white out" aboriginal people. So they were encouraging interracial relationships. They were encouraging them, because the idea was if they kept mixing then they would all be white.

OR: They didn't think they could all be black?

LML: They weren't trying to make them black, only white.

Tell me a little bit about the Reynoldstown project.

LML: This was 1993, '92? I couldn't get a soul to support me, except for the Reynoldstown Civic Improvement League. And they helped me out. Bought my own film, but they were very helpful in getting me into the community and getting me moving around in that community. And I'd done projects in Reynoldstown before. So it became real easy. And Borders of Faith was at Hughley Gallery, and it was the biggest crowd that they had had.

What does it mean to you now to work with the people in Madison?

LML: I'm coming in for a special purpose which is to look at these stories, to look at this community, and to move through this community. I'm on a journey. And I wanna learn through someone else what this place is about so that I can reinterpret or reimagine what I see. These are the people who are already here.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This story has been updated from its original version."
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Her current project, ''Mapping the Present Just Went By'', at the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center in Madison, Ga., is part art installation, part archival research project and part community activism. With Madison resident Ollie Rivers acting as her guide to the local culture, Marshall-Linnemeier unearthed the story of Anna Charleston, among others. Charleston was a black slave whose children were fathered by John Orr, a white man. By all accounts, the relationship was mutual. Though not the norm, such relationships weren't unheard of.

Charleston's descendants still live in the area, and their story is covered in a short documentary shot and edited by Atlanta documentary filmmaker Taryn Lee Crenshaw. Another centerpiece of the exhibit is the "Agan," a large mass of fabric strips made by Marshall-Linnemeier and the residents of Madison. The names of black slaves discovered in the Madison town archives are sewn into the work, which is designed as a costume to be danced in.

The room is punctuated with the paintings of Madison artist Eugene Swain. They're made in a flat, illustrative folk style reminiscent of Benny Andrews, another Madison native son, and chronicle intimate scenes of Madison life, past and present.

These artifacts and art works combine to create a narrative of black Madison, a story all but invisible even in Madison itself. It's a thoroughly American story: The confrontation of races that's sometimes a dance and sometimes a battle, and the power of understanding ancestry through personal family histories. Here Marshall-Linnemeier and Rivers discuss the project.

__Tell me about the genesis of this project.__

__Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier__: The first project that I worked on like this started in 1989. It was in Mound Bayou, Miss. I was working on a collaborative project with Duke's Center for Documentary Studies, the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at Ole Miss — University of Mississippi, and Jackson State's Mass Communication Project. It was called ''Mississippi Self-Portrait''. I had to travel all throughout the state of Mississippi meeting with African-American families, recording their stories. I wound up in a town in the Delta called Mound Bayou. It's the largest African-American town in the United States. I wound up there with [restaurant owner] Milburn Crowe, who had this amazing photographic collection. So he became a mentor.

That's the basis for the "Journey" projects. ... I would go in, and in the case of Mound Bayou, I photographed and came back with a series called ''Sanctuary''. That is now at the High Museum; they have it in their permanent collection.

From there I went to use the same paradigm: I'm going to go into a community, going to meet folks, get a mentor, meet people in the community, talk to people, take photographs, develop a narrative, and put the exhibit up in the community. That's the key. So people would come.

__Why are you interested in the South?__

__LML__: I'm a GRITS — Girl Raised in the South. And it's where I'm very comfortable. I just love this region. I never tried to get away from it. I claim it. I think it has the most interesting history behind it. I think that in order to understand the fabric of America you really have to understand this really critical piece of cloth, which is the American South. If we can get the South figured out, then everything else falls into place.

__Tell me about the issue of interracial relationships in early Southern history, which your project explores.__

__LML__: Basically, it's like this stereotypical narrative that we're kind of taught, especially in terms of interracial relationships. The rape narrative. We can't get outside that rape narrative, [we don't learn] that people actually did have relationships during slavery, that there were some narratives that were outside of the norm. In fact quite a few of them, probably, were outside of that rape narrative. As is [one] case here in Madison [where a white man] lived with his African-American wife and refused to leave her. That narrative was repeated throughout the South. That there were often times white men had two families, a black family and a white family. [African-Americans] don't look like the colors of the rainbow for no reason. And rape was not always the case in many of these relationships. As is the case with Anna Charleston and [John] Orr, who fathered her daughter and five of her children.

Clearly, there was rape. I'm not trying to [deny] that, but in order to understand history you got to be able to bring in other components of it and other ways of looking at it, 'cause otherwise you just get this one-sided, monotone history. And I think that as people we're so much more complicated than that.

__How has the project affected the community?__

__Ollie Rivers__: Blacks in Morgan County didn't feel comfortable [at the Cultural Center]. Like, "I'm not going there." But when Lynn came with this project, it brought them all; it brought all the black people out. I've never seen so many black people at the Cultural Center ever. And we need the little ones to come up feeling like it's OK for them to be here. They have a right to come here just like anybody else.

__You also did a project in Australia, Lynn. How was that different?__

__LML__: The aboriginal community was real different because you're dealing with racism on a different kind of level. It's a racism that's based on skin color, but you're dealing with indigenous people. So that's one of the first things: This is their land. It would be very much like doing the same thing with the Native American community: You're on their land. So, some of the same dynamics were operating over there, interracial relationships are different in Australia than here. In Australia, at one point in time, the policy of the Australian government was to "white out" aboriginal people. So they were encouraging interracial relationships. They were ''encouraging'' them, because the idea was if they kept mixing then they would all be white.

__OR__: They didn't think they could all be black?

__LML__: They weren't trying to make them black, only white.

__Tell me a little bit about the Reynoldstown project.__

__LML__: This was 1993, '92? I couldn't get a soul to support me, except for the Reynoldstown Civic Improvement League. And they helped me out. Bought my own film, but they were very helpful in getting me into the community and getting me moving around in that community. And I'd done projects in Reynoldstown before. So it became real easy. And ''Borders of Faith'' was at Hughley Gallery, and it was the biggest crowd that they had had.

__What does it mean to you now to work with the people in Madison?__

__LML__: I'm coming in for a special purpose which is to look at these stories, to look at this community, and to move through this community. I'm on a journey. And I wanna learn through someone else what this place is about so that I can reinterpret or reimagine what I see. These are the people who are already here.

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  string(7691) "    Mapping the Present Just Went By at the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center offers a community collage   2010-09-07T20:00:00+00:00 Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier pieces together hidden local histories   Cinque Hicks 1306447 2010-09-07T20:00:00+00:00  Atlanta photographer and painter Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier almost became an artist ensconced in the wine-and-cheese museum crowd. But her career took a left turn, the artist choosing instead to work in small communities, mostly in the rural South, excavating the hidden local histories that often go overlooked.

Her current project, Mapping the Present Just Went By, at the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center in Madison, Ga., is part art installation, part archival research project and part community activism. With Madison resident Ollie Rivers acting as her guide to the local culture, Marshall-Linnemeier unearthed the story of Anna Charleston, among others. Charleston was a black slave whose children were fathered by John Orr, a white man. By all accounts, the relationship was mutual. Though not the norm, such relationships weren't unheard of.

Charleston's descendants still live in the area, and their story is covered in a short documentary shot and edited by Atlanta documentary filmmaker Taryn Lee Crenshaw. Another centerpiece of the exhibit is the "Agan," a large mass of fabric strips made by Marshall-Linnemeier and the residents of Madison. The names of black slaves discovered in the Madison town archives are sewn into the work, which is designed as a costume to be danced in.

The room is punctuated with the paintings of Madison artist Eugene Swain. They're made in a flat, illustrative folk style reminiscent of Benny Andrews, another Madison native son, and chronicle intimate scenes of Madison life, past and present.

These artifacts and art works combine to create a narrative of black Madison, a story all but invisible even in Madison itself. It's a thoroughly American story: The confrontation of races that's sometimes a dance and sometimes a battle, and the power of understanding ancestry through personal family histories. Here Marshall-Linnemeier and Rivers discuss the project.

Tell me about the genesis of this project.

Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier: The first project that I worked on like this started in 1989. It was in Mound Bayou, Miss. I was working on a collaborative project with Duke's Center for Documentary Studies, the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at Ole Miss — University of Mississippi, and Jackson State's Mass Communication Project. It was called Mississippi Self-Portrait. I had to travel all throughout the state of Mississippi meeting with African-American families, recording their stories. I wound up in a town in the Delta called Mound Bayou. It's the largest African-American town in the United States. I wound up there with restaurant owner Milburn Crowe, who had this amazing photographic collection. So he became a mentor.

That's the basis for the "Journey" projects. ... I would go in, and in the case of Mound Bayou, I photographed and came back with a series called Sanctuary. That is now at the High Museum; they have it in their permanent collection.

From there I went to use the same paradigm: I'm going to go into a community, going to meet folks, get a mentor, meet people in the community, talk to people, take photographs, develop a narrative, and put the exhibit up in the community. That's the key. So people would come.

Why are you interested in the South?

LML: I'm a GRITS — Girl Raised in the South. And it's where I'm very comfortable. I just love this region. I never tried to get away from it. I claim it. I think it has the most interesting history behind it. I think that in order to understand the fabric of America you really have to understand this really critical piece of cloth, which is the American South. If we can get the South figured out, then everything else falls into place.

Tell me about the issue of interracial relationships in early Southern history, which your project explores.

LML: Basically, it's like this stereotypical narrative that we're kind of taught, especially in terms of interracial relationships. The rape narrative. We can't get outside that rape narrative, we don't learn that people actually did have relationships during slavery, that there were some narratives that were outside of the norm. In fact quite a few of them, probably, were outside of that rape narrative. As is one case here in Madison where a white man lived with his African-American wife and refused to leave her. That narrative was repeated throughout the South. That there were often times white men had two families, a black family and a white family. African-Americans don't look like the colors of the rainbow for no reason. And rape was not always the case in many of these relationships. As is the case with Anna Charleston and John Orr, who fathered her daughter and five of her children.

Clearly, there was rape. I'm not trying to deny that, but in order to understand history you got to be able to bring in other components of it and other ways of looking at it, 'cause otherwise you just get this one-sided, monotone history. And I think that as people we're so much more complicated than that.

How has the project affected the community?

Ollie Rivers: Blacks in Morgan County didn't feel comfortable at the Cultural Center. Like, "I'm not going there." But when Lynn came with this project, it brought them all; it brought all the black people out. I've never seen so many black people at the Cultural Center ever. And we need the little ones to come up feeling like it's OK for them to be here. They have a right to come here just like anybody else.

You also did a project in Australia, Lynn. How was that different?

LML: The aboriginal community was real different because you're dealing with racism on a different kind of level. It's a racism that's based on skin color, but you're dealing with indigenous people. So that's one of the first things: This is their land. It would be very much like doing the same thing with the Native American community: You're on their land. So, some of the same dynamics were operating over there, interracial relationships are different in Australia than here. In Australia, at one point in time, the policy of the Australian government was to "white out" aboriginal people. So they were encouraging interracial relationships. They were encouraging them, because the idea was if they kept mixing then they would all be white.

OR: They didn't think they could all be black?

LML: They weren't trying to make them black, only white.

Tell me a little bit about the Reynoldstown project.

LML: This was 1993, '92? I couldn't get a soul to support me, except for the Reynoldstown Civic Improvement League. And they helped me out. Bought my own film, but they were very helpful in getting me into the community and getting me moving around in that community. And I'd done projects in Reynoldstown before. So it became real easy. And Borders of Faith was at Hughley Gallery, and it was the biggest crowd that they had had.

What does it mean to you now to work with the people in Madison?

LML: I'm coming in for a special purpose which is to look at these stories, to look at this community, and to move through this community. I'm on a journey. And I wanna learn through someone else what this place is about so that I can reinterpret or reimagine what I see. These are the people who are already here.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This story has been updated from its original version.             13054864 2077981                          Lynn Marshall-Linnemeier pieces together hidden local histories "
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Karen Hilton is a fixture of Atlanta's underground comedy scene. Years ago, she was simply one of Atlanta's biggest comedy supporters, attending any and every local room around, lending her laughter to the performers. Eventually though, Hilton worked up the moxie to go from the seats in the crowd to spotlight on stage, and it's a good thing she did. After getting her start at the Relapse Theatre, Hilton has developed a hilariously dry, understated sense of humor coupled with an intelligence that has a dark side of its own. She still shows up regularly to support as many local shows as possible, only now audiences are occassionally lucky enough to see her perform as well.

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Tuesday September 7, 2010 12:56 pm EDT



Karen Hilton is a fixture of Atlanta's underground comedy scene. Years ago, she was simply one of Atlanta's biggest comedy supporters, attending any and every local room around, lending her laughter to the performers. Eventually though, Hilton worked up the moxie to go from the seats in the crowd to spotlight on stage, and it's a good thing she did. After getting her start at the Relapse...

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*Joeff Davis
*


Atlanta, meet the comedic ball of energy that is Eric Andre. On Saturday night he will be headlining at Comedy Gold, but today he came into CL for Another Comedy Podcast where we discussed his lack of acting skills, how black-nerd comedy became a genre, and why he doesn't do dick jokes anymore. Take a ride into the very strange and entertaining fro-hawked mind of Eric Andre. P.S. - He still tells a lot of dick jokes.

Download now or listen after the jump.

Subscribe to the ACP feed to download each new episode automatically."
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*Joeff Davis
*


Atlanta, meet the comedic ball of energy that is __[http://ericandre.com|Eric Andre]__. On Saturday night he will be headlining at [http://atlantacomedygold.com|Comedy Gold], but today he came into __CL__ for [http://clatl.com/acp|Another Comedy Podcast] where we discussed his lack of acting skills, how black-nerd comedy became a genre, and why he doesn't do dick jokes anymore. Take a ride into the very strange and entertaining fro-hawked mind of Eric Andre. P.S. - He still tells a lot of dick jokes.

[http://clatl.com/media/content/2064574/acp-eric-andre.mp3|Download now] or listen after the jump.

''Subscribe to the [http://feeds.clatl.com/clatl_anothercomedypodcast|ACP feed] to download each new episode automatically.''"
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*Joeff Davis
*


Atlanta, meet the comedic ball of energy that is Eric Andre. On Saturday night he will be headlining at Comedy Gold, but today he came into CL for Another Comedy Podcast where we discussed his lack of acting skills, how black-nerd comedy became a genre, and why he doesn't do dick jokes anymore. Take a ride into the very strange and entertaining fro-hawked mind of Eric Andre. P.S. - He still tells a lot of dick jokes.

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Friday September 3, 2010 12:00 pm EDT

  • Joeff Davis



Atlanta, meet the comedic ball of energy that is Eric Andre. On Saturday night he will be headlining at Comedy Gold, but today he came into CL for Another Comedy Podcast where we discussed his lack of acting skills, how black-nerd comedy became a genre, and why he doesn't do dick jokes anymore. Take a ride into the very strange and entertaining fro-hawked mind of Eric Andre....

| more...
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*
*Johnny Waggener

"Experimental Writers" and "Great American Novelists" mix in Decatur while Cornbred gallery serves up ribs and a solo show. Details after the jump."
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"Experimental Writers" and "Great American Novelists" mix in Decatur while Cornbred gallery serves up ribs and a solo show. Details after the jump.             13054783 2064501                          Weekend Arts Agenda September 03 2010 "
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Article

Friday September 3, 2010 10:05 am EDT

  • Johnny Waggener


"Experimental Writers" and "Great American Novelists" mix in Decatur while Cornbred gallery serves up ribs and a solo show. Details after the jump.

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In 1991, the erstwhile Atlanta College of Art unleashed a pair of game-changing artists into the wider art world: painter and sculptor Radcliffe Bailey and printmaker Kara Walker.



It quickly became a tale of two artists: Both received significant critical attention from the local arts press. Both maintained a full calendar of exhibitions in the city, including representation in the following year's biennial at the Nexus Contemporary Art Center (now the Contemporary). But ultimately their paths diverged: Walker left. Bailey stayed.



For those unfamiliar with the tonier provinces of Artworld-istan, both artists are international successes. Walker is a staple on the global biennial circuit, and Bailey will soon be the subject of a major midcareer retrospective at the High Museum. Both can and do write their own tickets in a world where artists are usually forced to choose between being exploited and being ignored.



Despite the worldwide kudos, those of us who spend our time blowing on the embers of Atlanta's cultural scene are tempted to see in these two artists both a success and a failure: Bailey represents the city's success in holding on to a major cultural figure, and Walker represents our failure to catch that lightning in the same bottle.

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In 1991, the erstwhile Atlanta College of Art unleashed a pair of game-changing artists into the wider art world: painter and sculptor [http://www.solomonprojects.com/artistpage/bailey/index.html|Radcliffe Bailey] and printmaker [http://learn.walkerart.org/karawalker|Kara Walker].



It quickly became a tale of two artists: Both received significant critical attention from the local arts press. Both maintained a full calendar of exhibitions in the city, including representation in the following year's biennial at the Nexus Contemporary Art Center (now the Contemporary). But ultimately their paths diverged: Walker left. Bailey stayed.



For those unfamiliar with the tonier provinces of Artworld-istan, both artists are international successes. Walker is a staple on the global biennial circuit, and Bailey will soon be the subject of a major midcareer retrospective at the High Museum. Both can and do write their own tickets in a world where artists are usually forced to choose between being exploited and being ignored.



Despite the worldwide kudos, those of us who spend our time blowing on the embers of Atlanta's cultural scene are tempted to see in these two artists both a success and a failure: Bailey represents the city's success in holding on to a major cultural figure, and Walker represents our failure to catch that lightning in the same bottle.

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Thursday September 2, 2010 03:30 pm EDT
Atlanta's no New York - and that's a good thing | more...
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Thursday September 2, 2010 04:05 am EDT
Eight of Atlanta's most interesting talents to follow this fall | more...
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  string(2880) "Ann-Marie Manker is among the busiest artists in Atlanta. Aside from teaching at SCAD and directing the new Kibbee Gallery, her drawings and paintings showed at the Roq la Rue Gallery in Seattle earlier this summer, and are currently on view at the National Museum for Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. And all this while she works on a new body of work for Whitespace Gallery called Softcore War, opening Sept. 10. Being busy isn't a problem for Manker, though. "Busy lately?" she laughs. "I've been busier."

Manker's problem, she says, is her obsession with matching colors. The exterior paint of her Cabbagetown house has been matched to the hue of her favorite Avon travel bag. Inside, repainted furniture matches the shades on the walls. "I have the urge to match my shoes to my shirt, everything," she says. "You know, it's not cool to be matching like that all the time."

If the obsession wreaks havoc in her personal life, though, it does the opposite for her paintings. In Softcore War, Manker uses a palette of pale blues and pinks, black and beige to create consistency throughout her panels. The fantastical landscapes are populated with wrecked cars covered in a substance that could be snow or cake frosting, ominous caves in cheerful colors, and roadblocks of swans. A young woman poses throughout, holding an Uzi with a birthday candle barrel or covering her face with a veil of frilly underwear.

Manker began working on these paintings after reading about the role of female suicide bombers in Afghanistan. "I've never been to Afghanistan," she says. "They're fantasies."

Manker compiles a file of images before she starts working on a painting — a photo she's taken of a hired model, maybe a still from an animated movie, a clipping from the newspaper, and so on. "I'm more connected with these things that have happened in my life being an artist in the West, but I'm addressing this subject that's affecting all of us."

The result is visually clear but conceptually complex, simultaneously suggesting Western notions of female adolescence, the trope of the femme fatale, and the ongoing war in Afghanistan. "Unfortunately, I'm a very sensitive person. I can't even watch TV or the news; it will make me too emotional. I have to self-protect," Manker says. "It's bringing it up, but bringing it up in an Ann-Marie-safe way. It's not my goal to be direct."

Few artists are working from as many sides of Atlanta's art world right now: bringing fresh curatorial focus to a burgeoning gallery, showing work that's demanding attention in and out of town, and instructing the next generation of artists. Manker takes her accomplishments in stride, saying her many roles usually just blend into one another, all part of the same general project, until it comes time to produce a body of paintings like Softcore War. "I need the summers for that," she says."
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Manker's problem, she says, is her obsession with matching colors. The exterior paint of her Cabbagetown house has been matched to the hue of her favorite Avon travel bag. Inside, repainted furniture matches the shades on the walls. "I have the urge to match my shoes to my shirt, everything," she says. "You know, it's not cool to be matching like that all the time."

If the obsession wreaks havoc in her personal life, though, it does the opposite for her paintings. In ''Softcore War'', Manker uses a palette of pale blues and pinks, black and beige to create consistency throughout her panels. The fantastical landscapes are populated with wrecked cars covered in a substance that could be snow or cake frosting, ominous caves in cheerful colors, and roadblocks of swans. A young woman poses throughout, holding an Uzi with a birthday candle barrel or covering her face with a veil of frilly underwear.

Manker began working on these paintings after reading about the role of female suicide bombers in Afghanistan. "I've never been to Afghanistan," she says. "They're fantasies."

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  string(3158) "       2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00 Cover Story - Ann-Marie Manker paints bright fantasies of dark times   Wyatt Williams 1306426 2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00  Ann-Marie Manker is among the busiest artists in Atlanta. Aside from teaching at SCAD and directing the new Kibbee Gallery, her drawings and paintings showed at the Roq la Rue Gallery in Seattle earlier this summer, and are currently on view at the National Museum for Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. And all this while she works on a new body of work for Whitespace Gallery called Softcore War, opening Sept. 10. Being busy isn't a problem for Manker, though. "Busy lately?" she laughs. "I've been busier."

Manker's problem, she says, is her obsession with matching colors. The exterior paint of her Cabbagetown house has been matched to the hue of her favorite Avon travel bag. Inside, repainted furniture matches the shades on the walls. "I have the urge to match my shoes to my shirt, everything," she says. "You know, it's not cool to be matching like that all the time."

If the obsession wreaks havoc in her personal life, though, it does the opposite for her paintings. In Softcore War, Manker uses a palette of pale blues and pinks, black and beige to create consistency throughout her panels. The fantastical landscapes are populated with wrecked cars covered in a substance that could be snow or cake frosting, ominous caves in cheerful colors, and roadblocks of swans. A young woman poses throughout, holding an Uzi with a birthday candle barrel or covering her face with a veil of frilly underwear.

Manker began working on these paintings after reading about the role of female suicide bombers in Afghanistan. "I've never been to Afghanistan," she says. "They're fantasies."

Manker compiles a file of images before she starts working on a painting — a photo she's taken of a hired model, maybe a still from an animated movie, a clipping from the newspaper, and so on. "I'm more connected with these things that have happened in my life being an artist in the West, but I'm addressing this subject that's affecting all of us."

The result is visually clear but conceptually complex, simultaneously suggesting Western notions of female adolescence, the trope of the femme fatale, and the ongoing war in Afghanistan. "Unfortunately, I'm a very sensitive person. I can't even watch TV or the news; it will make me too emotional. I have to self-protect," Manker says. "It's bringing it up, but bringing it up in an Ann-Marie-safe way. It's not my goal to be direct."

Few artists are working from as many sides of Atlanta's art world right now: bringing fresh curatorial focus to a burgeoning gallery, showing work that's demanding attention in and out of town, and instructing the next generation of artists. Manker takes her accomplishments in stride, saying her many roles usually just blend into one another, all part of the same general project, until it comes time to produce a body of paintings like Softcore War. "I need the summers for that," she says.             13054751 2056590                          Cover Story - Ann-Marie Manker paints bright fantasies of dark times "
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Article

Thursday September 2, 2010 04:00 am EDT
Ann-Marie Manker is among the busiest artists in Atlanta. Aside from teaching at SCAD and directing the new Kibbee Gallery, her drawings and paintings showed at the Roq la Rue Gallery in Seattle earlier this summer, and are currently on view at the National Museum for Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. And all this while she works on a new body of work for Whitespace Gallery called Softcore... | more...
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  string(50) "Best bets for plays, exhibits, film fests and more"
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  string(11425) "BOOKS

ATLANTA QUEER LITERARY FESTIVAL Fourth annual event will feature open mic events, panel discussions, readings and book signings around town. Oct. 13-16. atlqueerlitfest.blogspot.com.

CHUCK KLOSTERMAN Chances are you've never met Klosterman, but if you've read his collections of essays and nonfiction, you know what it would be like to drive cross country in a rented Ford Taurus searching for the house where Kurt Cobain killed himself or hang out with the members of a Guns 'n Roses cover band. Few writers are as capable of parsing the schizophrenic nonsense of pop culture with such clear and confessional insight. Free. Thurs., Oct. 7. 6:30-8 p.m. SCAD Atlanta, 1600 Peachtree St. www.acappellabooks.com.

DECATUR BOOK FESTIVAL The festival showcases fresh voices of contemporary Southern authors. See more here.

NATASHA TRETHEWEY Pulitzer prize-winning poet and Emory professor latest work, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf, explores her and her family's (they're from Mississippi) post-storm experiences. Free. Sun., Sept. 5. 1:15 p.m. Decatur Book Festival, First Baptist Decatur Carreker Hall Stage, East Ponce de Leon Avenue and Church Street, Decatur. www.decaturbookfestival.com. Thurs., Oct. 28. 4 p.m. Cave Canem reading with poet Kyle Dargan. Spelman College, Cosby Academic Center Auditorium, 350 Spelman Lane. www.spelman.edu.

POETRY ATLANTA NIGHT Conquering Venus author Colin Kelly hosts an evening of local poets including JC Reilly, Eve Hoffman, Bob Wood, Ann Lynn and Jenny Sadre-Orafai reading their latest works. Thurs., Sept. 30. 7:15 p.m. Decatur Public Library, 215 Sycamore St. 404-370-8450. www.georgiacenterforthebook.org.

RICHARD BAUSCH Bausch is no less than a contemporary master of the short story. A Georgia-born writer of precise ear and profound economy (he whittled his first short story from the shape of an 800-page manuscript), Bausch continues his much celebrated and awarded career with his latest collection, Something is Out There. Free. Mon., Nov. 15. 6:30 p.m. Joseph W. Jones Room, 311 Woodruff Library, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Road. www.creativewriting.emory.edu.

WILLIAM GIBSON The legendary science-fiction writer defined the cyberpunk aesthetic with his 1984 debut novel, Neuromancer, a fluorescent trip through a place he called "cyberspace." He'll discuss past accomplishments and latest novel, Zero History. Free. Mon., Sept. 20. 6:30-8 p.m. SCAD Atlanta, 1600 Peachtree St. www.acappellabooks.com.

DANCE

AMERICAN MUSCLE A dance concert and live music performance party "about the will, wild and wonder of America" by choreographer Blake Beckham and musical director Stephen Wood. $12. Thurs., Sept. 11. 8 p.m. Eyedrum, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive S.E. www.eyedrum.org.

BLACKBIRD Brooks and Company Dance's multimedia dance theater performance centers on the $36 billion dollar-per-year industry of commercial child trafficking and sexual exploitation, a large part of which takes place in Atlanta. Nov. 12-14. Balzer Theater at Herren's, 84 Luckie St. 678-528-1500. www.brooksandcompanydance.org.

CORAZON ABRIENDO (HEART OPENING) CORE celebrates its 30th anniversary season this year with programming that includes a restaging of Corazon Abriendo, a multimedia performance based on Mayan weaving traditions. November 19-20. 8 p.m. Balzer Theater at Herren's, 84 Luckie St. 678-528-1500. www.severaldancerscore.org.

IDEAS AT GARDENHOUSE DANCE Garden House Dance director Nicole Livieratos' most recent work includes video, a dance collaboration with Patricia Henrtize, and a piece "investigating night-time monkey brain." Free. Sat.-Sun., Sept. 18-19. 4 p.m. Gardenhouse Studio, 2752 E. Ponce de Leon Ave., Suite A, Decatur. www.gardenhousedance.org.

LUMINOCITY Lauri Stallings' next major performance will be the "largest site-specific art work both for gloATL and the city of Atlanta." Lumincoity will include 11 site-specific performances throughout downtown. Nov. 26-Dec. 11. www.gloatl.com.

MOULIN ROUGE – THE BALLET Atlanta Ballet channels the famed Parisian cabaret and its high-kicking Cancan dancers for its season opener. Oct. 22-31. $20. Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, 2800 Cobb Galleria Parkway. 800-982-2787. www.atlantaballet.com.

STAIBDANCE, VEGA STRING QUARTET AND WILLIAM RANSOM: IN CONCERT Contemporary dance paired with classical and neo-classical music from artistic director and Emory dance program faculty George Staib, and Emory's Vega String Quartet. Sept. 23-25. $10-$25. Schwartz Center for Performing Arts, Dance Studio, 1700 N. Decatur Road. 404-727-5050. www.arts.emory.edu.

FILM

DRIVE INVASION Annual rock 'n' roll movie extravaganza moves from the hot and crowded labor day weekend to a new October date. Oct. 10. Starlight Six Drive-In Theatre, 2000 Moreland Ave. 404-627-5786. www.starlightdrivein.com.

LATIN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL 25th annual festival featuring 15 contemporary films outstanding recent films from Argentina Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Uruguay. Sept. 25-Oct. 30. $6-$7. 8 p.m. High Museum of Art, Rich Theatre, 1280 Peachtree St. www.high.org.

OUT ON FILM The annual GLBTQ "celebrating PRIDE at the movies" enters its 23rd year. Oct. 1-7. Landmark Midtown Art Cinema, 931 Monroe Circle; Ansley Park Playhouse, 1545 Peachtree St. www.outonfilm.org.

THEATER

THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF A SQUIRREL The Lawrenceville playhouse's black box space hosts Daniel May in this off-beat sounding monologue play, which touches on themes such as microbiology and anti-Semiticism. Sept. 16-Oct. 3. $15. Thurs.–Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Aurora Theatre, 128 Pike St., Lawrenceville. 678-226-6222. www.auroratheatre.com.

page
LOBBY HERO For its second production, young Atlanta company Pinch 'n' Ouch Theatre stages this acclaimed tale of a young security guard who becomes involved in a murder in his building. Playwright Kenneth Lonergan wrote and directed the terrific little film You Can Count On Me. Nov. 3-28. $15-$30. Wed.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Pinch 'n' Ouch Theatre, 14th Street Playhouse, 173 14th St. 404-733-4738. www.pnotheatre.com.

THE NACIREMA SOCIETY REQUESTS THE HONOR OF YOUR PRESENCE AT A CELEBRATION OF THEIR FIRST ONE HUNDRED YEARS Acclaimed Atlanta novelist/playwright Pearl Cleage returns with a world premiere comedy about the African-American debutantes and organizers who encounter surprises at a major social function in Montgomery, Ala. Directed by Alliance Theatre artistic director Susan V. Booth. Oct. 20-Nov. 14. $20-$40. Wed.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-4650. www.alliancetheatre.org.

NIGHT BLOOMS This world premiere by Margaret Baldwin follows two families, one black, one white, in Selma, Ala., in 1965. Featuring Lala Cochran, Jill Jane Clements and Tom Thon. Sept. 24-Oct. 24. $20-$30. Horizon Theatre, 1083 Austin Ave. 404-584-7450. www.horizontheatre.com.

THE ODYSSEY: A JOURNEY HOME Joe Knezevich plays Homer's heroic castaway who contends with nymphs, witches, monsters and rival suitors in his long quest to reunite with his wife Penelope (Tess Malis Kincaid). Oct. 7-31. $15-$50. Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. Georgia Shakespeare, 4484 Peachtree Road. 404-264-0020. www.gashakespeare.org.

TWIST The Alliance Theatre opens its 42nd season with the musical Twist, but don't get out your old Chubby Checkers records. This new musical offers a fresh spin on the tale of Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, and the title Oliver! was obviously taken. With a book by The Wiz author William F. Brown and music and lyrics from Grammy-winner Tena Clark, Twist relocates the hapless orphan to 1928 New Orleans. Twist will be directed and choreographed by Debbie Allen, renowned for Fame and previous collaborations with the Alliance Theatre. Through Oct. 3. $25-$45. Tues.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-4650. www.alliancetheatre.org.

VISUAL ARTS

ATLANTA CELEBRATES PHOTOGRAPHY October means Atlanta Celebrates Photography. The 2010 edition features more than 150 photography events, including exhibits, lectures and an art auction. Prices and locations vary. www.acpinfo.org.

CONVERGENT FREQUENCIES i45 collective, which includes Barbara Archer Gallery, Henley Studios, Whitespace Gallery, and Wm Turner Gallery, presents another site-specific ArtBox installation at the intersection of Krog Street and Irwin Street/Lake Avenue from artists Matt Gilbert, Nat Slaughter and Matt Haffner. Fri.-Sun., Sept. 17-19. 6 p.m.-midnight; live performance Sat., 9 p.m.

CONVERSATIONS WITH CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS: JEFF KOONS Artist discusses the influence of Salvador Dalí on his work. Oct. 5. 7 p.m. High Museum of Art, Sifly Piazza, 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-5000. www.high.org.

DISCURSIVE DOCUMENTS: PERFORMING THE CATALOGUE A meditation by art collective John Q's (Joey Orr, Andy Ditzler and Wesley Chenault) on cataloguing and preservation beyond the printed format. Oct. 2-Jan. 8. Opens Sat., Oct., 2. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free-$5. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. MOCA GA, Education/Resource Center, 75 Bennett St. 404-367-8700. www.mocaga.org.

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE A group show featuring Jennifer Cawley, Zuzka Vaclavik and Cara Enteles, looks to be a sincerely cool endeavor into the fantastical that delves beyond Lewis Carroll. Through Oct. 23. Free. Opens Fri., Sept. 10, 7-10 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Emily Amy Gallery, 1000 Marietta St., Suite 208. 404- 877-5626. www.emilyamygallery.com.

EMANATE CAR SHOW Oakland-based artist Veronica de Jesus is bringing the automotive love with Emanate Care Show, a gathering of dreamy drawings and paintings. Through Jan. 8. Free. Opens, Sat. Nov. 20, 7-11 p.m. Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Get This! Gallery, 662 11th St. 678-596-4451. www.getthisgallery.com.

JOE TSAMBIRAS AND JASON BUTCHER This is a local art power duo if there ever was one. You could lose yourself for days in Tsambiras and Butcher's exciting, mind-boggling work. Through Dec. 5. Free. Opens Sat., Nov. 13. 7-11 p.m.; Wed., Fri. and Sat., noon-6 p.m.; Thurs. 1-6 p.m. Beep Beep Gallery, 696 Charles Allen Drive. 404-313-5722. www.beepbeepgallery.com.

KNOCK ON WOOD Folklore and emblems of luck are on the menu at Knock on Wood, the collection of 50 paintings and drawings by Sanithna Phansavanh. Through Oct. 26. Opens Sept. 11, 7-11 p.m. Free. Sun.-Thurs., noon-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., noon-9 p.m. Young Blood Gallery and Boutique. 636 N. Highland Ave. 404-254-4127. youngbloodgallery.com.

O' SAY CAN YOU SEE Laura Poitras breaks through tired 9/11 art clichés by mixing Ground Zero imagery with audio from the Yankees come-from-behind World Series victory in October 2001. Through Dec. 12. Opens Oct. 9, 6-10 p.m. $5. Tues.-Wed. and Fri-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thurs., 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, 535 Means St. 404-688-1970. thecontemporary.org.

PULL Under the wing of master printer Timothy McDowell this summer, artists Kim Anno, Kate Javens, Joanne Mattera, Don Pollack, Katherine Taylor and McDowell created a series of intaglio prints exhibited here in a portfolio edition. Show runs alongside McDowell's solo painting exhibition Kingdom Come. Through Oct. 6. Opens Sat., Sept. 11. 6-9 p.m. Free. Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Marcia Wood Gallery, 263 Walker St. 404-827-0030. www.marciawoodgallery.com."
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__ATLANTA QUEER LITERARY FESTIVAL__ Fourth annual event will feature open mic events, panel discussions, readings and book signings around town. Oct. 13-16. [http://atlqueerlitfest.blogspot.com/|atlqueerlitfest.blogspot.com].

__CHUCK KLOSTERMAN__ Chances are you've never met Klosterman, but if you've read his collections of essays and nonfiction, you know what it would be like to drive cross country in a rented Ford Taurus searching for the house where Kurt Cobain killed himself or hang out with the members of a Guns 'n Roses cover band. Few writers are as capable of parsing the schizophrenic nonsense of pop culture with such clear and confessional insight. Free. Thurs., Oct. 7. 6:30-8 p.m. SCAD Atlanta, 1600 Peachtree St. [http://www.acappellabooks.com/|www.acappellabooks.com].

__DECATUR BOOK FESTIVAL__ The festival showcases fresh voices of contemporary Southern authors. [http://clatl.com/atlanta/good-southern-lit-at-decatur-book-festival/Content?oid=2047949|See more here].

__NATASHA TRETHEWEY__ Pulitzer prize-winning poet and Emory professor latest work, ''Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf'', explores her and her family's (they're from Mississippi) post-storm experiences. Free. Sun., Sept. 5. 1:15 p.m. Decatur Book Festival, First Baptist Decatur Carreker Hall Stage, East Ponce de Leon Avenue and Church Street, Decatur. [http://www.decaturbookfestival.com/|www.decaturbookfestival.com]. Thurs., Oct. 28. 4 p.m. Cave Canem reading with poet Kyle Dargan. Spelman College, Cosby Academic Center Auditorium, 350 Spelman Lane. [http://www.spelman.edu/|www.spelman.edu].

__POETRY ATLANTA NIGHT__ ''Conquering Venus'' author Colin Kelly hosts an evening of local poets including JC Reilly, Eve Hoffman, Bob Wood, Ann Lynn and Jenny Sadre-Orafai reading their latest works. Thurs., Sept. 30. 7:15 p.m. Decatur Public Library, 215 Sycamore St. 404-370-8450. [http://www.georgiacenterforthebook.org/|www.georgiacenterforthebook.org].

__RICHARD BAUSCH__ Bausch is no less than a contemporary master of the short story. A Georgia-born writer of precise ear and profound economy (he whittled his first short story from the shape of an 800-page manuscript), Bausch continues his much celebrated and awarded career with his latest collection, ''Something is Out There''. Free. Mon., Nov. 15. 6:30 p.m. Joseph W. Jones Room, 311 Woodruff Library, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Road. [http://www.creativewriting.emory.edu/|www.creativewriting.emory.edu].

__WILLIAM GIBSON__ The legendary science-fiction writer defined the cyberpunk aesthetic with his 1984 debut novel, ''Neuromancer'', a fluorescent trip through a place he called "cyberspace." He'll discuss past accomplishments and latest novel, ''Zero History''. Free. Mon., Sept. 20. 6:30-8 p.m. SCAD Atlanta, 1600 Peachtree St. [http://www.acappellabooks.com/|www.acappellabooks.com].

DANCE

__''AMERICAN MUSCLE''__ A dance concert and live music performance party "about the will, wild and wonder of America" by choreographer Blake Beckham and musical director Stephen Wood. $12. Thurs., Sept. 11. 8 p.m. Eyedrum, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive S.E. [http://www.eyedrum.org/|www.eyedrum.org].

__''BLACKBIRD''__ Brooks and Company Dance's multimedia dance theater performance centers on the $36 billion dollar-per-year industry of commercial child trafficking and sexual exploitation, a large part of which takes place in Atlanta. Nov. 12-14. Balzer Theater at Herren's, 84 Luckie St. 678-528-1500. [http://www.brooksandcompanydance.org/|www.brooksandcompanydance.org].

__''CORAZON ABRIENDO (HEART OPENING)''__ CORE celebrates its 30th anniversary season this year with programming that includes a restaging of ''Corazon Abriendo'', a multimedia performance based on Mayan weaving traditions. November 19-20. 8 p.m. Balzer Theater at Herren's, 84 Luckie St. 678-528-1500. [http://www.severaldancerscore.org/|www.severaldancerscore.org].

__''IDEAS AT GARDENHOUSE DANCE''__ Garden House Dance director Nicole Livieratos' most recent work includes video, a dance collaboration with Patricia Henrtize, and a piece "investigating night-time monkey brain." Free. Sat.-Sun., Sept. 18-19. 4 p.m. Gardenhouse Studio, 2752 E. Ponce de Leon Ave., Suite A, Decatur. [http://www.gardenhousedance.org/|www.gardenhousedance.org].

__''LUMINOCITY''__ Lauri Stallings' next major performance will be the "largest site-specific art work both for gloATL and the city of Atlanta." ''Lumincoity'' will include 11 site-specific performances throughout downtown. Nov. 26-Dec. 11. [http://www.gloatl.com/|www.gloatl.com].

__''MOULIN ROUGE – THE BALLET''__ Atlanta Ballet channels the famed Parisian cabaret and its high-kicking Cancan dancers for its season opener. Oct. 22-31. $20. Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, 2800 Cobb Galleria Parkway. 800-982-2787. [http://www.atlantaballet.com/|www.atlantaballet.com].

__''STAIBDANCE, VEGA STRING QUARTET AND WILLIAM RANSOM: IN CONCERT''__ Contemporary dance paired with classical and neo-classical music from artistic director and Emory dance program faculty George Staib, and Emory's Vega String Quartet. Sept. 23-25. $10-$25. Schwartz Center for Performing Arts, Dance Studio, 1700 N. Decatur Road. 404-727-5050. [http://www.arts.emory.edu/|www.arts.emory.edu].

FILM

__DRIVE INVASION__ Annual rock 'n' roll movie extravaganza moves from the hot and crowded labor day weekend to a new October date. Oct. 10. Starlight Six Drive-In Theatre, 2000 Moreland Ave. 404-627-5786. [http://www.starlightdrivein.com/|www.starlightdrivein.com].

__LATIN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL__ 25th annual festival featuring 15 contemporary films outstanding recent films from Argentina Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Uruguay. Sept. 25-Oct. 30. $6-$7. 8 p.m. High Museum of Art, Rich Theatre, 1280 Peachtree St. [http://www.high.org/|www.high.org].

__OUT ON FILM__ The annual GLBTQ "celebrating PRIDE at the movies" enters its 23rd year. Oct. 1-7. Landmark Midtown Art Cinema, 931 Monroe Circle; Ansley Park Playhouse, 1545 Peachtree St. [http://www.outonfilm.org/|www.outonfilm.org].

THEATER

__''THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF A SQUIRREL''__ The Lawrenceville playhouse's black box space hosts Daniel May in this off-beat sounding monologue play, which touches on themes such as microbiology and anti-Semiticism. Sept. 16-Oct. 3. $15. Thurs.–Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Aurora Theatre, 128 Pike St., Lawrenceville. 678-226-6222. [http://www.auroratheatre.com/|www.auroratheatre.com].

[page]
__''LOBBY HERO''__ For its second production, young Atlanta company Pinch 'n' Ouch Theatre stages this acclaimed tale of a young security guard who becomes involved in a murder in his building. Playwright Kenneth Lonergan wrote and directed the terrific little film ''You Can Count On Me''. Nov. 3-28. $15-$30. Wed.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Pinch 'n' Ouch Theatre, 14th Street Playhouse, 173 14th St. 404-733-4738. [http://www.pnotheatre.com/|www.pnotheatre.com].

__''THE NACIREMA SOCIETY REQUESTS THE HONOR OF YOUR PRESENCE AT A CELEBRATION OF THEIR FIRST ONE HUNDRED YEARS''__ Acclaimed Atlanta novelist/playwright Pearl Cleage returns with a world premiere comedy about the African-American debutantes and organizers who encounter surprises at a major social function in Montgomery, Ala. Directed by Alliance Theatre artistic director Susan V. Booth. Oct. 20-Nov. 14. $20-$40. Wed.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-4650. [http://www.alliancetheatre.org/|www.alliancetheatre.org].

__NIGHT BLOOMS__ This world premiere by Margaret Baldwin follows two families, one black, one white, in Selma, Ala., in 1965. Featuring Lala Cochran, Jill Jane Clements and Tom Thon. Sept. 24-Oct. 24. $20-$30. Horizon Theatre, 1083 Austin Ave. 404-584-7450. [http://www.horizontheatre.com/|www.horizontheatre.com].

__''THE ODYSSEY: A JOURNEY HOME''__ Joe Knezevich plays Homer's heroic castaway who contends with nymphs, witches, monsters and rival suitors in his long quest to reunite with his wife Penelope (Tess Malis Kincaid). Oct. 7-31. $15-$50. Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. Georgia Shakespeare, 4484 Peachtree Road. 404-264-0020. [http://www.gashakespeare.org/|www.gashakespeare.org].

__''TWIST''__ The Alliance Theatre opens its 42nd season with the musical ''Twist'', but don't get out your old Chubby Checkers records. This new musical offers a fresh spin on the tale of ''Oliver Twist'' by Charles Dickens, and the title ''Oliver!'' was obviously taken. With a book by ''The Wiz'' author William F. Brown and music and lyrics from Grammy-winner Tena Clark, ''Twist'' relocates the hapless orphan to 1928 New Orleans. ''Twist'' will be directed and choreographed by Debbie Allen, renowned for ''Fame'' and previous collaborations with the Alliance Theatre. Through Oct. 3. $25-$45. Tues.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-4650. [http://www.alliancetheatre.org/|www.alliancetheatre.org].

VISUAL ARTS

__ATLANTA CELEBRATES PHOTOGRAPHY__ October means Atlanta Celebrates Photography. The 2010 edition features more than 150 photography events, including exhibits, lectures and an art auction. Prices and locations vary. [http://www.acpinfo.org/|www.acpinfo.org].

__''CONVERGENT FREQUENCIES''__ i45 collective, which includes Barbara Archer Gallery, Henley Studios, Whitespace Gallery, and Wm Turner Gallery, presents another site-specific ArtBox installation at the intersection of Krog Street and Irwin Street/Lake Avenue from artists Matt Gilbert, Nat Slaughter and Matt Haffner. Fri.-Sun., Sept. 17-19. 6 p.m.-midnight; live performance Sat., 9 p.m.

__CONVERSATIONS WITH CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS: JEFF KOONS__ Artist discusses the influence of Salvador Dalí on his work. Oct. 5. 7 p.m. High Museum of Art, Sifly Piazza, 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-5000. [http://www.high.org/|www.high.org].

__''DISCURSIVE DOCUMENTS: PERFORMING THE CATALOGUE''__ A meditation by art collective John Q's (Joey Orr, Andy Ditzler and Wesley Chenault) on cataloguing and preservation beyond the printed format. Oct. 2-Jan. 8. Opens Sat., Oct., 2. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free-$5. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. MOCA GA, Education/Resource Center, 75 Bennett St. 404-367-8700. [http://www.mocaga.org/|www.mocaga.org].

__''DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE''__ A group show featuring Jennifer Cawley, Zuzka Vaclavik and Cara Enteles, looks to be a sincerely cool endeavor into the fantastical that delves beyond Lewis Carroll. Through Oct. 23. Free. Opens Fri., Sept. 10, 7-10 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Emily Amy Gallery, 1000 Marietta St., Suite 208. 404- 877-5626. [http://www.emilyamygallery.com|www.emilyamygallery.com].

__''EMANATE CAR SHOW''__ Oakland-based artist Veronica de Jesus is bringing the automotive love with ''Emanate Care Show'', a gathering of dreamy drawings and paintings. Through Jan. 8. Free. Opens, Sat. Nov. 20, 7-11 p.m. Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Get This! Gallery, 662 11th St. 678-596-4451. [http://www.getthisgallery.com|www.getthisgallery.com].

__''JOE TSAMBIRAS AND JASON BUTCHER''__ This is a local art power duo if there ever was one. You could lose yourself for days in Tsambiras and Butcher's exciting, mind-boggling work. Through Dec. 5. Free. Opens Sat., Nov. 13. 7-11 p.m.; Wed., Fri. and Sat., noon-6 p.m.; Thurs. 1-6 p.m. Beep Beep Gallery, 696 Charles Allen Drive. 404-313-5722. [http://www.beepbeepgallery.com/|www.beepbeepgallery.com].

__''KNOCK ON WOOD''__ Folklore and emblems of luck are on the menu at ''Knock on Wood'', the collection of 50 paintings and drawings by Sanithna Phansavanh. Through Oct. 26. Opens Sept. 11, 7-11 p.m. Free. Sun.-Thurs., noon-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., noon-9 p.m. Young Blood Gallery and Boutique. 636 N. Highland Ave. 404-254-4127. [http://youngbloodgallery.com|youngbloodgallery.com].

__''O' SAY CAN YOU SEE''__ Laura Poitras breaks through tired 9/11 art clichés by mixing Ground Zero imagery with audio from the Yankees come-from-behind World Series victory in October 2001. Through Dec. 12. Opens Oct. 9, 6-10 p.m. $5. Tues.-Wed. and Fri-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thurs., 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, 535 Means St. 404-688-1970. [http://thecontemporary.org|thecontemporary.org].

__''PULL''__ Under the wing of master printer Timothy McDowell this summer, artists Kim Anno, Kate Javens, Joanne Mattera, Don Pollack, Katherine Taylor and McDowell created a series of intaglio prints exhibited here in a portfolio edition. Show runs alongside McDowell's solo painting exhibition ''Kingdom Come''. Through Oct. 6. Opens Sat., Sept. 11. 6-9 p.m. Free. Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Marcia Wood Gallery, 263 Walker St. 404-827-0030. [http://www.marciawoodgallery.com/|www.marciawoodgallery.com]."
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  string(11685) "    Best bets for plays, exhibits, film fests and more   2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00 Cover Story - Fall Arts Highlights   CL staff 1224075 2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00  BOOKS

ATLANTA QUEER LITERARY FESTIVAL Fourth annual event will feature open mic events, panel discussions, readings and book signings around town. Oct. 13-16. atlqueerlitfest.blogspot.com.

CHUCK KLOSTERMAN Chances are you've never met Klosterman, but if you've read his collections of essays and nonfiction, you know what it would be like to drive cross country in a rented Ford Taurus searching for the house where Kurt Cobain killed himself or hang out with the members of a Guns 'n Roses cover band. Few writers are as capable of parsing the schizophrenic nonsense of pop culture with such clear and confessional insight. Free. Thurs., Oct. 7. 6:30-8 p.m. SCAD Atlanta, 1600 Peachtree St. www.acappellabooks.com.

DECATUR BOOK FESTIVAL The festival showcases fresh voices of contemporary Southern authors. See more here.

NATASHA TRETHEWEY Pulitzer prize-winning poet and Emory professor latest work, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf, explores her and her family's (they're from Mississippi) post-storm experiences. Free. Sun., Sept. 5. 1:15 p.m. Decatur Book Festival, First Baptist Decatur Carreker Hall Stage, East Ponce de Leon Avenue and Church Street, Decatur. www.decaturbookfestival.com. Thurs., Oct. 28. 4 p.m. Cave Canem reading with poet Kyle Dargan. Spelman College, Cosby Academic Center Auditorium, 350 Spelman Lane. www.spelman.edu.

POETRY ATLANTA NIGHT Conquering Venus author Colin Kelly hosts an evening of local poets including JC Reilly, Eve Hoffman, Bob Wood, Ann Lynn and Jenny Sadre-Orafai reading their latest works. Thurs., Sept. 30. 7:15 p.m. Decatur Public Library, 215 Sycamore St. 404-370-8450. www.georgiacenterforthebook.org.

RICHARD BAUSCH Bausch is no less than a contemporary master of the short story. A Georgia-born writer of precise ear and profound economy (he whittled his first short story from the shape of an 800-page manuscript), Bausch continues his much celebrated and awarded career with his latest collection, Something is Out There. Free. Mon., Nov. 15. 6:30 p.m. Joseph W. Jones Room, 311 Woodruff Library, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Road. www.creativewriting.emory.edu.

WILLIAM GIBSON The legendary science-fiction writer defined the cyberpunk aesthetic with his 1984 debut novel, Neuromancer, a fluorescent trip through a place he called "cyberspace." He'll discuss past accomplishments and latest novel, Zero History. Free. Mon., Sept. 20. 6:30-8 p.m. SCAD Atlanta, 1600 Peachtree St. www.acappellabooks.com.

DANCE

AMERICAN MUSCLE A dance concert and live music performance party "about the will, wild and wonder of America" by choreographer Blake Beckham and musical director Stephen Wood. $12. Thurs., Sept. 11. 8 p.m. Eyedrum, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive S.E. www.eyedrum.org.

BLACKBIRD Brooks and Company Dance's multimedia dance theater performance centers on the $36 billion dollar-per-year industry of commercial child trafficking and sexual exploitation, a large part of which takes place in Atlanta. Nov. 12-14. Balzer Theater at Herren's, 84 Luckie St. 678-528-1500. www.brooksandcompanydance.org.

CORAZON ABRIENDO (HEART OPENING) CORE celebrates its 30th anniversary season this year with programming that includes a restaging of Corazon Abriendo, a multimedia performance based on Mayan weaving traditions. November 19-20. 8 p.m. Balzer Theater at Herren's, 84 Luckie St. 678-528-1500. www.severaldancerscore.org.

IDEAS AT GARDENHOUSE DANCE Garden House Dance director Nicole Livieratos' most recent work includes video, a dance collaboration with Patricia Henrtize, and a piece "investigating night-time monkey brain." Free. Sat.-Sun., Sept. 18-19. 4 p.m. Gardenhouse Studio, 2752 E. Ponce de Leon Ave., Suite A, Decatur. www.gardenhousedance.org.

LUMINOCITY Lauri Stallings' next major performance will be the "largest site-specific art work both for gloATL and the city of Atlanta." Lumincoity will include 11 site-specific performances throughout downtown. Nov. 26-Dec. 11. www.gloatl.com.

MOULIN ROUGE – THE BALLET Atlanta Ballet channels the famed Parisian cabaret and its high-kicking Cancan dancers for its season opener. Oct. 22-31. $20. Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, 2800 Cobb Galleria Parkway. 800-982-2787. www.atlantaballet.com.

STAIBDANCE, VEGA STRING QUARTET AND WILLIAM RANSOM: IN CONCERT Contemporary dance paired with classical and neo-classical music from artistic director and Emory dance program faculty George Staib, and Emory's Vega String Quartet. Sept. 23-25. $10-$25. Schwartz Center for Performing Arts, Dance Studio, 1700 N. Decatur Road. 404-727-5050. www.arts.emory.edu.

FILM

DRIVE INVASION Annual rock 'n' roll movie extravaganza moves from the hot and crowded labor day weekend to a new October date. Oct. 10. Starlight Six Drive-In Theatre, 2000 Moreland Ave. 404-627-5786. www.starlightdrivein.com.

LATIN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL 25th annual festival featuring 15 contemporary films outstanding recent films from Argentina Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Uruguay. Sept. 25-Oct. 30. $6-$7. 8 p.m. High Museum of Art, Rich Theatre, 1280 Peachtree St. www.high.org.

OUT ON FILM The annual GLBTQ "celebrating PRIDE at the movies" enters its 23rd year. Oct. 1-7. Landmark Midtown Art Cinema, 931 Monroe Circle; Ansley Park Playhouse, 1545 Peachtree St. www.outonfilm.org.

THEATER

THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF A SQUIRREL The Lawrenceville playhouse's black box space hosts Daniel May in this off-beat sounding monologue play, which touches on themes such as microbiology and anti-Semiticism. Sept. 16-Oct. 3. $15. Thurs.–Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Aurora Theatre, 128 Pike St., Lawrenceville. 678-226-6222. www.auroratheatre.com.

page
LOBBY HERO For its second production, young Atlanta company Pinch 'n' Ouch Theatre stages this acclaimed tale of a young security guard who becomes involved in a murder in his building. Playwright Kenneth Lonergan wrote and directed the terrific little film You Can Count On Me. Nov. 3-28. $15-$30. Wed.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Pinch 'n' Ouch Theatre, 14th Street Playhouse, 173 14th St. 404-733-4738. www.pnotheatre.com.

THE NACIREMA SOCIETY REQUESTS THE HONOR OF YOUR PRESENCE AT A CELEBRATION OF THEIR FIRST ONE HUNDRED YEARS Acclaimed Atlanta novelist/playwright Pearl Cleage returns with a world premiere comedy about the African-American debutantes and organizers who encounter surprises at a major social function in Montgomery, Ala. Directed by Alliance Theatre artistic director Susan V. Booth. Oct. 20-Nov. 14. $20-$40. Wed.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-4650. www.alliancetheatre.org.

NIGHT BLOOMS This world premiere by Margaret Baldwin follows two families, one black, one white, in Selma, Ala., in 1965. Featuring Lala Cochran, Jill Jane Clements and Tom Thon. Sept. 24-Oct. 24. $20-$30. Horizon Theatre, 1083 Austin Ave. 404-584-7450. www.horizontheatre.com.

THE ODYSSEY: A JOURNEY HOME Joe Knezevich plays Homer's heroic castaway who contends with nymphs, witches, monsters and rival suitors in his long quest to reunite with his wife Penelope (Tess Malis Kincaid). Oct. 7-31. $15-$50. Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. Georgia Shakespeare, 4484 Peachtree Road. 404-264-0020. www.gashakespeare.org.

TWIST The Alliance Theatre opens its 42nd season with the musical Twist, but don't get out your old Chubby Checkers records. This new musical offers a fresh spin on the tale of Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, and the title Oliver! was obviously taken. With a book by The Wiz author William F. Brown and music and lyrics from Grammy-winner Tena Clark, Twist relocates the hapless orphan to 1928 New Orleans. Twist will be directed and choreographed by Debbie Allen, renowned for Fame and previous collaborations with the Alliance Theatre. Through Oct. 3. $25-$45. Tues.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-4650. www.alliancetheatre.org.

VISUAL ARTS

ATLANTA CELEBRATES PHOTOGRAPHY October means Atlanta Celebrates Photography. The 2010 edition features more than 150 photography events, including exhibits, lectures and an art auction. Prices and locations vary. www.acpinfo.org.

CONVERGENT FREQUENCIES i45 collective, which includes Barbara Archer Gallery, Henley Studios, Whitespace Gallery, and Wm Turner Gallery, presents another site-specific ArtBox installation at the intersection of Krog Street and Irwin Street/Lake Avenue from artists Matt Gilbert, Nat Slaughter and Matt Haffner. Fri.-Sun., Sept. 17-19. 6 p.m.-midnight; live performance Sat., 9 p.m.

CONVERSATIONS WITH CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS: JEFF KOONS Artist discusses the influence of Salvador Dalí on his work. Oct. 5. 7 p.m. High Museum of Art, Sifly Piazza, 1280 Peachtree St. 404-733-5000. www.high.org.

DISCURSIVE DOCUMENTS: PERFORMING THE CATALOGUE A meditation by art collective John Q's (Joey Orr, Andy Ditzler and Wesley Chenault) on cataloguing and preservation beyond the printed format. Oct. 2-Jan. 8. Opens Sat., Oct., 2. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free-$5. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. MOCA GA, Education/Resource Center, 75 Bennett St. 404-367-8700. www.mocaga.org.

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE A group show featuring Jennifer Cawley, Zuzka Vaclavik and Cara Enteles, looks to be a sincerely cool endeavor into the fantastical that delves beyond Lewis Carroll. Through Oct. 23. Free. Opens Fri., Sept. 10, 7-10 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Emily Amy Gallery, 1000 Marietta St., Suite 208. 404- 877-5626. www.emilyamygallery.com.

EMANATE CAR SHOW Oakland-based artist Veronica de Jesus is bringing the automotive love with Emanate Care Show, a gathering of dreamy drawings and paintings. Through Jan. 8. Free. Opens, Sat. Nov. 20, 7-11 p.m. Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Get This! Gallery, 662 11th St. 678-596-4451. www.getthisgallery.com.

JOE TSAMBIRAS AND JASON BUTCHER This is a local art power duo if there ever was one. You could lose yourself for days in Tsambiras and Butcher's exciting, mind-boggling work. Through Dec. 5. Free. Opens Sat., Nov. 13. 7-11 p.m.; Wed., Fri. and Sat., noon-6 p.m.; Thurs. 1-6 p.m. Beep Beep Gallery, 696 Charles Allen Drive. 404-313-5722. www.beepbeepgallery.com.

KNOCK ON WOOD Folklore and emblems of luck are on the menu at Knock on Wood, the collection of 50 paintings and drawings by Sanithna Phansavanh. Through Oct. 26. Opens Sept. 11, 7-11 p.m. Free. Sun.-Thurs., noon-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., noon-9 p.m. Young Blood Gallery and Boutique. 636 N. Highland Ave. 404-254-4127. youngbloodgallery.com.

O' SAY CAN YOU SEE Laura Poitras breaks through tired 9/11 art clichés by mixing Ground Zero imagery with audio from the Yankees come-from-behind World Series victory in October 2001. Through Dec. 12. Opens Oct. 9, 6-10 p.m. $5. Tues.-Wed. and Fri-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thurs., 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, 535 Means St. 404-688-1970. thecontemporary.org.

PULL Under the wing of master printer Timothy McDowell this summer, artists Kim Anno, Kate Javens, Joanne Mattera, Don Pollack, Katherine Taylor and McDowell created a series of intaglio prints exhibited here in a portfolio edition. Show runs alongside McDowell's solo painting exhibition Kingdom Come. Through Oct. 6. Opens Sat., Sept. 11. 6-9 p.m. Free. Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Marcia Wood Gallery, 263 Walker St. 404-827-0030. www.marciawoodgallery.com.       0,0,10      13054757 2056769                          Cover Story - Fall Arts Highlights "
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Thursday September 2, 2010 04:00 am EDT
Best bets for plays, exhibits, film fests and more | more...
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  string(4855) "Barely seven months after public arts organization Flux Projects produced its first official event, it's hard to imagine the Atlanta art scene without it. While the recession has forced some arts organizations to cut back, executive director Anne Archer Dennington has helped the Louis Corrigan-founded organization set a new agenda for public art. In doing so, she has assumed an ambitious behind-the-scenes role as a champion of public art in a city that historically has underwhelmed in the public art sphere.

Dennington's not an artist, but describing her role as merely administrative is equally mistaken. One example of Dennington's finesse: She convinced the managers of Atlanta's busiest shopping mall to allow a conceptually minded choreographer to stage a troupe of contemporary dancers among mobs of shoppers on Valentine's Day weekend (Lauri Stallings' Bloom). Basically, Dennington's a master facilitator. Her skill lies in eloquently smoothing over the logistical difficulties of public art installations (the locations, the materials, the permits), which allow artists to spend more time on the actual art.

Under her and Corrigan's leadership, the organization will host its largest project yet, Flux, a mind-bending installation of mostly local artists, filmmakers, and dancers throughout the alleyways and art galleries of Castleberry Hill on Oct. 1. Flux follows in the footsteps of the superb Le Flash, Cathy Byrd and Stuart Keeler's light-based, fantastical public art event that took place in 2008 and 2009 in the same neighborhood

"I learn a lot just in sighting projects for artists. Those experiences let me know what projects work well in which places," Dennington says, explaining a day-to-day process that isn't necessarily glamorous. For Micah and Whitney Stansell's Between You and Me, a five-channel video projection that requires a large room for display, Dennington located an unoccupied building in Castleberry Hill that could accommodate the work for its premiere during Flux. To actually secure the location, though, Dennington coordinated months of queries, phone calls, and meetings to smooth out the idea of public art with the building's owners and parent corporation.

Flux Projects came onto the scene with a couple of large-scale events that demonstrated the broad scope of the organization's capabilities. Stallings' aforementioned inaugural Bloom at Lenox Square Mall was followed by artist collective John Q's Memory Flash, an evocation of Atlanta's queer history through installation and performance pieces, including the replication of a drag club's walk-in beer cooler and the staging of an entire softball game at Piedmont Park.

As the organization transitions toward more frequent, year-round programming, it's focusing on ways to engage a broader audience in Atlanta, to "evangelize" in a way that brings public art into the popular conversation. Smaller projects such as John Morse's controversial Roadside Haiku, which installs poetry placards in place of get-rich-quick and weight-loss road signs ("GO TO REAL BOOT CAMP! 6 Months Later — Exercise in Afghanistan," reads one), attempt to clandestinely plant art in front of an unsuspecting audience.

"It's great to fund artists to do new projects, but if all you do is give money, give money, give money, then we're really not serving them or our community to the fullest," Dennington says. "You have to provide 'funding' in a broader context."

Dennington and Corrigan hope to build Flux into something like Toronto's Nuit Blanche, an all-night cross-city contemporary art event, in part through programming that continues past a single evening. "That's a big, long-term goal, but I think it becomes easier to accomplish it if you're also doing things all the time," says Corrigan. Tristan Al-Haddad's "Cloud Cutting," a light-projection piece that manipulates the appearance of clouds at night, will begin during Flux but continue through December. Lee Walton's "Momentary Performances" will stage short performances, such as a woman drinking a Coke or a couple kissing, at signed locations throughout September and October.

Corrigan speaks about Flux in quixotic terms, about finding "a way for the event to evangelize for the art community here but also, in a more general way, for a creative spirit that I'd like to see permeating everything." Corrigan still works full time as an investment analyst, though, leaving Dennington, who met Corrigan while she was executive director of Atlanta Celebrates Photography, to become the public face for the organization and the visionary (but camera-shy) founder.

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Dennington's not an artist, but describing her role as merely administrative is equally mistaken. One example of Dennington's finesse: She convinced the managers of Atlanta's busiest shopping mall to allow a conceptually minded choreographer to stage a troupe of contemporary dancers among mobs of shoppers on Valentine's Day weekend (Lauri Stallings' ''Bloom''). Basically, Dennington's a master facilitator. Her skill lies in eloquently smoothing over the logistical difficulties of public art installations (the locations, the materials, the permits), which allow artists to spend more time on the actual art.

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As the organization transitions toward more frequent, year-round programming, it's focusing on ways to engage a broader audience in Atlanta, to "evangelize" in a way that brings public art into the popular conversation. Smaller projects such as John Morse's controversial ''Roadside Haiku'', which installs poetry placards in place of get-rich-quick and weight-loss road signs ("GO TO REAL BOOT CAMP! 6 Months Later — Exercise in Afghanistan," reads one), attempt to clandestinely plant art in front of an unsuspecting audience.

"It's great to fund artists to do new projects, but if all you do is give money, give money, give money, then we're really not serving them or our community to the fullest," Dennington says. "You have to provide 'funding' in a broader context."

Dennington and Corrigan hope to build ''Flux'' into something like Toronto's ''Nuit Blanche'', an all-night cross-city contemporary art event, in part through programming that continues past a single evening. "That's a big, long-term goal, but I think it becomes easier to accomplish it if you're also doing things all the time," says Corrigan. Tristan Al-Haddad's "Cloud Cutting," a light-projection piece that manipulates the appearance of clouds at night, will begin during ''Flux'' but continue through December. Lee Walton's "Momentary Performances" will stage short performances, such as a woman drinking a Coke or a couple kissing, at signed locations throughout September and October.

Corrigan speaks about ''Flux'' in quixotic terms, about finding "a way for the event to evangelize for the art community here but also, in a more general way, for a creative spirit that I'd like to see permeating everything." Corrigan still works full time as an investment analyst, though, leaving Dennington, who met Corrigan while she was executive director of Atlanta Celebrates Photography, to become the public face for the organization and the visionary (but camera-shy) founder.

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Flux Projects came onto the scene with a couple of large-scale events that demonstrated the broad scope of the organization's capabilities. Stallings' aforementioned inaugural Bloom at Lenox Square Mall was followed by artist collective John Q's Memory Flash, an evocation of Atlanta's queer history through installation and performance pieces, including the replication of a drag club's walk-in beer cooler and the staging of an entire softball game at Piedmont Park.

As the organization transitions toward more frequent, year-round programming, it's focusing on ways to engage a broader audience in Atlanta, to "evangelize" in a way that brings public art into the popular conversation. Smaller projects such as John Morse's controversial Roadside Haiku, which installs poetry placards in place of get-rich-quick and weight-loss road signs ("GO TO REAL BOOT CAMP! 6 Months Later — Exercise in Afghanistan," reads one), attempt to clandestinely plant art in front of an unsuspecting audience.

"It's great to fund artists to do new projects, but if all you do is give money, give money, give money, then we're really not serving them or our community to the fullest," Dennington says. "You have to provide 'funding' in a broader context."

Dennington and Corrigan hope to build Flux into something like Toronto's Nuit Blanche, an all-night cross-city contemporary art event, in part through programming that continues past a single evening. "That's a big, long-term goal, but I think it becomes easier to accomplish it if you're also doing things all the time," says Corrigan. Tristan Al-Haddad's "Cloud Cutting," a light-projection piece that manipulates the appearance of clouds at night, will begin during Flux but continue through December. Lee Walton's "Momentary Performances" will stage short performances, such as a woman drinking a Coke or a couple kissing, at signed locations throughout September and October.

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Article

Thursday September 2, 2010 04:00 am EDT
Barely seven months after public arts organization Flux Projects produced its first official event, it's hard to imagine the Atlanta art scene without it. While the recession has forced some arts organizations to cut back, executive director Anne Archer Dennington has helped the Louis Corrigan-founded organization set a new agenda for public art. In doing so, she has assumed an ambitious... | more...
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  string(2896) "One of the animating forces behind the early punk scenes in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., was the fact that many of the musicians made almost no distinction between themselves and their audiences. In those DIY days, the musicians were on stage not because they were doing something you couldn't do, but precisely because they were doing something you could — and often did — do.

Jason Freeman is a punk for geeks. With his conservative haircut and advanced degrees in composition, he's bringing many of the same boundary-busting ideas to classical music that punk musicians brought to rock. For Freeman, there's no reason regular folks shouldn't be able to participate in making "art music," and his music projects over the last decade have been devoted to figuring out ways to do exactly that.

Freeman's an assistant professor in Georgia Tech's School of Music and he uses technology to sweep away the boundaries between composers and audiences. One of his most widely known projects to date is "Piano Etudes," music for piano enabled by the Web's open-ended community of tinkerers. "Piano Etudes," commissioned by pianist Jenny Lin, consists of a series of musical fragments that can be rearranged on the fly by the performer. But anyone can have a hand in the mix by going to the accompanying website and clicking on the various music fragments to create new compositions. Some visitor-created pieces have even been selected and performed in concert.

"It's a utopian, idealist sort of thing," Freeman admits, referring to his vision that his interactive projects can give people a glimpse of what's it's like to compose music.

"Urban Remix," his 2010 Beltline collaboration with Michael Nitsche and Carl DiSalvo, attacks the problem another way by inviting Beltline visitors to record environmental sounds using an iPhone app and then remixing them into a soundscape of car horns, dog barks and bicycle bells that's, if not music, at least musical.

This fall, Freeman is developing "LOLC," a laptop orchestra project with Tech student Akito Van Troyer. In "LOLC" musicians improvise music by writing code live on stage. "It's super geeky," says Freeman. They've already shown an early version of the project at Princeton and at the Listening Machines showcase at Eyedrum. And in future performances, the digital environment will be expanded to include acoustic musicians as well.

Freeman also performs regularly with Sonic Generator, Georgia Tech's contemporary music ensemble-in-residence founded by Jessica Peek Sherwood and Tom Sherwood. This season kicks off with concerts in October and November. Amid the group's woodwinds and strings, Freeman plays with electronic toys as the designated tech guy.

It's the perfect gig for him. As with his other projects, for Sonic Generator he creates all sorts of spacey sounds that update the chamber orchestra for the 21st century."
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Jason Freeman is a punk for geeks. With his conservative haircut and advanced degrees in composition, he's bringing many of the same boundary-busting ideas to classical music that punk musicians brought to rock. For Freeman, there's no reason regular folks shouldn't be able to participate in making "art music," and his music projects over the last decade have been devoted to figuring out ways to do exactly that.

Freeman's an assistant professor in Georgia Tech's School of Music and he uses technology to sweep away the boundaries between composers and audiences. One of his most widely known projects to date is "Piano Etudes," music for piano enabled by the Web's open-ended community of tinkerers. "Piano Etudes," commissioned by pianist Jenny Lin, consists of a series of musical fragments that can be rearranged on the fly by the performer. But anyone can have a hand in the mix by going to the accompanying website and clicking on the various music fragments to create new compositions. Some visitor-created pieces have even been selected and performed in concert.

"It's a utopian, idealist sort of thing," Freeman admits, referring to his vision that his interactive projects can give people a glimpse of what's it's like to compose music.

"Urban Remix," his 2010 Beltline collaboration with Michael Nitsche and Carl DiSalvo, attacks the problem another way by inviting Beltline visitors to record environmental sounds using an iPhone app and then remixing them into a soundscape of car horns, dog barks and bicycle bells that's, if not music, at least musi''cal''.

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Freeman also performs regularly with Sonic Generator, Georgia Tech's contemporary music ensemble-in-residence founded by Jessica Peek Sherwood and Tom Sherwood. This season kicks off with concerts in October and November. Amid the group's woodwinds and strings, Freeman plays with electronic toys as the designated tech guy.

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  string(3212) "       2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00 Cover Story - Jason Freeman brings punk rock's boundary-busting ideas to classical music   Cinque Hicks 1306447 2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00  One of the animating forces behind the early punk scenes in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., was the fact that many of the musicians made almost no distinction between themselves and their audiences. In those DIY days, the musicians were on stage not because they were doing something you couldn't do, but precisely because they were doing something you could — and often did — do.

Jason Freeman is a punk for geeks. With his conservative haircut and advanced degrees in composition, he's bringing many of the same boundary-busting ideas to classical music that punk musicians brought to rock. For Freeman, there's no reason regular folks shouldn't be able to participate in making "art music," and his music projects over the last decade have been devoted to figuring out ways to do exactly that.

Freeman's an assistant professor in Georgia Tech's School of Music and he uses technology to sweep away the boundaries between composers and audiences. One of his most widely known projects to date is "Piano Etudes," music for piano enabled by the Web's open-ended community of tinkerers. "Piano Etudes," commissioned by pianist Jenny Lin, consists of a series of musical fragments that can be rearranged on the fly by the performer. But anyone can have a hand in the mix by going to the accompanying website and clicking on the various music fragments to create new compositions. Some visitor-created pieces have even been selected and performed in concert.

"It's a utopian, idealist sort of thing," Freeman admits, referring to his vision that his interactive projects can give people a glimpse of what's it's like to compose music.

"Urban Remix," his 2010 Beltline collaboration with Michael Nitsche and Carl DiSalvo, attacks the problem another way by inviting Beltline visitors to record environmental sounds using an iPhone app and then remixing them into a soundscape of car horns, dog barks and bicycle bells that's, if not music, at least musical.

This fall, Freeman is developing "LOLC," a laptop orchestra project with Tech student Akito Van Troyer. In "LOLC" musicians improvise music by writing code live on stage. "It's super geeky," says Freeman. They've already shown an early version of the project at Princeton and at the Listening Machines showcase at Eyedrum. And in future performances, the digital environment will be expanded to include acoustic musicians as well.

Freeman also performs regularly with Sonic Generator, Georgia Tech's contemporary music ensemble-in-residence founded by Jessica Peek Sherwood and Tom Sherwood. This season kicks off with concerts in October and November. Amid the group's woodwinds and strings, Freeman plays with electronic toys as the designated tech guy.

It's the perfect gig for him. As with his other projects, for Sonic Generator he creates all sorts of spacey sounds that update the chamber orchestra for the 21st century.             13054755 2056749                          Cover Story - Jason Freeman brings punk rock's boundary-busting ideas to classical music "
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Article

Thursday September 2, 2010 04:00 am EDT

One of the animating forces behind the early punk scenes in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., was the fact that many of the musicians made almost no distinction between themselves and their audiences. In those DIY days, the musicians were on stage not because they were doing something you couldn't do, but precisely because they were doing something you could — and often did — do.

Jason...

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She gets a change of pace with Becky Shaw, which opened Actor's Express's 23rd season this month. Hames plays a woman who has sex with her adopted brother after her father's death — and she's the normal one in Gina Gionfriddo's comedy. "In Becky Shaw I'm almost the straight man, which is great. I get to be like a real person and don't have to hide behind idiosyncracies. I've got musical comedy down, so it's really cool to do something different. It's great to be Viv instead of Lucy."

Hames rose to an even greater challenge at the beginning of Actor's Express' previous season, playing both Big Edie and Little Edie in the musical Grey Gardens. Hames prepared for the role by studying the beloved documentaries about Jackie Kennedy's most eccentric relatives. "These are two incredibly beautiful women. I'm a lot of things — I'm as cute as a button — but I'm not beautiful like that. I had to find connections to them. In the first act, it's Big Edie's joy in performing, and in the second, it's Little Edie's vulnerability under her strength."


Hames performing in a preview of last year's Grey Gardens

She traces her comedic sensibility to her childhood in Canton, Ga., where she was typecast as the witches, not the princesses, in school plays. "When I was 7 years old, in 1978, my brother died in a car accident. My mother loved 'The Carol Burnett Show,' but after that happened, she wouldn't leave her bedroom to watch it. So I'd watch the show and then go into the bedroom and act it out for her. I'm sure that has something to do with it." Burnett remains Hames' role model as an actress, funny or otherwise.

Hames believes in the importance of rehearsal and honing her comic timing, but she acknowledges that some aspects of humor just can't be taught. "It's learned and it's instinctual. The audience is like another character in the show, and they decide, to a certain extent, how it's told. But you can't give them everything they want, because you still have a story to tell. You and the audience decide together."

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She gets a change of pace with ''Becky Shaw'', which opened Actor's Express's 23rd season this month. Hames plays a woman who has sex with her adopted brother after her father's death — and she's the ''normal'' one in Gina Gionfriddo's comedy. "In ''Becky Shaw'' I'm almost the straight man, which is great. I get to be like a real person and don't have to hide behind idiosyncracies. I've got musical comedy down, so it's really cool to do something different. It's great to be Viv instead of Lucy."

Hames rose to an even greater challenge at the beginning of Actor's Express' previous season, playing both Big Edie and Little Edie in the musical ''[http://clatl.com/atlanta/complex-family-drama-grounds-grey-gardens/Content?oid=1283041|Grey Gardens]''. Hames prepared for the role by studying the beloved documentaries about Jackie Kennedy's most eccentric relatives. "These are two incredibly beautiful women. I'm a lot of things — I'm as cute as a button — but I'm not beautiful like that. I had to find connections to them. In the first act, it's [Big Edie's] joy in performing, and in the second, it's [Little Edie's] vulnerability under her strength."


''Hames performing in a preview of last year's ''Grey Gardens

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Hames believes in the importance of rehearsal and honing her comic timing, but she acknowledges that some aspects of humor just can't be taught. "It's learned and it's instinctual. The audience is like another character in the show, and they decide, to a certain extent, how it's told. But you can't give them everything they want, because you still have a story to tell. You [and the audience] decide together."

Despite her confidence and comfort level in performing, Hames feels like she can always learn more: "Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy took acting classes for their entire lives. I'm nowhere as good now as I will be when I'm 80.""
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For years, Hames has proven her musical chops in lighthearted shows ranging from Once Upon a Mattress to Seussical to I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change, but she doesn't want to restrict herself to funny business. "The only way I can stretch is to try new things. But in theater, the stakes are high. They aren't going to take a chance and say, 'Hire Jill for Medea!'"

She gets a change of pace with Becky Shaw, which opened Actor's Express's 23rd season this month. Hames plays a woman who has sex with her adopted brother after her father's death — and she's the normal one in Gina Gionfriddo's comedy. "In Becky Shaw I'm almost the straight man, which is great. I get to be like a real person and don't have to hide behind idiosyncracies. I've got musical comedy down, so it's really cool to do something different. It's great to be Viv instead of Lucy."

Hames rose to an even greater challenge at the beginning of Actor's Express' previous season, playing both Big Edie and Little Edie in the musical Grey Gardens. Hames prepared for the role by studying the beloved documentaries about Jackie Kennedy's most eccentric relatives. "These are two incredibly beautiful women. I'm a lot of things — I'm as cute as a button — but I'm not beautiful like that. I had to find connections to them. In the first act, it's Big Edie's joy in performing, and in the second, it's Little Edie's vulnerability under her strength."


Hames performing in a preview of last year's Grey Gardens

She traces her comedic sensibility to her childhood in Canton, Ga., where she was typecast as the witches, not the princesses, in school plays. "When I was 7 years old, in 1978, my brother died in a car accident. My mother loved 'The Carol Burnett Show,' but after that happened, she wouldn't leave her bedroom to watch it. So I'd watch the show and then go into the bedroom and act it out for her. I'm sure that has something to do with it." Burnett remains Hames' role model as an actress, funny or otherwise.

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Despite her confidence and comfort level in performing, Hames feels like she can always learn more: "Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy took acting classes for their entire lives. I'm nowhere as good now as I will be when I'm 80."             13054754 2056692                          Cover Story - Jill Hames means business — funny business "
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Article

Thursday September 2, 2010 04:00 am EDT

Atlanta actress Jill Hames doesn't exactly run away from her stage image as a bubbly wisecracker. She wears a "Cutie Pie" T-shirt to an interview and, whether in person or on Facebook, makes jokes with the frequency of a wacky neighbor on a sitcom. You feel like a laugh track should follow her around.

For years, Hames has proven her musical chops in lighthearted shows ranging from Once Upon a...

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  string(2941) "On stage, Kevin Gillese finds it easy to switch into "party guy" mode. The 29-year-old Canadian director, poet and improviser can comfortably portray loud, oblivious, floppy-limbed Will Ferrell types who brim with beery bravado. Off stage, he tries to keep his energies focused and disciplined as Dad's Garage Theatre's new artistic director.

Gillese moved from the wind chill of Edmonton, Alberta to the heat index of Atlanta seven months ago, and performs at Dad's improv shows every week. He'll makes his Atlanta debut as a director with Dad's season opener, The Two Gentlemen of Lebowski, which envisions a Shakespearean version of the Coen Brothers' cult film, The Big Lebowski. "We've tried to embrace the idea of the mashup," says Gillese. "When listening to The Gray Album, how much is Jay-Z and how much is the Beatles? It's both. So with this, the costumes are a combination of Shakespeare and modern. We've been working with a cellist from Berlin, who'll play live music with an old-fashioned vibe, but then he'll plug into the loop pedal and do a cello version of 'Hotel California.'"


Kevin Gillese and Arlen Konopaki in a trailer for their improv show Scratch

At Dad's, Gillese is adjusting to a slightly older, more experienced and settled staff and ensemble compared to his younger, hungrier colleagues at Edmonton's Rapid Fire Theatre, where he was previously artistic director. Plus, the economics of American theater make different demands than Canada, with its bounty of government arts funding. "I'm a helluva grant writer, but never done individual solicitations. ... Sometimes the artistic representative of a company is part of the process."

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Dad's Garage Beefcake Calendar promo

Gillese admits to experiencing about six weeks of culture shock when he moved to Atlanta, but then he settled into his Little Five Points apartment and began feeling at home. He finds that Atlanta has more in common with Edmonton than he expected. "People avoid the heat in Georgia like they avoid the cold in Edmonton — they run from their houses to their cars," he says. "In Edmonton, most of the year you have to wear gloves while driving, because the steering wheel gets so cold. I thought I'd never have to do that again, but here, sometimes you have to wear gloves because it's too hot to touch the steering wheel."

You know, that could be a funny improv sketch: Canadians deal with the weather like this, but Atlantans deal with it like this."
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Gillese moved from the wind chill of Edmonton, Alberta to the heat index of Atlanta seven months ago, and performs at Dad's improv shows every week. He'll makes his Atlanta debut as a director with Dad's season opener, ''The Two Gentlemen of Lebowski'', which envisions a Shakespearean version of the Coen Brothers' cult film, ''The Big Lebowski''. "We've tried to embrace the idea of the mashup," says Gillese. "When listening to ''The Gray Album'', how much is Jay-Z and how much is the Beatles? It's both. So with this, the costumes are a combination of Shakespeare and modern. We've been working with a cellist from Berlin, who'll play live music with an old-fashioned vibe, but then he'll plug into the loop pedal and do a cello version of 'Hotel California.'"


''Kevin Gillese and Arlen Konopaki in a trailer for their improv show ''Scratch

At Dad's, Gillese is adjusting to a slightly older, more experienced and settled staff and ensemble compared to his younger, hungrier colleagues at Edmonton's Rapid Fire Theatre, where he was previously artistic director. Plus, the economics of American theater make different demands than Canada, with its bounty of government arts funding. "I'm a helluva grant writer, but never done individual solicitations. ... Sometimes the artistic representative of a company is part of the process."

As artistic director, Gillese plans to build on Dad's mission to develop original work while drawing more national attention. "I want the rest of the United States to know about Dad's Garage. We'll keep doing what we do best — comedy — but broaden our understanding of it. I want to get into video and audio, and launch a YouTube channel for next season, not just for advertising, but for content. We got a grand from a lovely foundation to develop a season of online work."


''Dad's Garage Beefcake Calendar promo''

Gillese admits to experiencing about six weeks of culture shock when he moved to Atlanta, but then he settled into his Little Five Points apartment and began feeling at home. He finds that Atlanta has more in common with Edmonton than he expected. "People avoid the heat in Georgia like they avoid the cold in Edmonton — they run from their houses to their cars," he says. "In Edmonton, most of the year you have to wear gloves while driving, because the steering wheel gets so cold. I thought I'd never have to do that again, but here, sometimes you have to wear gloves because it's too ''hot'' to touch the steering wheel."

You know, that could be a funny improv sketch: Canadians deal with the weather like this, but Atlantans deal with it like ''this''."
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  string(3222) "       2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00 Cover Story - Kevin Gillese brings his Rapid Fire wit to Dad's Garage   Curt Holman Curt Holman 2010-09-02T08:00:00+00:00  On stage, Kevin Gillese finds it easy to switch into "party guy" mode. The 29-year-old Canadian director, poet and improviser can comfortably portray loud, oblivious, floppy-limbed Will Ferrell types who brim with beery bravado. Off stage, he tries to keep his energies focused and disciplined as Dad's Garage Theatre's new artistic director.

Gillese moved from the wind chill of Edmonton, Alberta to the heat index of Atlanta seven months ago, and performs at Dad's improv shows every week. He'll makes his Atlanta debut as a director with Dad's season opener, The Two Gentlemen of Lebowski, which envisions a Shakespearean version of the Coen Brothers' cult film, The Big Lebowski. "We've tried to embrace the idea of the mashup," says Gillese. "When listening to The Gray Album, how much is Jay-Z and how much is the Beatles? It's both. So with this, the costumes are a combination of Shakespeare and modern. We've been working with a cellist from Berlin, who'll play live music with an old-fashioned vibe, but then he'll plug into the loop pedal and do a cello version of 'Hotel California.'"


Kevin Gillese and Arlen Konopaki in a trailer for their improv show Scratch

At Dad's, Gillese is adjusting to a slightly older, more experienced and settled staff and ensemble compared to his younger, hungrier colleagues at Edmonton's Rapid Fire Theatre, where he was previously artistic director. Plus, the economics of American theater make different demands than Canada, with its bounty of government arts funding. "I'm a helluva grant writer, but never done individual solicitations. ... Sometimes the artistic representative of a company is part of the process."

As artistic director, Gillese plans to build on Dad's mission to develop original work while drawing more national attention. "I want the rest of the United States to know about Dad's Garage. We'll keep doing what we do best — comedy — but broaden our understanding of it. I want to get into video and audio, and launch a YouTube channel for next season, not just for advertising, but for content. We got a grand from a lovely foundation to develop a season of online work."


Dad's Garage Beefcake Calendar promo

Gillese admits to experiencing about six weeks of culture shock when he moved to Atlanta, but then he settled into his Little Five Points apartment and began feeling at home. He finds that Atlanta has more in common with Edmonton than he expected. "People avoid the heat in Georgia like they avoid the cold in Edmonton — they run from their houses to their cars," he says. "In Edmonton, most of the year you have to wear gloves while driving, because the steering wheel gets so cold. I thought I'd never have to do that again, but here, sometimes you have to wear gloves because it's too hot to touch the steering wheel."

You know, that could be a funny improv sketch: Canadians deal with the weather like this, but Atlantans deal with it like this.             13054749 2056583                          Cover Story - Kevin Gillese brings his Rapid Fire wit to Dad's Garage "
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Article

Thursday September 2, 2010 04:00 am EDT

On stage, Kevin Gillese finds it easy to switch into "party guy" mode. The 29-year-old Canadian director, poet and improviser can comfortably portray loud, oblivious, floppy-limbed Will Ferrell types who brim with beery bravado. Off stage, he tries to keep his energies focused and disciplined as Dad's Garage Theatre's new artistic director.

Gillese moved from the wind chill of Edmonton,...

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