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  string(44) "HIGH FREQUENCIES: Being there and back again"
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  string(169) "Vic Varney, an early mainstay of the Athens music scene,  discusses that, while he may have been absent from performing, he has continued to write and record new songs."
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  string(10398) "In the late '70s/early 1980s, it was common to get a phone call or a letter from Vic Varney, letting me know when his band the Method Actors would be playing in town, whether at 688 or the Agora Ballroom. Of course, calling the Method Actors a band, back then, was stretching the term. Bands were made up of at least three, usually four or more musicians. When the Method Actors took the stage, it was Varney on guitar and vocals, with David Gamble on drums and vocals. They didn’t need anyone else. The songwriting was tight, the performances angular shots to the head and heart. If the Athens music scene from which they came — The B-52’s, Pylon, Love Tractor, etc. — was changing the way we heard music, the Method Actors were turning the very concept of what it meant to be a band on its head.

At the time, the Method Actors seemed destined for “greater things,” as it is said, but perhaps the greatest thing they did was exist at all. The four years they were together, whether as the original duo, or later as a three- and then four-piece band, seemed like it would go on forever. Then, as quickly as the Method Actors emerged, they disappeared.

Getting an email from Vic Varney, telling me he would be playing a show in Atlanta Saturday, March 14, was a surprise, to say the least. It’s been 25 years since he’s played this city, by his count. If you were to ask me, it seems like two or three lifetimes ago.

What has Varney been doing in the interim? Apparently, writing and recording songs as he always has. He explains it best.

Tony Paris: Refresh my memory: Is it Method Actors, The Method Actors, or the Method Actors?

Vic Varney: It’s the Method Actors. I've always used a lower case t for all 'the' bands, including the Beatles. Whether that's correct or not in all cases to me is irrelevant, simply because I like the idea of a definite article being definite enough without having to draw any more attention to itself.

Tony Paris: The Method Actors were very much a part of the Athens scene, yet the band also seemed to be very much unto itself.

Vic Varney: I totally, happily, sadly, realistically agree. This is a point that seems to have been lost on most from Day One, and I can totally see why. First, my deep involvement with Pylon; that shaded a certain perception. I was very much part of the inner sanctum of a wonderfully edgy, niche-y scene, which, although I shamelessly promoted it (and self-promoted), I was destined to part from pretty early.

The Method Actors were an entity very much unto itself because, at the risk of sounding horribly self-aggrandizing, David and I were totally anomalous entities unto ourselves. If anything, we sort of backed into being in the right place at exactly the right time but, for better or for worse, were never really of a piece with that scene. The fact is, in 1980 and 1981 we were out of Athens more than in it, and much of that time was spent in England.

Having spent my life paying for that — not really fitting in — I feel that I can talk about it pretty objectively. And let me rush to point out that I'm not saying any of this with either pride or bitterness, on the one hand, or condescension on the other. I loved being a part of what happened in Athens, in particular, between 1978 and 1982, and have been a proud Athenian before and since (even when I was living in New York). But what we were doing in the Method Actors, as both a two-piece, and, later, as a three- and finally four-piece, didn't really mesh with whatever else was going on, not only in Athens but really anywhere. It would be horribly self-mythologizing to regard it as sui generis, but take Little Figures (1981), no longer my favorite Method Actors record but, as a double with 17 songs, obviously the most expansive — listen to “Bleeding," then “Pigeons," then “Halloween," then "H-Hi Whoopee." I mean … who else was doing that?

Robert Christgau once wrote in the Village Voice that the Method Actors personified what might be called Nonpopular Music. That is, a band destined to toil in the vineyards of pop but who could never make anything popular, anything that huge numbers of people would like. He didn't mean it as a compliment. But that's insightful. I seem to have done my best ever since to prove him right.

Tony Paris: Briefly, what have you been doing musically in the many years since the Method Actors?

Vic Varney: Since the end of the Method Actors (ca. 1984), I've recorded approximately 500 songs, of which I'd consider about 100 “keepers." For 26 of those years I was a full-time teacher of English (UGA, Columbia, and NYU) so I didn't really have time to pursue the career end of it with as much passion and focus as perhaps I should have, although I've never stopped playing out. In New York, I played at the Fez and, later, had a regular gig at the Living Room. I've played out, spottily, in Athens at a variety of venues over the last 35 years.

What I've particularly mastered is a failure to do anything with music on the promotional side. On the positive, I own all of it because I've written everything I've recorded and paid for all of the recordings. On the negative, I've done absolutely zero to find any of the recordings a good home. And I can be very specific about why: First, up until recently I had, as I said, a full-time job which entailed certain responsibilities. I spent all my available music time writing, practicing, and recording, and that left little time for the thing that increasingly, if unfortunately, became anathema: promoting the stuff, playing that particular game — just not my beach.

And to be totally frank — and this is painful to admit but it would be pretty dumb not to — I think that particular failure comes from my seeing pretty early that what I was doing had a certain ceiling. That it was simply not going to win any contests in a certain arena, and that what time I had would be best spent ensuring that what mattered the most to me, the songs, were taken care of. Which meant spending the time to write well, then distill, then distill further, then, when satisfied they were ready to go in the oven, record properly. As anyone with ears who hears can attest, an awful lot of them have been recorded beautifully, many with terrific musicians, including David LaBruyere on bass; Russ Pahl and Matt Stoessel on pedal steel; Andrej Kurti on violin; Dave Domizi on double bass; Tony Oscar — the brilliant Brazilian percussionist with whom I'll be playing at Gallery 378 on March 14 — among others.

Tony Paris: As in the past, you are accompanied by a percussionist. What draws you to such minimalist accompaniment onstage?

Vic Varney: Not too long ago I had dinner in Nashville with David LaBryuere and his soon-to-be-wife Chelsea, who I had met but didn't really know. She said, “David talks about you a lot, so tell me, what, exactly, is your story, musically?” And I said, “Well, I started out in a two-piece band then decided to reduce.”

So in that regard I guess I've recently ... expanded. But to your point: I've recorded over 15 "proper" albums. Ten were done with no more than one other musician. There are a lot of reasons for that — not least of which is really banal: money. I couldn't afford to adequately pay more than one person. If you pay for everything you do up front as you go, and you don't have a lot of dough to work with, and you want to spend whatever it takes to get a really good result in a good studio, then you have to make certain choices. I write and arrange with that in mind.

But the deeper, more revealing answer is this: I just don't like a lot of fluff. Recording a lot has taught me a lot, and one thing I noticed almost from the get-go is that the more stuff you add, the more conventional you're going to sound, especially if what you add is well done. I also noted, as I think everyone does, that doing so makes you a lot more likeable, and that almost everyone around you will encourage you to do that.

But the fact is, I've always — always — been drawn to those who said more with less. People like Robert Johnson, Joao Gilberto, Dylan, early Joni Mitchell, the Bruce Springsteen of Nebraska, the Richard Thompson of the solo shows, solo Blood Ulmer, Turkish musicians singing, playing an oud, those who did it with just voice and guitar. What I call the X-ray sound: where the soul comes through, and, ideally, little else. I'm about to record what I fully expect to be the best version of that I've done so far. And, buddy, let me tell ya — it's been a lifetime in the making. Sit down with a guitar, a chair and a mic, and pour your soul out, live, for 30 minutes ... sounds easy, don't it?

Tony Paris: With so many Athens bands reforming in one way or another, do you see some resurrection of the Method Actors in the future?

Vic Varney: No; absolutely zero.

Tony Paris: You mention having played a number of singer-songwriter showcase clubs, something that seems incongruous with your approach in the Method Actors. Has your songwriting changed? Or just the way and means of getting your songs to the public?

Vic Varney: Not sure I totally understand the question, but let me know if this helps: The Method Actors were loud, “experimental.” Tyrone's, the 40 Watt Club (all six iterations), Eddie’s, CBGB's, the Morton, the Agora, Hurrah, the Milkweg, the Peppermint Lounge, the Whisky, Blair's house tomorrow night, Betty Alice's living room, THE Living Room, whatever … I don't really see any distance between what I'm doing anywhere — just doing whatever I can, in any context offered, to get whatever it is I'm doing at that time across.

The problem is that what I've been doing over a far reach of time has changed quite a lot. And coming up one particular way colors everything one's expected to do afterwards. In a sense, I've kind of been chastised for not spending the last 35 years trying to recreate 1981. But that's OK — I do have one solace, which is that whatever song I wake up to work on every day is … time worth spending, time worth easing the passage of time. —CL—

Vic Varney, joined by Brazilian percussionist Tony Oscar, was scheduled to play the Lo Basement at 378 Gallery, 378 Clifton Road, 404-530-9277, Saturday, March 14. The show has since been cancelled."
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  string(10474) "In the late '70s/early 1980s, it was common to get a phone call or a letter from Vic Varney, letting me know when his band the Method Actors would be playing in town, whether at 688 or the Agora Ballroom. Of course, calling the Method Actors a band, back then, was stretching the term. Bands were made up of at least three, usually four or more musicians. When the Method Actors took the stage, it was Varney on guitar and vocals, with David Gamble on drums and vocals. They didn’t need anyone else. The songwriting was tight, the performances angular shots to the head and heart. If the Athens music scene from which they came — The B-52’s, Pylon, Love Tractor, etc. — was changing the way we heard music, the Method Actors were turning the very concept of what it meant to be a band on its head.

At the time, the Method Actors seemed destined for “greater things,” as it is said, but perhaps the greatest thing they did was exist at all. The four years they were together, whether as the original duo, or later as a three- and then four-piece band, seemed like it would go on forever. Then, as quickly as the Method Actors emerged, they disappeared.

Getting an email from Vic Varney, telling me he would be playing a show in Atlanta Saturday, March 14, was a surprise, to say the least. It’s been 25 years since he’s played this city, by his count. If you were to ask me, it seems like two or three lifetimes ago.

What has Varney been doing in the interim? Apparently, writing and recording songs as he always has. He explains it best.

__Tony Paris: Refresh my memory: Is it Method Actors, The Method Actors, or the Method Actors?__

__Vic Varney:__ It’s the Method Actors. I've always used a lower case t for all 'the' bands, including the Beatles. Whether that's correct or not in all cases to me is irrelevant, simply because I like the idea of a definite article being definite enough without having to draw any more attention to itself.

__Tony Paris: The Method Actors were very much a part of the Athens scene, yet the band also seemed to be very much unto itself.__

__Vic Varney:__ I totally, happily, sadly, realistically agree. This is a point that seems to have been lost on most from Day One, and I can totally see why. First, my deep involvement with Pylon; that shaded a certain perception. I was very much part of the inner sanctum of a wonderfully edgy, niche-y scene, which, although I shamelessly promoted it (and self-promoted), I was destined to part from pretty early.

The Method Actors were an entity very much unto itself because, at the risk of sounding horribly self-aggrandizing, David and I were totally anomalous entities unto ourselves. If anything, we sort of backed into being in the right place at exactly the right time but, for better or for worse, were never really of a piece with that scene. The fact is, in 1980 and 1981 we were out of Athens more than in it, and much of that time was spent in England.

Having spent my life paying for that — not really fitting in — I feel that I can talk about it pretty objectively. And let me rush to point out that I'm not saying any of this with either pride or bitterness, on the one hand, or condescension on the other. I loved'' ''being a part of what happened in Athens, in particular, between 1978 and 1982, and have been a proud Athenian before and since (even when I was living in New York). But what we were doing in the Method Actors, as both a two-piece, and, later, as a three- and finally four-piece, didn't really mesh with whatever else was going on, not only in Athens but really anywhere. It would be horribly self-mythologizing to regard it as ''sui generis'', but take Little Figures'' ''(1981), no longer my favorite Method Actors record but, as a double with 17 songs, obviously the most expansive — listen to “Bleeding," then “Pigeons," then “Halloween," then "H-Hi Whoopee." I mean … who else was doing that?

Robert Christgau once wrote in the ''Village Voice'' that the Method Actors personified what might be called Nonpopular Music. That is, a band destined to toil in the vineyards of pop but who could never make anything popular, anything that huge numbers of people would like. He didn't mean it as a compliment. But that's insightful. I seem to have done my best ever since to prove him right.

__Tony Paris: Briefly, what have you been doing musically in the many years since the Method Actors?__

__Vic Varney:__ Since the end of the Method Actors (ca. 1984), I've recorded approximately 500 songs, of which I'd consider about 100 “keepers." For 26 of those years I was a full-time teacher of English (UGA, Columbia, and NYU) so I didn't really have time to pursue the career end of it with as much passion and focus as perhaps I should have, although I've never stopped playing out. In New York, I played at the Fez and, later, had a regular gig at the Living Room. I've played out, spottily, in Athens at a variety of venues over the last 35 years.

What I've particularly mastered is a failure to do anything with music on the promotional side. On the positive, I own all of it because I've written everything I've recorded and paid for all of the recordings. On the negative, I've done absolutely zero to find any of the recordings a good home. And I can be very specific about why: First, up until recently I had, as I said, a full-time job which entailed certain responsibilities. I spent all my available music time writing, practicing, and recording, and that left little time for the thing that increasingly, if unfortunately, became anathema: promoting the stuff, playing that particular game — just not my beach.

And to be totally frank — and this is painful to admit but it would be pretty dumb not to — I think that particular failure comes from my seeing pretty early that what I was doing had a certain ceiling. That it was simply not going to win any contests in a certain arena, and that what time I had would be best spent ensuring that what mattered the most to me, the songs,'' ''were taken care of. Which meant spending the time to write well, then distill, then distill further, then, when satisfied they were ready to go in the oven, record properly. As anyone with ears who hears can attest, an awful lot of them have been recorded beautifully, many with terrific musicians, including David LaBruyere on bass; Russ Pahl and Matt Stoessel on pedal steel; Andrej Kurti on violin; Dave Domizi on double bass; Tony Oscar — the brilliant Brazilian percussionist with whom I'll be playing at Gallery 378 on March 14 — among others.

__Tony Paris: As in the past, you are accompanied by a percussionist. What draws you to such minimalist accompaniment onstage?__

__Vic Varney:__ Not too long ago I had dinner in Nashville with David LaBryuere and his soon-to-be-wife Chelsea, who I had met but didn't really know. She said, “David talks about you a lot, so tell me, what, exactly, is your story, musically?” And I said, “Well, I started out in a two-piece band then decided to reduce.”

So in that regard I guess I've recently ... expanded. But to your point: I've recorded over 15 "proper" albums. Ten were done with no more than one other musician. There are a lot of reasons for that — not least of which is really banal: money. I couldn't afford to adequately pay more than one person. If you pay for everything you do up front as you go, and you don't have a lot of dough to work with, and you want to spend whatever it takes to get a really good result in a good studio, then you have to make certain choices. I write and arrange with that in mind.

But the deeper, more revealing answer is this: I just don't like a lot of fluff. Recording a lot has taught me a lot, and one thing I noticed almost from the get-go is that the more stuff you add, the more conventional you're going to sound, especially if what you add is well done. I also noted, as I think everyone does, that doing so makes you a lot more likeable, and that almost everyone around you will encourage you to do that.

But the fact is, I've always — always — been drawn to those who said more with less. People like Robert Johnson, Joao Gilberto, Dylan, early Joni Mitchell, the Bruce Springsteen of Nebraska'', ''the Richard Thompson of the solo shows, solo Blood Ulmer, Turkish musicians singing, playing an oud, those who did it with just voice and guitar. What I call the X-ray sound: where the soul comes through, and, ideally, little else. I'm about to record what I fully expect to be the best version of that I've done so far. And, buddy, let me tell ya — it's been a lifetime in the making. Sit down with a guitar, a chair and a mic, and pour your soul out, live, for 30 minutes ... sounds easy, don't it?

__Tony Paris: With so many Athens bands reforming in one way or another, do you see some resurrection of the Method Actors in the future?__

__Vic Varney:__ No; absolutely zero.

__Tony Paris: You mention having played a number of singer-songwriter showcase clubs, something that seems incongruous with your approach in the Method Actors. Has your songwriting changed? Or just the way and means of getting your songs to the public?__

__Vic Varney:__ Not sure I totally understand the question, but let me know if this helps: The Method Actors were loud, “experimental.” Tyrone's, the 40 Watt Club (all six iterations), Eddie’s, CBGB's, the Morton, the Agora, Hurrah, the Milkweg, the Peppermint Lounge, the Whisky, Blair's house tomorrow night, Betty Alice's living room, THE Living Room, whatever … I don't really see any distance between what I'm doing anywhere — just doing whatever I can, in any context offered, to get whatever it is I'm doing at that time across.

The problem is that what I've been doing over a far reach of time has changed quite a lot. And coming up one particular way colors everything one's expected to do afterwards. In a sense, I've kind of been chastised for not spending the last 35 years trying to recreate 1981. But that's OK — I do have one solace, which is that whatever song I wake up to work on every day is … time worth spending, time worth easing the passage of time. —CL—

''Vic Varney, joined by Brazilian percussionist Tony Oscar, was scheduled to play the Lo Basement at 378 Gallery, 378 Clifton Road, 404-530-9277, Saturday, March 14. The show has since been cancelled.''"
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  string(11027) " VV Crop  2020-03-10T12:56:14+00:00 VV crop.jpg    methodactors vicvarney athensmusic 378gallery Vic Varney, an early mainstay of the Athens music scene,  discusses that, while he may have been absent from performing, he has continued to write and record new songs. 29999  2020-03-10T12:45:49+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Being there and back again tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris TONY PARIS Tony Paris 2020-03-10T12:45:49+00:00  In the late '70s/early 1980s, it was common to get a phone call or a letter from Vic Varney, letting me know when his band the Method Actors would be playing in town, whether at 688 or the Agora Ballroom. Of course, calling the Method Actors a band, back then, was stretching the term. Bands were made up of at least three, usually four or more musicians. When the Method Actors took the stage, it was Varney on guitar and vocals, with David Gamble on drums and vocals. They didn’t need anyone else. The songwriting was tight, the performances angular shots to the head and heart. If the Athens music scene from which they came — The B-52’s, Pylon, Love Tractor, etc. — was changing the way we heard music, the Method Actors were turning the very concept of what it meant to be a band on its head.

At the time, the Method Actors seemed destined for “greater things,” as it is said, but perhaps the greatest thing they did was exist at all. The four years they were together, whether as the original duo, or later as a three- and then four-piece band, seemed like it would go on forever. Then, as quickly as the Method Actors emerged, they disappeared.

Getting an email from Vic Varney, telling me he would be playing a show in Atlanta Saturday, March 14, was a surprise, to say the least. It’s been 25 years since he’s played this city, by his count. If you were to ask me, it seems like two or three lifetimes ago.

What has Varney been doing in the interim? Apparently, writing and recording songs as he always has. He explains it best.

Tony Paris: Refresh my memory: Is it Method Actors, The Method Actors, or the Method Actors?

Vic Varney: It’s the Method Actors. I've always used a lower case t for all 'the' bands, including the Beatles. Whether that's correct or not in all cases to me is irrelevant, simply because I like the idea of a definite article being definite enough without having to draw any more attention to itself.

Tony Paris: The Method Actors were very much a part of the Athens scene, yet the band also seemed to be very much unto itself.

Vic Varney: I totally, happily, sadly, realistically agree. This is a point that seems to have been lost on most from Day One, and I can totally see why. First, my deep involvement with Pylon; that shaded a certain perception. I was very much part of the inner sanctum of a wonderfully edgy, niche-y scene, which, although I shamelessly promoted it (and self-promoted), I was destined to part from pretty early.

The Method Actors were an entity very much unto itself because, at the risk of sounding horribly self-aggrandizing, David and I were totally anomalous entities unto ourselves. If anything, we sort of backed into being in the right place at exactly the right time but, for better or for worse, were never really of a piece with that scene. The fact is, in 1980 and 1981 we were out of Athens more than in it, and much of that time was spent in England.

Having spent my life paying for that — not really fitting in — I feel that I can talk about it pretty objectively. And let me rush to point out that I'm not saying any of this with either pride or bitterness, on the one hand, or condescension on the other. I loved being a part of what happened in Athens, in particular, between 1978 and 1982, and have been a proud Athenian before and since (even when I was living in New York). But what we were doing in the Method Actors, as both a two-piece, and, later, as a three- and finally four-piece, didn't really mesh with whatever else was going on, not only in Athens but really anywhere. It would be horribly self-mythologizing to regard it as sui generis, but take Little Figures (1981), no longer my favorite Method Actors record but, as a double with 17 songs, obviously the most expansive — listen to “Bleeding," then “Pigeons," then “Halloween," then "H-Hi Whoopee." I mean … who else was doing that?

Robert Christgau once wrote in the Village Voice that the Method Actors personified what might be called Nonpopular Music. That is, a band destined to toil in the vineyards of pop but who could never make anything popular, anything that huge numbers of people would like. He didn't mean it as a compliment. But that's insightful. I seem to have done my best ever since to prove him right.

Tony Paris: Briefly, what have you been doing musically in the many years since the Method Actors?

Vic Varney: Since the end of the Method Actors (ca. 1984), I've recorded approximately 500 songs, of which I'd consider about 100 “keepers." For 26 of those years I was a full-time teacher of English (UGA, Columbia, and NYU) so I didn't really have time to pursue the career end of it with as much passion and focus as perhaps I should have, although I've never stopped playing out. In New York, I played at the Fez and, later, had a regular gig at the Living Room. I've played out, spottily, in Athens at a variety of venues over the last 35 years.

What I've particularly mastered is a failure to do anything with music on the promotional side. On the positive, I own all of it because I've written everything I've recorded and paid for all of the recordings. On the negative, I've done absolutely zero to find any of the recordings a good home. And I can be very specific about why: First, up until recently I had, as I said, a full-time job which entailed certain responsibilities. I spent all my available music time writing, practicing, and recording, and that left little time for the thing that increasingly, if unfortunately, became anathema: promoting the stuff, playing that particular game — just not my beach.

And to be totally frank — and this is painful to admit but it would be pretty dumb not to — I think that particular failure comes from my seeing pretty early that what I was doing had a certain ceiling. That it was simply not going to win any contests in a certain arena, and that what time I had would be best spent ensuring that what mattered the most to me, the songs, were taken care of. Which meant spending the time to write well, then distill, then distill further, then, when satisfied they were ready to go in the oven, record properly. As anyone with ears who hears can attest, an awful lot of them have been recorded beautifully, many with terrific musicians, including David LaBruyere on bass; Russ Pahl and Matt Stoessel on pedal steel; Andrej Kurti on violin; Dave Domizi on double bass; Tony Oscar — the brilliant Brazilian percussionist with whom I'll be playing at Gallery 378 on March 14 — among others.

Tony Paris: As in the past, you are accompanied by a percussionist. What draws you to such minimalist accompaniment onstage?

Vic Varney: Not too long ago I had dinner in Nashville with David LaBryuere and his soon-to-be-wife Chelsea, who I had met but didn't really know. She said, “David talks about you a lot, so tell me, what, exactly, is your story, musically?” And I said, “Well, I started out in a two-piece band then decided to reduce.”

So in that regard I guess I've recently ... expanded. But to your point: I've recorded over 15 "proper" albums. Ten were done with no more than one other musician. There are a lot of reasons for that — not least of which is really banal: money. I couldn't afford to adequately pay more than one person. If you pay for everything you do up front as you go, and you don't have a lot of dough to work with, and you want to spend whatever it takes to get a really good result in a good studio, then you have to make certain choices. I write and arrange with that in mind.

But the deeper, more revealing answer is this: I just don't like a lot of fluff. Recording a lot has taught me a lot, and one thing I noticed almost from the get-go is that the more stuff you add, the more conventional you're going to sound, especially if what you add is well done. I also noted, as I think everyone does, that doing so makes you a lot more likeable, and that almost everyone around you will encourage you to do that.

But the fact is, I've always — always — been drawn to those who said more with less. People like Robert Johnson, Joao Gilberto, Dylan, early Joni Mitchell, the Bruce Springsteen of Nebraska, the Richard Thompson of the solo shows, solo Blood Ulmer, Turkish musicians singing, playing an oud, those who did it with just voice and guitar. What I call the X-ray sound: where the soul comes through, and, ideally, little else. I'm about to record what I fully expect to be the best version of that I've done so far. And, buddy, let me tell ya — it's been a lifetime in the making. Sit down with a guitar, a chair and a mic, and pour your soul out, live, for 30 minutes ... sounds easy, don't it?

Tony Paris: With so many Athens bands reforming in one way or another, do you see some resurrection of the Method Actors in the future?

Vic Varney: No; absolutely zero.

Tony Paris: You mention having played a number of singer-songwriter showcase clubs, something that seems incongruous with your approach in the Method Actors. Has your songwriting changed? Or just the way and means of getting your songs to the public?

Vic Varney: Not sure I totally understand the question, but let me know if this helps: The Method Actors were loud, “experimental.” Tyrone's, the 40 Watt Club (all six iterations), Eddie’s, CBGB's, the Morton, the Agora, Hurrah, the Milkweg, the Peppermint Lounge, the Whisky, Blair's house tomorrow night, Betty Alice's living room, THE Living Room, whatever … I don't really see any distance between what I'm doing anywhere — just doing whatever I can, in any context offered, to get whatever it is I'm doing at that time across.

The problem is that what I've been doing over a far reach of time has changed quite a lot. And coming up one particular way colors everything one's expected to do afterwards. In a sense, I've kind of been chastised for not spending the last 35 years trying to recreate 1981. But that's OK — I do have one solace, which is that whatever song I wake up to work on every day is … time worth spending, time worth easing the passage of time. —CL—

Vic Varney, joined by Brazilian percussionist Tony Oscar, was scheduled to play the Lo Basement at 378 Gallery, 378 Clifton Road, 404-530-9277, Saturday, March 14. The show has since been cancelled.    Courtesy Vic Varney METHOD ACTING: Vic Varney now and then.  0,0,1    MethodActors VicVarney Athensmusic 378Gallery                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Being there and back again "
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Music, High Frequencies, Local Music Features, Show Preview

Tuesday March 10, 2020 08:45 am EDT
Vic Varney, an early mainstay of the Athens music scene,  discusses that, while he may have been absent from performing, he has continued to write and record new songs. | more...
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  string(6231) "This weekend the Savannah Stopover Music Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary. Ten years of providing emerging bands traveling to Austin’s South by Southwest Music Conference a place to play en route to the international showcase in the Texas capital where their dreams may become reality.

It was a smart move for the festival’s founder, Kayne Lanahan, to take advantage of Savannah’s proximity to interstates 95 and 10 (routes many bands travel on their way to Austin) and offer a mini version of SXSW that would give musicians a chance to book another gig, maybe make some gas money, and garner new fans — and that offered music lovers unable to attend SXSW the chance to see up-and-coming bands.

::::
It’s the kind of move that can only happen in a smaller town where people unite together to put their city “on the map,” rather than larger metropolises dominated by infighting, jealousy, and greed.

I remember being in Austin in 1985 having lunch with Louis Black, one of the co-founders of SXSW. He was telling me how he, along with Roland Swenson, Nick Barbaro, and the late Louis Jay Meyers had been meeting with city officials to organize a weekend-long music festival in the then-sleepy college town to feature young bands, panels made up of music business professionals, and guest speakers — and to host record company A&R people, the rock press, slackers, and other music hangers-on looking for the “next big thing.” Thirty-five years later, SXSW pumps over $350  million annually into the city’s economy.

In Savannah, the Stopover Music Festival hasn’t grown to quite such proportions, but it has brought much-needed attention to Georgia’s oldest city, and offers those venturing to it a chance to see new bands without the crowds — and headaches — of SXSW.  For the 10th-anniversary celebration this year, over 60 bands perform at eight venues throughout  the city. Attendees can take in more music than they usually get to see in a weekend — and also experience some low-country hospitality.

At Wax N Facts the other day, Danny Beard took me upstairs. He wanted me to hear something. He put on the new Ambulette E.P., of which he’d just received a handful of copies of the vinyl 12-inch. The work of Matt Brown (Uncle Green, 3 Lb. Thrill) and Halley O’Malley (Nothing, No One), aided and abetted by guitarist Jonny Daly, bassist Lee Kennedy, and drummer Lee Wiggins, Too Bad About All Your Problems recalls what was best about late ’70s and early ’80s alternative music, if Wire, Television, and the Clash were your call to arms. I could understand Beard’s enthusiasm, the record rocks! Produced by the band and David Barbe and recorded at Chase Park Transduction Studios in Athens, the recording is a balancing act of musical experience and naiveté that is a refreshing antidote to the many ills in the world today. Definitely worth checking out, Ambulette performs this Saturday, March 7, at 529 with Five Eight, Big Fish Ensemble and Loud Humans.

::::
Two years ago, I witnessed Pleasure Club for the first time. Their set was mesmerizing. Vocalist James Hall cast a spell on the audience, a shaman unleashed, backed by a foreboding Goth tapestry of sounds provided by guitarist Marc Hutner, bassist Grant Curry, and drummer Michael Jerome. I remembered when Hall released his first solo album, Pleasure Club, from which this band takes its name, but I left Atlanta around the time of its release, and never got a chance to see Hall, or his subsequent band, live. Once Pleasure Club solidified, the band released two albums, Here Comes the Trick and The Fugitive Kind, garnering them fans in this country and others. Reuniting for shows in 2018, Pleasure Club is back with a new release, Scatter Roses, a four-song E.P. Produced and engineered by Curry, three of the songs are new recordings that capture the band’s onstage intensity while offering the nuanced soundscapes only achievable in a studio. The fourth, “Crooks” is from their 2004 release, The Fugitive Kind, remixed and presented in the full extended version as originally recorded. Pleasure Club celebrates the release of the new E.P. this weekend, with shows at the Earl Friday, March 6, and Saturday, March 7 — their only scheduled dates for 2020.

Opening Friday night’s show is Darling Machine, on the heels of releasing The Beautiful EP, also produced and engineered by Pleasure Club’s Curry. The three originals show a maturation in the band’s songwriting process, while keeping in line with its hard-rocking, Goth-inspired eponymous-titled debut. The fourth song on the E.P., a cover of David Bowie’s 1980 offering, “Scary Monsters & Super Creeps,” shows just how far ahead of his time Bowie was — and how much Darling Machines owes to the past while building its future.

Sunday, March 15, UKBOB celebrates his birthday — and 20 years on the air at WRFG, 89.3 FM Atlanta — at the Vista Room with the Blues Beatles. A six-piece band from Brazil, they offer roots-music takes on the music of the Fab Four, linking the British Invasion to the Delta Blues as UKBOB has been doing for two decades on his show “London to Louisiana.” As he says in a recent email, it’s “worth putting on shoes and leaving your zip code!”
 

Don’t forget: Re-igniting their "No Filter" tour, tickets for the Rolling Stones, July 9 at Mercedes Benz Stadium, are on sale now. … Tickets for the September 23 Bauhaus show at the Coca-Cola Roxy are also on sale. With Atlanta being one of only a handful of cities in which the reformed Goth Rock progenitors are performing, expect tickets to sell out fast, as people will certainly be traveling from out of state for this one. … Graham Nash, who will forever be associated with Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young (though he had already cemented a place for himself in the pop music echelon as a member of The Hollies), returns to Atlanta Tuesday, March 17, at Variety Playhouse. … Oh yeah, as if March 7 isn’t busy enough already, Wire plays the Variety this Saturday. … And though Sinead O’Connor’s two nights at City Winery, March 22 and 23, are sold out, the club does have a waiting list."
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  string(8134) "This weekend the __[https://www.savannahstopover.com|Savannah Stopover Music Festival]__ celebrates its 10th anniversary. Ten years of providing emerging bands traveling to Austin’s [https://www.sxsw.com|South by Southwest Music] Conference a place to play en route to the international showcase in the Texas capital where their dreams may become reality.

It was a smart move for the festival’s founder, __Kayne Lanahan__, to take advantage of [https://www.visitsavannah.com|Savannah]’s proximity to interstates 95 and 10 (routes many bands travel on their way to Austin) and offer a mini version of SXSW that would give musicians a chance to book another gig, maybe make some gas money, and garner new fans — and that offered music lovers unable to attend SXSW the chance to see up-and-coming bands.

::{img fileId="29618" desc="desc"}::
It’s the kind of move that can only happen in a smaller town where people unite together to put their city “on the map,” rather than larger metropolises dominated by infighting, jealousy, and greed.

I remember being in Austin in 1985 having lunch with Louis Black, one of the co-founders of SXSW. He was telling me how he, along with Roland Swenson, Nick Barbaro, and the late Louis Jay Meyers had been meeting with city officials to organize a weekend-long music festival in the then-sleepy college town to feature young bands, panels made up of music business professionals, and guest speakers — and to host record company A&R people, the rock press, slackers, and other music hangers-on looking for the “next big thing.” Thirty-five years later, SXSW pumps over $350  million annually into the city’s economy.

In Savannah, the Stopover Music Festival hasn’t grown to quite such proportions, but it has brought much-needed attention to Georgia’s oldest city, and offers those venturing to it a chance to see new bands without the crowds — and headaches — of SXSW.  For the 10th-anniversary celebration this year, over 60 bands perform at eight venues throughout  the city. Attendees can take in more music than they usually get to see in a weekend — and also experience some low-country hospitality.

At [http://littlefivepoints.net/wax-n-facts|Wax N Facts] the other day, Danny Beard took me upstairs. He wanted me to hear something. He put on the new __[https://www.facebook.com/ambuletteATL/|Ambulette]__ E.P., of which he’d just received a handful of copies of the vinyl 12-inch. The work of Matt Brown (Uncle Green, 3 Lb. Thrill) and Halley O’Malley (Nothing, No One), aided and abetted by guitarist Jonny Daly, bassist Lee Kennedy, and drummer Lee Wiggins, ''[https://ambulette.bandcamp.com/?fbclid=IwAR2B9yvfGR7EE05MSrDzGzYcEYWiQ97FZ7qehUa5R7u1bNyvg-rQ6BLp1AA|Too Bad About All Your Problems]'' recalls what was best about late ’70s and early ’80s alternative music, if Wire, Television, and the Clash were your call to arms. I could understand Beard’s enthusiasm, the record rocks! Produced by the band and David Barbe and recorded at Chase Park Transduction Studios in Athens, the recording is a balancing act of musical experience and naiveté that is a refreshing antidote to the many ills in the world today. Definitely worth checking out, Ambulette performs this Saturday, [https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ambulette-ep-release-w-five-eight-big-fish-ensemble-loudhumans-tickets-87636644563?aff=efbeventtix&fbclid=IwAR3MM85sCxYxqEhsP0WR_VjGiczPrjYXvuNCKNdwrtDnFETFSIJu7pkvHsU|March 7], at [http://529atlanta.com|529] with __Five Eight, Big Fish Ensemble__ and __Loud Humans.__

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Two years ago, I witnessed __[https://www.picuki.com/profile/pleasure_club_music|Pleasure Club]__ for the first time. Their set was mesmerizing. Vocalist James Hall cast a spell on the audience, a shaman unleashed, backed by a foreboding Goth tapestry of sounds provided by guitarist Marc Hutner, bassist Grant Curry, and drummer Michael Jerome. I remembered when Hall released his first solo album, ''Pleasure Club'', from which this band takes its name, but I left Atlanta around the time of its release, and never got a chance to see Hall, or his subsequent band, live. Once Pleasure Club solidified, the band released two albums, ''Here Comes the Trick'' and ''The Fugitive Kind'', garnering them fans in this country and others. Reuniting for shows in [https://creativeloafing.com/content-272134-a-conversation-with-james-hall|2018], Pleasure Club is back with a new release, ''[https://open.spotify.com/album/2UcU9C1D5N0MGggtyD9xcv?si=dt1xT9_oSFSgKXZ2_seRTQ&fbclid=IwAR1ldS337BIhqLWhpePYmORqbhs_aJ_jpAHSMFLC8181BsinGj1OJHnbV94|Scatter Roses]'', a four-song E.P. Produced and engineered by Curry, three of the songs are new recordings that capture the band’s onstage intensity while offering the nuanced soundscapes only achievable in a studio. The fourth, “Crooks” is from their 2004 release, ''The Fugitive Kind'', remixed and presented in the full extended version as originally recorded. Pleasure Club celebrates the release of the new E.P. this weekend, with [https://www.badearl.com/events/5288/Pleasure-Club|shows] at [http://www.badearl.com|the Earl] Friday, March 6, and Saturday, March 7 — their only scheduled dates for 2020.

Opening Friday night’s show is __[https://www.facebook.com/DarlingMachineAtlanta/|Darling Machine]__, on the heels of releasing ''The Beautiful EP'', also produced and engineered by Pleasure Club’s Curry. The three originals show a maturation in the band’s songwriting process, while keeping in line with its hard-rocking, Goth-inspired eponymous-titled [https://creativeloafing.com/content-420276-high-frequencies-darling-machine-celebrate-darling|debut]. The fourth song on the E.P., a cover of David Bowie’s 1980 offering, “Scary Monsters & Super Creeps,” shows just how far ahead of his time Bowie was — and how much Darling Machines owes to the past while building its future.

Sunday, March 15, __UKBOB__ celebrates his birthday — and 20 years on the air at [https://wrfg.org|WRFG], 89.3 FM Atlanta — at the [https://www.thevistaroom.com/music|Vista Room] with the __[https://intrepidartists.com/artists/blues-beatles/|Blues Beatles]__. A six-piece band from Brazil, they offer roots-music [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYRP_qNcddA|takes] on the music of the Fab Four, linking the British Invasion to the Delta Blues as UKBOB has been doing for two decades on his show “London to Louisiana.” As he says in a recent email, it’s “worth putting on shoes and leaving your zip code!”
 

__Don’t forget:__ Re-igniting their "No Filter" tour, tickets for the __[https://www.youtube.com/therollingstones|Rolling Stones]__, July 9 at [https://mercedesbenzstadium.com/rolling-stones-return-atlanta-2020-no-filter-tour/|Mercedes Benz Stadium], are on sale now. … Tickets for the September 23 __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhaus_(band)|Bauhaus]__ show at the [http://www.cocacolaroxy.com|Coca-Cola Roxy] are also on sale. With Atlanta being one of only a handful of cities in which the reformed Goth Rock progenitors are performing, expect tickets to sell out fast, as people will certainly be traveling from out of state for this one. … __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_Nash|Graham Nash]__, who will forever be associated with Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young (though he had already cemented a place for himself in the pop music echelon as a member of The Hollies), returns to Atlanta Tuesday, [https://www.eventbrite.com/e/graham-nash-tickets-75169420761|March 17], at [http://www.variety-playhouse.com|Variety Playhouse]. … Oh yeah, as if March 7 isn’t busy enough already, __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wire_(band)|Wire]__ plays the Variety this Saturday. … And though __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinéad_O'Connor|Sinead O’Connor]__’s two nights at [https://citywinery.com/atlanta/|City Winery], March [https://citywinery.com/atlanta/sinead-o-conner-3-22-20.html|22] and [https://citywinery.com/atlanta/sinead-o-conner-3-23-20.html|23], are sold out, the club does have a waiting list."
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  string(6833) " HiFreqs Ambulette STACKS OF TRACKS AT WAX N FACTS: The new Ambulette E.P. Photo credit: Tony Paris 2020-03-02T20:13:17+00:00 HiFreqs_Ambulette.jpg    darlingmachine highfreqs ambulette pleasureclub Repurposing music of the past for a better future 29616  2020-03-02T19:59:40+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: New lamps for old jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2020-03-02T19:59:40+00:00  This weekend the Savannah Stopover Music Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary. Ten years of providing emerging bands traveling to Austin’s South by Southwest Music Conference a place to play en route to the international showcase in the Texas capital where their dreams may become reality.

It was a smart move for the festival’s founder, Kayne Lanahan, to take advantage of Savannah’s proximity to interstates 95 and 10 (routes many bands travel on their way to Austin) and offer a mini version of SXSW that would give musicians a chance to book another gig, maybe make some gas money, and garner new fans — and that offered music lovers unable to attend SXSW the chance to see up-and-coming bands.

::::
It’s the kind of move that can only happen in a smaller town where people unite together to put their city “on the map,” rather than larger metropolises dominated by infighting, jealousy, and greed.

I remember being in Austin in 1985 having lunch with Louis Black, one of the co-founders of SXSW. He was telling me how he, along with Roland Swenson, Nick Barbaro, and the late Louis Jay Meyers had been meeting with city officials to organize a weekend-long music festival in the then-sleepy college town to feature young bands, panels made up of music business professionals, and guest speakers — and to host record company A&R people, the rock press, slackers, and other music hangers-on looking for the “next big thing.” Thirty-five years later, SXSW pumps over $350  million annually into the city’s economy.

In Savannah, the Stopover Music Festival hasn’t grown to quite such proportions, but it has brought much-needed attention to Georgia’s oldest city, and offers those venturing to it a chance to see new bands without the crowds — and headaches — of SXSW.  For the 10th-anniversary celebration this year, over 60 bands perform at eight venues throughout  the city. Attendees can take in more music than they usually get to see in a weekend — and also experience some low-country hospitality.

At Wax N Facts the other day, Danny Beard took me upstairs. He wanted me to hear something. He put on the new Ambulette E.P., of which he’d just received a handful of copies of the vinyl 12-inch. The work of Matt Brown (Uncle Green, 3 Lb. Thrill) and Halley O’Malley (Nothing, No One), aided and abetted by guitarist Jonny Daly, bassist Lee Kennedy, and drummer Lee Wiggins, Too Bad About All Your Problems recalls what was best about late ’70s and early ’80s alternative music, if Wire, Television, and the Clash were your call to arms. I could understand Beard’s enthusiasm, the record rocks! Produced by the band and David Barbe and recorded at Chase Park Transduction Studios in Athens, the recording is a balancing act of musical experience and naiveté that is a refreshing antidote to the many ills in the world today. Definitely worth checking out, Ambulette performs this Saturday, March 7, at 529 with Five Eight, Big Fish Ensemble and Loud Humans.

::::
Two years ago, I witnessed Pleasure Club for the first time. Their set was mesmerizing. Vocalist James Hall cast a spell on the audience, a shaman unleashed, backed by a foreboding Goth tapestry of sounds provided by guitarist Marc Hutner, bassist Grant Curry, and drummer Michael Jerome. I remembered when Hall released his first solo album, Pleasure Club, from which this band takes its name, but I left Atlanta around the time of its release, and never got a chance to see Hall, or his subsequent band, live. Once Pleasure Club solidified, the band released two albums, Here Comes the Trick and The Fugitive Kind, garnering them fans in this country and others. Reuniting for shows in 2018, Pleasure Club is back with a new release, Scatter Roses, a four-song E.P. Produced and engineered by Curry, three of the songs are new recordings that capture the band’s onstage intensity while offering the nuanced soundscapes only achievable in a studio. The fourth, “Crooks” is from their 2004 release, The Fugitive Kind, remixed and presented in the full extended version as originally recorded. Pleasure Club celebrates the release of the new E.P. this weekend, with shows at the Earl Friday, March 6, and Saturday, March 7 — their only scheduled dates for 2020.

Opening Friday night’s show is Darling Machine, on the heels of releasing The Beautiful EP, also produced and engineered by Pleasure Club’s Curry. The three originals show a maturation in the band’s songwriting process, while keeping in line with its hard-rocking, Goth-inspired eponymous-titled debut. The fourth song on the E.P., a cover of David Bowie’s 1980 offering, “Scary Monsters & Super Creeps,” shows just how far ahead of his time Bowie was — and how much Darling Machines owes to the past while building its future.

Sunday, March 15, UKBOB celebrates his birthday — and 20 years on the air at WRFG, 89.3 FM Atlanta — at the Vista Room with the Blues Beatles. A six-piece band from Brazil, they offer roots-music takes on the music of the Fab Four, linking the British Invasion to the Delta Blues as UKBOB has been doing for two decades on his show “London to Louisiana.” As he says in a recent email, it’s “worth putting on shoes and leaving your zip code!”
 

Don’t forget: Re-igniting their "No Filter" tour, tickets for the Rolling Stones, July 9 at Mercedes Benz Stadium, are on sale now. … Tickets for the September 23 Bauhaus show at the Coca-Cola Roxy are also on sale. With Atlanta being one of only a handful of cities in which the reformed Goth Rock progenitors are performing, expect tickets to sell out fast, as people will certainly be traveling from out of state for this one. … Graham Nash, who will forever be associated with Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young (though he had already cemented a place for himself in the pop music echelon as a member of The Hollies), returns to Atlanta Tuesday, March 17, at Variety Playhouse. … Oh yeah, as if March 7 isn’t busy enough already, Wire plays the Variety this Saturday. … And though Sinead O’Connor’s two nights at City Winery, March 22 and 23, are sold out, the club does have a waiting list.    Tony Paris STACKS OF TRACKS AT WAX N FACTS: The new Ambulette E.P.  0,0,1    highfreqs ambulette pleasureclub darlingmachine                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: New lamps for old "
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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies

Monday March 2, 2020 02:59 pm EST
Repurposing music of the past for a better future | more...
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  string(5588) "When Band of Gypsys, the Jimi Hendrix album recorded live at the Fillmore East 50 years ago New Year’s Eve, was first released in the spring of 1970, it was done so as an anomaly. It wasn’t a new Hendrix release per se, but a contractual obligation, a record designed to accommodate papers he’d signed while still a sideman playing the Chitlin’ Circuit.

Band of Gypsys was not released by Reprise Records, the label for which Hendrix recorded and on which he had released three albums — Are You Experienced, Axis: Bold As Love, and Electric Ladyland — which propelled him on his meteoric rise to fame. Those albums, recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience — with Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell, the two white, British musicians playing at his side as Hendrix emerged a musical shaman burning bright — altered the course of popular music with their psychedelic experimentation, Hendrix’s other-worldly approach to playing the guitar, and his consciousness-expanding lyrics.

Band of Gypsys, released on Capitol Records, was a stopgap between studio albums, a chance for the guitarist to wrangle free of a binding contract he mistakenly signed in 1965 while recording with Curtis Knight. 

To record Band of Gypsys, Hendrix enlisted ex-Electric Flag drummer Buddy Miles and ex-Army buddy Billy Cox on bass. The three had been jamming together, and the two musicians were eager to help the guitarist out of his predicament. The decision was to record four shows at New York’s Fillmore East — early and late sets December 31, 1969, and January 1, 1970 — giving Capitol one album, thereby fulfilling Hendrix’s contract.

When Hendrix took the stage with “some old friends with a brand new name, a Band of Gypsys,” everything was different. Hendrix’s music was more grounded, as if he had been searching for and rediscovering his roots — the blues, R&B, soul music — in a way that could only have been divined by someone who had explored the outer reaches of music. Hendrix was coming back to earth with greater vision, clarity, understanding, and focus, taking by surprise those who saw him as the psychedelic high priest of Groovy.

With the two African-American musicians onstage with him, the music didn’t echo the Flower Power of the ’60s, nor did the lyrics offer any lysergic road maps to self-awareness. With the Band of Gypsys, Hendrix got down to the real nitty-gritty, dealing with the realities of the day. “Machine Gun” was wrought by the Vietnam War and the divide it was creating in this country; “Message Of Love” sought to bring all people together; and “Power of Soul” — well, with it, “anything is possible.”

In less than a year, Hendrix would be dead, and the sole Band of Gypsys release would seem but a detour as he regrouped the Experience — now Mitchell and Cox — with the hits of his past diluting his message of love in the remaining concerts of his all-too-short life.

More than a contractual obligation fulfilled, Band of Gypsys marked a turning point in the guitarist’s career. Hendrix may not have connected with African Americans as he might’ve hoped at an ill-fated Harlem Street concert a few months prior, and the audience for the Fillmore East shows might’ve been primarily white, but the music played on those two nights is echoed in that of Parliament-Funkadelic, Vernon Reid’s Living Colour, and the countless other African American musicians inspired by those bands. For four months, the acknowledged time frame of the Band of Gypsys, Hendrix was reaching for a new musical Promised Land, leaving behind the gimmickry, the showmanship, and the wildman antics that had become his trademark with the Jimi Hendrix Experience. 


Fifty years on, with the recent release of the five CD set, Songs for Groovy Children, the full extent of the importance — indeed, the majesty — of those four concerts at the Fillmore East is revealed. Remixed with a presence and an immediacy that makes it hard to believe five decades have passed since their recording, the shows are presented in their near entirety — a few songs remain in the vaults due to Hendrix ’s guitar playing being too out of tune — offering the listener the chance to follow the progression of the songs and certainly to feel the difference Hendrix brought to each performance. With much of the live material recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the guitarist sounds as if he’s going through the motions, playing what’s expected of him to an audience there for the spectacle. On Songs for Groovy Children the playing is impassioned, with a depth typically not matched during one full concert, much less four shows in a row.


Songs for Groovy Children, its name taken from a comment Hendrix makes while introducing one of the songs, is pure, unadulterated Hendrix, the guitarist playing at his best, as if only for himself and the two other musicians onstage. That there were sold-out audiences bearing witness to each show seems to be of no consequence.

The original, six-song Band of Gypsys release — heavily edited from the performances released here— only hints at the power the three musicians brought with them. Subsequent hodgepodge releases of Band of Gypsys material have only served to confuse and muddy its impact. Presented here, as four concerts in succession, Songs for Groovy Children offers the truth and emotion embodied in the best of Hendrix’s music. And it certainly presents more questions than answers to what might have been had he lived. ­—CL—
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''Band of Gypsys'' was not released by Reprise Records, the label for which Hendrix recorded and on which he had released three albums — ''Are You Experienced, Axis: Bold As Love'', and ''Electric Ladyland'' — which propelled him on his meteoric rise to fame. Those albums, recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience — with Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell, the two white, British musicians playing at his side as Hendrix emerged a musical shaman burning bright — altered the course of popular music with their psychedelic experimentation, Hendrix’s other-worldly approach to playing the guitar, and his consciousness-expanding lyrics.

''Band of Gypsys'', released on Capitol Records, was a stopgap between studio albums, a chance for the guitarist to wrangle free of a binding contract he mistakenly signed in 1965 while recording with Curtis Knight. 

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When Hendrix took the stage with “some old friends with a brand new name, a Band of Gypsys,” everything was different. Hendrix’s music was more grounded, as if he had been searching for and rediscovering his roots — the blues, R&B, soul music — in a way that could only have been divined by someone who had explored the outer reaches of music. Hendrix was coming back to earth with greater vision, clarity, understanding, and focus, taking by surprise those who saw him as the psychedelic high priest of Groovy.

With the two African-American musicians onstage with him, the music didn’t echo the Flower Power of the ’60s, nor did the lyrics offer any lysergic road maps to self-awareness. With the Band of Gypsys, Hendrix got down to the real nitty-gritty, dealing with the realities of the day. “Machine Gun” was wrought by the Vietnam War and the divide it was creating in this country; “Message Of Love” sought to bring all people together; and “Power of Soul” — well, with it, “anything is possible.”

In less than a year, Hendrix would be dead, and the sole Band of Gypsys release would seem but a detour as he regrouped the Experience — now Mitchell and Cox — with the hits of his past diluting his message of love in the remaining concerts of his all-too-short life.

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Fifty years on, with the recent release of the five CD set, ''Songs for Groovy Children'', the full extent of the importance — indeed, the majesty — of those four concerts at the Fillmore East is revealed. Remixed with a presence and an immediacy that makes it hard to believe five decades have passed since their recording, the shows are presented in their near entirety — a few songs remain in the vaults due to Hendrix ’s guitar playing being too out of tune — offering the listener the chance to follow the progression of the songs and certainly to feel the difference Hendrix brought to each performance. With much of the live material recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the guitarist sounds as if he’s going through the motions, playing what’s expected of him to an audience there for the spectacle. On ''Songs for Groovy Children'' the playing is impassioned, with a depth typically not matched during one full concert, much less four shows in a row.


''Songs for Groovy Children'', its name taken from a comment Hendrix makes while introducing one of the songs, is pure, unadulterated Hendrix, the guitarist playing at his best, as if only for himself and the two other musicians onstage. That there were sold-out audiences bearing witness to each show seems to be of no consequence.

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~tc~(alias(highfreqs_jan20))~/tc~"
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  string(6394) " HF Jan Composite Albums  2020-01-03T19:52:09+00:00 HF_Jan_composite_albums.jpg   Really enjoyed this, especially the notes about this band allowing Jimi to reach further into his own roots and away from the flower power of recent times. I need to get the box set to hear the whole thing. highfreqs The full depth of Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys revealed 27191  2020-01-03T19:56:37+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: ‘Songs for groovy children’  jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris TONY PARIS  2020-01-03T19:56:37+00:00  When Band of Gypsys, the Jimi Hendrix album recorded live at the Fillmore East 50 years ago New Year’s Eve, was first released in the spring of 1970, it was done so as an anomaly. It wasn’t a new Hendrix release per se, but a contractual obligation, a record designed to accommodate papers he’d signed while still a sideman playing the Chitlin’ Circuit.

Band of Gypsys was not released by Reprise Records, the label for which Hendrix recorded and on which he had released three albums — Are You Experienced, Axis: Bold As Love, and Electric Ladyland — which propelled him on his meteoric rise to fame. Those albums, recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience — with Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell, the two white, British musicians playing at his side as Hendrix emerged a musical shaman burning bright — altered the course of popular music with their psychedelic experimentation, Hendrix’s other-worldly approach to playing the guitar, and his consciousness-expanding lyrics.

Band of Gypsys, released on Capitol Records, was a stopgap between studio albums, a chance for the guitarist to wrangle free of a binding contract he mistakenly signed in 1965 while recording with Curtis Knight. 

To record Band of Gypsys, Hendrix enlisted ex-Electric Flag drummer Buddy Miles and ex-Army buddy Billy Cox on bass. The three had been jamming together, and the two musicians were eager to help the guitarist out of his predicament. The decision was to record four shows at New York’s Fillmore East — early and late sets December 31, 1969, and January 1, 1970 — giving Capitol one album, thereby fulfilling Hendrix’s contract.

When Hendrix took the stage with “some old friends with a brand new name, a Band of Gypsys,” everything was different. Hendrix’s music was more grounded, as if he had been searching for and rediscovering his roots — the blues, R&B, soul music — in a way that could only have been divined by someone who had explored the outer reaches of music. Hendrix was coming back to earth with greater vision, clarity, understanding, and focus, taking by surprise those who saw him as the psychedelic high priest of Groovy.

With the two African-American musicians onstage with him, the music didn’t echo the Flower Power of the ’60s, nor did the lyrics offer any lysergic road maps to self-awareness. With the Band of Gypsys, Hendrix got down to the real nitty-gritty, dealing with the realities of the day. “Machine Gun” was wrought by the Vietnam War and the divide it was creating in this country; “Message Of Love” sought to bring all people together; and “Power of Soul” — well, with it, “anything is possible.”

In less than a year, Hendrix would be dead, and the sole Band of Gypsys release would seem but a detour as he regrouped the Experience — now Mitchell and Cox — with the hits of his past diluting his message of love in the remaining concerts of his all-too-short life.

More than a contractual obligation fulfilled, Band of Gypsys marked a turning point in the guitarist’s career. Hendrix may not have connected with African Americans as he might’ve hoped at an ill-fated Harlem Street concert a few months prior, and the audience for the Fillmore East shows might’ve been primarily white, but the music played on those two nights is echoed in that of Parliament-Funkadelic, Vernon Reid’s Living Colour, and the countless other African American musicians inspired by those bands. For four months, the acknowledged time frame of the Band of Gypsys, Hendrix was reaching for a new musical Promised Land, leaving behind the gimmickry, the showmanship, and the wildman antics that had become his trademark with the Jimi Hendrix Experience. 


Fifty years on, with the recent release of the five CD set, Songs for Groovy Children, the full extent of the importance — indeed, the majesty — of those four concerts at the Fillmore East is revealed. Remixed with a presence and an immediacy that makes it hard to believe five decades have passed since their recording, the shows are presented in their near entirety — a few songs remain in the vaults due to Hendrix ’s guitar playing being too out of tune — offering the listener the chance to follow the progression of the songs and certainly to feel the difference Hendrix brought to each performance. With much of the live material recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the guitarist sounds as if he’s going through the motions, playing what’s expected of him to an audience there for the spectacle. On Songs for Groovy Children the playing is impassioned, with a depth typically not matched during one full concert, much less four shows in a row.


Songs for Groovy Children, its name taken from a comment Hendrix makes while introducing one of the songs, is pure, unadulterated Hendrix, the guitarist playing at his best, as if only for himself and the two other musicians onstage. That there were sold-out audiences bearing witness to each show seems to be of no consequence.

The original, six-song Band of Gypsys release — heavily edited from the performances released here— only hints at the power the three musicians brought with them. Subsequent hodgepodge releases of Band of Gypsys material have only served to confuse and muddy its impact. Presented here, as four concerts in succession, Songs for Groovy Children offers the truth and emotion embodied in the best of Hendrix’s music. And it certainly presents more questions than answers to what might have been had he lived. ­—CL—
    Jan Blom/Authentic Hendrix LLC MESSAGE TO LOVE: Band of Gypsys (from left) Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Miles, Hendrix, Billy Cox, and Hendrix as they appear on the individual CD sleeves.  0,0,10    highfreqs                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: ‘Songs for groovy children’  "
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Friday January 3, 2020 02:56 pm EST
The full depth of Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys revealed | more...

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Martin Atkins (ex-Public Image Ltd, Ministry, Killing Joke, Brian Brain, Murder, Inc., Rx) co-founded the group with William Rieflin after the two had been playing together on the Ministry “A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Taste” tour. They felt that what they and the other like-minded musicians had together far outweighed anything Ministry frontman Al Jourgensen was giving them and kept the party going with a revolving-door of musicians after the tour was over. Indeed, over 130 different musicians have taken the stage as Pigface, with ten of the most constant members on tour for a limited run this month.

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Pigface in Hell at The Masquerade, 75 Martin Luther .King Jr Dr SW Doors 8:00 p.m.$29.50 advance;  all ages. Uber address: 92 Pryor St. SW (Kenny’s Alley, Underground Atlanta)."
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Martin Atkins (ex-Public Image Ltd, Ministry, Killing Joke, Brian Brain, Murder, Inc., Rx) co-founded the group with William Rieflin after the two had been playing together on the Ministry “A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Taste” tour. They felt that what they and the other like-minded musicians had together far outweighed anything Ministry frontman Al Jourgensen was giving them and kept the party going with a revolving-door of musicians after the tour was over. Indeed, over 130 different musicians have taken the stage as Pigface, with ten of the most constant members on tour for a limited run this month.

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Atkins is just as excited as he is serious in answering the second question.

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Atkins is just as excited as he is serious in answering the second question.

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The confirmed line up for the Atlanta date includes Atkins, Mary Byker (Pop Will Eat Itself, Gaye Bykers On Acid), Curse Mackey (Evil Mothers), En Esch (KMFDM), Lesley Rankine (Silverfish, Ruby), Charles Levi (My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult), Bobdog Catlin (Evil Mothers), Bradley Bills (Chant), Orville Kline (Porn and Chicken), Greta Brinkman (Moby, Druglord), Justin Pearson (The Locust), and more. -CL-

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Saturday November 2, 2019 01:59 pm EDT
The industrial music complex plays Masquerade November 22 | more...
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  string(6574) "Walking towards the sports arena where The Who were to perform Wednesday night, September 18, I was reminded of crossing the same parking lot 46 years earlier to see the British band for the first time.

That Tuesday night, November 27, 1973, me and a carload of high school friends stumbled toward the Omni, then home of the Atlanta Hawks and the Atlanta Flames. We were free. Free from our parents. Free from classes. On our own for the night. We were high on rebellion — if that’s what you call a couple of joints, a few tallboys, and some swigs from a shared bottle of Jack Daniels. We were rebelling against home and high school authority figures, the main embodiment of oppression we knew back then, turning a blind eye to the real injustice and inequity of a world that we would discover soon enough. We were living through our own “teenage wasteland” during the Nixon era, and The Who provided the perfect soundtrack for our teenage angst during those high school days, bumming cigarettes in the smoking area, hiding in the underbrush to not run cross-country, going to Friday-night football games to get high under the bleachers or to cop a feel. The Who, with their anthems heralding freedom and defining love in a song, were what we needed to make it through. They gave us the power to experience life “anyway, anyhow, anywhere.” To see The Who in concert was to be free, and “freedom tastes of reality.” We sought refuge from the emotional rollercoaster of adolescence in the songs of The Who, and going to see them in concert on the band’s “Fall Out Shelter” North American tour provided us with the inviolable sanctuary we so desperately sought.

Inside the State Farm Arena last week, the longhaired and acne-plagued audience of my misspent youth had grown up to now suffer from male-pattern baldness and too much Botox. Any of us who had hoped to die before we got old had failed miserably. There were some teenagers in the audience. You couldn’t tell if they were in their parents’ tow or if they wanted to see the band that provides the theme songs for all four of the “CSI” television franchises.

Those filling the seats for this, The Who’s “Moving On” Symphonic Tour, created a sea of gray. The median age of the audience certainly colored any anticipation of what to expect from The Who, at least from the two surviving members, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend, now both in their mid-70s.

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Certainly, both seemed to be enjoying themselves, and genuinely sincere when talking to the audience, admitting a love for their fans who have supported them for five decades, and appreciating the opportunity to still be able to take their music on the road. Giving props to Levenson and his work with the orchestra, it was obvious they were as energized from his arrangements as the audience was. The Who, at this point down to Townshend and Daltrey after the deaths of original drummer Keith Moon and bassist John Entwistle, were alright.

Bookending their time on stage with condensed versions of Tommy and Quadrophenia (both performed with the orchestra), the “band” stretched out on their own midway through the show, highlighting a tight set comprised of anthems like “The Kids Are Alright,” “I Can See for Miles,” “You Better, You Bet,” and a particularly poignant “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” performed by the Who left standing, Townshend on acoustic guitar accompanying Daltrey on vocals. With the new members of the band returning to the stage, the musicians were joined by the orchestra’s first violinist and the ASO’s cellist for a moving “Behind Blue Eyes.” Fittingly, the concert closed with “Baba O’Riley,” with first violinist Katie Jacoby (not a member of the ASO, but a part of The Who’s touring entourage) taking center stage and trading licks with Townshend, offering an extraordinary end to a magical, wondrous evening.

Onstage Townshend and Daltrey proved 70 to be the new 30. Though they now may be “moving on” rather than providing shelter for those in the throes of growing up — “I’m all mixed up, but I know what’s right” — they are doing so with style and grace. Will this, in fact, be the last Who tour? Who knows.

Walking back across that parking lot after the concert, I wondered if this was their last stand. The day’s date flashed in my mind, September 18, 2019. The 49th anniversary of the death of Jimi Hendrix, the flamboyant guitarist whose early career in London intermingled with that of The Who. It was then I realized the first time I saw the Who, November 27, 1973, would have been Hendrix’s 31st birthday. The beginning and the end."
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Inside the State Farm Arena last week, the longhaired and acne-plagued audience of my misspent youth had grown up to now suffer from male-pattern baldness and too much Botox. Any of us who had hoped to die before we got old had failed miserably. There were some teenagers in the audience. You couldn’t tell if they were in their parents’ tow or if they wanted to see the band that provides the theme songs for all four of the “CSI” television franchises.

Those filling the seats for this, The Who’s “Moving On” Symphonic Tour, created a sea of gray. The median age of the audience certainly colored any anticipation of what to expect from The Who, at least from the two surviving members, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend, now both in their mid-70s.

With a full orchestra commanding the stage — in Atlanta members of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra joined together with the band; other cities using local symphony members — the area in which members of the rock band could set up was relatively small, especially given the size of arena stages these days. The closeness of Daltrey and Townshend to each other, and to the rest of the band — second guitarist Simon Townshend (Pete’s brother), drummer Zak Starkey (Ringo Starr’s son), bassist Jon Button, and keyboardist Loren Gold — worked to the group’s advantage, keeping them together as a tight group physically and musically. As such, they rocked out, as a rock band should, with the added intensity of Keith Levenson’s orchestral arrangements adding a depth and forcefulness to the songs rather than getting in the way of anything the band attempted. Not only did the songs from the rock opera ''Tommy'' and ''Quadrophenia'' come to life as never before, but other selections from the band’s extensive catalogue were revived and brilliant in their presentation.

And Townshend and Daltrey? It may have taken Daltrey, dressed in black jeans and a form-fitting t-shirt, a few songs into the set to find his voice, but once he did, he was in fine form, hitting all the notes and commanding the stage with his signature whip — using the microphone as a lasso — as if the years hadn’t passed at all. Townshend was “on” from the minute he took the stage, joking that it was “nice to be back in Elton John’s hometown,” and playing guitar with the same energy he displayed as a young man when he had nothing but something to prove. Watching the big screen monitor close-ups while he was playing electric guitar, you expected blood to start pouring from his fingers, as he eschewed a pick to dig into the strings with his bare fingers for the big riffs.

Certainly, both seemed to be enjoying themselves, and genuinely sincere when talking to the audience, admitting a love for their fans who have supported them for five decades, and appreciating the opportunity to still be able to take their music on the road. Giving props to Levenson and his work with the orchestra, it was obvious they were as energized from his arrangements as the audience was. The Who, at this point down to Townshend and Daltrey after the deaths of original drummer Keith Moon and bassist John Entwistle, were alright.

Bookending their time on stage with condensed versions of ''Tommy'' and ''Quadrophenia'' (both performed with the orchestra), the “band” stretched out on their own midway through the show, highlighting a tight set comprised of anthems like “The Kids Are Alright,” “I Can See for Miles,” “You Better, You Bet,” and a particularly poignant “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” performed by the Who left standing, Townshend on acoustic guitar accompanying Daltrey on vocals. With the new members of the band returning to the stage, the musicians were joined by the orchestra’s first violinist and the ASO’s cellist for a moving “Behind Blue Eyes.” Fittingly, the concert closed with “Baba O’Riley,” with first violinist Katie Jacoby (not a member of the ASO, but a part of The Who’s touring entourage) taking center stage and trading licks with Townshend, offering an extraordinary end to a magical, wondrous evening.

Onstage Townshend and Daltrey proved 70 to be the new 30. Though they now may be “moving on” rather than providing shelter for those in the throes of growing up — “I’m all mixed up, but I know what’s right” — they are doing so with style and grace. Will this, in fact, be the last Who tour? Who knows.

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That Tuesday night, November 27, 1973, me and a carload of high school friends stumbled toward the Omni, then home of the Atlanta Hawks and the Atlanta Flames. We were free. Free from our parents. Free from classes. On our own for the night. We were high on rebellion — if that’s what you call a couple of joints, a few tallboys, and some swigs from a shared bottle of Jack Daniels. We were rebelling against home and high school authority figures, the main embodiment of oppression we knew back then, turning a blind eye to the real injustice and inequity of a world that we would discover soon enough. We were living through our own “teenage wasteland” during the Nixon era, and The Who provided the perfect soundtrack for our teenage angst during those high school days, bumming cigarettes in the smoking area, hiding in the underbrush to not run cross-country, going to Friday-night football games to get high under the bleachers or to cop a feel. The Who, with their anthems heralding freedom and defining love in a song, were what we needed to make it through. They gave us the power to experience life “anyway, anyhow, anywhere.” To see The Who in concert was to be free, and “freedom tastes of reality.” We sought refuge from the emotional rollercoaster of adolescence in the songs of The Who, and going to see them in concert on the band’s “Fall Out Shelter” North American tour provided us with the inviolable sanctuary we so desperately sought.

Inside the State Farm Arena last week, the longhaired and acne-plagued audience of my misspent youth had grown up to now suffer from male-pattern baldness and too much Botox. Any of us who had hoped to die before we got old had failed miserably. There were some teenagers in the audience. You couldn’t tell if they were in their parents’ tow or if they wanted to see the band that provides the theme songs for all four of the “CSI” television franchises.

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Certainly, both seemed to be enjoying themselves, and genuinely sincere when talking to the audience, admitting a love for their fans who have supported them for five decades, and appreciating the opportunity to still be able to take their music on the road. Giving props to Levenson and his work with the orchestra, it was obvious they were as energized from his arrangements as the audience was. The Who, at this point down to Townshend and Daltrey after the deaths of original drummer Keith Moon and bassist John Entwistle, were alright.

Bookending their time on stage with condensed versions of Tommy and Quadrophenia (both performed with the orchestra), the “band” stretched out on their own midway through the show, highlighting a tight set comprised of anthems like “The Kids Are Alright,” “I Can See for Miles,” “You Better, You Bet,” and a particularly poignant “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” performed by the Who left standing, Townshend on acoustic guitar accompanying Daltrey on vocals. With the new members of the band returning to the stage, the musicians were joined by the orchestra’s first violinist and the ASO’s cellist for a moving “Behind Blue Eyes.” Fittingly, the concert closed with “Baba O’Riley,” with first violinist Katie Jacoby (not a member of the ASO, but a part of The Who’s touring entourage) taking center stage and trading licks with Townshend, offering an extraordinary end to a magical, wondrous evening.

Onstage Townshend and Daltrey proved 70 to be the new 30. Though they now may be “moving on” rather than providing shelter for those in the throes of growing up — “I’m all mixed up, but I know what’s right” — they are doing so with style and grace. Will this, in fact, be the last Who tour? Who knows.

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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies

Saturday September 28, 2019 08:43 am EDT
The Who pick up their guitars and play — 'just like yesterday' | more...
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  string(46) "Getting the gang back together one last time"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(46) "Getting the gang back together one last time"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2019-08-03T23:36:57+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(66) "Content:_:HIGH FREQUENCIES: The Great Southeast Music Hall Reunion"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(24367) "Had the Sex Pistols never played the Great Southeast Music Hall, the music venue would still hold a significant place in Atlanta’s music history. Originally a bar, restaurant and concert hall tucked into the elbow of what was then Broadview Plaza, the setting was laid back, the beer served in buckets and the living seemed easy. The hippie counter-culture that had walked the Strip — Peachtree Street between 10th and 14th Streets — had disseminated into the mainstream, and the Great Southeast Music Hall was the perfect venue for those with longhair, tank tops, wide-belled Landlubber blue jeans and a yearning for peace and harmony to gather and groove together, listen to music and share in the joys and travails of becoming adults.

The Great Southeast Music Hall was not a rock club, not in the sense of Richards and the Electric Ballroom, two other Atlanta venues of the time, both located closer to the Strip, and therefore, downtown, an area considered unsafe by some suburbanites.

This was the ‘70s remember, and downtown Atlanta was becoming a ghost town, thanks to “white flight” — the move of businesses and people to areas north of the city — past Buckhead, past Chastain Park and Sandy Springs, to areas not even defined as OTP (outside the perimeter), because, for a time, no one knew they were ITP (inside the perimeter).

Located off Piedmont Road, with Morosgo Drive to the south and Marian Road to the north, the Broadview Plaza Shopping Center was the perfect place for a music venue, especially one catering to a wider, more varied audience by focusing on folk, country, bluegrass, and blues artists and singer-songwriters. The L-shaped strip mall had plenty of free parking, thanks to the grocery stores and small department stores that were its anchor tenants, allowing the Music Hall to schedule two shows a night without audiences having to worry about where to park before the first show’s turnover.

The Great Southeast Music Hall was also close to Brookhaven where, at the time, many Atlanta musicians lived, thanks to the cheap rent and small bungalows that made up the neighborhood before urbanization and gentrification spread up Peachtree Street. It was many of those local musicians, having played smaller clubs like the Bistro and the Twelfth Gate, who performed at the Music Hall, opening for national touring acts, and, in doing so,  built large enough followings to headline the Great Southeast Music Hall on their own.

Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra, Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People, the Hampton Geese Band, the Glenn Phillips Band,  Bill Sheffield, The Fans, the Para Band, and the Dynamic Atlanta Cruis-O-Matic were just some of the Atlanta performers to have headlined at the Great Southeast Music Hall.

When the original Broadview Plaza location was forced to close, it was natural for the Music Hall to move to Brookhaven to the theater located in Cherokee Plaza. Though many of the people remained and the Music Hall did well at the new location, it wasn’t the same. Sitting on cushions on the floor was replaced with tiered movie theater seats, and the Great Southeast Music Hall’s unique experience — not unlike like lounging in your own living room while your favorite musician performed — became one of more traditional theaters and music venues. The Dekalb County police didn’t help matters, either. The Music Hall was still selling cheap beer by the buckets, so once shows started, Dekalb’s finest would set up roadblocks at the exits of the shopping center to snare any inebriated music fans who tried to make it past the lines of police cars with rotating blue lights, officers, and dogs waiting for them on Peachtree Road.

This Sunday, August 4, a reunion of Great Southeast Music Hall employees, family and friends will take place at Smith’s Olde Bar. The get together starts at 5 p.m. with everyone gathering in the downstairs bar, then moving upstairs at 7 p.m. for the music. Bill Tush will emcee the evening, welcoming both Darryl Rhoades and Thermos Greenwood to the stage for their own sets. While neither will have their respective full bands with them, surviving members of both groups will appear, aided and abetted by many familiar Atlanta musicians as guests. Farrell Roberts, who has been busy planning the event along with Sharon Powell, says the reason for hosting this one is simple. Those who were regulars are getting older, and we should celebrate the past one more time. It’s hard to argue with that.

Farrell Roberts: It was named The Great Southeast Music Hall, Emporium, and Performing Arts Exchange. It was the ’70s. It held 525 people, who all sat on cushioned benches on the floor. They drank draft beer from a 32oz. metal bucket cost $2.75. You could get your bucket refilled and take it home as a souvenir.

Katherine Gasque: I was working for ABC Records in the mid 70’s. Jimmy Buffet was on our label and I went to the Great Southeast Music Hall for the first time to see him perform. It wasn’t a packed house but I was hooked on the place. Besides cheap buckets of beer and cheap food, the Hall was iconic, with an amazing wall signed by every artist who played there, it was magic. Tickets ran $3-4 dollars and everyone could see great music, rub elbows with like minded people, play some pinball, and drink cheap beer.

Kay Citron: It started at a point somewhere between the naivety of youth and hard core psychedelics and never ended! While listening to WRAS one night back in 1976, Aubrey the late night DJ offered free tickets to the first caller. I happened to be the lucky caller. I won tickets for Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People to see their show “Orgy on the Lawn.” I was young. I had to look up “orgy” in the Websters’ Dictionary. So off I go to this strange but intriguing event that included green, blue and purple performers on stage.

T’ Wesley Dean: My brother was part of a group that was going to stage a party at the Egyptian Ballroom in the Fox Theater, which was scheduled to be demolished. I talked my brother into letting me assemble a band for the party. I approached Bruce Baxter and Steve Wofford who were performing as Fletcher and the Piedmonts. The Piedmonts specialized in roots rock ’n' roll – Jerrry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Elvis, and early Rolling Stones. They enlisted Steve Marsh to sing and play guitar and Richy Height came along on drums. I sang and played bass. At the time Glitter Rock was threatening to be the “latest thing” and, in response, I told the Piedmonts I was going to paint myself green and call myself Thermos Greenwood. They said “OK. We’ll paint ourselves too and be colored people.” Honest to God we didn’t know any better. Our biggest influences were Saturday morning TV kiddy fare – Ramar of the Jungle, Tarzan movies, Warner Brothers cartoons, and the Coasters.  After playing a couple of successful parties we were invited by the Great Southeast Music Hall to come perform.

Sharon Powell: My first experience was when I won two tickets and an LP from WRAS for a band playing the Hall. I was NOT near the 18 year-old drinking age at the time, but, still, my friend and I, donned in our grooviest 10th street duds, picked up our tickets and LP at the door, and sauntered in like we owned the place. I met Farrell that night, and we became fast friends. I was working at Jumpin' Jack Flash Leather at the time, I think. Like a lot of us who went on to become forever attached to the Hall, I just sorta showed up and started working at whatever was needed. My first real paid gig there was when Bob Dulong asked if I would break down a bunch of boxes, and paid me for it. Next thing I knew, I was working in the box office, and getting money for it! Over the years, many of our jobs morphed to include much more than we started out doing. I ended my Hall career as a manager, box office, ticket sales, paying the bands, making sure contract rider stuff was attended, NOT being stoned, lol.

Citron: Too young to drink there (legally) but old enough to hang out and work the box office with Sharon and Chip, I returned as often as possible and basically “volunteered” to work. When there was nothing for me to do I would color in the black and white promo photos from the band bios in the office or play pinball in the lobby. The favored games, 6 Million Dollar Man and the Eight Ball machines, tried robbing Dan Baird and I of quarters, but we somehow ended up winning more free games than we had time to play. Good friendships for life. And THAT’S what I remember. Priscilla in the Emporium clothing me, Bean and Fly in the kitchen feeding me.

Powell: The Hall was and still is a huge part of my life. The political/cultural climate in the US was turbulent then as it is now.

Dean: In 1975 the war in Vietnam was over, flying on an airplane was fun, local police hadn’t been militarized, and the corporate lawyers and bean-counters had not yet ruined everything. I can remember Rex Patton and Ross Brittain played “19th Nervous Breakdown” nineteen times in a row on WIIN. It was a magic time to be in Atlanta.

Rex Patton: My initial contact with the Music Hall came from working at WIIN radio. We did remote interviews with recording acts in the Emporium for a feature called “Out to Lunch.” I basically worked on air for free. No salary. I worked another job from 6 am to 2 pm and then was on WIIN with Ross Brittain from 3 to sign-off. The only money I got was $50.00 a week for doing Taco Pronto promos (“Extra hot – all the time”). The Music Hall advertised with us by way of trade-outs. They paid us in meal tickets that we could use to eat at the Emporium. So, I was there, literally, 5 or more nights a week, just to feed myself. And, after a tasty dinner – I was partial to the Martin Mullett – I could wander into the hall itself and watch whomever was onstage that night.

Citron: My life changed as I met the music lovers, the musicians, the beer drinkers and the bartenders, the lighting and sound crew...I felt so at home on the padded floor seats!

Powell: A lot of stuff happened those first couple of years. I had my "day gigs,” which included working at Garma's Custom Leather and the Old Atlanta Satchel Co. There was a sort of crossover thing that happened. Management changed, staff came and went, but we didn't go too far … lots of us came to the Hall from other local Atlanta businesses: Comes the Sun, Garma's, the Electric Ballroom, Richards. The cool thing is the community we created. It wasn't just the Hall. If Alex (Cooley, who owned the Electric Ballroom) needed us at one of his gigs, we worked it out to help, and he did the same for us. Schedules were made in the community as a whole to make sure that everyone was covered. There wasn't the cutthroat competition that seems to exist now with the businesses in town. We all worked together.

Darryl Rhoades: It’s weird to think that my last performance at the GSEMH was over 41 years ago.  It was unlike any venue I had played before or since.  I have so many great memories of the Music Hall.   

Dean: Performing at the Music Hall was always great fun. That was where we covered the stage with kudzu, and hired the little people who worked at Sid and Marty Kroft’s to harass us on stage. The audiences there were the best – they would whoop and howl when we took the stage – we did look ridiculous. I can remember traipsing along the front edge of the stage thinking, “It doesn’t matter what I do. They are going to eat it up!”  And they did. We were able to be completely free in the moment.

Rhoades: There were no limits to what we could do there including the grand entrance in our holiday shows where several friends hoisted me up on a cross while I was dressed in a Santa Claus suit and screaming in a mic “You Got the wrong guy, you got the wrong guy” as I interrupted the band doing their Holiday Inn lounge show.

Patton: The Hall was also my entry into the Atlanta music scene as a participant. We played The Hahavishnu Orchestra on WIIN and through meeting the band members, I encountered the guys who would later end up forming Cruis-O-Matic, which I would eventually join. That led to interacting with and getting to know all of the players around town.

Rhoades: During the week billed as the Steve Martin Mull show, Steve had a college date on a Thursday night so they brought in Tom Waits for that show and Martin asked if I wanted to set in so I played drums with Jonny Hibbert on sax and Keith Christopher on bass with Martin on guitar and Tom on piano.  That was one of my more pleasant memories at the Music Hall.

Roberts: And the shows that people would come see were those of artists that were "on their way up,” who would soon become household names. Billy Joel, Tom Petty, Jimmy Buffett, Willie Nelson, Jim Croce, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Steve Martin, Joe Walsh, Robert Palmer, Emmylou Harris, Tom Waits, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Pure Prarie League The Sex Pistols, Lindsey Buckingham & Stevie Nicks, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Jerry Garcia & the Legion of Mary. Huey Lewis, and so many others. The legends of the Blues: B.B. King, Albert King, Freddie King, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon . The Jazz artists John McLaughlin, Weather Report, Chick Corea & Return to Forever.

Rhoades: I saw so many incredible acts including Buffalo Bob from Howdy Doody on a Saturday afternoon matinee while I was surrounded by a bunch of kids and their moms. I was there the night Lily Tomlin stopped the show to have a redneck removed when yelled for her to take her clothes off.  The music hall was all over the map in the kinds of entertainment they brought us…Ace Trucking Company, Proctor and Bergman, Bill Monroe, Roland Kirk, Steve Goodman and it didn’t seem to break the bank back then.  They even brought in a production of Hair.

Dean: I remember seeing Steve Martin, Dolly Parton, the Staple Singers, Split Enz, Doc and Merle Watson, Bill Monroe, John Prine, JJ Cale, Doug Kershaw, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Sea Level. It was endless. The Great Southeast Music Hall booked great acts!

Gasque: The Hall also allowed me to see performances of those who would become legends before they were well known: the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Mahavishnu Orchestra, David Allen Coe, Dixie Dregs, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris, Tom Waits, the Steve Martin Mull show, John Hartford, I could go on and on, and on.

Roberts: It was a time when all the groups would be booked for three, four, five nights in a row. So we would get to hang out and get to know them. I remember taking Tom Waits to Underground Atlanta. He loved it! Tom played maybe 10 times at the Hall. I remember going bowling at the Express Lanes on Monroe Circle with Steve Martin and Martin Mull, I remember going to breakfast at the long-gone Steak & Egg with Captain Beefheart & Phillip (Fly) Stone ….

Patton: The Hall hosted the most eclectic shows in town.  I’m sure everyone will mention the Martin/Mull show. But the acts ran the gamut from Gino Vanelli, Buffalo Bob and Howdy Doody, The B-52’s and Fairport Convention to Billy Crystal, Jimmy Buffett, Weather Report, Keith Jarrett and Doctor Hook.

Roberts: I remember all of the great jams, most of all, the night B.B. King was playing, and Eric Clapton & Diana Ross came to the show, got onstage and proceeded to tear the roof off the place for about an hour.

Patton: The absolute best show I ever saw there was the night B. B. King headlined with The Nighthawks opening. They were contracted for two shows and both sold out. But there were so many people outside after the second show, that a third was negotiated and performed. And, during King’s set, B.B.called harp player, Mark Wenner and guitarist, Jimmy Thackery from the Nighthawks up on stage to jam. After Thackery finished his solo, B.B. turned to him and bowed. To this day, I think that was the proudest moment in Jimmy’s life.

Roberts: I remember another magical night, the bill was B.B. King, and the Nighthawks. And Gregg Allman joined them for a couple of nights. The most soulful and sweaty shows in my 46-year career!

Patton: The most memorable shows? The Knobz, a band from North Carolina who played the “Punk Festival” at the Hall. The climax of their act came during their final number, “Disco Chainsaw,” when the lead singer sawed off his artificial leg with, yes, a gas-powered chainsaw.  Game over. Follow that, bitches!

Rhoades: I have to mention the appearance by the Sex Pistols, when I sat in with the opening act, Cruise-O-Matic. It was an intentionally strange billing with Cruise-O-Matic, known as a 60’s party band, that would guarantee to get a reaction from the crowd — and it did. I was brought up to sing a song written by myself and Rex Patton, “Boot In Your Face,” which was a spoof on the Ramones. The song was captured on film and eventually made it’s way into the Sex Pistol’s documentary, D.O.A., which is almost unwatchable for me but still, it’s history. I still have the magazine, National Examiner, which has a picture of me wearing a shirt I had spray painted with the words, “Kill Me.” In the article they superimposed a picture of Linda Ronstadt and the caption “America’s Sweetheart next to Punk bearing message on shirt that most true music fans would love to fulfill.” I’m damn proud of that one.

Patton: The Sex Pistols, as much for the hoopla as anything else. With Cruis-O-Matic being their opening act, I was privy to all the backstage intrigue as well as the Us vs. Them dynamic that pervaded the Hall while we played our overlong (not our fault — nobody could find Sid) set. Most importantly, I met my future wife then, as she was going through the crucible of the Sex Pistols being the act she had to promote on her first week on the job as “Claudia Sickeler – PR Director for the Great Southeast Music Hall.”

Citron: We could all reminisce about our favorite shows, John Prine, David Grisman, Doc and Merle, Jimmy Buffet, Leo Kotke, Ravi Shankar, John Hartford, Mac McAnally, Dolly Parton, Emmy Lou Harris, Janis Ian, Phoebe Snow, Johnathan Edwards, Crystal Gayle, Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra, B.B. King, Sun Ra, Muddy Waters,Tom Waits, Jerry Jeff Walker, NRBQ, David Bromberg, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the Sex Pistols, Steve Martin and Martin Mull, Jean Luc-Ponty, Asleep at the Wheel … but the real memories are of the hearts of the folks who ran the Hall. Gail (Bast), Robin (Conant), Ursula (Alexander), Claudia (Sickeler), Glenn (Allison), Chip (Abernathy), Doreen (Cochran), Farrell, Ron (Matthews), David (Manion), Sharon, Alun (Vontillus), Jack (Tarver), Brad (Moss) — insert a myriad of names here — the relationships that formed and have lasted the test of time. And, that night with Tommy Dean on stage singing away about “Chocolate City” and wondering ”who gave the monkey a gun,” I met my first husband on the back row — and we brought three wonderful children into the world (not that night, that happened quite a few years later). So, yes, the Music Hall changed my life.

Patton: Being there so often, I came to know everyone who worked there. Names popping into my head right now are Glenn, Gail, Doreen, Chip, Alun, Farrell, Mary, Phyllis, Brad, Ron, David, Carolyn, Betsy, Wiz. I know there are more and I’m sure other people will come up with them. Above and beyond the great musical experiences, the Hall was like a clubhouse, where we all ate together, drank together, got high together, saw shows together, hooked up and broke up. It was, basically, a funky shrine, where a bunch of like-minded people were busy being in their 20’s.

Powell: The staff at the Hall wasn't just staff … we were and many still are like family. We did (and often still do) help each other...helping each other move, painting parties, rides, checking on each other when we didn't show, lending/giving money, going to court when someone got busted, lol..now go fund me pages and helping hands when someone needs dentures, or help with the rent.

Gasque: It was small, it was friendly, and over time I met people who worked there that I am friends with today, Doreen Cochran, Sharon Powell, and Kay Vontillius. I distinctly remember the night I met Brad Moss, a part of management who was also involved in bringing the first U.S. performance of the Sex Pistols (a horrible performance however), because he and I became fast friends and years later would be married for 22 years until his death. The Music Hall gave me one of the greatest loves of my life.

Powell: I loved our Brookhaven community, and our connection to each other and the Hall. I loved our mutual commitment to making sure the show went on...even through the times of no/late paychecks, we would show up. We always showed up! When we had to move the Hall, we worked together to load it out, and worked just as hard to load back in at Cherokee Plaza.

Patton: I saw sets of some of the best music I had ever or would ever hear. And, when I walked out the front door of the Hall to go home – it was daylight. Magic.

Citron: What a great home away from home the GSEMH became for me.

Roberts: You had to be there.

Powell: I found the "I Have Been to the Great Southeast Music Hall" facebook page by total accident. I was living in the mountains, and was just surfing the net. I came upon the page, and noticed a couple of errors. Of course I contacted the page owner and talked to her about it. She and I became friends, and she made me an administrator. She was only 4 years-old when she used to go to the Hall because her mom loved it so much. Shannon Williamson created the page for her mom. Her mom is still with us, but. Shannon died last year. Shannon's dad was a Vietnam vet affected by Agent Orange. It’s thought that Shannon's lifelong illness was a result ... and it took her young life. This, to me, is sort of an example of the intrinsic interweaving of the culture of the day, the Hall, and our continued community

Powell: People often ask which was my favorite show. The truth is, I didn't actually see many of them. Just like all the other staff (unless you were actually in the room) we were working the door, the record store, the jewelry store, the emporium, the office....I always made time to check out Arlo Guthrie and John Hartford. I loved those guys' music, and as human beings. Fitting that the last show we ever did was Arlo at Cherokee Plaza. He knew our dire straits, and did all he could to help us stay open. He even penned a singalong tune for the occasion about "saving the old Music Hall"...We didn’t, but, I like to think that Shannon did, though, because...here we are.

Dean: For the reunion I’ll be with Steve Wofford. We will miss Charles Wolff and Bruce Baxter who have both split the orb. Steve Marsh is unable to make it from Denver. Bob Elsey and Jody Worrell will play guitars and Anne Boston will help with vocals. We will be focused less on visuals and more on recreating the music, like “Who Gave The Monkey A Gun,” “Nina of the Nile,” “Living In The Heart Of Chocolate City,” “I’ve Got Rubber Brain Cells In My Head,” and other thoughtful fare.

Rhoades: My appearance will be musical ,but I will also be performing some pieces from my standup show. I’m appearing at the Music Hall celebration with friends that I have recorded with and played live with for years, plus I will bring out special guests to sit in on a few songs. The material will give a nod to the Hahavishnu Orchestra, The Men from Glad, songs from several of my other CDs plus two unreleased songs, including one I wrote for this event.

Dean: Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra and Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People played many of the same venues but we have never performed back to back sets on the same stage. This is a first — and it promises to be fun!

Rhoades: I never had the opportunity to share the bill with Thermos Greenwood when we were both playing the Hall. This will be a special night, and likely, will never be repeated."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(24694) "Had the Sex Pistols never played the Great Southeast Music Hall, the music venue would still hold a significant place in Atlanta’s music history. Originally a bar, restaurant and concert hall tucked into the elbow of what was then Broadview Plaza, the setting was laid back, the beer served in buckets and the living seemed easy. The hippie counter-culture that had walked the Strip — Peachtree Street between 10th and 14th Streets — had disseminated into the mainstream, and the Great Southeast Music Hall was the perfect venue for those with longhair, tank tops, wide-belled Landlubber blue jeans and a yearning for peace and harmony to gather and groove together, listen to music and share in the joys and travails of becoming adults.

The Great Southeast Music Hall was not a rock club, not in the sense of Richards and the Electric Ballroom, two other Atlanta venues of the time, both located closer to the Strip, and therefore, downtown, an area considered unsafe by some suburbanites.

This was the ‘70s remember, and downtown Atlanta was becoming a ghost town, thanks to “white flight” — the move of businesses and people to areas north of the city — past Buckhead, past Chastain Park and Sandy Springs, to areas not even defined as OTP (outside the perimeter), because, for a time, no one knew they were ITP (inside the perimeter).

Located off Piedmont Road, with Morosgo Drive to the south and Marian Road to the north, the Broadview Plaza Shopping Center was the perfect place for a music venue, especially one catering to a wider, more varied audience by focusing on folk, country, bluegrass, and blues artists and singer-songwriters. The L-shaped strip mall had plenty of free parking, thanks to the grocery stores and small department stores that were its anchor tenants, allowing the Music Hall to schedule two shows a night without audiences having to worry about where to park before the first show’s turnover.

The Great Southeast Music Hall was also close to Brookhaven where, at the time, many Atlanta musicians lived, thanks to the cheap rent and small bungalows that made up the neighborhood before urbanization and gentrification spread up Peachtree Street. It was many of those local musicians, having played smaller clubs like the Bistro and the Twelfth Gate, who performed at the Music Hall, opening for national touring acts, and, in doing so,  built large enough followings to headline the Great Southeast Music Hall on their own.

Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra, Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People, the Hampton Geese Band, the Glenn Phillips Band,  Bill Sheffield, The Fans, the Para Band, and the Dynamic Atlanta Cruis-O-Matic were just some of the Atlanta performers to have headlined at the Great Southeast Music Hall.

When the original Broadview Plaza location was forced to close, it was natural for the Music Hall to move to Brookhaven to the theater located in Cherokee Plaza. Though many of the people remained and the Music Hall did well at the new location, it wasn’t the same. Sitting on cushions on the floor was replaced with tiered movie theater seats, and the Great Southeast Music Hall’s unique experience — not unlike like lounging in your own living room while your favorite musician performed — became one of more traditional theaters and music venues. The Dekalb County police didn’t help matters, either. The Music Hall was still selling cheap beer by the buckets, so once shows started, Dekalb’s finest would set up roadblocks at the exits of the shopping center to snare any inebriated music fans who tried to make it past the lines of police cars with rotating blue lights, officers, and dogs waiting for them on Peachtree Road.

This Sunday, August 4, a reunion of Great Southeast Music Hall employees, family and friends will take place at [https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-southeast-music-hall-revisited-reunion-tickets-60717045317|Smith’s Olde Bar]. The get together starts at 5 p.m. with everyone gathering in the downstairs bar, then moving upstairs at 7 p.m. for the music. Bill Tush will emcee the evening, welcoming both Darryl Rhoades and Thermos Greenwood to the stage for their own sets. While neither will have their respective full bands with them, surviving members of both groups will appear, aided and abetted by many familiar Atlanta musicians as guests. Farrell Roberts, who has been busy planning the event along with Sharon Powell, says the reason for hosting this one is simple. Those who were regulars are getting older, and we should celebrate the past one more time. It’s hard to argue with that.

__Farrell Roberts:__ It was named The Great Southeast Music Hall, Emporium, and Performing Arts Exchange. It was the ’70s. It held 525 people, who all sat on cushioned benches on the floor. They drank draft beer from a 32oz. metal bucket cost $2.75. You could get your bucket refilled and take it home as a souvenir.

__Katherine Gasque:__ I was working for ABC Records in the mid 70’s. Jimmy Buffet was on our label and I went to the Great Southeast Music Hall for the first time to see him perform. It wasn’t a packed house but I was hooked on the place. Besides cheap buckets of beer and cheap food, the Hall was iconic, with an amazing wall signed by every artist who played there, it was magic. Tickets ran $3-4 dollars and everyone could see great music, rub elbows with like minded people, play some pinball, and drink cheap beer.

__Kay Citron:__ It started at a point somewhere between the naivety of youth and hard core psychedelics and never ended! While listening to WRAS one night back in 1976, Aubrey the late night DJ offered free tickets to the first caller. I happened to be the lucky caller. I won tickets for Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People to see their show “Orgy on the Lawn.” I was young. I had to look up “orgy” in the Websters’ Dictionary. So off I go to this strange but intriguing event that included green, blue and purple performers on stage.

__T’ Wesley Dean: __My brother was part of a group that was going to stage a party at the Egyptian Ballroom in the Fox Theater, which was scheduled to be demolished. I talked my brother into letting me assemble a band for the party. I approached Bruce Baxter and Steve Wofford who were performing as Fletcher and the Piedmonts. The Piedmonts specialized in roots rock ’n' roll – Jerrry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Elvis, and early Rolling Stones. They enlisted Steve Marsh to sing and play guitar and Richy Height came along on drums. I sang and played bass. At the time Glitter Rock was threatening to be the “latest thing” and, in response, I told the Piedmonts I was going to paint myself green and call myself Thermos Greenwood. They said “OK. We’ll paint ourselves too and be colored people.” Honest to God we didn’t know any better. Our biggest influences were Saturday morning TV kiddy fare – Ramar of the Jungle, Tarzan movies, Warner Brothers cartoons, and the Coasters.  After playing a couple of successful parties we were invited by the Great Southeast Music Hall to come perform.

__Sharon Powell:__ My first experience was when I won two tickets and an LP from WRAS for a band playing the Hall. I was NOT near the 18 year-old drinking age at the time, but, still, my friend and I, donned in our grooviest 10th street duds, picked up our tickets and LP at the door, and sauntered in like we owned the place. I met Farrell that night, and we became fast friends. I was working at Jumpin' Jack Flash Leather at the time, I think. Like a lot of us who went on to become forever attached to the Hall, I just sorta showed up and started working at whatever was needed. My first real paid gig there was when Bob Dulong asked if I would break down a bunch of boxes, and paid me for it. Next thing I knew, I was working in the box office, and getting money for it! Over the years, many of our jobs morphed to include much more than we started out doing. I ended my Hall career as a manager, box office, ticket sales, paying the bands, making sure contract rider stuff was attended, NOT being stoned, lol.

__Citron:__ Too young to drink there (legally) but old enough to hang out and work the box office with Sharon and Chip, I returned as often as possible and basically “volunteered” to work. When there was nothing for me to do I would color in the black and white promo photos from the band bios in the office or play pinball in the lobby. The favored games, 6 Million Dollar Man and the Eight Ball machines, tried robbing Dan Baird and I of quarters, but we somehow ended up winning more free games than we had time to play. Good friendships for life. And THAT’S what I remember. Priscilla in the Emporium clothing me, Bean and Fly in the kitchen feeding me.

__Powell: __The Hall was and still is a huge part of my life. The political/cultural climate in the US was turbulent then as it is now.

__Dean:__ In 1975 the war in Vietnam was over, flying on an airplane was fun, local police hadn’t been militarized, and the corporate lawyers and bean-counters had not yet ruined everything. I can remember Rex Patton and Ross Brittain played “19th Nervous Breakdown” nineteen times in a row on WIIN. It was a magic time to be in Atlanta.

__Rex Patton:__ My initial contact with the Music Hall came from working at WIIN radio. We did remote interviews with recording acts in the Emporium for a feature called “Out to Lunch.” I basically worked on air for free. No salary. I worked another job from 6 am to 2 pm and then was on WIIN with Ross Brittain from 3 to sign-off. The only money I got was $50.00 a week for doing Taco Pronto promos (“Extra hot – all the time”). The Music Hall advertised with us by way of trade-outs. They paid us in meal tickets that we could use to eat at the Emporium. So, I was there, literally, 5 or more nights a week, just to feed myself. And, after a tasty dinner – I was partial to the Martin Mullett – I could wander into the hall itself and watch whomever was onstage that night.

__Citron:__ My life changed as I met the music lovers, the musicians, the beer drinkers and the bartenders, the lighting and sound crew...I felt so at home on the padded floor seats!

__Powell:__ A lot of stuff happened those first couple of years. I had my "day gigs,” which included working at Garma's Custom Leather and the Old Atlanta Satchel Co. There was a sort of crossover thing that happened. Management changed, staff came and went, but we didn't go too far … lots of us came to the Hall from other local Atlanta businesses: Comes the Sun, Garma's, the Electric Ballroom, Richards. The cool thing is the community we created. It wasn't just the Hall. If Alex (Cooley, who owned the Electric Ballroom) needed us at one of his gigs, we worked it out to help, and he did the same for us. Schedules were made in the community as a whole to make sure that everyone was covered. There wasn't the cutthroat competition that seems to exist now with the businesses in town. We all worked together.

__Darryl Rhoades:__ It’s weird to think that my last performance at the GSEMH was over 41 years ago.  It was unlike any venue I had played before or since.  I have so many great memories of the Music Hall.   

__Dean: __Performing at the Music Hall was always great fun. That was where we covered the stage with kudzu, and hired the little people who worked at Sid and Marty Kroft’s to harass us on stage. The audiences there were the best – they would whoop and howl when we took the stage – we did look ridiculous. I can remember traipsing along the front edge of the stage thinking, “It doesn’t matter what I do. They are going to eat it up!”  And they did. We were able to be completely free in the moment.

__Rhoades:__ There were no limits to what we could do there including the grand entrance in our holiday shows where several friends hoisted me up on a cross while I was dressed in a Santa Claus suit and screaming in a mic “You Got the wrong guy, you got the wrong guy” as I interrupted the band doing their Holiday Inn lounge show.

__Patton:__ The Hall was also my entry into the Atlanta music scene as a participant. We played The Hahavishnu Orchestra on WIIN and through meeting the band members, I encountered the guys who would later end up forming Cruis-O-Matic, which I would eventually join. That led to interacting with and getting to know all of the players around town.

__Rhoades:__ During the week billed as the Steve Martin Mull show, Steve had a college date on a Thursday night so they brought in Tom Waits for that show and Martin asked if I wanted to set in so I played drums with Jonny Hibbert on sax and Keith Christopher on bass with Martin on guitar and Tom on piano.  That was one of my more pleasant memories at the Music Hall.

__Roberts:__ And the shows that people would come see were those of artists that were "on their way up,” who would soon become household names. Billy Joel, Tom Petty, Jimmy Buffett, Willie Nelson, Jim Croce, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Steve Martin, Joe Walsh, Robert Palmer, Emmylou Harris, Tom Waits, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Pure Prarie League The Sex Pistols, Lindsey Buckingham & Stevie Nicks, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Jerry Garcia & the Legion of Mary. Huey Lewis, and so many others. The legends of the Blues: B.B. King, Albert King, Freddie King, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon . The Jazz artists John McLaughlin, Weather Report, Chick Corea & Return to Forever.

__Rhoades__: I saw so many incredible acts including Buffalo Bob from Howdy Doody on a Saturday afternoon matinee while I was surrounded by a bunch of kids and their moms. I was there the night Lily Tomlin stopped the show to have a redneck removed when yelled for her to take her clothes off.  The music hall was all over the map in the kinds of entertainment they brought us…Ace Trucking Company, Proctor and Bergman, Bill Monroe, Roland Kirk, Steve Goodman and it didn’t seem to break the bank back then.  They even brought in a production of Hair.

__Dean: __I remember seeing Steve Martin, Dolly Parton, the Staple Singers, Split Enz, Doc and Merle Watson, Bill Monroe, John Prine, JJ Cale, Doug Kershaw, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Sea Level. It was endless. The Great Southeast Music Hall booked great acts!

__Gasque:__ The Hall also allowed me to see performances of those who would become legends before they were well known: the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Mahavishnu Orchestra, David Allen Coe, Dixie Dregs, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris, Tom Waits, the Steve Martin Mull show, John Hartford, I could go on and on, and on.

__Roberts:__ It was a time when all the groups would be booked for three, four, five nights in a row. So we would get to hang out and get to know them. I remember taking Tom Waits to Underground Atlanta. He loved it! Tom played maybe 10 times at the Hall. I remember going bowling at the Express Lanes on Monroe Circle with Steve Martin and Martin Mull, I remember going to breakfast at the long-gone Steak & Egg with Captain Beefheart & Phillip (Fly) Stone ….

__Patton: __The Hall hosted the most eclectic shows in town.  I’m sure everyone will mention the Martin/Mull show. But the acts ran the gamut from Gino Vanelli, Buffalo Bob and Howdy Doody, The B-52’s and Fairport Convention to Billy Crystal, Jimmy Buffett, Weather Report, Keith Jarrett and Doctor Hook.

__Roberts:__ I remember all of the great jams, most of all, the night B.B. King was playing, and Eric Clapton & Diana Ross came to the show, got onstage and proceeded to tear the roof off the place for about an hour.

__Patton:__ The absolute best show I ever saw there was the night B. B. King headlined with The Nighthawks opening. They were contracted for two shows and both sold out. But there were so many people outside after the second show, that a third was negotiated and performed. And, during King’s set, B.B.called harp player, Mark Wenner and guitarist, Jimmy Thackery from the Nighthawks up on stage to jam. After Thackery finished his solo, B.B. turned to him and bowed. To this day, I think that was the proudest moment in Jimmy’s life.

__Roberts:__ I remember another magical night, the bill was B.B. King, and the Nighthawks. And Gregg Allman joined them for a couple of nights. The most soulful and sweaty shows in my 46-year career!

__Patton:__ The most memorable shows? The Knobz, a band from North Carolina who played the “Punk Festival” at the Hall. The climax of their act came during their final number, “Disco Chainsaw,” when the lead singer sawed off his artificial leg with, yes, a gas-powered chainsaw.  Game over. Follow that, bitches!

__Rhoades:__ I have to mention the appearance by the Sex Pistols, when I sat in with the opening act, Cruise-O-Matic. It was an intentionally strange billing with Cruise-O-Matic, known as a 60’s party band, that would guarantee to get a reaction from the crowd — and it did. I was brought up to sing a song written by myself and Rex Patton, “Boot In Your Face,” which was a spoof on the Ramones. The song was captured on film and eventually made it’s way into the Sex Pistol’s documentary, ''D.O.A.,'' which is almost unwatchable for me but still, it’s history. I still have the magazine, ''National Examiner'', which has a picture of me wearing a shirt I had spray painted with the words, “Kill Me.” In the article they superimposed a picture of Linda Ronstadt and the caption “America’s Sweetheart next to Punk bearing message on shirt that most true music fans would love to fulfill.” I’m damn proud of that one.

__Patton:__ The Sex Pistols, as much for the hoopla as anything else. With Cruis-O-Matic being their opening act, I was privy to all the backstage intrigue as well as the Us vs. Them dynamic that pervaded the Hall while we played our overlong (not our fault — nobody could find Sid) set. Most importantly, I met my future wife then, as she was going through the crucible of the Sex Pistols being the act she had to promote on her first week on the job as “Claudia Sickeler – PR Director for the Great Southeast Music Hall.”

__Citron:__ We could all reminisce about our favorite shows, John Prine, David Grisman, Doc and Merle, Jimmy Buffet, Leo Kotke, Ravi Shankar, John Hartford, Mac McAnally, Dolly Parton, Emmy Lou Harris, Janis Ian, Phoebe Snow, Johnathan Edwards, Crystal Gayle, Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra, B.B. King, Sun Ra, Muddy Waters,Tom Waits, Jerry Jeff Walker, NRBQ, David Bromberg, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the Sex Pistols, Steve Martin and Martin Mull, Jean Luc-Ponty, Asleep at the Wheel … but the real memories are of the hearts of the folks who ran the Hall. Gail (Bast), Robin (Conant), Ursula (Alexander), Claudia (Sickeler), Glenn (Allison), Chip (Abernathy), Doreen (Cochran), Farrell, Ron (Matthews), David (Manion), Sharon, Alun (Vontillus), Jack (Tarver), Brad (Moss) — insert a myriad of names here — the relationships that formed and have lasted the test of time. And, that night with Tommy Dean on stage singing away about “Chocolate City” and wondering ”who gave the monkey a gun,” I met my first husband on the back row — and we brought three wonderful children into the world (not that night, that happened quite a few years later). So, yes, the Music Hall changed my life.

__Patton: __Being there so often, I came to know everyone who worked there. Names popping into my head right now are Glenn, Gail, Doreen, Chip, Alun, Farrell, Mary, Phyllis, Brad, Ron, David, Carolyn, Betsy, Wiz. I know there are more and I’m sure other people will come up with them. Above and beyond the great musical experiences, the Hall was like a clubhouse, where we all ate together, drank together, got high together, saw shows together, hooked up and broke up. It was, basically, a funky shrine, where a bunch of like-minded people were busy being in their 20’s.

__Powell:__ The staff at the Hall wasn't just staff … we were and many still are like family. We did (and often still do) help each other...helping each other move, painting parties, rides, checking on each other when we didn't show, lending/giving money, going to court when someone got busted, lol..now go fund me pages and helping hands when someone needs dentures, or help with the rent.

__Gasque:__ It was small, it was friendly, and over time I met people who worked there that I am friends with today, Doreen Cochran, Sharon Powell, and Kay Vontillius. I distinctly remember the night I met Brad Moss, a part of management who was also involved in bringing the first U.S. performance of the Sex Pistols (a horrible performance however), because he and I became fast friends and years later would be married for 22 years until his death. The Music Hall gave me one of the greatest loves of my life.

__Powell:__ I loved our Brookhaven community, and our connection to each other and the Hall. I loved our mutual commitment to making sure the show went on...even through the times of no/late paychecks, we would show up. We always showed up! When we had to move the Hall, we worked together to load it out, and worked just as hard to load back in at Cherokee Plaza.

__Patton:__ I saw sets of some of the best music I had ever or would ever hear. And, when I walked out the front door of the Hall to go home – it was daylight. Magic.

__Citron:__ What a great home away from home the GSEMH became for me.

__Roberts:__ You had to be there.

__Powell:__ I found the "[https://www.facebook.com/groups/37003198317/|I Have Been to the Great Southeast Music Hall]" facebook page by total accident. I was living in the mountains, and was just surfing the net. I came upon the page, and noticed a couple of errors. ''Of course'' I contacted the page owner and talked to her about it. She and I became friends, and she made me an administrator. She was only 4 years-old when she used to go to the Hall because her mom loved it so much. Shannon Williamson created the page for her mom. Her mom is still with us, but. Shannon died last year. Shannon's dad was a Vietnam vet affected by Agent Orange. It’s thought that Shannon's lifelong illness was a result ... and it took her young life. This, to me, is sort of an example of the intrinsic interweaving of the culture of the day, the Hall, and our continued community

__Powell:__ People often ask which was my favorite show. The truth is, I didn't actually see many of them. Just like all the other staff (unless you were actually in the room) we were working the door, the record store, the jewelry store, the emporium, the office....I always made time to check out Arlo Guthrie and John Hartford. I loved those guys' music, and as human beings. Fitting that the last show we ever did was Arlo at Cherokee Plaza. He knew our dire straits, and did all he could to help us stay open. He even penned a singalong tune for the occasion about "saving the old Music Hall"...We didn’t, but, I like to think that Shannon did, though, because...here we are.

__Dean: __For the reunion I’ll be with Steve Wofford. We will miss Charles Wolff and Bruce Baxter who have both split the orb. Steve Marsh is unable to make it from Denver. Bob Elsey and Jody Worrell will play guitars and Anne Boston will help with vocals. We will be focused less on visuals and more on recreating the music, like “Who Gave The Monkey A Gun,” “Nina of the Nile,” “Living In The Heart Of Chocolate City,” “I’ve Got Rubber Brain Cells In My Head,” and other thoughtful fare.

__Rhoades:__ My appearance will be musical ,but I will also be performing some pieces from my standup show. I’m appearing at the Music Hall celebration with friends that I have recorded with and played live with for years, plus I will bring out special guests to sit in on a few songs. The material will give a nod to the Hahavishnu Orchestra, The Men from Glad, songs from several of my other CDs plus two unreleased songs, including one I wrote for this event.

__Dean: __Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra and Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People played many of the same venues but we have never performed back to back sets on the same stage. This is a first — and it promises to be fun!

__Rhoades:__ I never had the opportunity to share the bill with Thermos Greenwood when we were both playing the Hall. This will be a special night, and likely, will never be repeated."
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  string(25123) " IMG 8228  2019-08-03T23:31:57+00:00 IMG_8228.jpg   Remember seeing Roy Buchanan there! Must of been mid to late 70’s! Loved the Music Hall at Broadview & was there a lot because one of my best friends, Nanci Williams, did a lot of art work for them.  I still have my bucket !  Getting the gang back together one last time 21521  2019-08-03T23:36:57+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: The Great Southeast Music Hall Reunion tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris TONY PARIS Tony Paris 2019-08-03T23:36:57+00:00  Had the Sex Pistols never played the Great Southeast Music Hall, the music venue would still hold a significant place in Atlanta’s music history. Originally a bar, restaurant and concert hall tucked into the elbow of what was then Broadview Plaza, the setting was laid back, the beer served in buckets and the living seemed easy. The hippie counter-culture that had walked the Strip — Peachtree Street between 10th and 14th Streets — had disseminated into the mainstream, and the Great Southeast Music Hall was the perfect venue for those with longhair, tank tops, wide-belled Landlubber blue jeans and a yearning for peace and harmony to gather and groove together, listen to music and share in the joys and travails of becoming adults.

The Great Southeast Music Hall was not a rock club, not in the sense of Richards and the Electric Ballroom, two other Atlanta venues of the time, both located closer to the Strip, and therefore, downtown, an area considered unsafe by some suburbanites.

This was the ‘70s remember, and downtown Atlanta was becoming a ghost town, thanks to “white flight” — the move of businesses and people to areas north of the city — past Buckhead, past Chastain Park and Sandy Springs, to areas not even defined as OTP (outside the perimeter), because, for a time, no one knew they were ITP (inside the perimeter).

Located off Piedmont Road, with Morosgo Drive to the south and Marian Road to the north, the Broadview Plaza Shopping Center was the perfect place for a music venue, especially one catering to a wider, more varied audience by focusing on folk, country, bluegrass, and blues artists and singer-songwriters. The L-shaped strip mall had plenty of free parking, thanks to the grocery stores and small department stores that were its anchor tenants, allowing the Music Hall to schedule two shows a night without audiences having to worry about where to park before the first show’s turnover.

The Great Southeast Music Hall was also close to Brookhaven where, at the time, many Atlanta musicians lived, thanks to the cheap rent and small bungalows that made up the neighborhood before urbanization and gentrification spread up Peachtree Street. It was many of those local musicians, having played smaller clubs like the Bistro and the Twelfth Gate, who performed at the Music Hall, opening for national touring acts, and, in doing so,  built large enough followings to headline the Great Southeast Music Hall on their own.

Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra, Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People, the Hampton Geese Band, the Glenn Phillips Band,  Bill Sheffield, The Fans, the Para Band, and the Dynamic Atlanta Cruis-O-Matic were just some of the Atlanta performers to have headlined at the Great Southeast Music Hall.

When the original Broadview Plaza location was forced to close, it was natural for the Music Hall to move to Brookhaven to the theater located in Cherokee Plaza. Though many of the people remained and the Music Hall did well at the new location, it wasn’t the same. Sitting on cushions on the floor was replaced with tiered movie theater seats, and the Great Southeast Music Hall’s unique experience — not unlike like lounging in your own living room while your favorite musician performed — became one of more traditional theaters and music venues. The Dekalb County police didn’t help matters, either. The Music Hall was still selling cheap beer by the buckets, so once shows started, Dekalb’s finest would set up roadblocks at the exits of the shopping center to snare any inebriated music fans who tried to make it past the lines of police cars with rotating blue lights, officers, and dogs waiting for them on Peachtree Road.

This Sunday, August 4, a reunion of Great Southeast Music Hall employees, family and friends will take place at Smith’s Olde Bar. The get together starts at 5 p.m. with everyone gathering in the downstairs bar, then moving upstairs at 7 p.m. for the music. Bill Tush will emcee the evening, welcoming both Darryl Rhoades and Thermos Greenwood to the stage for their own sets. While neither will have their respective full bands with them, surviving members of both groups will appear, aided and abetted by many familiar Atlanta musicians as guests. Farrell Roberts, who has been busy planning the event along with Sharon Powell, says the reason for hosting this one is simple. Those who were regulars are getting older, and we should celebrate the past one more time. It’s hard to argue with that.

Farrell Roberts: It was named The Great Southeast Music Hall, Emporium, and Performing Arts Exchange. It was the ’70s. It held 525 people, who all sat on cushioned benches on the floor. They drank draft beer from a 32oz. metal bucket cost $2.75. You could get your bucket refilled and take it home as a souvenir.

Katherine Gasque: I was working for ABC Records in the mid 70’s. Jimmy Buffet was on our label and I went to the Great Southeast Music Hall for the first time to see him perform. It wasn’t a packed house but I was hooked on the place. Besides cheap buckets of beer and cheap food, the Hall was iconic, with an amazing wall signed by every artist who played there, it was magic. Tickets ran $3-4 dollars and everyone could see great music, rub elbows with like minded people, play some pinball, and drink cheap beer.

Kay Citron: It started at a point somewhere between the naivety of youth and hard core psychedelics and never ended! While listening to WRAS one night back in 1976, Aubrey the late night DJ offered free tickets to the first caller. I happened to be the lucky caller. I won tickets for Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People to see their show “Orgy on the Lawn.” I was young. I had to look up “orgy” in the Websters’ Dictionary. So off I go to this strange but intriguing event that included green, blue and purple performers on stage.

T’ Wesley Dean: My brother was part of a group that was going to stage a party at the Egyptian Ballroom in the Fox Theater, which was scheduled to be demolished. I talked my brother into letting me assemble a band for the party. I approached Bruce Baxter and Steve Wofford who were performing as Fletcher and the Piedmonts. The Piedmonts specialized in roots rock ’n' roll – Jerrry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Elvis, and early Rolling Stones. They enlisted Steve Marsh to sing and play guitar and Richy Height came along on drums. I sang and played bass. At the time Glitter Rock was threatening to be the “latest thing” and, in response, I told the Piedmonts I was going to paint myself green and call myself Thermos Greenwood. They said “OK. We’ll paint ourselves too and be colored people.” Honest to God we didn’t know any better. Our biggest influences were Saturday morning TV kiddy fare – Ramar of the Jungle, Tarzan movies, Warner Brothers cartoons, and the Coasters.  After playing a couple of successful parties we were invited by the Great Southeast Music Hall to come perform.

Sharon Powell: My first experience was when I won two tickets and an LP from WRAS for a band playing the Hall. I was NOT near the 18 year-old drinking age at the time, but, still, my friend and I, donned in our grooviest 10th street duds, picked up our tickets and LP at the door, and sauntered in like we owned the place. I met Farrell that night, and we became fast friends. I was working at Jumpin' Jack Flash Leather at the time, I think. Like a lot of us who went on to become forever attached to the Hall, I just sorta showed up and started working at whatever was needed. My first real paid gig there was when Bob Dulong asked if I would break down a bunch of boxes, and paid me for it. Next thing I knew, I was working in the box office, and getting money for it! Over the years, many of our jobs morphed to include much more than we started out doing. I ended my Hall career as a manager, box office, ticket sales, paying the bands, making sure contract rider stuff was attended, NOT being stoned, lol.

Citron: Too young to drink there (legally) but old enough to hang out and work the box office with Sharon and Chip, I returned as often as possible and basically “volunteered” to work. When there was nothing for me to do I would color in the black and white promo photos from the band bios in the office or play pinball in the lobby. The favored games, 6 Million Dollar Man and the Eight Ball machines, tried robbing Dan Baird and I of quarters, but we somehow ended up winning more free games than we had time to play. Good friendships for life. And THAT’S what I remember. Priscilla in the Emporium clothing me, Bean and Fly in the kitchen feeding me.

Powell: The Hall was and still is a huge part of my life. The political/cultural climate in the US was turbulent then as it is now.

Dean: In 1975 the war in Vietnam was over, flying on an airplane was fun, local police hadn’t been militarized, and the corporate lawyers and bean-counters had not yet ruined everything. I can remember Rex Patton and Ross Brittain played “19th Nervous Breakdown” nineteen times in a row on WIIN. It was a magic time to be in Atlanta.

Rex Patton: My initial contact with the Music Hall came from working at WIIN radio. We did remote interviews with recording acts in the Emporium for a feature called “Out to Lunch.” I basically worked on air for free. No salary. I worked another job from 6 am to 2 pm and then was on WIIN with Ross Brittain from 3 to sign-off. The only money I got was $50.00 a week for doing Taco Pronto promos (“Extra hot – all the time”). The Music Hall advertised with us by way of trade-outs. They paid us in meal tickets that we could use to eat at the Emporium. So, I was there, literally, 5 or more nights a week, just to feed myself. And, after a tasty dinner – I was partial to the Martin Mullett – I could wander into the hall itself and watch whomever was onstage that night.

Citron: My life changed as I met the music lovers, the musicians, the beer drinkers and the bartenders, the lighting and sound crew...I felt so at home on the padded floor seats!

Powell: A lot of stuff happened those first couple of years. I had my "day gigs,” which included working at Garma's Custom Leather and the Old Atlanta Satchel Co. There was a sort of crossover thing that happened. Management changed, staff came and went, but we didn't go too far … lots of us came to the Hall from other local Atlanta businesses: Comes the Sun, Garma's, the Electric Ballroom, Richards. The cool thing is the community we created. It wasn't just the Hall. If Alex (Cooley, who owned the Electric Ballroom) needed us at one of his gigs, we worked it out to help, and he did the same for us. Schedules were made in the community as a whole to make sure that everyone was covered. There wasn't the cutthroat competition that seems to exist now with the businesses in town. We all worked together.

Darryl Rhoades: It’s weird to think that my last performance at the GSEMH was over 41 years ago.  It was unlike any venue I had played before or since.  I have so many great memories of the Music Hall.   

Dean: Performing at the Music Hall was always great fun. That was where we covered the stage with kudzu, and hired the little people who worked at Sid and Marty Kroft’s to harass us on stage. The audiences there were the best – they would whoop and howl when we took the stage – we did look ridiculous. I can remember traipsing along the front edge of the stage thinking, “It doesn’t matter what I do. They are going to eat it up!”  And they did. We were able to be completely free in the moment.

Rhoades: There were no limits to what we could do there including the grand entrance in our holiday shows where several friends hoisted me up on a cross while I was dressed in a Santa Claus suit and screaming in a mic “You Got the wrong guy, you got the wrong guy” as I interrupted the band doing their Holiday Inn lounge show.

Patton: The Hall was also my entry into the Atlanta music scene as a participant. We played The Hahavishnu Orchestra on WIIN and through meeting the band members, I encountered the guys who would later end up forming Cruis-O-Matic, which I would eventually join. That led to interacting with and getting to know all of the players around town.

Rhoades: During the week billed as the Steve Martin Mull show, Steve had a college date on a Thursday night so they brought in Tom Waits for that show and Martin asked if I wanted to set in so I played drums with Jonny Hibbert on sax and Keith Christopher on bass with Martin on guitar and Tom on piano.  That was one of my more pleasant memories at the Music Hall.

Roberts: And the shows that people would come see were those of artists that were "on their way up,” who would soon become household names. Billy Joel, Tom Petty, Jimmy Buffett, Willie Nelson, Jim Croce, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Steve Martin, Joe Walsh, Robert Palmer, Emmylou Harris, Tom Waits, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Pure Prarie League The Sex Pistols, Lindsey Buckingham & Stevie Nicks, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Jerry Garcia & the Legion of Mary. Huey Lewis, and so many others. The legends of the Blues: B.B. King, Albert King, Freddie King, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon . The Jazz artists John McLaughlin, Weather Report, Chick Corea & Return to Forever.

Rhoades: I saw so many incredible acts including Buffalo Bob from Howdy Doody on a Saturday afternoon matinee while I was surrounded by a bunch of kids and their moms. I was there the night Lily Tomlin stopped the show to have a redneck removed when yelled for her to take her clothes off.  The music hall was all over the map in the kinds of entertainment they brought us…Ace Trucking Company, Proctor and Bergman, Bill Monroe, Roland Kirk, Steve Goodman and it didn’t seem to break the bank back then.  They even brought in a production of Hair.

Dean: I remember seeing Steve Martin, Dolly Parton, the Staple Singers, Split Enz, Doc and Merle Watson, Bill Monroe, John Prine, JJ Cale, Doug Kershaw, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Sea Level. It was endless. The Great Southeast Music Hall booked great acts!

Gasque: The Hall also allowed me to see performances of those who would become legends before they were well known: the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Mahavishnu Orchestra, David Allen Coe, Dixie Dregs, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris, Tom Waits, the Steve Martin Mull show, John Hartford, I could go on and on, and on.

Roberts: It was a time when all the groups would be booked for three, four, five nights in a row. So we would get to hang out and get to know them. I remember taking Tom Waits to Underground Atlanta. He loved it! Tom played maybe 10 times at the Hall. I remember going bowling at the Express Lanes on Monroe Circle with Steve Martin and Martin Mull, I remember going to breakfast at the long-gone Steak & Egg with Captain Beefheart & Phillip (Fly) Stone ….

Patton: The Hall hosted the most eclectic shows in town.  I’m sure everyone will mention the Martin/Mull show. But the acts ran the gamut from Gino Vanelli, Buffalo Bob and Howdy Doody, The B-52’s and Fairport Convention to Billy Crystal, Jimmy Buffett, Weather Report, Keith Jarrett and Doctor Hook.

Roberts: I remember all of the great jams, most of all, the night B.B. King was playing, and Eric Clapton & Diana Ross came to the show, got onstage and proceeded to tear the roof off the place for about an hour.

Patton: The absolute best show I ever saw there was the night B. B. King headlined with The Nighthawks opening. They were contracted for two shows and both sold out. But there were so many people outside after the second show, that a third was negotiated and performed. And, during King’s set, B.B.called harp player, Mark Wenner and guitarist, Jimmy Thackery from the Nighthawks up on stage to jam. After Thackery finished his solo, B.B. turned to him and bowed. To this day, I think that was the proudest moment in Jimmy’s life.

Roberts: I remember another magical night, the bill was B.B. King, and the Nighthawks. And Gregg Allman joined them for a couple of nights. The most soulful and sweaty shows in my 46-year career!

Patton: The most memorable shows? The Knobz, a band from North Carolina who played the “Punk Festival” at the Hall. The climax of their act came during their final number, “Disco Chainsaw,” when the lead singer sawed off his artificial leg with, yes, a gas-powered chainsaw.  Game over. Follow that, bitches!

Rhoades: I have to mention the appearance by the Sex Pistols, when I sat in with the opening act, Cruise-O-Matic. It was an intentionally strange billing with Cruise-O-Matic, known as a 60’s party band, that would guarantee to get a reaction from the crowd — and it did. I was brought up to sing a song written by myself and Rex Patton, “Boot In Your Face,” which was a spoof on the Ramones. The song was captured on film and eventually made it’s way into the Sex Pistol’s documentary, D.O.A., which is almost unwatchable for me but still, it’s history. I still have the magazine, National Examiner, which has a picture of me wearing a shirt I had spray painted with the words, “Kill Me.” In the article they superimposed a picture of Linda Ronstadt and the caption “America’s Sweetheart next to Punk bearing message on shirt that most true music fans would love to fulfill.” I’m damn proud of that one.

Patton: The Sex Pistols, as much for the hoopla as anything else. With Cruis-O-Matic being their opening act, I was privy to all the backstage intrigue as well as the Us vs. Them dynamic that pervaded the Hall while we played our overlong (not our fault — nobody could find Sid) set. Most importantly, I met my future wife then, as she was going through the crucible of the Sex Pistols being the act she had to promote on her first week on the job as “Claudia Sickeler – PR Director for the Great Southeast Music Hall.”

Citron: We could all reminisce about our favorite shows, John Prine, David Grisman, Doc and Merle, Jimmy Buffet, Leo Kotke, Ravi Shankar, John Hartford, Mac McAnally, Dolly Parton, Emmy Lou Harris, Janis Ian, Phoebe Snow, Johnathan Edwards, Crystal Gayle, Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra, B.B. King, Sun Ra, Muddy Waters,Tom Waits, Jerry Jeff Walker, NRBQ, David Bromberg, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the Sex Pistols, Steve Martin and Martin Mull, Jean Luc-Ponty, Asleep at the Wheel … but the real memories are of the hearts of the folks who ran the Hall. Gail (Bast), Robin (Conant), Ursula (Alexander), Claudia (Sickeler), Glenn (Allison), Chip (Abernathy), Doreen (Cochran), Farrell, Ron (Matthews), David (Manion), Sharon, Alun (Vontillus), Jack (Tarver), Brad (Moss) — insert a myriad of names here — the relationships that formed and have lasted the test of time. And, that night with Tommy Dean on stage singing away about “Chocolate City” and wondering ”who gave the monkey a gun,” I met my first husband on the back row — and we brought three wonderful children into the world (not that night, that happened quite a few years later). So, yes, the Music Hall changed my life.

Patton: Being there so often, I came to know everyone who worked there. Names popping into my head right now are Glenn, Gail, Doreen, Chip, Alun, Farrell, Mary, Phyllis, Brad, Ron, David, Carolyn, Betsy, Wiz. I know there are more and I’m sure other people will come up with them. Above and beyond the great musical experiences, the Hall was like a clubhouse, where we all ate together, drank together, got high together, saw shows together, hooked up and broke up. It was, basically, a funky shrine, where a bunch of like-minded people were busy being in their 20’s.

Powell: The staff at the Hall wasn't just staff … we were and many still are like family. We did (and often still do) help each other...helping each other move, painting parties, rides, checking on each other when we didn't show, lending/giving money, going to court when someone got busted, lol..now go fund me pages and helping hands when someone needs dentures, or help with the rent.

Gasque: It was small, it was friendly, and over time I met people who worked there that I am friends with today, Doreen Cochran, Sharon Powell, and Kay Vontillius. I distinctly remember the night I met Brad Moss, a part of management who was also involved in bringing the first U.S. performance of the Sex Pistols (a horrible performance however), because he and I became fast friends and years later would be married for 22 years until his death. The Music Hall gave me one of the greatest loves of my life.

Powell: I loved our Brookhaven community, and our connection to each other and the Hall. I loved our mutual commitment to making sure the show went on...even through the times of no/late paychecks, we would show up. We always showed up! When we had to move the Hall, we worked together to load it out, and worked just as hard to load back in at Cherokee Plaza.

Patton: I saw sets of some of the best music I had ever or would ever hear. And, when I walked out the front door of the Hall to go home – it was daylight. Magic.

Citron: What a great home away from home the GSEMH became for me.

Roberts: You had to be there.

Powell: I found the "I Have Been to the Great Southeast Music Hall" facebook page by total accident. I was living in the mountains, and was just surfing the net. I came upon the page, and noticed a couple of errors. Of course I contacted the page owner and talked to her about it. She and I became friends, and she made me an administrator. She was only 4 years-old when she used to go to the Hall because her mom loved it so much. Shannon Williamson created the page for her mom. Her mom is still with us, but. Shannon died last year. Shannon's dad was a Vietnam vet affected by Agent Orange. It’s thought that Shannon's lifelong illness was a result ... and it took her young life. This, to me, is sort of an example of the intrinsic interweaving of the culture of the day, the Hall, and our continued community

Powell: People often ask which was my favorite show. The truth is, I didn't actually see many of them. Just like all the other staff (unless you were actually in the room) we were working the door, the record store, the jewelry store, the emporium, the office....I always made time to check out Arlo Guthrie and John Hartford. I loved those guys' music, and as human beings. Fitting that the last show we ever did was Arlo at Cherokee Plaza. He knew our dire straits, and did all he could to help us stay open. He even penned a singalong tune for the occasion about "saving the old Music Hall"...We didn’t, but, I like to think that Shannon did, though, because...here we are.

Dean: For the reunion I’ll be with Steve Wofford. We will miss Charles Wolff and Bruce Baxter who have both split the orb. Steve Marsh is unable to make it from Denver. Bob Elsey and Jody Worrell will play guitars and Anne Boston will help with vocals. We will be focused less on visuals and more on recreating the music, like “Who Gave The Monkey A Gun,” “Nina of the Nile,” “Living In The Heart Of Chocolate City,” “I’ve Got Rubber Brain Cells In My Head,” and other thoughtful fare.

Rhoades: My appearance will be musical ,but I will also be performing some pieces from my standup show. I’m appearing at the Music Hall celebration with friends that I have recorded with and played live with for years, plus I will bring out special guests to sit in on a few songs. The material will give a nod to the Hahavishnu Orchestra, The Men from Glad, songs from several of my other CDs plus two unreleased songs, including one I wrote for this event.

Dean: Darryl Rhoades and the Hahavishnu Orchestra and Thermos Greenwood and the Colored People played many of the same venues but we have never performed back to back sets on the same stage. This is a first — and it promises to be fun!

Rhoades: I never had the opportunity to share the bill with Thermos Greenwood when we were both playing the Hall. This will be a special night, and likely, will never be repeated.    Tony Paris Archives BUCKETS OF MOONBEAMS, REALLY: The beer doesn't taste as good, drinking it from this old tin now; but the memories are so sweet.  0,0,1                                 HIGH FREQUENCIES: The Great Southeast Music Hall Reunion "
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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies, Atlanta Music News, Music Features

Saturday August 3, 2019 07:36 pm EDT
Getting the gang back together one last time | more...
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  string(21) "Jeff Walls, 1956-2019"
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  string(7704) "Jeff Walls passed away about the same time this piece was first being written. Working on the upcoming edition of Creative Loafing’s Music Issue, I remembered what the guitarist for Guadalcanal Diary, Hillbilly Frankenstein, Blasting Cap, and The Woggles told me last year when we were discussing a then-just released Guadalcanal Diary live album. I thought his words rang true then and now, as good advice for any musician reading the issue, whether just starting out, or still playing the road that goes on forever.

I was struck by the sacrifices many local musicians make when first starting out, in order to create their art on their own terms, and thought about how Walls had done the same when he, Murray Attaway, Rhett Crowe, and John Poe first formed Guadalcanal Diary. They made the same sacrifices every musician wanting to be in a rock ’n’ roll band makes.

There are the obvious. Playing Tuesday nights at an empty club for no money, at least, not enough to cover the gas it took to get to the gig. Being late with rent (again). Choosing between creating music that expresses your inner feelings and playing songs that will get you booked into clubs that might pay you a decent wage, but never what you’re worth. Traveling long hours and too many miles to an out-of-town gig only to find out the promoter cancelled the show because of lack of ticket sales — and everyone in the van is hungry and tired. Getting the van stolen — with or without your gear in it.

Then there’s the not-so-obvious. Loss of benefits from what some would deem a “real” job: No taxes withheld on a regular basis. No health insurance. No retirement fund. All things of seemingly no consequence when you’re young, invincible, and ready to take on the world. But, if you’re lucky enough and determined enough to play music well past your 20s, into middle age and later, those things begin to add up. If you encounter a health crisis, you’re fucked.

But you keep on. You persist.

Walls not only learned how to live with the shortfalls of being a musician, he was able to overcome them, as well, leading a full, fruitful life, married, with children and grandchildren, family that was with him the afternoon he died at Duke University Hospital in Durham, North Carolina. Diagnosed with  “an extremely rare form of pulmonary hypertension know as PVOD: Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease, one so rare that it only affects one to two people out of ten million. It is caused by progressive blockages of the small capillaries in the lungs. This causes the heart to have to work harder, until eventual heart failure. There is no known cure or treatment,” other than possibly a double lung transplant, for which Walls was waiting.

With friends rallying to support him through a GoFundMe page, a series of benefit concerts, and other fundraising activities, I thought the Music Issue would be a good time to publish the unique perspective the Marietta native offered on what he learned being in bands, staying the course, and continuing to play long after others might have chosen to hang up the guitar and spend more time at home.

Though sage advice, what he learned in three decades of playing music was not included in the original article focused on the release of At your Birthday Party. His answer was forthright.

“The biggest lesson I learned was to follow my own muse and not take any bullshit off anybody,” the musician/producer told me. “I’ve never had any luck trying to second-guess public taste. The best work I’ve ever done, the only stuff that ever made much of an impression on anybody was the result of me trying to impress myself and no one else.

“I wouldn’t recognize a ‘hit’ if it walked up and bit me on the ass,” he continued, “But the music biz is full of self-appointed experts who think they have the magical ability to hear a hit 100 percent of the time. But because they aren’t creative visionaries, they can only relate to what sounds vaguely like a hit that they have already heard. If they could spot a hit every time, wouldn’t it stand to reason that everything they released would be a hit? It is important to remember that for every hit song, there was always some big-wig in charge who wanted to quash it. And for every horrible song that you can name, there was some idiot up the chain who was convinced it was a sure-fire hit. One should never underestimate the short-sighted fallacy of human thinking, especially when it comes down from people in high positions.

“The Woggles had an extremely strong work ethic when I joined the band as a card-carrying Woggle in 2003 (I had produced the bulk of The Woggles’ recordings beginning with their first single in 1990). But before I joined, they carried forth around the world in a ragtag operation, sleeping on floors, traveling in vans with no AC, and frequently resorting to using substitutes when a member’s personal commitments kept them from being able to make the gig.

“After eight years of touring worldwide with Guadalcanal Diary on a bigger level than The Woggles have ever done, Guadalcanal eventually arrived at a fairly civilized way of coping with the hardships of touring. I would like to think that my experience with touring has helped make life on the road a less stressful experience for The Woggles. I think that my influence has contributed to Woggles’ tours becoming more focused, streamlined operations. At the very least, since I joined, the audience could count on seeing the same four Woggles perform at every show.

“I also learned how important is to keep the label politics and music biz at arm’s distance. The Woggles are in the enviable position of being able to do exactly what we want to do. We are lucky to have very little outside interference, which allows us to focus on what we like about playing music for people. There is no pressure, no sense of being on a treadmill that is constantly in danger of spinning out of control. No one has any expectations of ever ‘making it big’; no one entertains any delusions of stardom. We do what we do only because we love it.”

Perhaps it’s the love Walls — also known as “Flesh Hammer,” his stage name in The Woggles — exuded onstage no matter who he played with that has caused such an outpouring of kindness from the friends, fans, and complete strangers who’ve pledged money on his GoFundMe page since his hospitalization over a month ago. According to Murray Attaway, Walls’ former Guadalcanal Diary bandmate and longtime friend, the response has been “overwhelming.”

Along with proceeds from the two “See My Friends” benefit concerts, now memorial concerts for the late guitarist, scheduled for June 7 at the Foundry in Athens and June 23 at the Earl, and the selling of “Flesh Hammer Strong” stickers, Attaway hopes a respectable dent will be made in the medical bills Walls incurred. Other benefits already planned, such as the “Night of Cocktails & Comedy” June 26 at the Old Fourth Ward Distillery, will continue to take place.

Once Attaway posted on his Facebook page Walls had passed, tributes from those the Athens musician knew or who he touched through his music began to fill the social media site. Those of us at Creative Loafing join them in extending our condolences to his wife Phyllis, his family, those he shared a stage with and those he guided in the studio. Everyone has a story about Jeff Walls. And they all have  something good to say about him. He was kind, considerate, funny, erudite. Everything you could ask for in a husband, father, friend and bandmate.

Who could ask for anything more?"
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I was struck by the sacrifices many local musicians make when first starting out, in order to create their art on their own terms, and thought about how Walls had done the same when he, Murray Attaway, Rhett Crowe, and John Poe first formed Guadalcanal Diary. They made the same sacrifices every musician wanting to be in a rock ’n’ roll band makes.

There are the obvious. Playing Tuesday nights at an empty club for no money, at least, not enough to cover the gas it took to get to the gig. Being late with rent (again). Choosing between creating music that expresses your inner feelings and playing songs that will get you booked into clubs that might pay you a decent wage, but never what you’re worth. Traveling long hours and too many miles to an out-of-town gig only to find out the promoter cancelled the show because of lack of ticket sales — and everyone in the van is hungry and tired. Getting the van stolen — with or without your gear in it.

Then there’s the not-so-obvious. Loss of benefits from what some would deem a “real” job: No taxes withheld on a regular basis. No health insurance. No retirement fund. All things of seemingly no consequence when you’re young, invincible, and ready to take on the world. But, if you’re lucky enough and determined enough to play music well past your 20s, into middle age and later, those things begin to add up. If you encounter a health crisis, you’re fucked.

But you keep on. You persist.

Walls not only learned how to live with the shortfalls of being a musician, he was able to overcome them, as well, leading a full, fruitful life, married, with children and grandchildren, family that was with him the afternoon he died at Duke University Hospital in Durham, North Carolina. Diagnosed with  “an extremely rare form of pulmonary hypertension know as PVOD: Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease, one so rare that it only affects one to two people out of ten million. It is caused by progressive blockages of the small capillaries in the lungs. This causes the heart to have to work harder, until eventual heart failure. There is no known cure or treatment,” other than possibly a double lung transplant, for which Walls was waiting.

With friends rallying to support him through a GoFundMe page, a series of benefit concerts, and other fundraising activities, I thought the Music Issue would be a good time to publish the unique perspective the Marietta native offered on what he learned being in bands, staying the course, and continuing to play long after others might have chosen to hang up the guitar and spend more time at home.

Though sage advice, what he learned in three decades of playing music was not included in the original article focused on the release of ''At your Birthday Party''. His answer was forthright.

“The biggest lesson I learned was to follow my own muse and not take any bullshit off anybody,” the musician/producer told me. “I’ve never had any luck trying to second-guess public taste. The best work I’ve ever done, the only stuff that ever made much of an impression on anybody was the result of me trying to impress myself and no one else.

“I wouldn’t recognize a ‘hit’ if it walked up and bit me on the ass,” he continued, “But the music biz is full of self-appointed experts who think they have the magical ability to hear a hit 100 percent of the time. But because they aren’t creative visionaries, they can only relate to what sounds vaguely like a hit that they have already heard. If they could spot a hit every time, wouldn’t it stand to reason that everything they released would be a hit? It is important to remember that for every hit song, there was always some big-wig in charge who wanted to quash it. And for every horrible song that you can name, there was some idiot up the chain who was convinced it was a sure-fire hit. One should never underestimate the short-sighted fallacy of human thinking, especially when it comes down from people in high positions.

“The Woggles had an extremely strong work ethic when I joined the band as a card-carrying Woggle in 2003 (I had produced the bulk of The Woggles’ recordings beginning with their first single in 1990). But before I joined, they carried forth around the world in a ragtag operation, sleeping on floors, traveling in vans with no AC, and frequently resorting to using substitutes when a member’s personal commitments kept them from being able to make the gig.

“After eight years of touring worldwide with Guadalcanal Diary on a bigger level than The Woggles have ever done, Guadalcanal eventually arrived at a fairly civilized way of coping with the hardships of touring. I would like to think that my experience with touring has helped make life on the road a less stressful experience for The Woggles. I think that my influence has contributed to Woggles’ tours becoming more focused, streamlined operations. At the very least, since I joined, the audience could count on seeing the same four Woggles perform at every show.

“I also learned how important is to keep the label politics and music biz at arm’s distance. The Woggles are in the enviable position of being able to do exactly what we want to do. We are lucky to have very little outside interference, which allows us to focus on what we like about playing music for people. There is no pressure, no sense of being on a treadmill that is constantly in danger of spinning out of control. No one has any expectations of ever ‘making it big’; no one entertains any delusions of stardom. We do what we do only because we love it.”

Perhaps it’s the love Walls — also known as “Flesh Hammer,” his stage name in The Woggles — exuded onstage no matter who he played with that has caused such an outpouring of kindness from the friends, fans, and complete strangers who’ve pledged money on his [https://www.gofundme.com/f/jeff-walls-medical-fund?fbclid=IwAR2GgDhKKK2McVbCrXQtVU4SE5CXn34Pz4O0dPEXVD-E-y_oHWXLClRoLjE|GoFundMe page] since his hospitalization over a month ago. According to Murray Attaway, Walls’ former Guadalcanal Diary bandmate and longtime friend, the response has been “overwhelming.”

Along with proceeds from the two “See My Friends” benefit concerts, now memorial concerts for the late guitarist, scheduled for [https://www.facebook.com/See-My-Friends-The-Campaign-for-Jeff-Walls-289308372022642/?eid=ARD0ZlL9JeVf-j34ApZrDiSEdklE8zo09IueWidIfco_zl2K7cTtzps9D4DQYzlIE_T4b4pAr7cTHYCG|June 7 at the Foundry] in Athens and [https://www.facebook.com/events/485297218882415/|June 23 at the Earl], and the selling of [https://fleshhammerstrong.bigcartel.com/product/flesh-hammer-4-sticker-pack-3|“Flesh Hammer Strong” stickers], Attaway hopes a respectable dent will be made in the medical bills Walls incurred. Other benefits already planned, such as the [https://www.facebook.com/finelycraftedcomedy/photos/gm.2436190969948796/2313827248838114/?type=3&theater|“Night of Cocktails & Comedy”] June 26 at the Old Fourth Ward Distillery, will continue to take place.

Once Attaway posted on his Facebook page Walls had passed, tributes from those the Athens musician knew or who he touched through his music began to fill the social media site. Those of us at ''Creative Loafing'' join them in extending our condolences to his wife Phyllis, his family, those he shared a stage with and those he guided in the studio. Everyone has a story about Jeff Walls. And they all have  something good to say about him. He was kind, considerate, funny, erudite. Everything you could ask for in a husband, father, friend and bandmate.

Who could ask for anything more?"
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  string(9743) " Woggles BoTH SF GregGutbezahl 02 2019 028  2019-05-30T20:30:04+00:00 Woggles-BoTH-SF-GregGutbezahl-02-2019-028.jpg   He will live forever through his recorded music. I was blessed to know him. I only knew Jeff from the records and the few shows I was lucky enough to see. (I've been exiled to Texas for the last few decades) He was everything you want a musician to be - warm, generous, all in, and talented as hell. Loved all his bands and all his playing. His passing leaves a hurt in my heart that's not going away anytime soon. Love and peace to everyone who knew him and played with him. Jeff was the consummate professional, always on time for a sound check or a showtime. And he was gracious to a fault. The world is a lesser place with him not in it.. Stellar piece, Tony. As to be expected. I was just a nobody in Marietta when Gualdalcanal started. Saw every show I could with Hillbilly Frankenstein and caught a few Woggle shows after moving far away. Even some shows in Boston and Chicago. Met Jeff through good friends of his in the early 80's hanging out at The Strand in Marietta. Jeff was always the most gracious nicest non-judgmental common sense person I have ever met. I would not say that about many people at all. Truly, Jeff made an impression on me from way back that I will never forget. His talent was amazing but his personality even out shined that. Many hearts are hurt and I understand why. It is a shame that artists who try to keep their principles have to struggle just to live.  Just one more reason why we need medicare for all. jeff walls guadalcanal diary the woggles The late guitarist had ‘the right stuff’ 18207  2019-05-30T20:25:47+00:00 Jeff Walls, 1956-2019 tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2019-05-30T20:25:47+00:00  Jeff Walls passed away about the same time this piece was first being written. Working on the upcoming edition of Creative Loafing’s Music Issue, I remembered what the guitarist for Guadalcanal Diary, Hillbilly Frankenstein, Blasting Cap, and The Woggles told me last year when we were discussing a then-just released Guadalcanal Diary live album. I thought his words rang true then and now, as good advice for any musician reading the issue, whether just starting out, or still playing the road that goes on forever.

I was struck by the sacrifices many local musicians make when first starting out, in order to create their art on their own terms, and thought about how Walls had done the same when he, Murray Attaway, Rhett Crowe, and John Poe first formed Guadalcanal Diary. They made the same sacrifices every musician wanting to be in a rock ’n’ roll band makes.

There are the obvious. Playing Tuesday nights at an empty club for no money, at least, not enough to cover the gas it took to get to the gig. Being late with rent (again). Choosing between creating music that expresses your inner feelings and playing songs that will get you booked into clubs that might pay you a decent wage, but never what you’re worth. Traveling long hours and too many miles to an out-of-town gig only to find out the promoter cancelled the show because of lack of ticket sales — and everyone in the van is hungry and tired. Getting the van stolen — with or without your gear in it.

Then there’s the not-so-obvious. Loss of benefits from what some would deem a “real” job: No taxes withheld on a regular basis. No health insurance. No retirement fund. All things of seemingly no consequence when you’re young, invincible, and ready to take on the world. But, if you’re lucky enough and determined enough to play music well past your 20s, into middle age and later, those things begin to add up. If you encounter a health crisis, you’re fucked.

But you keep on. You persist.

Walls not only learned how to live with the shortfalls of being a musician, he was able to overcome them, as well, leading a full, fruitful life, married, with children and grandchildren, family that was with him the afternoon he died at Duke University Hospital in Durham, North Carolina. Diagnosed with  “an extremely rare form of pulmonary hypertension know as PVOD: Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease, one so rare that it only affects one to two people out of ten million. It is caused by progressive blockages of the small capillaries in the lungs. This causes the heart to have to work harder, until eventual heart failure. There is no known cure or treatment,” other than possibly a double lung transplant, for which Walls was waiting.

With friends rallying to support him through a GoFundMe page, a series of benefit concerts, and other fundraising activities, I thought the Music Issue would be a good time to publish the unique perspective the Marietta native offered on what he learned being in bands, staying the course, and continuing to play long after others might have chosen to hang up the guitar and spend more time at home.

Though sage advice, what he learned in three decades of playing music was not included in the original article focused on the release of At your Birthday Party. His answer was forthright.

“The biggest lesson I learned was to follow my own muse and not take any bullshit off anybody,” the musician/producer told me. “I’ve never had any luck trying to second-guess public taste. The best work I’ve ever done, the only stuff that ever made much of an impression on anybody was the result of me trying to impress myself and no one else.

“I wouldn’t recognize a ‘hit’ if it walked up and bit me on the ass,” he continued, “But the music biz is full of self-appointed experts who think they have the magical ability to hear a hit 100 percent of the time. But because they aren’t creative visionaries, they can only relate to what sounds vaguely like a hit that they have already heard. If they could spot a hit every time, wouldn’t it stand to reason that everything they released would be a hit? It is important to remember that for every hit song, there was always some big-wig in charge who wanted to quash it. And for every horrible song that you can name, there was some idiot up the chain who was convinced it was a sure-fire hit. One should never underestimate the short-sighted fallacy of human thinking, especially when it comes down from people in high positions.

“The Woggles had an extremely strong work ethic when I joined the band as a card-carrying Woggle in 2003 (I had produced the bulk of The Woggles’ recordings beginning with their first single in 1990). But before I joined, they carried forth around the world in a ragtag operation, sleeping on floors, traveling in vans with no AC, and frequently resorting to using substitutes when a member’s personal commitments kept them from being able to make the gig.

“After eight years of touring worldwide with Guadalcanal Diary on a bigger level than The Woggles have ever done, Guadalcanal eventually arrived at a fairly civilized way of coping with the hardships of touring. I would like to think that my experience with touring has helped make life on the road a less stressful experience for The Woggles. I think that my influence has contributed to Woggles’ tours becoming more focused, streamlined operations. At the very least, since I joined, the audience could count on seeing the same four Woggles perform at every show.

“I also learned how important is to keep the label politics and music biz at arm’s distance. The Woggles are in the enviable position of being able to do exactly what we want to do. We are lucky to have very little outside interference, which allows us to focus on what we like about playing music for people. There is no pressure, no sense of being on a treadmill that is constantly in danger of spinning out of control. No one has any expectations of ever ‘making it big’; no one entertains any delusions of stardom. We do what we do only because we love it.”

Perhaps it’s the love Walls — also known as “Flesh Hammer,” his stage name in The Woggles — exuded onstage no matter who he played with that has caused such an outpouring of kindness from the friends, fans, and complete strangers who’ve pledged money on his GoFundMe page since his hospitalization over a month ago. According to Murray Attaway, Walls’ former Guadalcanal Diary bandmate and longtime friend, the response has been “overwhelming.”

Along with proceeds from the two “See My Friends” benefit concerts, now memorial concerts for the late guitarist, scheduled for June 7 at the Foundry in Athens and June 23 at the Earl, and the selling of “Flesh Hammer Strong” stickers, Attaway hopes a respectable dent will be made in the medical bills Walls incurred. Other benefits already planned, such as the “Night of Cocktails & Comedy” June 26 at the Old Fourth Ward Distillery, will continue to take place.

Once Attaway posted on his Facebook page Walls had passed, tributes from those the Athens musician knew or who he touched through his music began to fill the social media site. Those of us at Creative Loafing join them in extending our condolences to his wife Phyllis, his family, those he shared a stage with and those he guided in the studio. Everyone has a story about Jeff Walls. And they all have  something good to say about him. He was kind, considerate, funny, erudite. Everything you could ask for in a husband, father, friend and bandmate.

Who could ask for anything more?    ©2019 Greg Gutbezahl / Studio 680 FEBRUARY 5, 2019: Jeff Walls with The Woggles at Bottom of the Hill, San Francisco, California.  0,0,1    "Jeff Walls" "Guadalcanal Diary" "The Woggles"                             Jeff Walls, 1956-2019 "
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Thursday May 30, 2019 04:25 pm EDT
The late guitarist had ‘the right stuff’ | more...
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  string(146) "The new gallery in Candler Park is a ‘pop-up shop’ for local artists; Kevn Kinney and Clay Harper provide the soundtrack for tonight's opening"
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  string(6388) "If you were taking in the sensory overload that was Clay Harper hosting his Tuesday nights in May residency at the Avondale Town Cinema last year, you will recall each night had it’s own series of art work promoting the music, art and social discourse.

The graphics, somewhat surrealist interpretations of the familiar juxtaposed with a red flower, were the work of therealfranktee, an otherwise unknown Atlanta artist, whose work is as comforting as it can be jarring.

Therealfranktee has come a long way since those Tuesday nights twelve months ago when Harper was previewing songs from his then about to be released album, Bleak Beauty. Indeed, Harper’s return to the stage proved to be a springboard for the prolific artist, who creates about five new works a week, launching his popularity into the stratosphere usually inhabited by the space-suited astronaut so often a cornerstone of his artwork.

The artist has taken his fifteen minutes and run with them. Tonight, May 2, he opens 378, a new art gallery on Clifton Road, around the corner from the Fellini's Pizza on McLendon Avenue in Candler Park.

Tonight’s opening will feature works by Tee, along with those of two other Atlanta-based artists, Anna Jensen and Ruth Franklin. Pieces from a series of postcard exchanges between artists Jack Logan and Kosmo Vinyl will also be on display.

The gallery will work as a pop-up space whenever the artists open the doors, with notices posted on Instagram and Facebook: @therealfranktee. Tonight’s opening promises to be something more than just an art exhibit. Music for the evening will be provided by Kevn Kinney and Friends. Kinney’s performance is not without reason. One of therealfranktee’s astronauts, holding a red flower, appears on the cover of Live The Love Beautiful, Drivin N Cryin’s new album, to be released June 21. It was through Harper that Kinney decided DNC should use Tee’s art for the album, the various components he provided incorporated in the package by art director Susan Archie at the World of AnArchie. Archie, a three-time Grammy winner, also designed Harper’s Bleak Beauty, the album that prompted him to organize last year’s successful Tuesday nights in May.

If such artistic incestuous isn’t enough for you, it was Harper who urged therealfranktee to open 378, reason enough for Harper to also be performing tonight.

Tee says the purpose of the gallery is “evolving,” but that his main hope is to provide a place for “local artists and musicians who need a space for a week or two, and to provide it to them if they are able to cover the operating expenses only while they are there.”

The artist/gallery operator says his art “will most likely always be represented, unless someone wants to take it down for their show.” Tee “encourages artists to reach out to book space to make sure the it gets used. The main goal of 378 is to help lift and build artists and musicians of all kinds,” he says. “I don’t have a plan. It’s just seeing where and how it evolves."

Tonight, he explains, “the artists will keep all proceeds from their sales. If money is donated for refreshments or at the door, after operating expenses are covered, those proceeds will be donated to a charity.”

Tee says that hopefully, once 378 is hosting pop-ups on a regular basis, more  I have a few ideas for  we have a few ideas as to what charity or school we will give the proceeds to after expenses.

The artists exhibiting at the opening were chosen because “they are who are in my life at the moment.” Tee moves in impressive circles. Ruth Franklin was voted “Best Established Visual Artist” by readers of Creative Loafing in 2014. Anna Jensen’s work has been commissioned by the Plaza Hotel in New York. Both artists have exhibited on the two sides of the Atlantic.

Kosmo Vinyl, one-time manager of The Clash, has been exhibiting the world over, including at Shawn Vinson’s Different Trains Gallery in Decatur. Vinyl has also been co-conspirator with Harper on a number of projects. He produced Drivin N Cryin’s 1997 self-titled album, released on Harper’s Casino Music label, recently remastered, retitled and re-released as Too Late to Turn Back Now. Perhaps it is Vinyl’s collaboration with Athens musician and artist Jack Logan that brings this party full-circle. Logan created the comic book that accompanied Doug, the second album by Harper’s first band, The Coolies. It was Logan’s clay figure Frank, from his album Bulk, which first inspired therealfranktee.

He explains. “He Logan made these little yellow clay figurines for his album Bulk. I have one. After collecting all types of art for 30 years or more, I started taking photos of Frank. Then I made stencils of him. Then drawings. After that, I started making the posters for Clay’s shows at Avondale Towne Cinema. Since then, I have become obsessed.

“The main reason I did Drivin N Cryin’s new album cover is because Clay has a lot of my stuff hanging in his house and Kevn saw it. It seems Kevn and I rode on the same spaceship at some point in 1985.

Tee describes his work as “fun. Really, it’s whatever makes me happy. I’m not sure if it fits in or not but it’s colorful, fun and open.” That attitude is why the flower has become so much a part of his paintings. “I thought it just made everything happy.

“One more thing about the flower,” he adds. “My ant was Japanese and barely spoke English. She adopted me as a child when i was getting off drugs. Before she died, she painted a water color for me. It was a red poppy so that’s the flower I paint. She was a saint. If we could all have grace and mercy like her, traffic wouldn’t be so bad in this town.”

“I get a lot of messages from deserving artists and musicians asking how they can book 378,” Tee notes. “I would love to hand the keys over to these people and let them man their own shows and create their own space for one or two weeks at a time. These are just ideas. Right now things are just moving, and I’m willing to see where it goes.I really don't know what this place is going to be. I am riddled with anxiety but that is life. I have hopes that artists of all types will have a chance to use the space, make some money from their art and bring some love to the community.”"
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The graphics, somewhat surrealist interpretations of the familiar juxtaposed with a red flower, were the work of therealfranktee, an otherwise unknown Atlanta artist, whose work is as comforting as it can be jarring.

__Therealfranktee__ has come a long way since those Tuesday nights twelve months ago when Harper was previewing songs from his then about to be released album, ''Bleak Beauty. ''Indeed, Harper’s return to the stage proved to be a springboard for the prolific artist, who creates about five new works a week, launching his popularity into the stratosphere usually inhabited by the space-suited astronaut so often a cornerstone of his artwork.

The artist has taken his fifteen minutes and run with them. Tonight, May 2, he opens __378__, a new art gallery on Clifton Road, around the corner from the __[http://www.fellinisatlanta.com|Fellini's Pizza]__ on [https://www.google.com/maps/place/McLendon Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30307/@33.764844,-84.3351946,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x88f506b7de234a03:0x45446e9841732149!8m2!3d33.764844!4d-84.3330059|McLendon Avenue] in Candler Park.

Tonight’s opening will feature works by Tee, along with those of two other Atlanta-based artists, __[https://annajensenart.com/home.html|Anna Jensen]__ and __[http://www.ruthfranklin.com|Ruth Franklin]__. Pieces from a series of postcard exchanges between artists __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Logan|Jack Logan]__ and __[https://kosmovinyl.com|Kosmo Vinyl]__ will also be on display.

The gallery will work as a pop-up space whenever the artists open the doors, with notices posted on Instagram and Facebook: @therealfranktee. Tonight’s opening promises to be something more than just an art exhibit. Music for the evening will be provided by __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevn_Kinney|Kevn Kinney]__ and Friends. Kinney’s performance is not without reason. One of therealfranktee’s astronauts, holding a red flower, appears on the cover of ''Live The Love Beautiful'', __[https://www.drivinncryin.com|Drivin N Cryin]__’s new album, to be released June 21. It was through Harper that Kinney decided DNC should use Tee’s art for the album, the various components he provided incorporated in the package by art director __Susan Archie__ at the __[http://www.worldofanarchie.com|World of AnArchie]__. Archie, a three-time Grammy winner, also designed Harper’s ''Bleak Beauty'', the album that prompted him to organize last year’s successful Tuesday nights in May.

If such artistic incestuous isn’t enough for you, it was Harper who urged therealfranktee to open 378, reason enough for Harper to also be performing tonight.

Tee says the purpose of the gallery is “evolving,” but that his main hope is to provide a place for “local artists and musicians who need a space for a week or two, and to provide it to them if they are able to cover the operating expenses only while they are there.”

The artist/gallery operator says his art “will most likely always be represented, unless someone wants to take it down for their show.” Tee “encourages artists to reach out to book space to make sure the it gets used. The main goal of 378 is to help lift and build artists and musicians of all kinds,” he says. “I don’t have a plan. It’s just seeing where and how it evolves."

Tonight, he explains, “the artists will keep all proceeds from their sales. If money is donated for refreshments or at the door, after operating expenses are covered, those proceeds will be donated to a charity.”

Tee says that hopefully, once 378 is hosting pop-ups on a regular basis, more  I have a few ideas for  we have a few ideas as to what charity or school we will give the proceeds to after expenses.

The artists exhibiting at the opening were chosen because “they are who are in my life at the moment.” Tee moves in impressive circles. Ruth Franklin was voted “Best Established Visual Artist” by readers of ''Creative Loafing ''in 2014. Anna Jensen’s work has been commissioned by the Plaza Hotel in New York. Both artists have exhibited on the two sides of the Atlantic.

Kosmo Vinyl, one-time manager of The Clash, has been exhibiting the world over, including at Shawn Vinson’s __[https://www.differenttrainsgallery.com|Different Trains Gallery]__ in Decatur. Vinyl has also been co-conspirator with Harper on a number of projects. He produced Drivin N Cryin’s 1997 self-titled album, released on Harper’s Casino Music label, recently remastered, retitled and re-released as ''Too Late to Turn Back Now''. Perhaps it is Vinyl’s collaboration with Athens musician and artist Jack Logan that brings this party full-circle. Logan created the comic book that accompanied ''Doug'', the second album by Harper’s first band,'' The Coolies. ''It was Logan’s clay figure Frank, from his album ''[https://aquariumdrunkard.com/2018/01/22/shrunken-head-an-oral-history-of-jack-logans-bulk/|Bulk]'', which first inspired therealfranktee.

He explains. “He [[Logan] made these little yellow clay figurines for his album ''Bulk''. I have one. After collecting all types of art for 30 years or more, I started taking photos of Frank. Then I made stencils of him. Then drawings. After that, I started making the posters for Clay’s shows at Avondale Towne Cinema. Since then, I have become obsessed.

“The main reason I did Drivin N Cryin’s new album cover is because Clay has a lot of my stuff hanging in his house and Kevn saw it. It seems Kevn and I rode on the same spaceship at some point in 1985.

Tee describes his work as “fun. Really, it’s whatever makes me happy. I’m not sure if it fits in or not but it’s colorful, fun and open.” That attitude is why the flower has become so much a part of his paintings. “I thought it just made everything happy.

“One more thing about the flower,” he adds. “My ant was Japanese and barely spoke English. She adopted me as a child when i was getting off drugs. Before she died, she painted a water color for me. It was a red poppy so that’s the flower I paint. She was a saint. If we could all have grace and mercy like her, traffic wouldn’t be so bad in this town.”

“I get a lot of messages from deserving artists and musicians asking how they can book 378,” Tee notes. “I would love to hand the keys over to these people and let them man their own shows and create their own space for one or two weeks at a time. These are just ideas. Right now things are just moving, and I’m willing to see where it goes.I really don't know what this place is going to be. I am riddled with anxiety but that is life. I have hopes that artists of all types will have a chance to use the space, make some money from their art and bring some love to the community.”"
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[https://games.lol/|PC Games Download]  The new gallery in Candler Park is a ‘pop-up shop’ for local artists; Kevn Kinney and Clay Harper provide the soundtrack for tonight's opening 17056  2019-05-02T13:58:42+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: 378 — Art for art’s sake tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2019-05-02T13:58:42+00:00  If you were taking in the sensory overload that was Clay Harper hosting his Tuesday nights in May residency at the Avondale Town Cinema last year, you will recall each night had it’s own series of art work promoting the music, art and social discourse.

The graphics, somewhat surrealist interpretations of the familiar juxtaposed with a red flower, were the work of therealfranktee, an otherwise unknown Atlanta artist, whose work is as comforting as it can be jarring.

Therealfranktee has come a long way since those Tuesday nights twelve months ago when Harper was previewing songs from his then about to be released album, Bleak Beauty. Indeed, Harper’s return to the stage proved to be a springboard for the prolific artist, who creates about five new works a week, launching his popularity into the stratosphere usually inhabited by the space-suited astronaut so often a cornerstone of his artwork.

The artist has taken his fifteen minutes and run with them. Tonight, May 2, he opens 378, a new art gallery on Clifton Road, around the corner from the Fellini's Pizza on McLendon Avenue in Candler Park.

Tonight’s opening will feature works by Tee, along with those of two other Atlanta-based artists, Anna Jensen and Ruth Franklin. Pieces from a series of postcard exchanges between artists Jack Logan and Kosmo Vinyl will also be on display.

The gallery will work as a pop-up space whenever the artists open the doors, with notices posted on Instagram and Facebook: @therealfranktee. Tonight’s opening promises to be something more than just an art exhibit. Music for the evening will be provided by Kevn Kinney and Friends. Kinney’s performance is not without reason. One of therealfranktee’s astronauts, holding a red flower, appears on the cover of Live The Love Beautiful, Drivin N Cryin’s new album, to be released June 21. It was through Harper that Kinney decided DNC should use Tee’s art for the album, the various components he provided incorporated in the package by art director Susan Archie at the World of AnArchie. Archie, a three-time Grammy winner, also designed Harper’s Bleak Beauty, the album that prompted him to organize last year’s successful Tuesday nights in May.

If such artistic incestuous isn’t enough for you, it was Harper who urged therealfranktee to open 378, reason enough for Harper to also be performing tonight.

Tee says the purpose of the gallery is “evolving,” but that his main hope is to provide a place for “local artists and musicians who need a space for a week or two, and to provide it to them if they are able to cover the operating expenses only while they are there.”

The artist/gallery operator says his art “will most likely always be represented, unless someone wants to take it down for their show.” Tee “encourages artists to reach out to book space to make sure the it gets used. The main goal of 378 is to help lift and build artists and musicians of all kinds,” he says. “I don’t have a plan. It’s just seeing where and how it evolves."

Tonight, he explains, “the artists will keep all proceeds from their sales. If money is donated for refreshments or at the door, after operating expenses are covered, those proceeds will be donated to a charity.”

Tee says that hopefully, once 378 is hosting pop-ups on a regular basis, more  I have a few ideas for  we have a few ideas as to what charity or school we will give the proceeds to after expenses.

The artists exhibiting at the opening were chosen because “they are who are in my life at the moment.” Tee moves in impressive circles. Ruth Franklin was voted “Best Established Visual Artist” by readers of Creative Loafing in 2014. Anna Jensen’s work has been commissioned by the Plaza Hotel in New York. Both artists have exhibited on the two sides of the Atlantic.

Kosmo Vinyl, one-time manager of The Clash, has been exhibiting the world over, including at Shawn Vinson’s Different Trains Gallery in Decatur. Vinyl has also been co-conspirator with Harper on a number of projects. He produced Drivin N Cryin’s 1997 self-titled album, released on Harper’s Casino Music label, recently remastered, retitled and re-released as Too Late to Turn Back Now. Perhaps it is Vinyl’s collaboration with Athens musician and artist Jack Logan that brings this party full-circle. Logan created the comic book that accompanied Doug, the second album by Harper’s first band, The Coolies. It was Logan’s clay figure Frank, from his album Bulk, which first inspired therealfranktee.

He explains. “He Logan made these little yellow clay figurines for his album Bulk. I have one. After collecting all types of art for 30 years or more, I started taking photos of Frank. Then I made stencils of him. Then drawings. After that, I started making the posters for Clay’s shows at Avondale Towne Cinema. Since then, I have become obsessed.

“The main reason I did Drivin N Cryin’s new album cover is because Clay has a lot of my stuff hanging in his house and Kevn saw it. It seems Kevn and I rode on the same spaceship at some point in 1985.

Tee describes his work as “fun. Really, it’s whatever makes me happy. I’m not sure if it fits in or not but it’s colorful, fun and open.” That attitude is why the flower has become so much a part of his paintings. “I thought it just made everything happy.

“One more thing about the flower,” he adds. “My ant was Japanese and barely spoke English. She adopted me as a child when i was getting off drugs. Before she died, she painted a water color for me. It was a red poppy so that’s the flower I paint. She was a saint. If we could all have grace and mercy like her, traffic wouldn’t be so bad in this town.”

“I get a lot of messages from deserving artists and musicians asking how they can book 378,” Tee notes. “I would love to hand the keys over to these people and let them man their own shows and create their own space for one or two weeks at a time. These are just ideas. Right now things are just moving, and I’m willing to see where it goes.I really don't know what this place is going to be. I am riddled with anxiety but that is life. I have hopes that artists of all types will have a chance to use the space, make some money from their art and bring some love to the community.”    therealfranktee THAT'S ONE SMALL STEP: Artwork for Drivin N Cryin's new single, "Step By Step," by therealfranktee.                                   HIGH FREQUENCIES: 378 — Art for art’s sake "
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Culture, Visual Arts , Music, High Frequencies, Music Features

Thursday May 2, 2019 09:58 am EDT
The new gallery in Candler Park is a ‘pop-up shop’ for local artists; Kevn Kinney and Clay Harper provide the soundtrack for tonight's opening | more...
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Such was the beginning of the party Dallas Austin threw at his Sandy Springs home, secluded in the woods northwest of Atlanta, the Thursday before Super Bowl LIII. The music producer, a long-time fan of AMC’s series The Walking Dead, along with Walking Dead stars Norman Reedus (“Daryl Dixon”) and Jeffrey Dean Morgan (“Negan”), DeAngelo Williams (former NFL Player), DeSean Jackson (Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver) and Tarik Cohen (Chicago Bears running back) hosted a party celebrating the show’s season nine mid-season premiere, which will broadcast this Sunday, February 10. As guests arrived, they were escorted to the red carpet for photo ops, then grabbed by 11Alive The A Team's Francesca Amiker for quick interviews.

The walkers, however, were unimpressed with the celebrities that crossed the red carpet. They were on their best behavior, so it seemed. Were these not the undead walkers at all, but the mysterious Whisperers introduced at the end of season nine’s first half? It was hard to tell, at first. They were everywhere. And they weren’t talking. They would, however, get all up in your face, as if they were about to attack. The walkers would lunge for your skull or a limb; the Whisperers would quickly stop before making body contact, putting their index finger close to their mouth, as if cautioning you not to breathe a word.

One couldn’t escape them. They were everywhere. Try wandering down one of the curving hallways of Austin’s home to get to a circular sitting room, and the walkers would be blocking your way. Getting to the screening room was no simple task, either. If you made it without incident, a large-screen television warned of the evil coming to The Walking Dead in the second half of season nine. Order a drink from the bar, and the window behind it allowed an underwater view of the second-floor outdoor swimming pool, where the severed heads of those who weren’t so lucky in their encounters with the walkers floated in the deep end.

Taking the elevator upstairs to the main living and dining areas — think of the groovy space pad the Jetsons called home — you would have to hurry to make sure the steel doors closed behind you, lest you be trapped inside the glowing orange pod with one of the living dead.

The many guests, including other football players, rappers, celebrities, models, and musicians — Eddie Drummond, former American football wide receiver and return specialist; Isaac Asiata, guard for the Miami Dolphins; Storm Norton, Minnesota Vikings offensive tackle; the Vikings' Trae Waynes; Cooper Andrews, who plays “Jerry” in The Walking Dead; his girlfriend, motion picture sound specialist Abin Shim; film producer and Georgia Entertainment Gala founder Autumn Essie Bailey-Ford; Phaedra Parks, formerly of "Real Housewives of Atlanta;" Quad Lunceford, "Married to Medicine;" rappers Waka Flocka Flame; and F.L.Y. (who sang "Swag Surfin'" to everyone's delight), among them — filled the upstairs areas. And none of them, like The Walking Dead executive producer Greg Nicotero, could hide in a corner, because in Austin’s house there are none. Every wall, ceiling, and floor curves into one another, creating the impression you are in a time-warp, trapped in a prehistoric cave turned interstellar space ship rather than the living quarters of a 21st-century man.

Austin appeared to be having a great time, easily grooving with everyone who wanted to say “hello” or snap a selfie. Still, he kept a watchful eye on the goings-on, sometimes adjusting the lighting as he moved from room to room, always making sure people were relaxed and enjoying the vibe.

While much of his home’s decor was switched out with images from the horror series for the event, there were certain touches that remained his: Covering one wall, a multitude of James Brown photographs honored the Godfather of Soul. A large portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. seated, in a suit and tie, taken during his first arrest in 1956, adorned another in the entrance hall. An early black-and-white photograph of a young, smiling Jimi Hendrix, displaying the innocence of the guitarist yet to realize his dreams and forever change the world through his Experience, hung across from MLK.

There was also music, sweet music rockin’ the house, from a deejay that controlled the beats no matter where you were, inside or out. And there was food. And cocktails. Specially crafted cocktails, created specifically for the Walking Dead evening. You had your choice: the Zombie Zinger (Martell Blue Swift, cranberry juice, pineapple juice, ginger ale with lime wedge), the Lucille Skull Crusher (Avion Silver tequila, apple juice, lemon juice, and simple syrup) or the Dead Doozie (Absolut Elyx vodka, Lillet Blanc, jasmine tea, lemon juice, and orange blossom honey served in the prerequisite copper coupe).

With things heating up inside the house — the party was more than getting started — it was hard to venture outdoors into the cold to watch even more guests making their entrance on the red carpet. One eager Walking Dead fan, hoping to catch a glimpse of any of the cast she could, unknowingly backed into actors Reedus and Morgan as they had just gotten out of an SUV. She turned around and, shocked, cried out their TV character names, Daryl and Negan, over and over in disbelief. Laughing, the two — who are nemeses onscreen but appeared to get along quite well off — posed for a quick photo with her. It was well after the actors finished being photographed with others on the red carpet before the woman regained her composure.

It was a fun night — and a great kick-off for Super Bowl LIII weekend in Atlanta. Luckily, despite so many walkers — who were actually the same walkers featured in the AMC series — lurking everywhere, all the guests made it out alive.

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Such was the beginning of the party __[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas_Austin|Dallas Austin]__ threw at his Sandy Springs home, secluded in the woods northwest of Atlanta, the Thursday before Super Bowl LIII. The music producer, a long-time fan of AMC’s series ''The Walking Dead'', along with __Walking Dead__ stars __Norman Reedus__ (“Daryl Dixon”) and __Jeffrey Dean Morgan__ (“Negan”), __DeAngelo Williams__ (former NFL Player), __DeSean Jackson__ (Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver) and __Tarik Cohen__ (Chicago Bears running back) hosted a party celebrating the show’s [https://www.amc.com/shows/the-walking-dead|season nine] mid-season premiere, which will broadcast this Sunday, February 10. As guests arrived, they were escorted to the red carpet for photo ops, then grabbed by 11Alive The A Team's __Francesca Amiker__ for [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akOVzSDFFlQ|quick interviews].

The walkers, however, were unimpressed with the celebrities that crossed the red carpet. They were on their best behavior, so it seemed. Were these not the undead walkers at all, but the mysterious Whisperers introduced at the end of season nine’s first half? It was hard to tell, at first. They were everywhere. And they weren’t talking. They would, however, get all up in your face, as if they were about to attack. The walkers would lunge for your skull or a limb; the Whisperers would quickly stop before making body contact, putting their index finger close to their mouth, as if cautioning you not to breathe a word.

One couldn’t escape them. They were everywhere. Try wandering down one of the curving hallways of Austin’s home to get to a circular sitting room, and the walkers would be blocking your way. Getting to the screening room was no simple task, either. If you made it without incident, a large-screen television warned of the evil coming to ''The Walking Dead'' in the second half of season nine. Order a drink from the bar, and the window behind it allowed an underwater view of the second-floor outdoor swimming pool, where the severed heads of those who weren’t so lucky in their encounters with the walkers floated in the deep end.

Taking the elevator upstairs to the main living and dining areas — think of the [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyinD6ZDqeg|groovy space pad] the Jetsons called home — you would have to hurry to make sure the steel doors closed behind you, lest you be trapped inside the glowing orange pod with one of the living dead.

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Austin appeared to be having a great time, easily grooving with everyone who wanted to say “hello” or snap a selfie. Still, he kept a watchful eye on the goings-on, sometimes adjusting the lighting as he moved from room to room, always making sure people were relaxed and enjoying the vibe.

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With things heating up inside the house — the party was more than getting started — it was hard to venture outdoors into the cold to watch even more guests making their entrance on the red carpet. One eager Walking Dead fan, hoping to catch a glimpse of any of the cast she could, unknowingly backed into actors Reedus and Morgan as they had just gotten out of an SUV. She turned around and, shocked, cried out their TV character names, Daryl and Negan, over and over in disbelief. Laughing, the two — who are nemeses onscreen but appeared to get along quite well off — posed for a quick photo with her. It was well after the actors finished being photographed with others on the red carpet before the woman regained her composure.

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Such was the beginning of the party Dallas Austin threw at his Sandy Springs home, secluded in the woods northwest of Atlanta, the Thursday before Super Bowl LIII. The music producer, a long-time fan of AMC’s series The Walking Dead, along with Walking Dead stars Norman Reedus (“Daryl Dixon”) and Jeffrey Dean Morgan (“Negan”), DeAngelo Williams (former NFL Player), DeSean Jackson (Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver) and Tarik Cohen (Chicago Bears running back) hosted a party celebrating the show’s season nine mid-season premiere, which will broadcast this Sunday, February 10. As guests arrived, they were escorted to the red carpet for photo ops, then grabbed by 11Alive The A Team's Francesca Amiker for quick interviews.

The walkers, however, were unimpressed with the celebrities that crossed the red carpet. They were on their best behavior, so it seemed. Were these not the undead walkers at all, but the mysterious Whisperers introduced at the end of season nine’s first half? It was hard to tell, at first. They were everywhere. And they weren’t talking. They would, however, get all up in your face, as if they were about to attack. The walkers would lunge for your skull or a limb; the Whisperers would quickly stop before making body contact, putting their index finger close to their mouth, as if cautioning you not to breathe a word.

One couldn’t escape them. They were everywhere. Try wandering down one of the curving hallways of Austin’s home to get to a circular sitting room, and the walkers would be blocking your way. Getting to the screening room was no simple task, either. If you made it without incident, a large-screen television warned of the evil coming to The Walking Dead in the second half of season nine. Order a drink from the bar, and the window behind it allowed an underwater view of the second-floor outdoor swimming pool, where the severed heads of those who weren’t so lucky in their encounters with the walkers floated in the deep end.

Taking the elevator upstairs to the main living and dining areas — think of the groovy space pad the Jetsons called home — you would have to hurry to make sure the steel doors closed behind you, lest you be trapped inside the glowing orange pod with one of the living dead.

The many guests, including other football players, rappers, celebrities, models, and musicians — Eddie Drummond, former American football wide receiver and return specialist; Isaac Asiata, guard for the Miami Dolphins; Storm Norton, Minnesota Vikings offensive tackle; the Vikings' Trae Waynes; Cooper Andrews, who plays “Jerry” in The Walking Dead; his girlfriend, motion picture sound specialist Abin Shim; film producer and Georgia Entertainment Gala founder Autumn Essie Bailey-Ford; Phaedra Parks, formerly of "Real Housewives of Atlanta;" Quad Lunceford, "Married to Medicine;" rappers Waka Flocka Flame; and F.L.Y. (who sang "Swag Surfin'" to everyone's delight), among them — filled the upstairs areas. And none of them, like The Walking Dead executive producer Greg Nicotero, could hide in a corner, because in Austin’s house there are none. Every wall, ceiling, and floor curves into one another, creating the impression you are in a time-warp, trapped in a prehistoric cave turned interstellar space ship rather than the living quarters of a 21st-century man.

Austin appeared to be having a great time, easily grooving with everyone who wanted to say “hello” or snap a selfie. Still, he kept a watchful eye on the goings-on, sometimes adjusting the lighting as he moved from room to room, always making sure people were relaxed and enjoying the vibe.

While much of his home’s decor was switched out with images from the horror series for the event, there were certain touches that remained his: Covering one wall, a multitude of James Brown photographs honored the Godfather of Soul. A large portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. seated, in a suit and tie, taken during his first arrest in 1956, adorned another in the entrance hall. An early black-and-white photograph of a young, smiling Jimi Hendrix, displaying the innocence of the guitarist yet to realize his dreams and forever change the world through his Experience, hung across from MLK.

There was also music, sweet music rockin’ the house, from a deejay that controlled the beats no matter where you were, inside or out. And there was food. And cocktails. Specially crafted cocktails, created specifically for the Walking Dead evening. You had your choice: the Zombie Zinger (Martell Blue Swift, cranberry juice, pineapple juice, ginger ale with lime wedge), the Lucille Skull Crusher (Avion Silver tequila, apple juice, lemon juice, and simple syrup) or the Dead Doozie (Absolut Elyx vodka, Lillet Blanc, jasmine tea, lemon juice, and orange blossom honey served in the prerequisite copper coupe).

With things heating up inside the house — the party was more than getting started — it was hard to venture outdoors into the cold to watch even more guests making their entrance on the red carpet. One eager Walking Dead fan, hoping to catch a glimpse of any of the cast she could, unknowingly backed into actors Reedus and Morgan as they had just gotten out of an SUV. She turned around and, shocked, cried out their TV character names, Daryl and Negan, over and over in disbelief. Laughing, the two — who are nemeses onscreen but appeared to get along quite well off — posed for a quick photo with her. It was well after the actors finished being photographed with others on the red carpet before the woman regained her composure.

It was a fun night — and a great kick-off for Super Bowl LIII weekend in Atlanta. Luckily, despite so many walkers — who were actually the same walkers featured in the AMC series — lurking everywhere, all the guests made it out alive.

     ALL PHOTOS TONY PARIS DREAM ON DREAMER: 'Life gets in your way ... live to learn you'll be lucky one day.'      "The Walking Dead" "Dallas Austin" "Super Bowl LIII" "AMC's Walking Dead Party in Atlanta" #TWD #TWDSB                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: You'll never walk alone "
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Friday February 8, 2019 08:50 pm EST
Dallas Austin opens up his home for AMC's 'The Walking Dead' — and to kick off Super Bowl LIII weekend in the ATL | more...
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  string(4428) "The members of Blackfox have been promising something special for their show in the Atlanta Room at Smith’s Olde Bar tonight. With it being the kick-off of Super Bowl LIII weekend here in the ATL, one can only wonder what that something might be. Only one way to find out of course, head over for the show. I’m still banking on the New Orleans Saints onstage with them, taking a group knee. Whatever happens, the band will include a nine-piece line-up onstage, performing songs from their two LPs and their as-yet-unfinished third album.

Drummer Mitchell Sosebee acknowledges the band does seem to take different forms for it’s performances. “We keep morphing our lineup, as we went from a three-piece with guests (on the first record), to an eight-piece on the second (La Brea). We are currently working on songs for the third album,” he continues, noting that it may take a step “in a slightly different direction, although the cast of players contributing are likely to be the same people, just slightly different roles.”

“Stacey (Cargall, the singer/guitarist in the band) writes great songs, and we’re always trying to find the best way to present them. We are lucky to have a core group of players (himself, Cargall and Ryan Taylor, guitars/synths) who are so much fun to play with, that our rehearsals are very much an outlet for everyone’s creativity. We refer to our rehearsals as ‘music therapy.’ It is a wonderful thing to have good friends and fellow musicians who enjoy each other’s talent, as well as each other’s company.”

Such camaraderie shows onstage, like it did when an extended line-up took the stage at last year’s Grant Park Summer Shade Festival. The nine musicians offered a full, rhythmic wave of music that altered between the ehthno sounds of Ginger Baker’s Air Force and the space explorations of Hawkwind, with a little glam thrown in for good measure, to more roots-inspired rock ’n’ R&B.

Of late, the core of Blackfox has been joined by Jim Combs, keyboards; Greg Wright, bass; Andy Gish; and Monica Arrington.

The International Pop Overthrow, a three night event celebrating pop music, takes place in Atlanta this weekend at the Red Light Cafe. While all three nights, Feb 1, 2, and 3, promise to please the most ardent of power pop music lovers, of special interest to many longtime Atlantans will be the appearance of The Raves. Known for their Beatlesque songs and harmonies, The Raves were mainstays on Atlanta stages … uh, the first, make that second, time pop music took over the world. Brothers John and Chuck Yoakum, with Kenneth Kennedy, are now joined by by Dale Hall keeping the beat.

Stevie T. Tombstone returns to Atlanta Thursday, Feb. 6, for an evening of “Tunes and Tales” at the Elliott Street Deli and Pub. Can’t think of a better place to hear him than downstairs in the the intimate confines of what surely is one of Atlanta’s oldest music rooms. History runs deep there, just like T’s roots, the singer/guitarist being the Georgia-born relation to the legendary fiddler Clayton McMichen.

Having spent more time on the road rather than hanging his hat in one place, Stevie T recently decided to call North Carolina home. One hopes that means the one-time Atlanta will return to the Elliott Street Pub sooner than later. Meanwhile, according to an email I received from him, he has “plans to record a stripped-down collection of tunes he’s been holding onto a while. …  until he found  until the proper setting. The working title is Cabin on the Hill. The inspiration of my new surroundings has helped me visualize the outcome although the songs do the work themselves.”

The Breeze Kings were happy to announce on their Facebook page that old friend Coy Bowles of the Zac Brown Band stopped in the Northside Tavern Thursday, Jan. 31, bringing with him a couple of friends, Laur Joamets (Little Joe) of Drivin N Cryin and Dave Grohl, who some of you may know from the Foo Fighters, the band in the ATL for a Super Saturday performance at a makeshift venue built at Atlantic Station. You never know who is going to show up at the Northside’s Thursday night blues parties.

The line-up for the Amplify Decatur Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be Mavis Staples, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco), Kevn Kinney (Drivin N Cryin), and the Bitteroots."
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Drummer __Mitchell Sosebee__ acknowledges the band does seem to take different forms for it’s performances. “We keep morphing our lineup, as we went from a three-piece with guests (on the first record), to an eight-piece on the second (''La Brea''). We are currently working on songs for the third album,” he continues, noting that it may take a step “in a slightly different direction, although the cast of players contributing are likely to be the same people, just slightly different roles.”

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Such camaraderie shows onstage, like it did when an extended line-up took the stage at last year’s Grant Park Summer Shade Festival. The nine musicians offered a full, rhythmic wave of music that altered between the ehthno sounds of Ginger Baker’s Air Force and the space explorations of Hawkwind, with a little glam thrown in for good measure, to more roots-inspired rock ’n’ R&B.

Of late, the core of Blackfox has been joined by __Jim Combs__, keyboards; __Greg Wright__, bass; __Andy Gish__; and __Monica Arrington__.

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__Stevie T. Tombstone__ returns to Atlanta Thursday, Feb. 6, for an evening of “Tunes and Tales” at the __[http://elliottstreet.com/events/2019/2/7/stevie-tombstone|Elliott Street Deli and Pub]__. Can’t think of a better place to hear him than downstairs in the the intimate confines of what surely is one of Atlanta’s oldest music rooms. History runs deep there, just like T’s roots, the singer/guitarist being the Georgia-born relation to the legendary fiddler Clayton McMichen.

Having spent more time on the road rather than hanging his hat in one place, Stevie T recently decided to call North Carolina home. One hopes that means the one-time Atlanta will return to the Elliott Street Pub sooner than later. Meanwhile, according to an email I received from him, he has “plans to record a stripped-down collection of tunes he’s been holding onto a while. …  until he found  until the proper setting. The working title is ''Cabin on the Hill''. The inspiration of my new surroundings has helped me visualize the outcome although the songs do the work themselves.”

The __[http://breezekings.com|Breeze Kings]__ were happy to announce on their Facebook page that old friend __Coy Bowles__ of the __Zac Brown Band__ stopped in the __Northside Tavern__ Thursday, Jan. 31, bringing with him a couple of friends, __Laur Joamets__ (Little Joe) of __Drivin N Cryin__ and __Dave Grohl__, who some of you may know from the __Foo Fighters__, the band in the ATL for a Super Saturday performance at a makeshift venue built at Atlantic Station. You never know who is going to show up at the Northside’s Thursday night blues parties.

The line-up for the __[https://www.amplifydecatur.org|Amplify Decatur Music]__ Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be __Mavis Staples__, __Jeff Tweedy__ (Wilco), __Kevn Kinney__ (Drivin N Cryin), and the Bitteroots."
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Drummer Mitchell Sosebee acknowledges the band does seem to take different forms for it’s performances. “We keep morphing our lineup, as we went from a three-piece with guests (on the first record), to an eight-piece on the second (La Brea). We are currently working on songs for the third album,” he continues, noting that it may take a step “in a slightly different direction, although the cast of players contributing are likely to be the same people, just slightly different roles.”

“Stacey (Cargall, the singer/guitarist in the band) writes great songs, and we’re always trying to find the best way to present them. We are lucky to have a core group of players (himself, Cargall and Ryan Taylor, guitars/synths) who are so much fun to play with, that our rehearsals are very much an outlet for everyone’s creativity. We refer to our rehearsals as ‘music therapy.’ It is a wonderful thing to have good friends and fellow musicians who enjoy each other’s talent, as well as each other’s company.”

Such camaraderie shows onstage, like it did when an extended line-up took the stage at last year’s Grant Park Summer Shade Festival. The nine musicians offered a full, rhythmic wave of music that altered between the ehthno sounds of Ginger Baker’s Air Force and the space explorations of Hawkwind, with a little glam thrown in for good measure, to more roots-inspired rock ’n’ R&B.

Of late, the core of Blackfox has been joined by Jim Combs, keyboards; Greg Wright, bass; Andy Gish; and Monica Arrington.

The International Pop Overthrow, a three night event celebrating pop music, takes place in Atlanta this weekend at the Red Light Cafe. While all three nights, Feb 1, 2, and 3, promise to please the most ardent of power pop music lovers, of special interest to many longtime Atlantans will be the appearance of The Raves. Known for their Beatlesque songs and harmonies, The Raves were mainstays on Atlanta stages … uh, the first, make that second, time pop music took over the world. Brothers John and Chuck Yoakum, with Kenneth Kennedy, are now joined by by Dale Hall keeping the beat.

Stevie T. Tombstone returns to Atlanta Thursday, Feb. 6, for an evening of “Tunes and Tales” at the Elliott Street Deli and Pub. Can’t think of a better place to hear him than downstairs in the the intimate confines of what surely is one of Atlanta’s oldest music rooms. History runs deep there, just like T’s roots, the singer/guitarist being the Georgia-born relation to the legendary fiddler Clayton McMichen.

Having spent more time on the road rather than hanging his hat in one place, Stevie T recently decided to call North Carolina home. One hopes that means the one-time Atlanta will return to the Elliott Street Pub sooner than later. Meanwhile, according to an email I received from him, he has “plans to record a stripped-down collection of tunes he’s been holding onto a while. …  until he found  until the proper setting. The working title is Cabin on the Hill. The inspiration of my new surroundings has helped me visualize the outcome although the songs do the work themselves.”

The Breeze Kings were happy to announce on their Facebook page that old friend Coy Bowles of the Zac Brown Band stopped in the Northside Tavern Thursday, Jan. 31, bringing with him a couple of friends, Laur Joamets (Little Joe) of Drivin N Cryin and Dave Grohl, who some of you may know from the Foo Fighters, the band in the ATL for a Super Saturday performance at a makeshift venue built at Atlantic Station. You never know who is going to show up at the Northside’s Thursday night blues parties.

The line-up for the Amplify Decatur Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be Mavis Staples, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco), Kevn Kinney (Drivin N Cryin), and the Bitteroots.    Courtesy of Blackfox AT SMITH'S OLDE BAR: Onstage then and tonight, Friday, Feb. 1, 2019.                                   HIGH FREQUENCIES: Blackfox — Out of the tar pits "
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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies

Friday February 1, 2019 04:48 pm EST
Blackfox play the Atlanta Room, Stevie T is at the Elliott Street Pub | more...
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  string(64) "Glam times, goth times, you know they’ve had their share

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  string(7132) "It can be argued that glam rock never really went away. What is goth other than a permutation of the street hustle David Bowie, the New York Dolls and Mott The Hoople gave listeners, shot up with a heavy dose of punk? Indeed, both Bauhaus and The Cure borrowed elements from glam bands before them, though their lyrical content was certainly darker and more introspective, a nihilistic reflection of the post-punk times.

Today, Peter Murphy and David J. are paying tribute to their band Bauhaus; Ian Hunter is announcing a second Mott The Hoople “reunion”tour; Sylvain Sylvain is still talking trash with his vaudeville escapades; and David Bowie is probably selling more records than he ever did while he was alive.

It comes as no surprise that Darling Machine have regrouped. A mainstay of the Atlanta glam and goth scene at the turn of the century, the band celebrates the release of their new, self-titled LP, Darling Machine, with a show tonight at Vinyl, in the Center Stage complex. As reviewed in this column a few months ago, the album, “a self-described combination of  ‘old school goth and punk with (a) modern pop sensibility,’ is just that. ... A guitar heavy quartet, the group is more The Cult meets Gene Loves Jezebel than of the Specimen/Alien Sex Fiend, or even Bauhaus/Cure variety goth,” but with “a penchant for the pop hooks that pervaded the music of the latter two. Produced, mixed and engineered by Jeff Tomei, the music is menacing, not unlike Pleasure Club during its heyday.”

“I’ve said this from day one when we first decided to regroup Darling Machine, ‘This is not a reunion, this is a reconstruction,’” Vernon P. Love explains, regarding the reformation of the Atlanta band he fronted in the late ‘90s to 2002. “The current times brought this band back together — and the lyrical content of the songs mean as much, if not more, today, than when they were originally written.”

The idea of “getting the band back together,” Love laughs, had its genesis in original bassist Troy Portella getting snowed in at Love’s place during a visit a couple of years ago. “I was totally against reliving the past, unless we invented something new and fresh.Troy convinced me that the lyrics I wrote — and the music the band created — was as relevant, if not more so, today than it was the first time around. Still, if we were to do this, then Darling Machine was to be totally reinvented, a new image, a new expanded sound, basically starting over.”

Portella — along with Love and drummer Jason Gang — was in the first incarnation of Darling Machine, which released a self-titled CD produced by Mac Carter (ex-Shadow Puppets, Brand New Immortals, Drivin N Cryin).

“We toured the southeast frequently,” Love recalls, “supporting this band, headlining that show, making zero dollars, until bad manners, bad extracurricular activities, problems and dysfunction took hold, diminishing the band’s morale until we finally called it quits.”

After the breakup, Love started thejuliadream with Matt Spatial, playing up and down the East Coast and releasing a CD, Above From Beneath  until the standard pitfalls of being in a band after years of touring — running out of money and a fizzling morale — caused them to break-up.

Love says that after thejuliadream, he needed to take a rest, “to cleanse my palate. I didn’t know if I would ever join another band, or form one. To me,

“After all this I basically needed to cleanse my pallet and take a rest. I didn't know if I would ever join another band or form one. The ATL scene, in my opinion, was tapped out as far as quality, or like-minded musicians, who were into what I wanted to do musically.”

Yet Portella’s long talks with Love during that snow storm, and Gang’s subsequent agreeing to join them again, made Love rethink his position. The three focused on finding a new guitarist, someone who could expand their sound, yet shared the same musical approach. They found that in J1m1 Mullins.

“J1m1 fit well with our new direction — and can play just about anything,” Love says. “He brought new light to the songs with his sound, tone and reinvented guitar parts. He is the Billy Duffy or Reeves Gabriels of Atlanta, just what we needed for our new sound.”

“At first, I was not really sure it would all come together,” Love recalls of the new band’s first rehearsals. “But, you never know how these things will turn out … the songs started coming back to life, we began writing new material, and, we realized it was too good not to go forward! Hence the restoration of Darling Machine. It grew into itself, fresh, new, and  updated!

“Looking back on the last one and a half years of us resurrecting this band and cultivating it's sound and look, I realized we had something special. So we went for it, full steam ahead!”

Going for it including the enlistment of the aforementioned Jeff Tomei  (Smashing Pumpkins, Matchbox 20, etc.) to produce, mix, and engineer the new album.

“He Tomei came recommended by my dear friends Johnny Blade and James Hall. Jeff produces The Ladies Of ... and I had met Jeff back in the day, while visiting some of the Ladies Of sessions. After a consultation with him, it was a no brainer to have him at the helm in the studio. He liked the band and it's sound and was happy to have something new he could get onboard with.

“I had decided,” Love continues, “since we were going full steam ahead with Darling Machine, why not take it another step further and make a record to showcase the new band? Jeff ‘cut the fat,’ so to speak, kind of like what Rick Rubin did with the Cult's Electric album. More importantly, he gave us insight into crafting songs, developing them even further, and made us an even better band. During these sessions we really grew as a band!”

The growth shows. Darling Machine  rocks, with Love’s phrasing and the band’s attack playing off each other like the best rock ’n’ roll bands do. The ten songs create a powerhouse unlike anything to come out of Atlanta in recent times. A formidable debut, it recalls the early days of glam and goth, but with a look to the future that only an understanding of the past can bring about.

Love agrees. “We now have a body of work we are truly proud of, that we’re excited to support, full steam ahead. This is how the LP came about: concept, graphics, artwork, packaging — and a child was born! HA !”

Of course, releasing the record is just the beginning. Though Love acknowledges that “the LP is gaining traction slowly but surely,” he and the other members of Darling Machine know that the real work — touring, building a following — has only just begun.

“We plan to capitalize on that, focusing on the ATL region and hitting all the markets we can. Obviously if we could find a support slot on a major tour that would help,” he laughs. “But, if you don’t have the determination to to do the work yourself, why bother? That’s why we say, ‘Full steam ahead!”"
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Today, Peter Murphy and David J. are paying tribute to their band Bauhaus; Ian Hunter is announcing a second Mott The Hoople “reunion”tour; Sylvain Sylvain is still talking trash with his vaudeville escapades; and David Bowie is probably selling more records than he ever did while he was alive.

It comes as no surprise that [https://www.facebook.com/GothPopPowerPunk/|Darling Machine] have regrouped. A mainstay of the Atlanta glam and goth scene at the turn of the century, the band celebrates the release of their new, self-titled LP, ''Darling Machine'', with a show [http://www.centerstage-atlanta.com/show/?id=3306&artist=DARLING MACHINE – LP RELEASE SHOW|tonight at Vinyl], in the Center Stage complex. As reviewed in this column a few months ago, the album, “a self-described combination of  ‘old school goth and punk with (a) modern pop sensibility,’ is just that. ... A guitar heavy quartet, the group is more The Cult meets Gene Loves Jezebel than of the Specimen/Alien Sex Fiend, or even Bauhaus/Cure variety goth,” but with “a penchant for the pop hooks that pervaded the music of the latter two. Produced, mixed and engineered by Jeff Tomei, the music is menacing, not unlike Pleasure Club during its heyday.”

“I’ve said this from day one when we first decided to regroup Darling Machine, ‘This is not a reunion, this is a reconstruction,’” Vernon P. Love explains, regarding the reformation of the Atlanta band he fronted in the late ‘90s to 2002. “The current times brought this band back together — and the lyrical content of the songs mean as much, if not more, today, than when they were originally written.”

The idea of “getting the band back together,” Love laughs, had its genesis in original bassist Troy Portella getting snowed in at Love’s place during a visit a couple of years ago. “I was totally against reliving the past, unless we invented something new and fresh.Troy convinced me that the lyrics I wrote — and the music the band created — was as relevant, if not more so, today than it was the first time around. Still, if we were to do this, then Darling Machine was to be totally reinvented, a new image, a new expanded sound, basically starting over.”

Portella — along with Love and drummer Jason Gang — was in the first incarnation of Darling Machine, which released a self-titled CD produced by Mac Carter (ex-Shadow Puppets, Brand New Immortals, Drivin N Cryin).

“We toured the southeast frequently,” Love recalls, “supporting this band, headlining that show, making zero dollars, until bad manners, bad extracurricular activities, problems and dysfunction took hold, diminishing the band’s morale until we finally called it quits.”

After the breakup, Love started thejuliadream with Matt Spatial, playing up and down the East Coast and releasing a CD, ''Above From Beneath '' until the standard pitfalls of being in a band after years of touring — running out of money and a fizzling morale — caused them to break-up.

Love says that after thejuliadream, he needed to take a rest, “to cleanse my palate. I didn’t know if I would ever join another band, or form one. To me,

“After all this I basically needed to cleanse my pallet and take a rest. I didn't know if I would ever join another band or form one. The ATL scene, in my opinion, was tapped out as far as quality, or like-minded musicians, who were into what I wanted to do musically.”

Yet Portella’s long talks with Love during that snow storm, and Gang’s subsequent agreeing to join them again, made Love rethink his position. The three focused on finding a new guitarist, someone who could expand their sound, yet shared the same musical approach. They found that in J1m1 Mullins.

“J1m1 fit well with our new direction — and can play just about anything,” Love says. “He brought new light to the songs with his sound, tone and reinvented guitar parts. He is the Billy Duffy or Reeves Gabriels of Atlanta, just what we needed for our new sound.”

“At first, I was not really sure it would all come together,” Love recalls of the new band’s first rehearsals. “But, you never know how these things will turn out … the songs started coming back to life, we began writing new material, and, we realized it was too good not to go forward! Hence the restoration of Darling Machine. It grew into itself, fresh, new, and  updated!

“Looking back on the last one and a half years of us resurrecting this band and cultivating it's sound and look, I realized we had something special. So we went for it, full steam ahead!”

Going for it including the enlistment of the aforementioned Jeff Tomei  (Smashing Pumpkins, Matchbox 20, etc.) to produce, mix, and engineer the new album.

“He [[Tomei] came recommended by my dear friends Johnny Blade and James Hall. Jeff produces The Ladies Of ... and I had met Jeff back in the day, while visiting some of the Ladies Of sessions. After a consultation with him, it was a no brainer to have him at the helm in the studio. He liked the band and it's sound and was happy to have something new he could get onboard with.

“I had decided,” Love continues, “since we were going full steam ahead with Darling Machine, why not take it another step further and make a record to showcase the new band? Jeff ‘cut the fat,’ so to speak, kind of like what Rick Rubin did with the Cult's ''Electric'' album. More importantly, he gave us insight into crafting songs, developing them even further, and made us an even better band. During these sessions we really grew as a band!”

The growth shows. ''Darling Machine '' rocks, with Love’s phrasing and the band’s attack playing off each other like the best rock ’n’ roll bands do. The ten songs create a powerhouse unlike anything to come out of Atlanta in recent times. A formidable debut, it recalls the early days of glam and goth, but with a look to the future that only an understanding of the past can bring about.

Love agrees. “We now have a body of work we are truly proud of, that we’re excited to support, full steam ahead. This is how the LP came about: concept, graphics, artwork, packaging — and a child was born! HA !”

Of course, releasing the record is just the beginning. Though Love acknowledges that “the LP is gaining traction slowly but surely,” he and the other members of Darling Machine know that the real work — touring, building a following — has only just begun.

“We plan to capitalize on that, focusing on the ATL region and hitting all the markets we can. Obviously if we could find a support slot on a major tour that would help,” he laughs. “But, if you don’t have the determination to to do the work yourself, why bother? That’s why we say, ‘Full steam ahead!”"
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  string(7775) " DM 01 Edit  2019-01-25T18:26:11+00:00 DM 01 edit.jpg    darlingmachine gothatlanta jefftomei Glam times, goth times, you know they’ve had their share

  12911  2019-01-25T18:27:34+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Darling Machine celebrate 'Darling Machine' tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris TONY PARIS Tony Paris 2019-01-25T18:27:34+00:00  It can be argued that glam rock never really went away. What is goth other than a permutation of the street hustle David Bowie, the New York Dolls and Mott The Hoople gave listeners, shot up with a heavy dose of punk? Indeed, both Bauhaus and The Cure borrowed elements from glam bands before them, though their lyrical content was certainly darker and more introspective, a nihilistic reflection of the post-punk times.

Today, Peter Murphy and David J. are paying tribute to their band Bauhaus; Ian Hunter is announcing a second Mott The Hoople “reunion”tour; Sylvain Sylvain is still talking trash with his vaudeville escapades; and David Bowie is probably selling more records than he ever did while he was alive.

It comes as no surprise that Darling Machine have regrouped. A mainstay of the Atlanta glam and goth scene at the turn of the century, the band celebrates the release of their new, self-titled LP, Darling Machine, with a show tonight at Vinyl, in the Center Stage complex. As reviewed in this column a few months ago, the album, “a self-described combination of  ‘old school goth and punk with (a) modern pop sensibility,’ is just that. ... A guitar heavy quartet, the group is more The Cult meets Gene Loves Jezebel than of the Specimen/Alien Sex Fiend, or even Bauhaus/Cure variety goth,” but with “a penchant for the pop hooks that pervaded the music of the latter two. Produced, mixed and engineered by Jeff Tomei, the music is menacing, not unlike Pleasure Club during its heyday.”

“I’ve said this from day one when we first decided to regroup Darling Machine, ‘This is not a reunion, this is a reconstruction,’” Vernon P. Love explains, regarding the reformation of the Atlanta band he fronted in the late ‘90s to 2002. “The current times brought this band back together — and the lyrical content of the songs mean as much, if not more, today, than when they were originally written.”

The idea of “getting the band back together,” Love laughs, had its genesis in original bassist Troy Portella getting snowed in at Love’s place during a visit a couple of years ago. “I was totally against reliving the past, unless we invented something new and fresh.Troy convinced me that the lyrics I wrote — and the music the band created — was as relevant, if not more so, today than it was the first time around. Still, if we were to do this, then Darling Machine was to be totally reinvented, a new image, a new expanded sound, basically starting over.”

Portella — along with Love and drummer Jason Gang — was in the first incarnation of Darling Machine, which released a self-titled CD produced by Mac Carter (ex-Shadow Puppets, Brand New Immortals, Drivin N Cryin).

“We toured the southeast frequently,” Love recalls, “supporting this band, headlining that show, making zero dollars, until bad manners, bad extracurricular activities, problems and dysfunction took hold, diminishing the band’s morale until we finally called it quits.”

After the breakup, Love started thejuliadream with Matt Spatial, playing up and down the East Coast and releasing a CD, Above From Beneath  until the standard pitfalls of being in a band after years of touring — running out of money and a fizzling morale — caused them to break-up.

Love says that after thejuliadream, he needed to take a rest, “to cleanse my palate. I didn’t know if I would ever join another band, or form one. To me,

“After all this I basically needed to cleanse my pallet and take a rest. I didn't know if I would ever join another band or form one. The ATL scene, in my opinion, was tapped out as far as quality, or like-minded musicians, who were into what I wanted to do musically.”

Yet Portella’s long talks with Love during that snow storm, and Gang’s subsequent agreeing to join them again, made Love rethink his position. The three focused on finding a new guitarist, someone who could expand their sound, yet shared the same musical approach. They found that in J1m1 Mullins.

“J1m1 fit well with our new direction — and can play just about anything,” Love says. “He brought new light to the songs with his sound, tone and reinvented guitar parts. He is the Billy Duffy or Reeves Gabriels of Atlanta, just what we needed for our new sound.”

“At first, I was not really sure it would all come together,” Love recalls of the new band’s first rehearsals. “But, you never know how these things will turn out … the songs started coming back to life, we began writing new material, and, we realized it was too good not to go forward! Hence the restoration of Darling Machine. It grew into itself, fresh, new, and  updated!

“Looking back on the last one and a half years of us resurrecting this band and cultivating it's sound and look, I realized we had something special. So we went for it, full steam ahead!”

Going for it including the enlistment of the aforementioned Jeff Tomei  (Smashing Pumpkins, Matchbox 20, etc.) to produce, mix, and engineer the new album.

“He Tomei came recommended by my dear friends Johnny Blade and James Hall. Jeff produces The Ladies Of ... and I had met Jeff back in the day, while visiting some of the Ladies Of sessions. After a consultation with him, it was a no brainer to have him at the helm in the studio. He liked the band and it's sound and was happy to have something new he could get onboard with.

“I had decided,” Love continues, “since we were going full steam ahead with Darling Machine, why not take it another step further and make a record to showcase the new band? Jeff ‘cut the fat,’ so to speak, kind of like what Rick Rubin did with the Cult's Electric album. More importantly, he gave us insight into crafting songs, developing them even further, and made us an even better band. During these sessions we really grew as a band!”

The growth shows. Darling Machine  rocks, with Love’s phrasing and the band’s attack playing off each other like the best rock ’n’ roll bands do. The ten songs create a powerhouse unlike anything to come out of Atlanta in recent times. A formidable debut, it recalls the early days of glam and goth, but with a look to the future that only an understanding of the past can bring about.

Love agrees. “We now have a body of work we are truly proud of, that we’re excited to support, full steam ahead. This is how the LP came about: concept, graphics, artwork, packaging — and a child was born! HA !”

Of course, releasing the record is just the beginning. Though Love acknowledges that “the LP is gaining traction slowly but surely,” he and the other members of Darling Machine know that the real work — touring, building a following — has only just begun.

“We plan to capitalize on that, focusing on the ATL region and hitting all the markets we can. Obviously if we could find a support slot on a major tour that would help,” he laughs. “But, if you don’t have the determination to to do the work yourself, why bother? That’s why we say, ‘Full steam ahead!”    Courtesy Darling Machine STARCRUSHERS: The members of Darling Machine hold a record release party, Friday, Jan. 25, at Vinyl. Spurge and Space Giants open.      "darlingmachine" "gothatlanta" "JeffTomei"                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Darling Machine celebrate 'Darling Machine' "
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Music, High Frequencies

Friday January 25, 2019 01:27 pm EST
Glam times, goth times, you know they’ve had their share



 

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  string(14194) "David Dickens passed away in his sleep Tuesday, January 8, his sudden death attributed to a heart attack.
Dickens was a formidable figure in Atlanta’s early punk scene, due in part to his clean-shaven head with a mohawk that ran down the middle of his skull, whether fully-extended in the best British tradition, or short-cropped, mirroring Travis Bickel at his most deranged. With a studded leather jacket or vest always covering his usually shirtless torso, Dickens appeared to be a menacing figure, certainly someone you didn’t want to mess with. But once you got past the exterior, you discovered an intelligent, witty person, one with whom you could converse on a wide range of topics, from the obvious — punk rock and politics — to the sublime.
While he was a mainstay of 688, Metroplex, and Margaritaville, ’80s clubs he frequented and/or worked at and where most people first encountered him, it was the past 10 years on Facebook where many people — those who weren’t regulars decades ago at his apartment behind the old Krystal’s on Ponce — really got to know him.
Dickens was a liberal — and Facebook was the podium from which he daily took conservatives to task for greed, corruption, power plays, and cronyism, traits Dickens also acknowledged were not just endemic to those across the political spectrum from himself. He kept checks and balances on both sides, whether through his astute posts or the memes he generated with regularity. He catalogued them, together with other telling memes he found on social media, in a variety of photo albums that captured the absurdity and inequity of life in the 21 century: “Hypocrisy so thick you could cut it with a knife!”; “Sign, sign, everywhere a sign”; “Does this taste funny to you?”; “Food for Thought”; and “THINK … for yourselves!” among them. Doing so wasn’t without consequences. Many times his Facebook page would go blank for weeks at a time, the result of Dickens being banished to Facebook jail for some inconvenient truth he debunked or lie he exposed. When he got out, he wouldn’t cower, but come out fighting, stronger and more steadfast than before.
It was shocking to learn of Dickens’ passing, not just because death is an unsettling part of life, but because David Dickens was so much a part of Atlanta and the punk rock scene. He personified a place and time in which so many people first discovered themselves — who they were, who they would become — and forged lifelong friendships with others during such a formative period of their life. For many of the misfits, the uncertain, the undecided, Dickens was a guiding light, a voice of reason in the anarchy of the time. With him died a part of our youth, but also a part of our resiliency and resolve.
It’s that which so many people remarked and remembered on Facebook as his death became known — common threads throughout the posts were common themes in his relationships with so many who knew him. Here are but a few of the thoughts, memories, and condolences from those who knew him best.

Phil Rockstroh: A friend of close to four decades, dating back to the punk rock era, has pogoed to a farther sphere of the multiverse. Dave was one of the first Southern boys to brandish a formidable mohawk — an act of bravery and defiance (because neither rednecks, nor bourgeoisie pink people, nor even hippies — could abide the fact that punk was a cultural force of liberation and not the ridiculous caricature of mindless, puerile aggression portrayed in corporate media).

Kat Peters: I cannot remember the exact moment I met David Dickens. I remember seeing him standing at the bar at the 688 club with Chris Wood from the Restraints. You could not miss him. Perfectly bleached platinum mohawk, swagger, sneer, studs and spikes — the epitome of punk rock. He was truly iconic. The both of them intimidated me, since I was new to the downtown scene. Looks are deceiving, as the old adage goes … and we became friends. I do remember the gaggle of young punks hanging out at his apartment behind the Krystal off Ponce de Leon Avenue. It was legendary. Those people became my family; my misfit tribe. Under that perfectly executed punk rock exterior, he had a heart of pure gold. His friends meant everything to him, and he had many. He never, ever lost the ethos of punk rock. His integrity and authenticity were intact until the very end. He was well read and highly intelligent. A total package of “cool.”


Cynthia Rojas: We were lucky to have known Dave. Punk wasn’t a fashion trend, rather a mindset of not taking B.S. I believe David’s bravery and honesty fostered many along this path. David’s conviction to seeking truth and passion for fairness made him extraordinary. His humor and playfulness will live on in our hearts as we strive for a better world and think, “WWDD?”

Kevin Eaton: My heart goes out to the beautiful people who knew David Dickens far better than I ever did; those who grew up with him, went to school with him, were intimate with him, and spent their lives close to him. I was already an emotional orphan when I showed up, spending those four formative years of my life, 1982-1986, in Atlanta. ! was blessed with some real cool cats and chicks whom I met at the 688 Club, to hang out/party/live life with. I probably met Dave via Chris Wood, who was my neighbor at 1385 West Peachtree, in the winter of ’84. Dave and I wound up on that teen punk poster, LOL! David Barge had a copy on his wall he used for target practice.

L. Eric Snoddy: I am saddened by your passing. Wish I could have had that last conversation. We had many back in our youth. The thought of not hearing your opinion is just not right. You helped me grow into the person I am today.

Elizabeth Bailey: Words fail me, my friend. I am so grateful we connected … we had amazing and funny conversations. Thank you for every word. Thank you for being kind, protective, and unapologetically David.

Erik Sizemore: I have known you since I was 16 years old. I watched you overcome terrible challenges and was with you when you celebrated great success. I have learned from you. Disagreed with you. Laughed with you and yelled at you. It seems so wrong that I will not have the opportunity to speak with you again. You are an icon of my youth. You now have the answers to the great mysteries of life. I shall miss you. I will not forget you.

Corie-Lynn Cloud: I can’t do this. No. Not acceptable. My 53-year-old self is sobbing. My 15-year-old self is screaming into the void.

Kim Niedzwiecki: Rest in Peace does not sound fitting for you. Rock On sounds better. You will be missed by so many. Thanks for being my friend.

Mikel K Poet: He was such a big part of our hearts and of our minds. I can't believe that he is gone, that we will never experience his intelligence, his wit, his passion for life, and ability to look at things for what they really are.

Stan McPhail: I'll miss your posts and your wicked sense of humor. You intimidated me when we first met, with the mohawk and all that leather. You turned out to be a really good guy and insanely smart. You always found a way to make me laugh even when I didn't want to. Hopefully you have all the answers now.

Randy Blazak: I remember when he was the doorman at 688, and he'd let a little punk-wannabe like me in for free. I was in awe of him.

Amy Goodman Abramson: When we reconnected on FB a few years back, I told Dave how I was always so in awe of him because he was the " real deal" and I was a "weekend punk.” He stayed the "real deal" till the end … with the ability to listen to and accept people for who they were. We should all be this lucky in our lives to be accepted for whatever we aspire to be.

Dana Taylor: Oh, man. I'm unfolding those days and nights when you and Todd Butler and I hung at his house or grabbed pizza or found ourselves in the parking lot outside the Silver Screen with a herd of other punk types. And now you are both gone. I'm gonna go put on that Clash shirt we both had from the riot show, and know that I'm gonna miss you — just like the other folks here. There wasn't anyone quite like you, that's for sure. Blessings on the passage, David.

Clare Butler: He always sent me a message every year on Todd’s Butler birthday with a wacky story about something they did together. He was so kind. David, you were a light in this world.

Oria Kunin: I will miss your revolutionary voice and your sardonic wit. You stood against the hypocrisy and kept true to the young idealism we had back in the Metroplex days when we thought we could make a difference.

Chris Siciliano: You and Michael Hochman welcomed me with open arms when I moved to Atlanta. The first to do so. You changed my trajectory and helped make me who I am today. I have some amazing memories that I will cherish forever. You were truly one of a kind.

Lynn Martineau: You were a great friend and an integral part of my life. You accepted me for who I was and taught me it was okay to be different.

Vanessa Faulkner: I am happy I met you, at the best and most intense times of our lives: the ’80s, 688, Metroplex, Margaritaville, Blue Rat Gallery, Pershing Point … .

Kimberley Alexander: Can’t stop seeing him standing in Margaritaville, with his skull vest on, listening to bands and talking up a storm.

A. Kristin Kirkland: Oh, noooooo ... my youth would not have been the same without you in it.

Doug Hamilton: You were a beacon of integrity on the Atlanta scene that we all looked up to. I really, really admired your bravery and your honesty, and I was captivated by your charisma.

Joel David Godbey: David, you were one of the brightest, most thought-provoking friends I ever had the pleasure to know. Godspeed to Valhöll.

DeAri DeVille: Atlanta has lost a legend. Always looked up to you, Brother.

Mark Rutledge: I just found out that Dave passed away early on Tuesday. I had spoken with him around 8 p.m. Monday night. I met Dave when I was in the fifth grade. I can't believe I'm writing this. My world is feeling empty.

Kim Cresswell: My heart is just crushed. So many things to say about such an iconic person from the Atlanta punk scene, but no words come close. This one is incredibly hard to take. So very upsetting.

Elaine Eaton Ward: He was one of the good guys.


Clark Brown: There is one story David and I shared about a tattoo we both have. Chris Wood had a biker friend who did them and talked me into getting one — old-school shit. It was a skull and a snake, the only one I ever got, and I was so proud of it. A few weeks later I ran into David and damned if he didn't have the very same tattoo. We had a good laugh about it and pinned it on Chris.

Greta Sybers: Your death brings back memories of a time in our lives which was so pivotal to so many of us in defining who we are today. Thank you, David Dickens, for being. It just goes to show that the angels among us take many forms.

Rob Groover: He was at every show I went to for years and years 688, Metroplex, etc.. I was intimidated by his look but after we talked I was struck by what a nice guy he was, especially given his badass mohawk and punk look.

Tracey Fedor: The best thing about Dave is that he had friends of every kind. He was not concerned with appearances. He did his thing, and he liked when you did yours. I was at 688 every night I could make it, and there were so many people trying so hard. The worst thing was being called a poser — fighting words. In the middle of all that posturing, Dave made a point of telling me what he liked about me, specifically, and it was all the things that made me different, not punk, not this or that, but truly me. Movie night at his apartment looked like random people scooped up in a fish net. I met some real pearls through him.

Chris Mills: I was one of the kids who spent a lot of time among the circus of friends who visited, lived, or stayed over at the apartment in Wishing Well. It is noteworthy to me that Dave kept that space a drug free place. … he was a formative influence on me and how I have viewed the world, made decisions, and interacted with people. At a tough time and place for the different, the troubled, and the unusual, he was a role model, sounding board, entertainer, and ... a leader.

Luke Warm Dude: Passing away on the birthday of Elvis AND Bowie was amazingly you … You are an amazing inspiration.

K. Mohamed Gernatt: Fuck you, fucker! Why'd you have to go and leave like that? RIPower my favorite anarchist. … and godspeed.

Michael Oakley: My heart is broken. I am so glad we had the conversations we've had on the phone recently. For those who didn't know about his health issues ... he was truly grateful for each and every step he took after having cheated death so many times. … He’d had heart troubles and a recent gall bladder removal, was on life-sustaining heart medication, living on borrowed time. He was matter of fact about his condition and expressed that he'd have no regrets.

Lazlo Aluisa: We were usually on the same page but those times we did have a heated debate, you were always someone who took on that sort of thing in good spirit. Though your ideas were strong, you were tolerant when listening to others, and never held on to things said in the heat of the moment or ceased to love those that you went head to head with. In that way you challenged us to be the best that we could be and supported who we were. You were very unique in that way. I will always respect and admire your brave spirit, your always being ready to stand up for the people and causes you believed in and for the love in your heart that you showed us all. Though that physical heart finally gave out on that very sad morning, your true heart still beats on, like the best of songs and ideas do, and in the hearts of all of us.

“A Celebration of an Extraordinary Life — David Dickens,” hosted by Corie-Lynn Cloud, Chris Mills and Kat Peters, will be held Sunday, Jan. 27,  3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Manuel’s Tavern."
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  string(14710) "David Dickens passed away in his sleep Tuesday, January 8, his sudden death attributed to a heart attack.
Dickens was a formidable figure in Atlanta’s early punk scene, due in part to his clean-shaven head with a mohawk that ran down the middle of his skull, whether fully-extended in the best British tradition, or short-cropped, mirroring Travis Bickel at his most deranged. With a studded leather jacket or vest always covering his usually shirtless torso, Dickens appeared to be a menacing figure, certainly someone you didn’t want to mess with. But once you got past the exterior, you discovered an intelligent, witty person, one with whom you could converse on a wide range of topics, from the obvious — punk rock and politics — to the sublime.
While he was a mainstay of 688, Metroplex, and Margaritaville, ’80s clubs he frequented and/or worked at and where most people first encountered him, it was the past 10 years on Facebook where many people — those who weren’t regulars decades ago at his apartment behind the old Krystal’s on Ponce — really got to know him.
Dickens was a liberal — and Facebook was the podium from which he daily took conservatives to task for greed, corruption, power plays, and cronyism, traits Dickens also acknowledged were not just endemic to those across the political spectrum from himself. He kept checks and balances on both sides, whether through his astute posts or the memes he generated with regularity. He catalogued them, together with other telling memes he found on social media, in a variety of photo albums that captured the absurdity and inequity of life in the 21{SUP()}st{SUP} century: “Hypocrisy so thick you could cut it with a knife!”; “Sign, sign, everywhere a sign”; “Does this taste funny to you?”; “Food for Thought”; and “THINK … for yourselves!” among them. Doing so wasn’t without consequences. Many times his Facebook page would go blank for weeks at a time, the result of Dickens being banished to Facebook jail for some inconvenient truth he debunked or lie he exposed. When he got out, he wouldn’t cower, but come out fighting, stronger and more steadfast than before.
It was shocking to learn of Dickens’ passing, not just because death is an unsettling part of life, but because David Dickens was so much a part of Atlanta and the punk rock scene. He personified a place and time in which so many people first discovered themselves — who they were, who they would become — and forged lifelong friendships with others during such a formative period of their life. For many of the misfits, the uncertain, the undecided, Dickens was a guiding light, a voice of reason in the anarchy of the time. With him died a part of our youth, but also a part of our resiliency and resolve.
It’s that which so many people remarked and remembered on Facebook as his death became known — common threads throughout the posts were common themes in his relationships with so many who knew him. Here are but a few of the thoughts, memories, and condolences from those who knew him best.

Phil Rockstroh: A friend of close to four decades, dating back to the punk rock era, has pogoed to a farther sphere of the multiverse. Dave was one of the first Southern boys to brandish a formidable mohawk — an act of bravery and defiance (because neither rednecks, nor bourgeoisie pink people, nor even hippies — could abide the fact that punk was a cultural force of liberation and not the ridiculous caricature of mindless, puerile aggression portrayed in corporate media).

Kat Peters: I cannot remember the exact moment I met David Dickens. I remember seeing him standing at the bar at the 688 club with Chris Wood from the Restraints. You could not miss him. Perfectly bleached platinum mohawk, swagger, sneer, studs and spikes — the epitome of punk rock. He was truly iconic. The both of them intimidated me, since I was new to the downtown scene. Looks are deceiving, as the old adage goes … and we became friends. I do remember the gaggle of young punks hanging out at his apartment behind the Krystal off Ponce de Leon Avenue. It was legendary. Those people became my family; my misfit tribe. Under that perfectly executed punk rock exterior, he had a heart of pure gold. His friends meant everything to him, and he had many. He never, ever lost the ethos of punk rock. His integrity and authenticity were intact until the very end. He was well read and highly intelligent. A total package of “cool.”

{img fileId="12616" width="600px" stylebox="float: left; margin-right: 25px; margin-bottom: 50px; text-align: left; font-family: sans-serif;" desc="BLUE RAT GALLERY DAYS: The Strand throws a party. David Dickens with Jane Torrence. Photo by Clark Brown."}
Cynthia Rojas: We were lucky to have known Dave. Punk wasn’t a fashion trend, rather a mindset of not taking B.S. I believe David’s bravery and honesty fostered many along this path. David’s conviction to seeking truth and passion for fairness made him extraordinary. His humor and playfulness will live on in our hearts as we strive for a better world and think, “WWDD?”

Kevin Eaton: My heart goes out to the beautiful people who knew David Dickens far better than I ever did; those who grew up with him, went to school with him, were intimate with him, and spent their lives close to him. I was already an emotional orphan when I showed up, spending those four formative years of my life, 1982-1986, in Atlanta. ! was blessed with some real cool cats and chicks whom I met at the 688 Club, to hang out/party/live life with. I probably met Dave via Chris Wood, who was my neighbor at 1385 West Peachtree, in the winter of ’84. Dave and I wound up on that teen punk poster, LOL! David Barge had a copy on his wall he used for target practice.

L. Eric Snoddy: I am saddened by your passing. Wish I could have had that last conversation. We had many back in our youth. The thought of not hearing your opinion is just not right. You helped me grow into the person I am today.

Elizabeth Bailey: Words fail me, my friend. I am so grateful we connected … we had amazing and funny conversations. Thank you for every word. Thank you for being kind, protective, and unapologetically David.

Erik Sizemore: I have known you since I was 16 years old. I watched you overcome terrible challenges and was with you when you celebrated great success. I have learned from you. Disagreed with you. Laughed with you and yelled at you. It seems so wrong that I will not have the opportunity to speak with you again. You are an icon of my youth. You now have the answers to the great mysteries of life. I shall miss you. I will not forget you.

Corie-Lynn Cloud: I can’t do this. No. Not acceptable. My 53-year-old self is sobbing. My 15-year-old self is screaming into the void.

Kim Niedzwiecki: Rest in Peace does not sound fitting for you. Rock On sounds better. You will be missed by so many. Thanks for being my friend.

Mikel K Poet: He was such a big part of our hearts and of our minds. I can't believe that he is gone, that we will never experience his intelligence, his wit, his passion for life, and ability to look at things for what they really are.

Stan McPhail: I'll miss your posts and your wicked sense of humor. You intimidated me when we first met, with the mohawk and all that leather. You turned out to be a really good guy and insanely smart. You always found a way to make me laugh even when I didn't want to. Hopefully you have all the answers now.

Randy Blazak: I remember when he was the doorman at 688, and he'd let a little punk-wannabe like me in for free. I was in awe of him.

Amy Goodman Abramson: When we reconnected on FB a few years back, I told Dave how I was always so in awe of him because he was the " real deal" and I was a "weekend punk.” He stayed the "real deal" till the end … with the ability to listen to and accept people for who they were. We should all be this lucky in our lives to be accepted for whatever we aspire to be.

Dana Taylor: Oh, man. I'm unfolding those days and nights when you and Todd [[Butler] and I hung at his house or grabbed pizza or found ourselves in the parking lot outside the Silver Screen with a herd of other punk types. And now you are both gone. I'm gonna go put on that Clash shirt we both had from the riot show, and know that I'm gonna miss you — just like the other folks here. There wasn't anyone quite like you, that's for sure. Blessings on the passage, David.

Clare Butler: He always sent me a message every year on Todd’s [[Butler] birthday with a wacky story about something they did together. He was so kind. David, you were a light in this world.

Oria Kunin: I will miss your revolutionary voice and your sardonic wit. You stood against the hypocrisy and kept true to the young idealism we had back in the Metroplex days when we thought we could make a difference.

Chris Siciliano: You and Michael Hochman welcomed me with open arms when I moved to Atlanta. The first to do so. You changed my trajectory and helped make me who I am today. I have some amazing memories that I will cherish forever. You were truly one of a kind.

Lynn Martineau: You were a great friend and an integral part of my life. You accepted me for who I was and taught me it was okay to be different.

Vanessa Faulkner: I am happy I met you, at the best and most intense times of our lives: the ’80s, 688, Metroplex, Margaritaville, Blue Rat Gallery, Pershing Point … .

Kimberley Alexander: Can’t stop seeing him standing in Margaritaville, with his skull vest on, listening to bands and talking up a storm.

A. Kristin Kirkland: Oh, noooooo ... my youth would not have been the same without you in it.

Doug Hamilton: You were a beacon of integrity on the Atlanta scene that we all looked up to. I really, really admired your bravery and your honesty, and I was captivated by your charisma.

Joel David Godbey: David, you were one of the brightest, most thought-provoking friends I ever had the pleasure to know. Godspeed to Valhöll.

DeAri DeVille: Atlanta has lost a legend. Always looked up to you, Brother.

Mark Rutledge: I just found out that Dave passed away early on Tuesday. I had spoken with him around 8 p.m. Monday night. I met Dave when I was in the fifth grade. I can't believe I'm writing this. My world is feeling empty.

Kim Cresswell: My heart is just crushed. So many things to say about such an iconic person from the Atlanta punk scene, but no words come close. This one is incredibly hard to take. So very upsetting.

Elaine Eaton Ward: He was one of the good guys.

{img fileId="12617" width="600px" stylebox="float: right; margin-left: 25px; margin-bottom: 25px; text-align: left; font-family: sans-serif;" desc="BROTHERS IN ARMS: David Dickens and Chris Wood. Photo by Clark Brown."}
Clark Brown: There is one story David and I shared about a tattoo we both have. Chris Wood had a biker friend who did them and talked me into getting one — old-school shit. It was a skull and a snake, the only one I ever got, and I was so proud of it. A few weeks later I ran into David and damned if he didn't have the very same tattoo. We had a good laugh about it and pinned it on Chris.

Greta Sybers: [[Your death] brings back memories of a time in our lives which was so pivotal to so many of us in defining who we are today. Thank you, David Dickens, for being. It just goes to show that the angels among us take many forms.

Rob Groover: He was at every show I went to for years and years [[688, Metroplex, etc.]. I was intimidated by his look but after we talked I was struck by what a nice guy he was, especially given his badass mohawk and punk look.

Tracey Fedor: The best thing about Dave is that he had friends of every kind. He was not concerned with appearances. He did his thing, and he liked when you did yours. I was at 688 every night I could make it, and there were so many people trying so hard. The worst thing was being called a poser — fighting words. In the middle of all that posturing, Dave made a point of telling me what he liked about me, specifically, and it was all the things that made me different, not punk, not this or that, but truly me. Movie night at his apartment looked like random people scooped up in a fish net. I met some real pearls through him.

Chris Mills: I was one of the kids who spent a lot of time among the circus of friends who visited, lived, or stayed over at the apartment in Wishing Well. It is noteworthy to me that Dave kept that space a drug free place. … he was a formative influence on me and how I have viewed the world, made decisions, and interacted with people. At a tough time and place for the different, the troubled, and the unusual, he was a role model, sounding board, entertainer, and ... a leader.

Luke Warm Dude: Passing away on the birthday of Elvis AND Bowie was amazingly you … You are an amazing inspiration.

K. Mohamed Gernatt: Fuck you, fucker! Why'd you have to go and leave like that? RIPower my favorite anarchist. … and godspeed.

Michael Oakley: My heart is broken. I am so glad we had the conversations we've had on the phone recently. For those who didn't know about his health issues ... he was truly grateful for each and every step he took after having cheated death so many times. … He’d had heart troubles and a recent gall bladder removal, was on life-sustaining heart medication, living on borrowed time. He was matter of fact about his condition and expressed that he'd have no regrets.

Lazlo Aluisa: We were usually on the same page but [[those] times we did have a heated debate, you were always someone who took on that sort of thing in good spirit. Though your ideas were strong, you were tolerant when listening to others, and never held on to things said in the heat of [[the moment] or ceased to love those that you went head to head with. In that way you challenged us to be the best that we could be and supported who we were. You were very unique in that way. I will always respect and admire your brave spirit, your always [[being] ready to stand up for the people and causes [[you] believed in and for the love in your heart that you showed us all. Though that physical heart finally gave out on that very sad morning, your true heart still beats on, like the best of songs and ideas do, and in the hearts of all of us.

''“A Celebration of an Extraordinary Life — David Dickens,” hosted by Corie-Lynn Cloud, Chris Mills and Kat Peters, will be held Sunday, Jan. 27,  3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Manuel’s Tavern.''"
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  string(15743) " Dd2  2019-01-16T22:22:33+00:00 dd2.jpg   I think David was closer to an anarchist radical than a liberal. He certainly took me to task more times than once on Facebook. I loved it because he was such an influence on me when I was a teenager in the early 80s. My tribute: https://watchingthewheelsdad.net/2019/01/11/thanks-punk-for-david-dickens/ RIP my brother. And for the record, Dave was a radical leftist, not a liberal. He would want that clarification, I’m sure. I hope he and Ria are bossing people around in the not too sweet hereafter. RIP. I will never forget you. I'm not a particularly nostalgic person, but damn, man.  Dave epitomized a time in my life.  He was a member of a tribe defined almost solely on the fact that none of us had a tribe.  I never hung with him outside of 688 but we spent a lot of time together there talking and drinking.  He was an independent thinker, witty and smart.  A sweetheart who nonetheless didn't suffer fools. atlantapunkrock daviddickens 688 metroplex For many, he was the icon of Atlanta's original punk rock scene; for others, he was the voice of reason in an increasingly insane world 12613  2019-01-17T23:32:00+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Remembering David Dickens, 1961 — 2019 tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris TONY PARIS Tony Paris 2019-01-17T23:32:00+00:00  David Dickens passed away in his sleep Tuesday, January 8, his sudden death attributed to a heart attack.
Dickens was a formidable figure in Atlanta’s early punk scene, due in part to his clean-shaven head with a mohawk that ran down the middle of his skull, whether fully-extended in the best British tradition, or short-cropped, mirroring Travis Bickel at his most deranged. With a studded leather jacket or vest always covering his usually shirtless torso, Dickens appeared to be a menacing figure, certainly someone you didn’t want to mess with. But once you got past the exterior, you discovered an intelligent, witty person, one with whom you could converse on a wide range of topics, from the obvious — punk rock and politics — to the sublime.
While he was a mainstay of 688, Metroplex, and Margaritaville, ’80s clubs he frequented and/or worked at and where most people first encountered him, it was the past 10 years on Facebook where many people — those who weren’t regulars decades ago at his apartment behind the old Krystal’s on Ponce — really got to know him.
Dickens was a liberal — and Facebook was the podium from which he daily took conservatives to task for greed, corruption, power plays, and cronyism, traits Dickens also acknowledged were not just endemic to those across the political spectrum from himself. He kept checks and balances on both sides, whether through his astute posts or the memes he generated with regularity. He catalogued them, together with other telling memes he found on social media, in a variety of photo albums that captured the absurdity and inequity of life in the 21 century: “Hypocrisy so thick you could cut it with a knife!”; “Sign, sign, everywhere a sign”; “Does this taste funny to you?”; “Food for Thought”; and “THINK … for yourselves!” among them. Doing so wasn’t without consequences. Many times his Facebook page would go blank for weeks at a time, the result of Dickens being banished to Facebook jail for some inconvenient truth he debunked or lie he exposed. When he got out, he wouldn’t cower, but come out fighting, stronger and more steadfast than before.
It was shocking to learn of Dickens’ passing, not just because death is an unsettling part of life, but because David Dickens was so much a part of Atlanta and the punk rock scene. He personified a place and time in which so many people first discovered themselves — who they were, who they would become — and forged lifelong friendships with others during such a formative period of their life. For many of the misfits, the uncertain, the undecided, Dickens was a guiding light, a voice of reason in the anarchy of the time. With him died a part of our youth, but also a part of our resiliency and resolve.
It’s that which so many people remarked and remembered on Facebook as his death became known — common threads throughout the posts were common themes in his relationships with so many who knew him. Here are but a few of the thoughts, memories, and condolences from those who knew him best.

Phil Rockstroh: A friend of close to four decades, dating back to the punk rock era, has pogoed to a farther sphere of the multiverse. Dave was one of the first Southern boys to brandish a formidable mohawk — an act of bravery and defiance (because neither rednecks, nor bourgeoisie pink people, nor even hippies — could abide the fact that punk was a cultural force of liberation and not the ridiculous caricature of mindless, puerile aggression portrayed in corporate media).

Kat Peters: I cannot remember the exact moment I met David Dickens. I remember seeing him standing at the bar at the 688 club with Chris Wood from the Restraints. You could not miss him. Perfectly bleached platinum mohawk, swagger, sneer, studs and spikes — the epitome of punk rock. He was truly iconic. The both of them intimidated me, since I was new to the downtown scene. Looks are deceiving, as the old adage goes … and we became friends. I do remember the gaggle of young punks hanging out at his apartment behind the Krystal off Ponce de Leon Avenue. It was legendary. Those people became my family; my misfit tribe. Under that perfectly executed punk rock exterior, he had a heart of pure gold. His friends meant everything to him, and he had many. He never, ever lost the ethos of punk rock. His integrity and authenticity were intact until the very end. He was well read and highly intelligent. A total package of “cool.”


Cynthia Rojas: We were lucky to have known Dave. Punk wasn’t a fashion trend, rather a mindset of not taking B.S. I believe David’s bravery and honesty fostered many along this path. David’s conviction to seeking truth and passion for fairness made him extraordinary. His humor and playfulness will live on in our hearts as we strive for a better world and think, “WWDD?”

Kevin Eaton: My heart goes out to the beautiful people who knew David Dickens far better than I ever did; those who grew up with him, went to school with him, were intimate with him, and spent their lives close to him. I was already an emotional orphan when I showed up, spending those four formative years of my life, 1982-1986, in Atlanta. ! was blessed with some real cool cats and chicks whom I met at the 688 Club, to hang out/party/live life with. I probably met Dave via Chris Wood, who was my neighbor at 1385 West Peachtree, in the winter of ’84. Dave and I wound up on that teen punk poster, LOL! David Barge had a copy on his wall he used for target practice.

L. Eric Snoddy: I am saddened by your passing. Wish I could have had that last conversation. We had many back in our youth. The thought of not hearing your opinion is just not right. You helped me grow into the person I am today.

Elizabeth Bailey: Words fail me, my friend. I am so grateful we connected … we had amazing and funny conversations. Thank you for every word. Thank you for being kind, protective, and unapologetically David.

Erik Sizemore: I have known you since I was 16 years old. I watched you overcome terrible challenges and was with you when you celebrated great success. I have learned from you. Disagreed with you. Laughed with you and yelled at you. It seems so wrong that I will not have the opportunity to speak with you again. You are an icon of my youth. You now have the answers to the great mysteries of life. I shall miss you. I will not forget you.

Corie-Lynn Cloud: I can’t do this. No. Not acceptable. My 53-year-old self is sobbing. My 15-year-old self is screaming into the void.

Kim Niedzwiecki: Rest in Peace does not sound fitting for you. Rock On sounds better. You will be missed by so many. Thanks for being my friend.

Mikel K Poet: He was such a big part of our hearts and of our minds. I can't believe that he is gone, that we will never experience his intelligence, his wit, his passion for life, and ability to look at things for what they really are.

Stan McPhail: I'll miss your posts and your wicked sense of humor. You intimidated me when we first met, with the mohawk and all that leather. You turned out to be a really good guy and insanely smart. You always found a way to make me laugh even when I didn't want to. Hopefully you have all the answers now.

Randy Blazak: I remember when he was the doorman at 688, and he'd let a little punk-wannabe like me in for free. I was in awe of him.

Amy Goodman Abramson: When we reconnected on FB a few years back, I told Dave how I was always so in awe of him because he was the " real deal" and I was a "weekend punk.” He stayed the "real deal" till the end … with the ability to listen to and accept people for who they were. We should all be this lucky in our lives to be accepted for whatever we aspire to be.

Dana Taylor: Oh, man. I'm unfolding those days and nights when you and Todd Butler and I hung at his house or grabbed pizza or found ourselves in the parking lot outside the Silver Screen with a herd of other punk types. And now you are both gone. I'm gonna go put on that Clash shirt we both had from the riot show, and know that I'm gonna miss you — just like the other folks here. There wasn't anyone quite like you, that's for sure. Blessings on the passage, David.

Clare Butler: He always sent me a message every year on Todd’s Butler birthday with a wacky story about something they did together. He was so kind. David, you were a light in this world.

Oria Kunin: I will miss your revolutionary voice and your sardonic wit. You stood against the hypocrisy and kept true to the young idealism we had back in the Metroplex days when we thought we could make a difference.

Chris Siciliano: You and Michael Hochman welcomed me with open arms when I moved to Atlanta. The first to do so. You changed my trajectory and helped make me who I am today. I have some amazing memories that I will cherish forever. You were truly one of a kind.

Lynn Martineau: You were a great friend and an integral part of my life. You accepted me for who I was and taught me it was okay to be different.

Vanessa Faulkner: I am happy I met you, at the best and most intense times of our lives: the ’80s, 688, Metroplex, Margaritaville, Blue Rat Gallery, Pershing Point … .

Kimberley Alexander: Can’t stop seeing him standing in Margaritaville, with his skull vest on, listening to bands and talking up a storm.

A. Kristin Kirkland: Oh, noooooo ... my youth would not have been the same without you in it.

Doug Hamilton: You were a beacon of integrity on the Atlanta scene that we all looked up to. I really, really admired your bravery and your honesty, and I was captivated by your charisma.

Joel David Godbey: David, you were one of the brightest, most thought-provoking friends I ever had the pleasure to know. Godspeed to Valhöll.

DeAri DeVille: Atlanta has lost a legend. Always looked up to you, Brother.

Mark Rutledge: I just found out that Dave passed away early on Tuesday. I had spoken with him around 8 p.m. Monday night. I met Dave when I was in the fifth grade. I can't believe I'm writing this. My world is feeling empty.

Kim Cresswell: My heart is just crushed. So many things to say about such an iconic person from the Atlanta punk scene, but no words come close. This one is incredibly hard to take. So very upsetting.

Elaine Eaton Ward: He was one of the good guys.


Clark Brown: There is one story David and I shared about a tattoo we both have. Chris Wood had a biker friend who did them and talked me into getting one — old-school shit. It was a skull and a snake, the only one I ever got, and I was so proud of it. A few weeks later I ran into David and damned if he didn't have the very same tattoo. We had a good laugh about it and pinned it on Chris.

Greta Sybers: Your death brings back memories of a time in our lives which was so pivotal to so many of us in defining who we are today. Thank you, David Dickens, for being. It just goes to show that the angels among us take many forms.

Rob Groover: He was at every show I went to for years and years 688, Metroplex, etc.. I was intimidated by his look but after we talked I was struck by what a nice guy he was, especially given his badass mohawk and punk look.

Tracey Fedor: The best thing about Dave is that he had friends of every kind. He was not concerned with appearances. He did his thing, and he liked when you did yours. I was at 688 every night I could make it, and there were so many people trying so hard. The worst thing was being called a poser — fighting words. In the middle of all that posturing, Dave made a point of telling me what he liked about me, specifically, and it was all the things that made me different, not punk, not this or that, but truly me. Movie night at his apartment looked like random people scooped up in a fish net. I met some real pearls through him.

Chris Mills: I was one of the kids who spent a lot of time among the circus of friends who visited, lived, or stayed over at the apartment in Wishing Well. It is noteworthy to me that Dave kept that space a drug free place. … he was a formative influence on me and how I have viewed the world, made decisions, and interacted with people. At a tough time and place for the different, the troubled, and the unusual, he was a role model, sounding board, entertainer, and ... a leader.

Luke Warm Dude: Passing away on the birthday of Elvis AND Bowie was amazingly you … You are an amazing inspiration.

K. Mohamed Gernatt: Fuck you, fucker! Why'd you have to go and leave like that? RIPower my favorite anarchist. … and godspeed.

Michael Oakley: My heart is broken. I am so glad we had the conversations we've had on the phone recently. For those who didn't know about his health issues ... he was truly grateful for each and every step he took after having cheated death so many times. … He’d had heart troubles and a recent gall bladder removal, was on life-sustaining heart medication, living on borrowed time. He was matter of fact about his condition and expressed that he'd have no regrets.

Lazlo Aluisa: We were usually on the same page but those times we did have a heated debate, you were always someone who took on that sort of thing in good spirit. Though your ideas were strong, you were tolerant when listening to others, and never held on to things said in the heat of the moment or ceased to love those that you went head to head with. In that way you challenged us to be the best that we could be and supported who we were. You were very unique in that way. I will always respect and admire your brave spirit, your always being ready to stand up for the people and causes you believed in and for the love in your heart that you showed us all. Though that physical heart finally gave out on that very sad morning, your true heart still beats on, like the best of songs and ideas do, and in the hearts of all of us.

“A Celebration of an Extraordinary Life — David Dickens,” hosted by Corie-Lynn Cloud, Chris Mills and Kat Peters, will be held Sunday, Jan. 27,  3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Manuel’s Tavern.    Clark Brown THERE WAS A TIME: David Dickens with Genevieve Curbow, ca. early 1980s.      AtlantaPunkRock DavidDickens 688 Metroplex                              HIGH FREQUENCIES: Remembering David Dickens, 1961 — 2019 "
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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies

Thursday January 17, 2019 06:32 pm EST
For many, he was the icon of Atlanta's original punk rock scene; for others, he was the voice of reason in an increasingly insane world | more...

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  string(58) "Artist Emily M. Getsay, others, to discuss resistance art"
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  string(6462) "Activism and the arts. Are the two ever really separate? Whether reflecting what is, what could be, or what should be, isn’t art, at its best, a means of communication? A way to arouse emotions and to galvanize viewers to action? Yes, art is a means of escape, but also a contemplation of our current reality.

This Sunday, January 13, We Are March On Georgia, Art + Activism – Women’s Caucus For Art of Georgia, and The Bakery Atlanta will be hosting “The Art of Protest Workshop” at the arts and entertainment venue, 825 Warner Street, to not only discuss art and its role in activism, but for participants to create their own advocacy artwork to be used in the March On to 2020! women’s march in Atlanta on the BeltLine, January 19, and in the 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, taking place this year on January 21.

On The Bakery Atlanta’s Facebook page, the workshop, which runs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., is described as including “a breakdown of what Protest Art means and how to conceptualize it.” At a time in these United States, when protests — and protest art — are needed now perhaps more than at any other time in our nation’s history, the afternoon session promises to be an enlightening and invigorating discussion. Emily M. Getsay, the first queer person and the youngest to be elected as president of the Georgia chapter of the Women’s Caucus for Art, will partner with Gloria Moore, March On to 2020 and March on the Polls coordinator; Anne Rowles, co-founder of the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia (which is affiliated with the National Women’s Caucus for Art); WCAGA Vice President Chelsea Hoag; and Le’Dor Milteer, who will be singing at the March On to 2020; along with other members and constituents of the March and Atlanta resistance movements.

Creative Loafing: How long have you been involved with the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia?

Emily M. Getsay: I joined the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia in 2016. My first show as a member was “Artists Against Modern Day Slavery” at Mammal Gallery. It became an annual exhibition curated by our Art + Activism Committee. This year’s event will take place at the Shambhala Center in Decatur on Saturday, January 19 at 7 p.m. In 2017, I became the chair of our Art + Activism Committee and became the president of WCAGA in January 2018.

Does your interest in working with WCAGA stem from being an artist, or are you more focused on resistance movements?

As a conceptual artist, my work often portrays different elements of resistance and advocacy. My purpose as an artist is not only to mobilize other artists and marginalized voices through my art but also to create work that inspires other artists to do the same. The Caucus brought all of those elements together. As the president, I feel that I’m making the impact I’ve always wanted.

Do you see art as a means of drawing people into resistance and protest movements who might otherwise not give such movements a second thought?

Art serves as a connector. As humans, we are all connected in one way or another. Art serves as a way for people to remember that about ourselves.

Will the workshop focus on art in broader terms? Or is this more about the art of the protest sign in a march or demonstration situation and how to best get your message across?

The workshop will explore examples of my earlier work as an artist and the progression of my work in order to ignite a movement. It will also express the different elements for which attendees can fight as artists while protesting outside of physically participating in rallies and marches.

For example, my piece “Why Aren’t you Fighting?” the workshop background image explores my own space within protesting. We all have a part in the movements because we are all human. If one group is suffering, we are all suffering. Until we all have rights, none of us can stop fighting. This piece explores that space between finding your identity and fighting for others even if you as a person don’t specifically reflect those spaces that need fighting.

An “Art of Protest Exhibition,” in which the work of many of the participants of The Art of Protest workshop will be eligible, is also scheduled to take place, following the March to 2020 Rally on January 19 and the MLK Day parade on January 21. When and where will this exhibit be held?

The Exhibit will follow the March On to 2020 and take place on February 4 for one night only at The Bakery in southwest Atlanta. Those who participate in the “Art of Protest Workshop” will be granted a spot in the show. All artists are able to submit work as long as it is within the limitations. The show will be salon style and free to the public.

A portion of the proceeds from the exhibition will go to supporting the muralists covering up the Squishiepuss work throughout Atlanta. We will also be taking donations for these artists at the door.

Smoking allowed dept. ... The Earl continues to celebrate its twentieth anniversary this weekend. Rightly so. It’s no easy feat for a club booking rock ’n’ roll bands to stay open for any length of time, much less for two decades. When the restaurant/lounge/performance venue first opened its doors at 488 Flat Shoals Avenue, it, along with the Echo Lounge, were pioneers of East Atlanta Village, then just becoming another viable Atlanta nightlife district, especially for those believing Little Five Points was becoming too commercial for their alternative tastes. First booking local and regional bands, owner John Searson started including national touring acts, with the demise of the Echo Lounge. The mix of such bands, along with the restaurant’s sizable and tasty menu, along with Sunday theme brunches, cemented the Earl’s popularity and draw. Of the hundreds of acts to perform on the backroom stage, it’s hard to name a favorite show, but the Batusis with Sylvain Sylvain and Cheetah Chrome will always remain a favorite. The party continues through the weekend, though I wouldn’t say the celebration is capped off until Wednesday, January 16, when Jon Spencer and the Hitmakers and Subsonics take the stage.

Not only for book readers dept. ... The line-up for the Amplify Decatur Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be Mavis Staples, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco), Kevn Kinney (Drivin N Cryin), and the Bitteroots."
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  string(7011) "Activism and the arts. Are the two ever really separate? Whether reflecting what is, what could be, or what should be, isn’t art, at its best, a means of communication? A way to arouse emotions and to galvanize viewers to action? Yes, art is a means of escape, but also a contemplation of our current reality.

This Sunday, January 13, [https://www.facebook.com/wearemarchongeorgia/?tn-str=k*F|We Are March On Georgia], [https://www.facebook.com/art.activism.wcaga/|Art + Activism – Women’s Caucus For Art of Georgia], and [https://thebakeryatlanta.com|The Bakery Atlanta] will be hosting “[https://www.facebook.com/events/357060961774765/|The Art of Protest Workshop]” at the arts and entertainment venue, 825 Warner Street, to not only discuss art and its role in activism, but for participants to create their own advocacy artwork to be used in the March On to 2020! women’s march in Atlanta on the BeltLine, January 19, and in the 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, taking place this year on January 21.

On The Bakery Atlanta’s Facebook page, the workshop, which runs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., is described as including “a breakdown of what Protest Art means and how to conceptualize it.” At a time in these United States, when protests — and protest art — are needed now perhaps more than at any other time in our nation’s history, the afternoon session promises to be an enlightening and invigorating discussion. Emily M. Getsay, the first queer person and the youngest to be elected as president of the Georgia chapter of the Women’s Caucus for Art, will partner with Gloria Moore, March On to 2020 and March on the Polls coordinator; Anne Rowles, co-founder of the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia (which is affiliated with the [https://nationalwca.org/|National Women’s Caucus for Art]); WCAGA Vice President Chelsea Hoag; and Le’Dor Milteer, who will be singing at the March On to 2020; along with other members and constituents of the March and Atlanta resistance movements.

__''Creative Loafing'': How long have you been involved with the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia?__

Emily M. Getsay: I joined the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia in 2016. My first show as a member was “__[http://cp.wabe.org/post/womens-caucus-art-curates-exhibit-human-trafficking|Artists Against Modern Day Slavery]__” at Mammal Gallery. It became an annual exhibition curated by our Art + Activism Committee. This year’s [https://www.facebook.com/events/391257248287185/|event] will take place at the Shambhala Center in Decatur on Saturday, January 19 at 7 p.m. In 2017, I became the chair of our Art + Activism Committee and became the president of WCAGA in January 2018.

__Does your interest in working with WCAGA stem from being an artist, or are you more focused on resistance movements?__

As a conceptual artist, my work often portrays different elements of resistance and advocacy. My purpose as an artist is not only to mobilize other artists and marginalized voices through my art but also to create work that inspires other artists to do the same. The Caucus brought all of those elements together. As the president, I feel that I’m making the impact I’ve always wanted.

__Do you see art as a means of drawing people into resistance and protest movements who might otherwise not give such movements a second thought?__

Art serves as a connector. As humans, we are all connected in one way or another. Art serves as a way for people to remember that about ourselves.

__Will the workshop focus on art in broader terms? Or is this more about the art of the protest sign in a march or demonstration situation and how to best get your message across?__

The workshop will explore examples of my earlier work as an artist and the progression of my work in order to ignite a movement. It will also express the different elements for which attendees can fight as artists while protesting outside of physically participating in rallies and marches.

For example, my piece “Why Aren’t you Fighting?” [[the workshop background image] explores my own space within protesting. We all have a part in the movements because we are all human. If one group is suffering, we are all suffering. Until we all have rights, none of us can stop fighting. This piece explores that space between finding your identity and fighting for others even if you as a person don’t specifically reflect those spaces that need fighting.

__An “Art of Protest Exhibition,” in which the work of many of the participants of The Art of Protest workshop will be eligible, is also scheduled to take place, following the March to 2020 Rally on January 19 and the MLK Day parade on January 21. When and where will this exhibit be held?__

[https://www.facebook.com/events/2228238687445928/|The Exhibit] will follow the March On to 2020 and take place on February 4 for one night only at The Bakery in southwest Atlanta. Those who participate in the “Art of Protest Workshop” will be granted a spot in the show. All artists are able to submit work as long as it is within the limitations. The show will be salon style and free to the public.

A portion of the proceeds from the exhibition will go to supporting the muralists covering up the Squishiepuss work throughout Atlanta. We will also be taking donations for these artists at the door.

__Smoking allowed dept. ...__ __[http://www.badearl.com|The Earl]__ continues to celebrate its __twentieth __anniversary this weekend. Rightly so. It’s no easy feat for a club booking rock ’n’ roll bands to stay open for any length of time, much less for two decades. When the restaurant/lounge/performance venue first opened its doors at 488 Flat Shoals Avenue, it, along with the Echo Lounge, were pioneers of __East Atlanta Village__, then just becoming another viable Atlanta nightlife district, especially for those believing Little Five Points was becoming too commercial for their alternative tastes. First booking local and regional bands, owner __John Searson__ started including national touring acts, with the demise of the Echo Lounge. The mix of such bands, along with the restaurant’s sizable and tasty menu, along with Sunday theme brunches, cemented the Earl’s popularity and draw. Of the hundreds of acts to perform on the backroom stage, it’s hard to name a favorite show, but the __Batusis__ with __Sylvain Sylvain__ and __Cheetah Chrome__ will always remain a favorite. The party continues through the weekend, though I wouldn’t say the celebration is capped off until Wednesday, January 16, when __Jon Spencer and the Hitmakers__ and __Subsonics__ take the stage.

__Not only for book readers dept. ...__ The line-up for the __[https://www.amplifydecatur.org|Amplify Decatur]__ Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be __Mavis Staples__, __Jeff Tweedy__ (Wilco), __Kevn Kinney__ (Drivin N Cryin), and the __Bitteroots__."
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  string(6949) " EmGetsay  2019-01-12T22:31:02+00:00 EmGetsay.png     Artist Emily M. Getsay, others, to discuss resistance art 12500  2019-01-17T22:58:00+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Activism and the arts at the Bakery tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris TONY PARIS Tony Paris 2019-01-17T22:58:00+00:00  Activism and the arts. Are the two ever really separate? Whether reflecting what is, what could be, or what should be, isn’t art, at its best, a means of communication? A way to arouse emotions and to galvanize viewers to action? Yes, art is a means of escape, but also a contemplation of our current reality.

This Sunday, January 13, We Are March On Georgia, Art + Activism – Women’s Caucus For Art of Georgia, and The Bakery Atlanta will be hosting “The Art of Protest Workshop” at the arts and entertainment venue, 825 Warner Street, to not only discuss art and its role in activism, but for participants to create their own advocacy artwork to be used in the March On to 2020! women’s march in Atlanta on the BeltLine, January 19, and in the 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, taking place this year on January 21.

On The Bakery Atlanta’s Facebook page, the workshop, which runs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., is described as including “a breakdown of what Protest Art means and how to conceptualize it.” At a time in these United States, when protests — and protest art — are needed now perhaps more than at any other time in our nation’s history, the afternoon session promises to be an enlightening and invigorating discussion. Emily M. Getsay, the first queer person and the youngest to be elected as president of the Georgia chapter of the Women’s Caucus for Art, will partner with Gloria Moore, March On to 2020 and March on the Polls coordinator; Anne Rowles, co-founder of the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia (which is affiliated with the National Women’s Caucus for Art); WCAGA Vice President Chelsea Hoag; and Le’Dor Milteer, who will be singing at the March On to 2020; along with other members and constituents of the March and Atlanta resistance movements.

Creative Loafing: How long have you been involved with the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia?

Emily M. Getsay: I joined the Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia in 2016. My first show as a member was “Artists Against Modern Day Slavery” at Mammal Gallery. It became an annual exhibition curated by our Art + Activism Committee. This year’s event will take place at the Shambhala Center in Decatur on Saturday, January 19 at 7 p.m. In 2017, I became the chair of our Art + Activism Committee and became the president of WCAGA in January 2018.

Does your interest in working with WCAGA stem from being an artist, or are you more focused on resistance movements?

As a conceptual artist, my work often portrays different elements of resistance and advocacy. My purpose as an artist is not only to mobilize other artists and marginalized voices through my art but also to create work that inspires other artists to do the same. The Caucus brought all of those elements together. As the president, I feel that I’m making the impact I’ve always wanted.

Do you see art as a means of drawing people into resistance and protest movements who might otherwise not give such movements a second thought?

Art serves as a connector. As humans, we are all connected in one way or another. Art serves as a way for people to remember that about ourselves.

Will the workshop focus on art in broader terms? Or is this more about the art of the protest sign in a march or demonstration situation and how to best get your message across?

The workshop will explore examples of my earlier work as an artist and the progression of my work in order to ignite a movement. It will also express the different elements for which attendees can fight as artists while protesting outside of physically participating in rallies and marches.

For example, my piece “Why Aren’t you Fighting?” the workshop background image explores my own space within protesting. We all have a part in the movements because we are all human. If one group is suffering, we are all suffering. Until we all have rights, none of us can stop fighting. This piece explores that space between finding your identity and fighting for others even if you as a person don’t specifically reflect those spaces that need fighting.

An “Art of Protest Exhibition,” in which the work of many of the participants of The Art of Protest workshop will be eligible, is also scheduled to take place, following the March to 2020 Rally on January 19 and the MLK Day parade on January 21. When and where will this exhibit be held?

The Exhibit will follow the March On to 2020 and take place on February 4 for one night only at The Bakery in southwest Atlanta. Those who participate in the “Art of Protest Workshop” will be granted a spot in the show. All artists are able to submit work as long as it is within the limitations. The show will be salon style and free to the public.

A portion of the proceeds from the exhibition will go to supporting the muralists covering up the Squishiepuss work throughout Atlanta. We will also be taking donations for these artists at the door.

Smoking allowed dept. ... The Earl continues to celebrate its twentieth anniversary this weekend. Rightly so. It’s no easy feat for a club booking rock ’n’ roll bands to stay open for any length of time, much less for two decades. When the restaurant/lounge/performance venue first opened its doors at 488 Flat Shoals Avenue, it, along with the Echo Lounge, were pioneers of East Atlanta Village, then just becoming another viable Atlanta nightlife district, especially for those believing Little Five Points was becoming too commercial for their alternative tastes. First booking local and regional bands, owner John Searson started including national touring acts, with the demise of the Echo Lounge. The mix of such bands, along with the restaurant’s sizable and tasty menu, along with Sunday theme brunches, cemented the Earl’s popularity and draw. Of the hundreds of acts to perform on the backroom stage, it’s hard to name a favorite show, but the Batusis with Sylvain Sylvain and Cheetah Chrome will always remain a favorite. The party continues through the weekend, though I wouldn’t say the celebration is capped off until Wednesday, January 16, when Jon Spencer and the Hitmakers and Subsonics take the stage.

Not only for book readers dept. ... The line-up for the Amplify Decatur Music Festival 2019 has been announced. Taking the Decatur Square stage April 13 will be Mavis Staples, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco), Kevn Kinney (Drivin N Cryin), and the Bitteroots.    COURTESY OF THE ARTIST WHY AREN’T YOU FIGHTING?: Lustre print by Emily M. Getsay, 2017, 4 ft. X 3 ft.                                   HIGH FREQUENCIES: Activism and the arts at the Bakery "
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Homepage
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Crib Notes
News You May Have Missed
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Visual Arts , Homepage, Music, Crib Notes, News You May Have Missed, High Frequencies

Thursday January 17, 2019 05:58 pm EST
Artist Emily M. Getsay, others, to discuss resistance art | more...
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  string(7928) "It’s time to say good-bye to 2018. For those who choose to do so, celebrating with live music, there’s a lot to choose from in Atlanta this year. Below is a list for those not content staying at home, switching from obnoxious New Year’s Eve celebration hosts to the aggravating ones.

!!!!Aisle 5: Funk You with Universal Sigh, 9 PM.
!!!!The Bakery: New Year, Who Dis? — a Southern Fried and Morph New Year’s Eve Party with DJ sets, live performances and a Countdown Drag Show.
!!!!The Buckhead Theatre: Drivin N Cryin with Dan Baird and Homemade Sin, 9 PM.
!!!!Coca-Cola Roxy: The Roots with Victory Boyd, 9 PM.
!!!!The EARL: The Coathangers with Vincas and Paralyzer, 9 PM.
!!!!Eddie’s Attic: Michelle Malone Band with Eliot Bronson, 10 PM. There will also be a 7:30 PM show with no opener.
!!!!529: Breathers with Shepherds, Likes, Shouldies and Salsa Chest, 9 PM.
!!!!Fox Theatre: Widespread Panic, 9 PM.
!!!!Masquerade (Heaven): Sevendust with Cane Hill, Madame Mayhem and Shallow Side, 7 PM.
!!!!Northside Tavern: Lola Gulley Band & Atlanta Horns, with Albert White, Eddie Tigner and Beverly “Guitar” Watkins, 10 PM.
!!!!Park Tavern: Yacht Rock Revue, opening band, 9 PM.
!!!!Red Clay Music Foundry: Esoebo, 7 PM.
!!!!Red Light Cafe: The Gilded Age Gala New Year’s Eve Celebration, 8 PM.
!!!!Smith’s Olde Bar (The Music Room): Rumours — A Fleetwood Mac Tribute, 8 PM.
!!!!Smith’s Olde Bar (The Atlanta Room): Led Zeppelified with Young Again, 8 PM.
!!!!The Star Bar: Gringo Star, with Anna Kramer & the Lost Cause, Mammabear, Chrome Castle and more, 8 PM.
!!!!The Tabernacle: Umphrey’s McGee, 8 PM.
!!!!Terminal West: Larkin Poe with Andrea & Mud, 8 PM.
!!!!Underground Atlanta: Peach Drop, 5 PM on.
!!!!Variety Playhouse: Family and Friends, with Neighbor Lady, and Dot.s, 8 PM.
!!!!Vista Room: Electric Avenue, 9 PM.

Two immediately recognizable and hometown favorites and their bands take over the Buckhead Theatre this New Year’s Eve, Kevn Kinney with Drivin N Cryin and Dan Baird with Homemade Sin. As different as their onstage performances are, so are the answers they gave when I asked them both for words people can take with them into 2019.

Baird was succinct, “Same New Years resolution as always, ‘don’t bullshit yourself.’”

Kinney was a little more illustrious.

!!!!New Years
!!!!Resolution
!!!!Restitution
!!!!Revolution
!!!!  What’s so funny about peace and love and understanding?
!!!!  Good question Nick Lowe
!!!!I think my goal this year is to count to ten
!!!!New Year’s Eve
!!!!Ten
!!!!Nine
!!!!Eight
!!!!Seven
!!!!Six
!!!!Five
!!!!Four
!!!!Three
!!!!Two
!!!!One!!
!!!!Celebration!
!!!!  Try to cross the River Ponce
!!!!Count to ten
!!!!Barista explains to you that a macchiato is espresso with foam not carmelattofrorthingmilkshake?
!!!!Count to ten
!!!!Does the person in front of you at Publix wait until they have got the total to pull their wallet out ,as if the total was different they’d pay some other way ?
!!!!Count to ten
!!!!Etc.
!!!!Etc.
!!!!Etc.
!!!!Resolution
!!!!Find some peace within
!!!!Restitution
!!!!Make peace with those around you
!!!!Revolution
!!!!Turn off the 24 minute news cycle
!!!!Delete one social media app
!!!!Think for yourself
!!!!Be yourself
!!!!Choose yourself
!!!!Love yourself
!!!!Say Good Morning
!!!!In the mirror
!!!!Teach yourself
!!!!Encourage others
!!!!Get out of the house
!!!!Buy local art
!!!!Support local music
!!!!Remember the young people serving in the military and their husbands wives and children who also sacrifice their hearts and time . . .
!!!!that’s not a political statement
!!!!That’s a people statement
!!!!The peaceful evolution starts now
!!!!  And that’s just the first day!!
!!!!364 more to go
!!!!10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1
!!!!Ahhhh!
!!!!  God Bless.
!!!!  Kevn Kinney
!!!!Atlanta Georgia
!!!!Dec. 27. 2018
!!!!1:15 A.M
!!!!!! 
Ghost echoes dept. … I didn’t need Lonnie Holley to tell me he “woke up in a fucked up America” this year. I wake up in a fucked up America everyday. I also didn’t need Childish Gambino to lay out “this is America” for me this year. I see the problems in this country in my every waking moment. But I’m glad both of them did. I’m glad they both chose to say something. There is too much wrong with this country to keep quiet. That said, popular music shouldn’t just mirror society’s ills, but also offer some form of escape. Artists do that in a way that reaches into our subconscious, taking us away, while reminding us of the struggles to be faced, yet to be won.

And the best? The best is a rest stop somewhere along Hwy 61. You stop in for another cup of coffee, the jukebox is playing some unheard tune, you pay the cashier, head out, and wrack your brain the rest of the journey trying to figure out what — and who — you heard all those miles ago. I’ve heard countless songs on Spotify I’ll never hear again. At the time, they were the best things I ever heard, and, though I may never hear them again, I’ll remember the song, that moment, in hopes of experiencing them again.

People are obsessed with the “best.” Being the best. Knowing what’s best. Doing your best is what you should look to. There are a lot of musicians who do their best. You can hear it in their music. It’s not the calculated attempt at success, but the commitment to vinyl, to tape, to hard drive of what they feel at that moment. What’s important to them. It’s why Childish Gambino’s release of “This Is America” can be considered one of the major events of 2018. It’s why so many people hear the best in Lonnie Holley’s MITH (Jagjaguwar). We all may wake up in a fucked up America, but not every one of us can tell the story of having “snuck off the slave ship” like Holley does. His portrayal of such a past is the best thing I’ve heard heard in a long time. There’s no “winning” in that song. There’s only grief, heartache and the shackles of history attempting to keep people down. Clearly, “winning” is for losers. The 2016 presidential election was won by someone who based his campaign on “winning,” of “making America great again.” Look where that got us in 2018.

But albums released in 2018 that did take us somewhere also rocked our senses and sensibilities. Many of them released locally made an impact globally — Holley, Gambino — while there were others that, while they may not have made such an impression, gave us just the escape needed to keep our sanity intact: The Royal Krunk Jazz Orchestra: Get It How You Live (Ropeadope); Clay Harper: Bleak Beauty (no label); Subsonics: Flesh-Colored Paint (Slovenly); Rock*A*Teens: Sixth House (Merge); Tiger! Tiger!: Backing the Wrong Horse (Chicken Ranch); Michelle Malone: Slings and Arrows (SBS); Tinsley Ellis: Winning Hand (Alligator); Angie Aparo: Life is a Flower; Life is a Gun (Schoolkids Records); and Darling Machine: Darling Machine (Walk The Earth).

Such want for the superlative has become a part of many people’s everyday lives. Many want the best place to eat. The best movie to see. The best band to hear. They forget about what’s best for themselves.

As a writer, a music journalist, a critic, a monkey with a typewriter, readers sometimes think we hold all the answers. We don’t, though some of us may have a more educated view, a broader perspective, or a deeper historical frame of reference than most. Those who think they know all are only fooling themselves — and their readers. “You’ve got to be serious about what you do, but you can’t take what you do too seriously,” paraphrasing something guitarist Robert Fripp once told me. “It takes two feet to walk: one with a sense of purpose and the other with a sense of humor.”"
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!!!!__Aisle 5:__ [https://www.aisle5atl.com/event/1787240-funk-you-atlanta/|Funk You with Universal Sigh], 9 PM.
!!!!__The Bakery:__ [https://thebakeryatlanta.com/community-calendar-full/2018/12/31/new-year-who-dis-an-sfqp-x-morph-nye-party|New Year, Who Dis? — a Southern Fried and Morph New Year’s Eve Party] with DJ sets, live performances and a Countdown Drag Show.
!!!!__The Buckhead Theatre:__ [http://www.thebuckheadtheatreatl.com/EventDetail?tmeventid=0E005524F6E256E8&offerid=90428|Drivin N Cryin with Dan Baird and Homemade Sin], 9 PM.
!!!!__Coca-Cola Roxy:__ [http://www.cocacolaroxy.com/EventDetail?tmeventid=0E00554E020F337F&offerid=91987|The Roots with Victory Boyd], 9 PM.
!!!!__The EARL:__ [http://www.badearl.com/events/4954/The-Coathangers|The Coathangers with Vincas and Paralyzer], 9 PM.
!!!!__Eddie’s Attic:__ [http://www.ticketfly.com/event/1760274?utm_medium=api|Michelle Malone Band with Eliot Bronson], 10 PM. There will also be a 7:30 PM show with no opener.
!!!!__529:__ [https://www.freshtix.com/events/breathersnye|Breathers with Shepherds, Likes, Shouldies and Salsa Chest], 9 PM.
!!!!__Fox Theatre:__ [https://www.ticketoffices.com/Widespread-Panic/537/2852971|Widespread Panic], 9 PM.
!!!!__Masquerade __(Heaven): [http://www.masqueradeatlanta.com/events/sevendust/|Sevendust with Cane Hill, Madame Mayhem and Shallow Side], 7 PM.
!!!!__Northside Tavern:__ [http://www.northsidetavern.com|Lola Gulley Band & Atlanta Horns, with Albert White, Eddie Tigner and Beverly “Guitar” Watkins], 10 PM.
!!!!__Park Tavern:__ [http://www.parktavern.com/events/new-years-eve-yacht-rock-revue|Yacht Rock Revue, opening band], 9 PM.
!!!!__Red Clay Music Foundry:__ [https://www.etix.com/ticket/p/2068273/new-years-eve-dinner-a-show-with-esoebo-duluth-eddie-owen-presents-at-the-red-clay-music-foundry|Esoebo], 7 PM.
!!!!__Red Light Cafe:__ [http://redlightcafe.com/events/speakeasy-electro-swing-atlanta-presents-the-gilded-age-gala-dec-31-2018|The Gilded Age Gala New Year’s Eve Celebration], 8 PM.
!!!!__Smith’s Olde Bar__ (The Music Room): [https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rumours-a-fleetwood-mac-tribute-tickets-52913157679|Rumours — A Fleetwood Mac Tribute], 8 PM.
!!!!__Smith’s Olde Bar __(The Atlanta Room): [https://www.eventbrite.com/e/led-zeppelified-young-again-tickets-51977611435|Led Zeppelified with Young Again], 8 PM.
!!!!__The Star Bar:__ [http://www.starbaratlanta.com/events/new-years-eve-wgringo-star-anna-kramer-amp-the-lost-cause-mammabear-chrome-castle-and-more|Gringo Star, with Anna Kramer & the Lost Cause, Mammabear, Chrome Castle and more], 8 PM.
!!!!__The Tabernacle:__ [http://www.tabernacleatl.com/EventDetail?tmeventid=0E0054F3D3313596&offerid=87012|Umphrey’s McGee], 8 PM.
!!!!__Terminal West:__ [https://www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/1769293?utm_medium=api|Larkin Poe with Andrea & Mud], 8 PM.
!!!!__Underground Atlanta:__ [https://www.atlantaga.gov/Home/Components/Calendar/Event/18067/658|Peach Drop], 5 PM on.
!!!!__Variety Playhouse:__ [http://www.variety-playhouse.com/event/family-and-friends/|Family and Friends, with Neighbor Lady, and Dot.s], 8 PM.
!!!!__Vista Room:__ [https://www.freshtix.com/events/electric-avenues-nye-bash-|Electric Avenue], 9 PM.

Two immediately recognizable and hometown favorites and their bands take over the Buckhead Theatre this New Year’s Eve, Kevn Kinney with Drivin N Cryin and Dan Baird with Homemade Sin. As different as their onstage performances are, so are the answers they gave when I asked them both for words people can take with them into 2019.

Baird was succinct, “Same New Years resolution as always, ‘don’t bullshit yourself.’”

Kinney was a little more illustrious.

!!!!''New Years''
!!!!''Resolution''
!!!!''Restitution''
!!!!''Revolution''
!!!! %%% ''What’s so funny about peace and love and understanding?''
!!!! %%% ''Good question Nick Lowe''
!!!!''I think my goal this year is to count to ten''
!!!!''New Year’s Eve''
!!!!''Ten''
!!!!''Nine''
!!!!''Eight''
!!!!''Seven''
!!!!''Six''
!!!!''Five''
!!!!''Four''
!!!!''Three''
!!!!''Two''
!!!!''One!!''
!!!!''Celebration!''
!!!! %%% ''Try to cross the River Ponce''
!!!!''Count to ten''
!!!!''Barista explains to you that a macchiato is espresso with foam not carmelattofrorthingmilkshake?''
!!!!''Count to ten''
!!!!''Does the person in front of you at Publix wait until they have got the total to pull their wallet out ,as if the total was different they’d pay some other way ?''
!!!!''Count to ten''
!!!!''Etc.''
!!!!''Etc.''
!!!!''Etc.''
!!!!''Resolution''
!!!!''Find some peace within''
!!!!''Restitution''
!!!!''Make peace with those around you''
!!!!''Revolution''
!!!!''Turn off the 24 minute news cycle''
!!!!''Delete one social media app''
!!!!''Think for yourself''
!!!!''Be yourself''
!!!!''Choose yourself''
!!!!''Love yourself''
!!!!''Say Good Morning''
!!!!''In the mirror''
!!!!''Teach yourself''
!!!!''Encourage others''
!!!!''Get out of the house''
!!!!''Buy local art''
!!!!''Support local music''
!!!!''Remember the young people serving in the military and their husbands wives and children who also sacrifice their hearts and time . . .''
!!!!''that’s not a political statement''
!!!!''That’s a people statement''
!!!!''The peaceful evolution starts now''
!!!! %%% ''And that’s just the first day!!''
!!!!''364 more to go''
!!!!''10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1''
!!!!''Ahhhh!''
!!!! %%% ''God Bless.''
!!!! %%% Kevn Kinney
!!!!Atlanta Georgia
!!!!Dec. 27. 2018
!!!!1:15 A.M
!!!!!! 
__Ghost echoes dept.__ … I didn’t need Lonnie Holley to tell me he [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ss3cz9FgGnA|“woke up in a fucked up America”] this year. I wake up in a fucked up America everyday. I also didn’t need Childish Gambino to lay out “this is America” for me this year. I see the problems in this country in my every waking moment. But I’m glad both of them did. I’m glad they both chose to say something. There is too much wrong with this country to keep quiet. That said, popular music shouldn’t just mirror society’s ills, but also offer some form of escape. Artists do that in a way that reaches into our subconscious, taking us away, while reminding us of the struggles to be faced, yet to be won.

And the best? The best is a rest stop somewhere along Hwy 61. You stop in for another cup of coffee, the jukebox is playing some unheard tune, you pay the cashier, head out, and wrack your brain the rest of the journey trying to figure out what — and who — you heard all those miles ago. I’ve heard countless songs on Spotify I’ll never hear again. At the time, they were the best things I ever heard, and, though I may never hear them again, I’ll remember the song, that moment, in hopes of experiencing them again.

People are obsessed with the “best.” Being the best. Knowing what’s best. Doing your best is what you should look to. There are a lot of musicians who do their best. You can hear it in their music. It’s not the calculated attempt at success, but the commitment to vinyl, to tape, to hard drive of what they feel at that moment. What’s important to them. It’s why __Childish Gambino__’s release of [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYOjWnS4cMY|“This Is America”] can be considered one of the major events of 2018. It’s why so many people hear the best in __Lonnie Holley__’s ''MITH (''Jagjaguwar). We all may wake up in a fucked up America, but not every one of us can tell the story of having [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feB4GoGwn7o|“snuck off the slave ship”] like Holley does. His portrayal of such a past is the best thing I’ve heard heard in a long time. There’s no “winning” in that song. There’s only grief, heartache and the shackles of history attempting to keep people down. Clearly, “winning” is for losers. The 2016 presidential election was won by someone who based his campaign on “winning,” of “making America great again.” Look where that got us in 2018.

But albums released in 2018 that did take us somewhere also rocked our senses and sensibilities. Many of them released locally made an impact globally — Holley, Gambino — while there were others that, while they may not have made such an impression, gave us just the escape needed to keep our sanity intact: __The Royal Krunk Jazz Orchestra:__ ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOzTNV85e2o&list=PL0jKx5TjvJSt33fcgW17SmF5MvjV9m2Xt|Get It How You Live]'' (Ropeadope); __Clay Harper:__ ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1WMBK0hIO8&list=PLI_C5jMT4w2p6uKIhyScaXFutrquCdH0j|Bleak Beauty]'' (no label); __Subsonics:__ ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFQmSJ1oXD0&list=PLXq5HQTvlYXMaP_Fad9Pc_tSCPOHcEt_f|Flesh-Colored Paint]'' (Slovenly); __Rock*A*Teens__: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gw1GOXDBjow&list=OLAK5uy_k_bjkj6df1XTn-TtpI35uD6PVgafF5yv0|Sixth House]'' (Merge); __Tiger! Tiger!:__ ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7zDm6vg6kI&list=PL-ROqfyAQJa1yLTmxvPUuqzL1lSV51-bP|Backing the Wrong Horse]'' (Chicken Ranch); __Michelle Malone:__ ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udPoTzfgZl8&list=OLAK5uy_kTZnWjEsB-Vmz9D4cemsYjDZTNSypJ2CY|Slings and Arrows] ''(SBS); Tinsley Ellis: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cS0sSyEHrM|Winning Hand] ''(Alligator); __Angie Aparo:__ ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Jp3nwfekPI|Life is a Flower; Life is a Gun]'' (Schoolkids Records); and __Darling Machine:__ ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PumoyO-x4-M|Darling Machine]'' (Walk The Earth).

Such want for the superlative has become a part of many people’s everyday lives. Many want the best place to eat. The best movie to see. The best band to hear. They forget about what’s best for themselves.

As a writer, a music journalist, a critic, a monkey with a typewriter, readers sometimes think we hold all the answers. We don’t, though some of us may have a more educated view, a broader perspective, or a deeper historical frame of reference than most. Those who think they know all are only fooling themselves — and their readers. “You’ve got to be serious about what you do, but you can’t take what you do too seriously,” paraphrasing something guitarist Robert Fripp once told me. “It takes two feet to walk: one with a sense of purpose and the other with a sense of humor.”"
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  string(8501) " DNC For HiFreqs  2018-12-29T19:01:25+00:00 DNC for HiFreqs.png     Objects are closer than they appear 12191  2018-12-29T19:12:41+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: 2018 in the rear-view mirror tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-12-29T19:12:41+00:00  It’s time to say good-bye to 2018. For those who choose to do so, celebrating with live music, there’s a lot to choose from in Atlanta this year. Below is a list for those not content staying at home, switching from obnoxious New Year’s Eve celebration hosts to the aggravating ones.

!!!!Aisle 5: Funk You with Universal Sigh, 9 PM.
!!!!The Bakery: New Year, Who Dis? — a Southern Fried and Morph New Year’s Eve Party with DJ sets, live performances and a Countdown Drag Show.
!!!!The Buckhead Theatre: Drivin N Cryin with Dan Baird and Homemade Sin, 9 PM.
!!!!Coca-Cola Roxy: The Roots with Victory Boyd, 9 PM.
!!!!The EARL: The Coathangers with Vincas and Paralyzer, 9 PM.
!!!!Eddie’s Attic: Michelle Malone Band with Eliot Bronson, 10 PM. There will also be a 7:30 PM show with no opener.
!!!!529: Breathers with Shepherds, Likes, Shouldies and Salsa Chest, 9 PM.
!!!!Fox Theatre: Widespread Panic, 9 PM.
!!!!Masquerade (Heaven): Sevendust with Cane Hill, Madame Mayhem and Shallow Side, 7 PM.
!!!!Northside Tavern: Lola Gulley Band & Atlanta Horns, with Albert White, Eddie Tigner and Beverly “Guitar” Watkins, 10 PM.
!!!!Park Tavern: Yacht Rock Revue, opening band, 9 PM.
!!!!Red Clay Music Foundry: Esoebo, 7 PM.
!!!!Red Light Cafe: The Gilded Age Gala New Year’s Eve Celebration, 8 PM.
!!!!Smith’s Olde Bar (The Music Room): Rumours — A Fleetwood Mac Tribute, 8 PM.
!!!!Smith’s Olde Bar (The Atlanta Room): Led Zeppelified with Young Again, 8 PM.
!!!!The Star Bar: Gringo Star, with Anna Kramer & the Lost Cause, Mammabear, Chrome Castle and more, 8 PM.
!!!!The Tabernacle: Umphrey’s McGee, 8 PM.
!!!!Terminal West: Larkin Poe with Andrea & Mud, 8 PM.
!!!!Underground Atlanta: Peach Drop, 5 PM on.
!!!!Variety Playhouse: Family and Friends, with Neighbor Lady, and Dot.s, 8 PM.
!!!!Vista Room: Electric Avenue, 9 PM.

Two immediately recognizable and hometown favorites and their bands take over the Buckhead Theatre this New Year’s Eve, Kevn Kinney with Drivin N Cryin and Dan Baird with Homemade Sin. As different as their onstage performances are, so are the answers they gave when I asked them both for words people can take with them into 2019.

Baird was succinct, “Same New Years resolution as always, ‘don’t bullshit yourself.’”

Kinney was a little more illustrious.

!!!!New Years
!!!!Resolution
!!!!Restitution
!!!!Revolution
!!!!  What’s so funny about peace and love and understanding?
!!!!  Good question Nick Lowe
!!!!I think my goal this year is to count to ten
!!!!New Year’s Eve
!!!!Ten
!!!!Nine
!!!!Eight
!!!!Seven
!!!!Six
!!!!Five
!!!!Four
!!!!Three
!!!!Two
!!!!One!!
!!!!Celebration!
!!!!  Try to cross the River Ponce
!!!!Count to ten
!!!!Barista explains to you that a macchiato is espresso with foam not carmelattofrorthingmilkshake?
!!!!Count to ten
!!!!Does the person in front of you at Publix wait until they have got the total to pull their wallet out ,as if the total was different they’d pay some other way ?
!!!!Count to ten
!!!!Etc.
!!!!Etc.
!!!!Etc.
!!!!Resolution
!!!!Find some peace within
!!!!Restitution
!!!!Make peace with those around you
!!!!Revolution
!!!!Turn off the 24 minute news cycle
!!!!Delete one social media app
!!!!Think for yourself
!!!!Be yourself
!!!!Choose yourself
!!!!Love yourself
!!!!Say Good Morning
!!!!In the mirror
!!!!Teach yourself
!!!!Encourage others
!!!!Get out of the house
!!!!Buy local art
!!!!Support local music
!!!!Remember the young people serving in the military and their husbands wives and children who also sacrifice their hearts and time . . .
!!!!that’s not a political statement
!!!!That’s a people statement
!!!!The peaceful evolution starts now
!!!!  And that’s just the first day!!
!!!!364 more to go
!!!!10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1
!!!!Ahhhh!
!!!!  God Bless.
!!!!  Kevn Kinney
!!!!Atlanta Georgia
!!!!Dec. 27. 2018
!!!!1:15 A.M
!!!!!! 
Ghost echoes dept. … I didn’t need Lonnie Holley to tell me he “woke up in a fucked up America” this year. I wake up in a fucked up America everyday. I also didn’t need Childish Gambino to lay out “this is America” for me this year. I see the problems in this country in my every waking moment. But I’m glad both of them did. I’m glad they both chose to say something. There is too much wrong with this country to keep quiet. That said, popular music shouldn’t just mirror society’s ills, but also offer some form of escape. Artists do that in a way that reaches into our subconscious, taking us away, while reminding us of the struggles to be faced, yet to be won.

And the best? The best is a rest stop somewhere along Hwy 61. You stop in for another cup of coffee, the jukebox is playing some unheard tune, you pay the cashier, head out, and wrack your brain the rest of the journey trying to figure out what — and who — you heard all those miles ago. I’ve heard countless songs on Spotify I’ll never hear again. At the time, they were the best things I ever heard, and, though I may never hear them again, I’ll remember the song, that moment, in hopes of experiencing them again.

People are obsessed with the “best.” Being the best. Knowing what’s best. Doing your best is what you should look to. There are a lot of musicians who do their best. You can hear it in their music. It’s not the calculated attempt at success, but the commitment to vinyl, to tape, to hard drive of what they feel at that moment. What’s important to them. It’s why Childish Gambino’s release of “This Is America” can be considered one of the major events of 2018. It’s why so many people hear the best in Lonnie Holley’s MITH (Jagjaguwar). We all may wake up in a fucked up America, but not every one of us can tell the story of having “snuck off the slave ship” like Holley does. His portrayal of such a past is the best thing I’ve heard heard in a long time. There’s no “winning” in that song. There’s only grief, heartache and the shackles of history attempting to keep people down. Clearly, “winning” is for losers. The 2016 presidential election was won by someone who based his campaign on “winning,” of “making America great again.” Look where that got us in 2018.

But albums released in 2018 that did take us somewhere also rocked our senses and sensibilities. Many of them released locally made an impact globally — Holley, Gambino — while there were others that, while they may not have made such an impression, gave us just the escape needed to keep our sanity intact: The Royal Krunk Jazz Orchestra: Get It How You Live (Ropeadope); Clay Harper: Bleak Beauty (no label); Subsonics: Flesh-Colored Paint (Slovenly); Rock*A*Teens: Sixth House (Merge); Tiger! Tiger!: Backing the Wrong Horse (Chicken Ranch); Michelle Malone: Slings and Arrows (SBS); Tinsley Ellis: Winning Hand (Alligator); Angie Aparo: Life is a Flower; Life is a Gun (Schoolkids Records); and Darling Machine: Darling Machine (Walk The Earth).

Such want for the superlative has become a part of many people’s everyday lives. Many want the best place to eat. The best movie to see. The best band to hear. They forget about what’s best for themselves.

As a writer, a music journalist, a critic, a monkey with a typewriter, readers sometimes think we hold all the answers. We don’t, though some of us may have a more educated view, a broader perspective, or a deeper historical frame of reference than most. Those who think they know all are only fooling themselves — and their readers. “You’ve got to be serious about what you do, but you can’t take what you do too seriously,” paraphrasing something guitarist Robert Fripp once told me. “It takes two feet to walk: one with a sense of purpose and the other with a sense of humor.”    Photo treatment by the Real Frank Tee. Original photos provide by the respective bands. ROCK IN THE NEW YEAR: Drivin N Cryin (bottom) and Dan Baird and Homemade Sin (top) play the Buckhead Theatre New Year's Eve.                                   HIGH FREQUENCIES: 2018 in the rear-view mirror "
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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies

Saturday December 29, 2018 02:12 pm EST
Objects are closer than they appear | more...
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  string(6038) "In 1976, Neil Young barnstormed across the U.S. with Crazy Horse, playing shows that established the band as a musical tour de force and earned their performances legendary status. Each evening, Young would open with an acoustic set; a tape compiling them has made the rounds to collectors for years. Now, Young is giving them an official release with Songs for Judy, the latest installment of his “Archive Performance Series” of releases. Twenty-three songs, eight cities, ten shows capturing Young at a time many thought him to be at the peak of his powers. Who knew, four decades later, he would still be going strong? Six of the tracks on Songs for Judy were recorded during the early and late shows at Atlanta’s Fox Theatre Nov. 24, Thanksgiving Eve, of that year. The next day, Young would fly to San Francisco, joining Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison and many others to bid farewell to the Band at the Last Waltz.

At the beginning of the album, Young welcomes the audience by telling a story of seeing Judy Garland in the Fox’s pit — "the abyss," he jokes, that separates him from the audience. Young says that he saw the actress, who  portrayed Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, down there carrying a music folio of “Somewhere, Over the Rainbow.”

The first show that Wednesday night was sold-out. You can hear the Atlanta crowd’s enthusiasm during the “Songs for Judy Intro” at the beginning of this album, and during “Old Laughing Lady” and “The Needle and the Damage Done.” Young was incredible, solo and with Crazy Horse, performing write-home-about versions of “Like a Hurricane” and “Cortez the Killer” (both with Crazy Horse and neither included here). When the early concert was over, it was worth playing cat ’n’ mouse with ushers and security, running low, undercover, around the Fox, hiding from their flashlights as they cleared the house for the late show. When the doors for the second show finally opened, two people crouching behind the wall of “Black Heaven” at the top of the balcony surfaced and merged with the ticket-holders to find their seats. The second concert did not disappoint, as “The Losing End,” “Here We Are in the Years,” “Pocahontas” and “Sugar Mountain” here attest.

It was during that last song that Young again referenced Garland’s presence, urging her to, “come on up, Judy” when he began “Sugar Mountain,” his ode to lost youth. But Garland didn’t. She wasn't there. She was never there, staring up at Young from the abyss, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” sheet music in hand. No, the only ones there were those in the audience facing their own future, preparing to grow up and having to leave Sugar Mountain behind, whether they wanted to or not. It was time to experience life, learn its lessons, and to treasure the experiences one encounters on the journey. Outside the Fox Theatre, the temperature dipped into the mid-30s. People bundled up as they left the concert and headed out into the cold, crisp night. The future looked bright, as bright as the stars shining in that clear November sky. The wind began to blow. 

Van Morrison: The Prophet Speaks (Exile/Caroline) — Indeed he does!. The prophet speaks through the fourteen song here, eight covers of R&B classics and six new Morrison compositions, the latter showing he still has a lot to say, even forty studio albums into his career. Morrison hits a groove on the opening track, Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson’s “Gonna Send You Back to Where I Got You From,” and doesn’t let up, his vocals conjuring times and places from long ago, while Morrison remains in the present, a vocalist at the top of his game. Mere words do not capture the feel, the depth he captures here. Jazz? R&B? Soul? It’s Van losing himself in the genres — and in doing so, transcending what we’ve come to know, channeling them with a purity and an understanding very few vocalists these days capture, much less convey. A beautiful album that finds Morrison rediscovering his roots while expressing much of what he’s learned along a decades-long spiritual journey, whether of faith or of being, that’s he’s allowed us to join him on.

Big Brother & the Holding Co.: Sex, Dope & Cheap Thrills (Columbia Legacy) — Fifty years after its initial release, a version of Cheap Thrills, the landmark psychedelic album that introduced Janis Joplin to the world (the band’s previous album, Big Brother & the Holding Company, on Mainstream, was but an starter for the meal that was to come) has been released with the original title intact, twenty-five studio songs presented for the first time, a live track and four songs from the original sessions previously-available elsewhere. It’s easy to forget that Big Brother started as a psychedelic band, Joplin’s husky, blues-drenched vocals, her dynamic stage presence and her bawdy stage presence quickly eclipsed the sound the band was laying down behind her, but in these tracks, you discover what an incredible band Big Brother & the Holding Company was , and how  instrumental (pun intended) they were, guitarists Sam Andrew and James Gurley in particular, in forging the psychedelic San Francisco sound that established the Grateful Dead, Quicksilver Messenger Service and Jefferson Airplane. What’s most striking about these recordings today is how “out there” they still sound, five decades later. They stand as a look into a world of psychedelic possibilities that will never be explored again. That any of of the tracks ever got released to begin with is a testament to the foresight and risk-taking associated with music visionaries like John Hammond and Clive Davis, people who discerned the artistry of musicians rather than just their commercial potential. This collection shows there was nothing commercial about Janis Joplin and Big Brother & the Holding Co. in 1968, but their artistry allowed them to break through — and change music for the better."
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At the beginning of the album, Young welcomes the audience by telling a story of seeing Judy Garland in the Fox’s pit ''— ''"the abyss," he jokes, that separates him from the audience. Young says that he saw the actress, who  portrayed Dorothy in ''The Wizard of Oz,'' down there carrying a music folio of “Somewhere, Over the Rainbow.”

The first show that Wednesday night was sold-out. You can hear the Atlanta crowd’s enthusiasm during the “Songs for Judy Intro” at the beginning of this album, and during “Old Laughing Lady” and “The Needle and the Damage Done.” Young was incredible, solo and with Crazy Horse, performing write-home-about versions of “Like a Hurricane” and “Cortez the Killer” (both with Crazy Horse and neither included here). When the early concert was over, it was worth playing cat ’n’ mouse with ushers and security, running low, undercover, around the Fox, hiding from their flashlights as they cleared the house for the late show. When the doors for the second show finally opened, two people crouching behind the wall of “Black Heaven” at the top of the balcony surfaced and merged with the ticket-holders to find their seats. The second concert did not disappoint, as “The Losing End,” “Here We Are in the Years,” “Pocahontas” and “Sugar Mountain” here attest.

It was during that last song that Young again referenced Garland’s presence, urging her to, “come on up, Judy” when he began “Sugar Mountain,” his ode to lost youth. But Garland didn’t. She wasn't there. She was never there, staring up at Young from the abyss, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” sheet music in hand. No, the only ones there were those in the audience facing their own future, preparing to grow up and having to leave Sugar Mountain behind, whether they wanted to or not. It was time to experience life, learn its lessons, and to treasure the experiences one encounters on the journey. Outside the Fox Theatre, the temperature dipped into the mid-30s. People bundled up as they left the concert and headed out into the cold, crisp night. The future looked bright, as bright as the stars shining in that clear November sky. The wind began to blow. 

__Van Morrison:__ ''The Prophet Speaks'' (Exile/Caroline) — Indeed he does!. The prophet speaks through the fourteen song here, eight covers of R&B classics and six new Morrison compositions, the latter showing he still has a lot to say, even forty studio albums into his career. Morrison hits a groove on the opening track, Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson’s “Gonna Send You Back to Where I Got You From,” and doesn’t let up, his vocals conjuring times and places from long ago, while Morrison remains in the present, a vocalist at the top of his game. Mere words do not capture the feel, the depth he captures here. Jazz? R&B? Soul? It’s Van losing himself in the genres — and in doing so, transcending what we’ve come to know, channeling them with a purity and an understanding very few vocalists these days capture, much less convey. A beautiful album that finds Morrison rediscovering his roots while expressing much of what he’s learned along a decades-long spiritual journey, whether of faith or of being, that’s he’s allowed us to join him on.

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  string(6830) " * 2Neil Young Press Photo Credit Gary Burden  2018-12-25T17:47:58+00:00 * 2Neil-Young-Press-Photo-Credit-Gary-Burden.jpg    neilyoungsongsforjudy vanmorrisontheprophetspeakes bigbrother&theholdingcosexdopeandcheapthrills Stalwarts of the '60s mystify us still 12134  2018-12-25T17:50:27+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Neil Young, Van Morrison and Big Brother & the Holding Co.  tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-12-25T17:50:27+00:00  In 1976, Neil Young barnstormed across the U.S. with Crazy Horse, playing shows that established the band as a musical tour de force and earned their performances legendary status. Each evening, Young would open with an acoustic set; a tape compiling them has made the rounds to collectors for years. Now, Young is giving them an official release with Songs for Judy, the latest installment of his “Archive Performance Series” of releases. Twenty-three songs, eight cities, ten shows capturing Young at a time many thought him to be at the peak of his powers. Who knew, four decades later, he would still be going strong? Six of the tracks on Songs for Judy were recorded during the early and late shows at Atlanta’s Fox Theatre Nov. 24, Thanksgiving Eve, of that year. The next day, Young would fly to San Francisco, joining Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison and many others to bid farewell to the Band at the Last Waltz.

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The first show that Wednesday night was sold-out. You can hear the Atlanta crowd’s enthusiasm during the “Songs for Judy Intro” at the beginning of this album, and during “Old Laughing Lady” and “The Needle and the Damage Done.” Young was incredible, solo and with Crazy Horse, performing write-home-about versions of “Like a Hurricane” and “Cortez the Killer” (both with Crazy Horse and neither included here). When the early concert was over, it was worth playing cat ’n’ mouse with ushers and security, running low, undercover, around the Fox, hiding from their flashlights as they cleared the house for the late show. When the doors for the second show finally opened, two people crouching behind the wall of “Black Heaven” at the top of the balcony surfaced and merged with the ticket-holders to find their seats. The second concert did not disappoint, as “The Losing End,” “Here We Are in the Years,” “Pocahontas” and “Sugar Mountain” here attest.

It was during that last song that Young again referenced Garland’s presence, urging her to, “come on up, Judy” when he began “Sugar Mountain,” his ode to lost youth. But Garland didn’t. She wasn't there. She was never there, staring up at Young from the abyss, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” sheet music in hand. No, the only ones there were those in the audience facing their own future, preparing to grow up and having to leave Sugar Mountain behind, whether they wanted to or not. It was time to experience life, learn its lessons, and to treasure the experiences one encounters on the journey. Outside the Fox Theatre, the temperature dipped into the mid-30s. People bundled up as they left the concert and headed out into the cold, crisp night. The future looked bright, as bright as the stars shining in that clear November sky. The wind began to blow. 

Van Morrison: The Prophet Speaks (Exile/Caroline) — Indeed he does!. The prophet speaks through the fourteen song here, eight covers of R&B classics and six new Morrison compositions, the latter showing he still has a lot to say, even forty studio albums into his career. Morrison hits a groove on the opening track, Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson’s “Gonna Send You Back to Where I Got You From,” and doesn’t let up, his vocals conjuring times and places from long ago, while Morrison remains in the present, a vocalist at the top of his game. Mere words do not capture the feel, the depth he captures here. Jazz? R&B? Soul? It’s Van losing himself in the genres — and in doing so, transcending what we’ve come to know, channeling them with a purity and an understanding very few vocalists these days capture, much less convey. A beautiful album that finds Morrison rediscovering his roots while expressing much of what he’s learned along a decades-long spiritual journey, whether of faith or of being, that’s he’s allowed us to join him on.

Big Brother & the Holding Co.: Sex, Dope & Cheap Thrills (Columbia Legacy) — Fifty years after its initial release, a version of Cheap Thrills, the landmark psychedelic album that introduced Janis Joplin to the world (the band’s previous album, Big Brother & the Holding Company, on Mainstream, was but an starter for the meal that was to come) has been released with the original title intact, twenty-five studio songs presented for the first time, a live track and four songs from the original sessions previously-available elsewhere. It’s easy to forget that Big Brother started as a psychedelic band, Joplin’s husky, blues-drenched vocals, her dynamic stage presence and her bawdy stage presence quickly eclipsed the sound the band was laying down behind her, but in these tracks, you discover what an incredible band Big Brother & the Holding Company was , and how  instrumental (pun intended) they were, guitarists Sam Andrew and James Gurley in particular, in forging the psychedelic San Francisco sound that established the Grateful Dead, Quicksilver Messenger Service and Jefferson Airplane. What’s most striking about these recordings today is how “out there” they still sound, five decades later. They stand as a look into a world of psychedelic possibilities that will never be explored again. That any of of the tracks ever got released to begin with is a testament to the foresight and risk-taking associated with music visionaries like John Hammond and Clive Davis, people who discerned the artistry of musicians rather than just their commercial potential. This collection shows there was nothing commercial about Janis Joplin and Big Brother & the Holding Co. in 1968, but their artistry allowed them to break through — and change music for the better.    Gary Burden SONGS FOR JUDY: Neil Young releases songs recorded at Atlanta's Fox Theatre in 1976 on his latest album.      Neilyoungsongsforjudy Vanmorrisontheprophetspeakes Bigbrother&theholdingcosexdopeandcheapthrills                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Neil Young, Van Morrison and Big Brother & the Holding Co.  "
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Music

Tuesday December 25, 2018 12:50 pm EST
Stalwarts of the '60s mystify us still | more...
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  string(24) "Do you hear what I hear?"
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  string(20557) "At some point, marketing teams realized that Christmas time is big business, not only for general retail sales, but for music sales — and the best way to exploit the fact during the holiday season is for recording artists to release Christmas albums. Forget that since the advent of the phonograph record there have been Christmas records; the last two decades have seen the market flooded with them.

While such recordings may be a way to cash in — I mean, Neil Diamond and Barbra “Four Christmas Albums For Chrissake” Streisand — I’ve always enjoyed listening to Christmas music this time of the year, maybe even more than Christmas itself. Okay, maybe not being hammered over the head everywhere I go with Christmas songs, but having the option and a reason for playing the music in December sure beats the hell out of playing Christmas songs in May. Or July. Twenty years ago was the last Christmas and holiday music recap I published, but, just like you dragging decorations out of the basement  and down from the attic, I couldn’t resist bringing the list out another time.

And there’s so much more from which to choose! Forget the old standards from when I was a kid, the voices of Bing Crosby and Mario Lanza filling the house, the former singing the holiday carols and the latter delivering the more traditional hymns, leading up to Christmas day. It always struck me a little funny: All year long contemporary rock and pop would be played on the family stereo — a (now) vintage in-wall RCA BK2 with a pair of three-foot by one-and-a-half foot three-way speakers with crossovers — but between Thanksgiving and Christmas, this other music, by these other singers, would come out of the closet for a few weeks, then the records would be put away until the next year.

It was pretty standard seasonal sounds, alright, until the mid-‘60s. Then A Christmas Gift For You From Phil Spector was released. And things changed. Darlene Love, The Ronettes, and The Crystals hit us with that Wall Of Sound. In mono! The next year, The Beach Boys’ Christmas Album followed, then the Supremes released Merry Christmas The Beatles started releasing their fan club Christmas singles, and before you know it, it’s 2009 and Bob fucking Dylan is releasing Christmas In The Heart! Not only is it good, it’s incredible, embodying all that’s right about Christmas music: hymns, carols and popular songs that are spirited, upbeat, fun and sincere. Almost a decade after its release, many still scoff at it, some don’t even know it exists, but Dylan really captures the spirit and warmth of the holidays in this unexpected gem that few others can match.

That’s not to diminish others who have tossed their wreath in the snow. Walk into any good record store or search online and you'll find holiday music available in every genre — rock, pop, soul, rap, new age, jazz, classical, punk, post-industrial, Goth — more artists than ever are releasing Christmas music, and they’re doing so in interesting ways. While many take the old, familiar carols that many of us grew up on and reinterpret them in their own style, others have written their own Christmas songs, taking the time to pen original compositions that either retell the traditional tales or comment on society during a time that, for many, is one of reflection, as some look back, others forward, with everyone looking for a better day. Aimee Mann does a great job with One More Drifter in the Snow. Annie Lennox is rockin’ around the right Christmas tree on A Christmas Cornucopia. Others who hit the mark with their seasonal offerings are Tracey Thorn with Tinsel And Lights; Sarah McLachlan, Wintersong; Kim Wilde, Wilde Winter Songbook; M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel with A She & Him Christmas; Pink Martini brings it with Joy To The World; Sufjan Stevens, whose five-CD box set, Songs For Christmas Sing-A-Long (In Stereo Hi-Fi) should not be missed, and the Jesus of Cool himself, Nick Lowe, knocks it outta the park with Quality Street — A Seasonal Selection For All The Family. These are just some of the newer releases.

This year, Eric Clapton, who recently released Merry Xmas, gives Christmas songs their props with this formidable reinterpretation of the classics — and an original or two, with his latter day blues riffs spicing up the holidays just fine. JD McPherson, whose “Socks” is also welcome Christmas fare, plays it just right with his roots Americana approach. The same holds true for Bloodshot Records’ release from last year, The 13 Days of Xmas, the various artists compilation with tracks from Murder By Death, Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, one-time Atlantan Kelly Hogan and the man who refuses to quit when he quits, Dexter Romweber. And John Legend sings the standards straight on his new album, A Legendary Christmas.

There are plenty of old standards worth seeking out — and I’m still not talking Dean Martin, Nat “King” Cole or Frank Sinatra. Arthur Lyman’s With A Christmas Vibe is a bachelor pad staple; Jerry Jeff Walker’s Christmas Gonzo Style rides high; Martin Atkins and the Chicago Industrial League pound a white noise Christmas with The Industrial Christmas Carol; Morgan Fisher presents the perfect hybrid of styles with Claws; and you can’t do wrong with James Brown when he proclaims, Santa’s Got A Brand New Bag.

Want to go the more traditional route, without the syrupy-sweet hangover? Get back with Ethan James, The Ancient Music; Marta Sebestyen, Apocrypha; Les Voix Bulgares, Chants de Noel; and for those not wanting to go too far back in time, there’s the beautiful contemporary take on the past, Manzanera and MacKay present Christmas by The Players to make your spirits bright.

Locally, Michelle Malone and the Hot Toddies have a new holiday EP, Toddie Time out this week, sure to compliment her 1992 offering, A Swingin’ Christmas in the Attic. Indigo Girls give a beautiful holiday offering with Holly Happy Days. You can hear The Black Lips perform “Christmas in Baghdad” on a split single b/w “Plump Righteous” from King Khan and BBQ Show. Not too (too) long ago, The Woggles released a fine Christmas single, the original “Santa’s Coming (Ho, Ho, Ho)” b/w “Back Door Santa.” If you look in the right places, and you’re lucky, you can find “Red Lights (Merry Christmas)” by Dreams So Real. The same holds true for those willing to search for If your luck holds up, and your willing to dig, you’ll also strike gold with the “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) 45 by Face of Concern.

This is by no means a comprehensive list of local Christmas recordings, nor is it but a sampling of those by national and international artists. But, it’s a start. A good start.

!!!The 45 List
Many of the best Yuletide rock songs have been released only as singles. It's rare that an artist will include a Christmas song on an album, but it has been done. The Pretenders' "2000 Years" is on Learning To Crawl and the Payola$' "Christmas Is Coming" is on Hammer On A Drum, just as the Bongos released "Tree Wise Men" on Drums Along The Hudson and "Weird" Al Yankovic included "Christmas At Ground Zero" on Polka Party!. But that's the exception rather than the rule.

When the songs do appear on 45s, they are usually "B"-sides, unless its a special seasonal release, in which case usually both sides have a holiday theme. A number of seven and twelve-inch singles have been released, many of which are still available. Some are worth shopping for. You decide. Here are a few of them:

*Adams, Bryan: "Christmas Time" b/w "Reggae Christmas" (A&M)
*Blondie/Fab Five Freddy/Snuky Tate: “Christmas Rapture” (Flexi)
*Billy Jackson and the Citizen's Band: "Have A Happy Christmas ('Twas The Night Before Christmas)" (London)
*The Black Lips: "Christmas in Baghdad" b/w The King Khan & BBQ Show: "Plump Righteous" (Norton)
*The Blacktop Rockets: "Yuletide Blues" b/w Thee Kustom Kings"El Rudolfo"(Straight8)
*Bowie, Davis and Bing Crosby: "Peace On Earth"/"Little Drummer Boy" b/w "Fantastic Voyage" (RCA)
*The Buzz of Delight: "Christmas" (DB Recs)
*Can: "Silent Night" b/w "Cascade Waltz" (EMI)
*Cannibals: "Christmas Rock 'N' Roll" b/w "New Year's Eve Song" (Hit)
*Captain Kangaroo: "When Santa Claus Gets Your Letter" b/w "Sleigh Ride" (Golden)
*Captain Sensible: "One Christmas Catalogue" b/w "Relax" (A&M)
*Cocteau Twins: “Winter Wonderland” and “Frosty The Snowman” (Capitol)
*Damned: "There Ain't No Sanity Clause" b/w "Looking At You" (Big Beat)
*Dreams So Real: "Red Lights (Merry Christmas)" b/w "Bearing Witness" (Arista)
*Dumbells (Roxy Music): "Giddy-Up (inc. 'Sleigh Rides')" b/w "A Christmas Dream" (EG)
*Eagles: "Please Come Home For Christmas" b/w "Funky New Year" (Elektra)
*Elmo & Patsy: "Grandma got Run Over by a Reindeer" original (Stiff)
*Elton John: "Step Into Christmas" b/w "Ho Ho Ho (Who'd Be A Turkey At Christmas)" (MCA)
*Enya: "Oiche Chiun (Silent Night)" (Reprise)
*Face Of Concern: "Christmas (Baby, Please Come Home)" (Press)
*Face Of Concern: "Peace By Tomorrow" (Dragon Path)
*Father Guido Sarducci: "I Won't Be Twisting This Christmas" b/w "Santa's Lament"(Warner Bros.)
*Fear: "Fuck Christmas" b/w "(Beep) Christmas" (Slash)
*Foghat: "Goin' Home For Christmas" b/w "Santa Claus Is Back In Town" (Merry Christmas 1986)
*Freddy King: "I Hear Jingle Bells" b/w " Christmas Tears" (Federal)
*George Thorogood and the Destroyers: "Rock 'N' Roll Christmas" b/w "New Year's Eve Party" (EMI)
*Greg Lake: "I Believe in Father Christmas" (Manticore)
*Greedies: "A Merry Jingle" b/w "A Merry Jangle" (Vertigo)
*Headroom, Max: "Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You're A Lovely Guy)" b/w "Gimme Shades" (Chrysalis)
*Jethro Tull: ""Ring Out, Solstice Bells" b/w " Christmas Song" (Chyrsalis)
*Jimi Hendrix: "Little Drummer Boy/Silent Night/Auld Lang Syne" (Reprise)
*Jimmy: "White Christmas" b/w "Spin The Bottle" (Fatima)
*John Lennon & Yoko Ono: "Happy Christmas (War Is Over)" b/w "Listen (The Snow Is Falling)" (Apple/Capitol)
*Karen Mantler: "I Love Christmas" (Watt)
*Kate Bush: "December Will Be Magic Again" (EMI)
*Keith Richards: "Run Rudolph Run" (Rolling Stones)
*King Diamond: "No Presents For Christmas" (Roadrunner)
*Kinks: "Father Christmas" b/w "Wish I Could Fly Like Superman" (Arista)
*Korgis: "Wish You A Merry Christmas" b/w "Dumb Waiters" (WEA)
*Kurtis Blow: "Christmas Rappin'" (Mercury)
*McCartney, Paul: "Wonderful Christmastime" b/w "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reggae" (Columbia)
*Mike Lorenz: "The Rap Before Christmas" b/w "Auld Lang Syne (Go Go)" (Hottrax)
*Miracle Legion: "Little Drummer Boy" b/w "Blue Christmas" (Incas)
*Patti Smith Group: "White Christmas" (Jason)
*Payola$: "Christmas Is Coming"
*Prince and the Revolution: "I Would Die 4 U" b/w "Another Lonely Christmas" (Warner Bros.)
*Ramones: "Merry Christmas (I Don't Want To Fight)" (WEA)
*Residents: "Santa Dog 1978" b/w "Santa Dog 1972" (Ralph)
*Richards, Keith: "Run Rudolph Run" b/w "The Harder They Come" (Rolling Stones)
*Robert Fripp: “Silent Night” (EG flexi)
*Roy Wood's Wizzard: "I Wish it Could be Christmas Everyday" (UA)
*Russell, Leon: "Slipping Into Christmas" b/w "Christmas In Chicago" (Shelter)
*Siouxsie & The Banshees: "Il Est Ne Le Divin Enfant" (Polydor)
*Spinal Tap: "Christmas With The Devil" b/w "Scratch Mix" (Enigma)
*Springsteen, Bruce: "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town" (Columbia)
*Springsteen, Bruce: "Merry Christmas, Baby" (Columbia)
*Squeeze: "Christmas Day" (A&M)
*Squier, Billy: "Christmas Is The Time To Say 'I Love You'" b/w "White Christmas" (Capitol)
*Tapper Zukie: "Archie, The Rednose Reindeer" (Mer)
*Thick Pigeon: "Jingle Bell Rock" b/w The French Impressionists: "Santa Baby" (Operation Twilight)
*Three Wise Men (XTC): "Thanks For Christmas" b/w "Countdown To Christmas Partytime" (Virgin)
*Timbuk 3: "All I Want For Christmas" b/w "Blue Christmas"/"I Love You X 3" (I.R.S.)
*U.K. Subs: "Hey Santa" b/w "Thunderbird" (Fallout)
*Wham!: "Last Christmas" b/w "Everything She Wants" (CBS)
*Wilde, Kim & Mel Smith: "Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree" b/w "Deck The Blooming Halls" (10 Records)
*Wilson, Ann & Nancy: "Here Is Christmas" b/w "Bring A Torch Jeanette Isabella" (Capitol)
*The Woggles: "Santa's Coming (Ho, Ho, Ho)" b/w "Back Door Santa" (Wicked Cool)
*Yobs: "Stille Nacht" b/w ""Silent Nite" (Yob)
!!!ROCK & POP:
*Aimee Mann: One More Drifter In The Snow
*Annie Lennox: A Christmas Cornucopia
*Arthur Lyman: With A Christmas Vibe
*Bob Dylan: Christmas In The Heart
*Brian Wilson: What I Really Want For Christmas
*Canned Heat: Christmas Album
*Carly Simon: Christmas Is Almost Here
*Carole King: A Holiday Carole
*Chris Stamey Group: Christmas Time
*Christina Aguilera: My Kind Of Christmas
*Chuck Leavell: What's In The Bag?
*Dan Hicks & The Hot Licks: Crazy For Christmas
*Darlene Love: It's Christmas, of Course
*Dwight Twilley: Have A Twilley Christmas EP
*Dwight Yoakam: Come On Christmas
*Eric Clapton: Merry Xmas
*Esquivel: Merry Xmas From The Space-Age Bachelor Pad
*JD McPherson: "Socks"
*Indio Girls: Holly Happy Days
*Jorma Kaukonen: Christmas
*League Of Decency: A Swingin' Christmas
*Los Straitjackets: 'Tis The Season For Los Straitjackets!
*Low: Christmas
*Martin Atkins and the Chicago Industrial League: The Industrial Christmas Carol
*Michelle Malone: A Swinging Christmas In The Attic
*Michelle Malone: A Very SOTA Christmas
*Michelle Malone & the Hot Toddies: Toddie Time (SBS)
*Morgan Fisher: Hybrid Kids 2:Claws
*Nick Lowe: Quality Street: A Seasonal Selection For All The Family
*Pink Martini: Joy To The World
*The Players: Manzanera and MacKay present Christmas (Ryko)
*The Raveonettes: Wishing You A Rave Christmas (Vice)
*Ringo Starr: I Wanna Be Santa Claus
*The Roches: We Three Kings
*Rotary Connection: Peace
*RuPaul: Ho Ho Ho
*Sarah McLachlan: Wintersong
*Shawn Colvin: Holiday Songs And Lullabies
*She & Him: A Very She & Him Christmas
*Sufjan Stevens: Songs For Christmas Box Set:
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. I: Noel
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. II: Hark!
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. III: Ding! Dong!
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. IV: Joy!
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. V: Peace!
*Tracey Thorn: Tinsel And Lights
!!!Various Artists:
*The Christmas Album (Sony)
*Christmas in Stereo and Christmas 2 (Kindercore)
*A Christmas Record (Ze)
*Christmas Present 1992 (Sister Ruby)
*Christmas Present Vol. 2 (Sister Ruby)
*Christmas Present, Vol. 3 (Sister Ruby)
*Christmas Vols. 1, 1987 — 7, 1993 (Perimeter)
*Flagpole 1990: A Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1991: Son of the Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1992: The Daughter of the Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1992: The Mother of All Flagpole Christmas Albums
*Flagpole 1993: The Red-Headed Stepchild of the Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1994: The Soft-Spoken Beatnik Cousin of the Flagpole Christmas Album (Long Play)
*Flagpole 1995: Chilly, the Flagpole Christmas Album That Could Not Love
*Flagpole 1996: The Flagpole Christmas Album: The "white" album.
*The Mother Of All Flagpole Christmas Albums (Ortone)
*Ghosts Of Christmas Past (Les Disques Du Crepuscule)
*Ghosts Of Christmas Past (LTM 2-CD)
*Happy Birthday, Baby Jesus, Vols. 1 and 2 (Sympathy For The Record Industry)
*Hardcore Holiday (Essential Noise)
*A Lump Of Coal (First Warning)
*A Midnight Christmas Mess (Midnight)
*Riot Grrrl Christmas (Cleopatra)
*A Very Special Christmas
*A Very Special Christmas 2
*A Very Special Christmas — Jazz To The World
*A Very Special Christmas — World Christmas
*A Very Special Christmas 3
*A Very Special Christmas 4 — Live From Washington, D.C.
*A Very Special Christmas 5
*A Very Special Christmas 6 — Acoustic Christmas
*A Very Special Christmas 7
*A Very Special Christmas: 25 Years Bringing Joy to the World
*A Very Special Christmas: Bringing Peace on Earth
*VH1: The Big 80's Christmas (Rhino)
*The World Shines Brightly, Parts One, Two, Three & Four — Trattoria Calendar O.S.T.
!!!RAP:
*MC M: Xmaz N The Hood (Priority)
*Fishbone: It's A Wonderful Life (Gonna Have A Good Time) (Columbia)
*Various Artists: Christmas Rap (Profile).
!!!SOUL and R&B:
*Blind Boys of Alabama: Go Tell it on the Mountain (RealWorld)
*Booker T. & the MG's: In The Christmas Spirit (Atlantic)
*James Brown: Santa's Got A Brand New Bag (Rhino)
*Jackie Wilson: Merry Christmas From Jackie Wilson (Rhino)
*John Legend: A Legendary Christmas
*New Edition: Christmas All Over The World (MCA)
*Ray Charles: The Spirit Of Christmas (Columbia/Rhino)
*The Sounds Of Blackness: The Night Before Christmas — A Musical Fantasy (Perspective)
!!!OLDIES:
*The Beach Boys: Christmas Album (Capitol)
*Bobby Darin: The 25th Day Of December (Atco)
*Elvis Presley: Elvis' Christmas Album (RCA)
*The Four Seasons: Christmas Album (Rhino)
*The Partridge Family: A Christmas Card (Razor & Tie)
*Phil Spector & Various Artists: A Christmas Gift For You (Rhino)
!!!FOLK & BLUES:
*Boys of the Lough: Midwinter Night's Dream (Blix Street)
*Brave Combo: "It's Christmas, Man!" (Rounder)
*Joan Baez: Noel (Vanguard)
*John Wesley Harding: God Made Me Do It (Sire/Reprise)
*Johnny Winter: Please Come Home for Christmas (Pointblank/Charisma)
*Jorma Kaukonen: Christmas (Relix)
*Marta Sebestyen: Apochrya (Hannibal)
*John Fahey: The New Possibility and Christmas, Vol. 2 (Takoma)
*Leon Redbone: Christmas Island (August)
*Various Artists: Death Might Be Your Santa Claus (Columbia)
*Various Artists: Even Santa Gets The Blues (Pointblank)
!!!WORLD:
*Bulgarian Voices: Christmas Sacrament (Fremeaux)
*Les Voix Bulgares, Chants de Noel (Fremeaux)
*Various Artists: Mas! A Caribbean Christmas Party (Ryko)
*Various Artists: Reggae Christmas From Studio One (Heartbeat)
!!!JAZZ:
*Chet Baker: Silent Nights (DineMec)
*Cyrus Chestnut: Blessed Quietness: A Collection Of Hymns, Spirituals And Carols
*Ella Fitzgerald: Wishes You A Swinging Christmas (Verve)
*Vince Guaraldi Trio: A Charlie Brown Christmas
*Various Artists: Hipster's Holiday — Vocal Jazz and R&B Classics (Rhino)
*Various Artists: Hot Jazz for a Cool Night (MusicMasters)
*Various Artists: God Rest Ye Merry, Jazzmen (Columbia)
!!!NEW AGE:
*John Boswell: Festival Of The Heart (Hearts Of Space)
*Kitaro: Peace on Earth (Domo)
*Susan Mazer & Dallas Smith: Carol For The Planet (Intersound)
*David Lanz/Michael Jones: Solstice (Narada)
*Eric Tingstad/Nancy Rumble: The Gift (Sona Gaia)
*George Winston: December (Windham Hill)
*The Joy Circuit: Crystal Clear Christmas (A&M)
*Shane Keister: The Sounds Of Christmas (RCA)
!!!COUNTRY:
*Ben Keith: Christmas — Seven Gates (Reprise)
*Emmylou Harris: Light Of The Stable (Warner Bros.) —
*Jerry Jeff Walker: Christmas Gonzo Style (Rykodisc)
*Travis Tritt: Loving Time Of The Year (Warner Bros.)
*Various Artists: Christmas On The Range (Capitol)
*Various Artists: Hillbilly Holiday (Rhino)
!!!NOVELTY & COMEDY:
*Bob Rivers Comedy Corp: Twisted Christmas (Atco)
*Elmo & Patsy: Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer (Epic)
*Spike Jones: It's A Spike Jones Christmas (Rhino)
*The Scrooge Brothers: Commercial Christmasland (Rhino)
*The Three Stooges: Christmas Time With (Rhino)
*Various Artists: Dr. Demento — The Greatest Christmas Novelty CD Of All Time (Rhino)
!!!VOCALISTS:
*Amy Grant: Home For Christmas (A&M)
*Dean Martin: The Christmas Album (Reprise)
*Dean Martin: Christmas With Dino (Capitol)
*Frank Sinatra: A Jolly Christmas (Capitol)
*Frank Sinatra: Christmas Dreaming (Columbia)
*Frank Sinatra: Ultimate Christmas (Capitol)
*The Manhattan Transfer: The Christmas Album (Columbia)
!!!EASY LISTENING:
*Ferrante & Teicher: Snowbound/We Wish You A Merry Christmas (United Artists/EMI)
*Lawrence Welk, His Orchestra and Chorus: 22 Merry Christmas Favorites (Ranwwood)
*Mantovani And His Orchestra: Christmas Favourites and The Great Songs Of Christmas (London and Bainbridge).
!!!CLASSICAL:
*A Christmas Tree (Columbia)
*Brian Slawson: A Yule Log (CBS)
*The Hampton String Quartet: What If MOZART Wrote "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas?” (RCA Red Seal)
*Mannhein Steamroller: Christmas and A Fresh Aire Christmas by Chip Davis (American Gramophone)
*Sarah Brightman: A Winter Symphony (Angel)
 

A shortened version of this column appears in the December, 2018, print edition of Creative Loafing."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(33050) "At some point, marketing teams realized that Christmas time is big business, not only for general retail sales, but for music sales — and the best way to exploit the fact during the holiday season is for recording artists to release Christmas albums. Forget that since the advent of the phonograph record there have been Christmas records; the last two decades have seen the market flooded with them.

While such recordings may be a way to cash in — I mean, Neil Diamond and Barbra “''Four Christmas Albums For Chrissake''” Streisand — I’ve always enjoyed listening to Christmas music this time of the year, maybe even more than Christmas itself. Okay, maybe not being hammered over the head everywhere I go with Christmas songs, but having the option and a reason for playing the music in December sure beats the hell out of playing Christmas songs in May. Or July. Twenty years ago was the last Christmas and holiday music recap I published, but, just like you dragging decorations out of the basement  and down from the attic, I couldn’t resist bringing the list out another time.

And there’s so much more from which to choose! Forget the old standards from when I was a kid, the voices of Bing Crosby and Mario Lanza filling the house, the former singing the holiday carols and the latter delivering the more traditional hymns, leading up to Christmas day. It always struck me a little funny: All year long contemporary rock and pop would be played on the family stereo — a (now) vintage in-wall RCA BK2 with a pair of three-foot by one-and-a-half foot three-way speakers with crossovers — but between Thanksgiving and Christmas, this other music, by these other singers, would come out of the closet for a few weeks, then the records would be put away until the next year.

It was pretty standard seasonal sounds, alright, until the mid-‘60s. Then ''A Christmas Gift For You From Phil Spector'' was released. And things changed. Darlene Love, The Ronettes, and The Crystals hit us with that Wall Of Sound. In mono! The next year, ''The Beach Boys’ Christmas Album'' followed, then the Supremes released ''Merry Christmas'' The Beatles started releasing their fan club Christmas singles, and before you know it, it’s 2009 and Bob f''ucking'' Dylan is releasing ''Christmas In The Heart''! Not only is it good, it’s incredible, embodying all that’s right about Christmas music: hymns, carols and popular songs that are spirited, upbeat, fun and sincere. Almost a decade after its release, many still scoff at it, some don’t even know it exists, but Dylan really captures the spirit and warmth of the holidays in this unexpected gem that few others can match.

That’s not to diminish others who have tossed their wreath in the snow. Walk into any good record store or search online and you'll find holiday music available in every genre — rock, pop, soul, rap, new age, jazz, classical, punk, post-industrial, Goth — more artists than ever are releasing Christmas music, and they’re doing so in interesting ways. While many take the old, familiar carols that many of us grew up on and reinterpret them in their own style, others have written their own Christmas songs, taking the time to pen original compositions that either retell the traditional tales or comment on society during a time that, for many, is one of reflection, as some look back, others forward, with everyone looking for a better day. __Aimee Mann__ does a great job with ''One More Drifter in the Snow''. __Annie Lennox__ is rockin’ around the right Christmas tree on ''A Christmas Cornucopia''. Others who hit the mark with their seasonal offerings are __Tracey Thorn__ with ''Tinsel And Lights''; __Sarah McLachlan__, ''Wintersong''; __Kim Wilde__, ''Wilde Winter Songbook''; __M. Ward__ and __Zooey Deschanel__ with ''A She & Him Christmas''; __Pink Martini__ brings it with ''Joy To The World''; __Sufjan Stevens__, whose five-CD box set, ''Songs For Christmas Sing-A-Long (In Stereo Hi-Fi)'' should not be missed, and the Jesus of Cool himself, __Nick Lowe__, knocks it outta the park with ''Quality Street — A Seasonal Selection For All The Family''. These are just some of the ''newer'' releases.

This year, __Eric Clapton__, who recently released ''Merry Xmas'', gives Christmas songs their props with this formidable reinterpretation of the classics — and an original or two, with his latter day blues riffs spicing up the holidays just fine. __JD McPherson__, whose ''“Socks”'' is also welcome Christmas fare, plays it just right with his roots Americana approach. The same holds true for Bloodshot Records’ release from last year, ''The 13 Days of Xmas'', the various artists compilation with tracks from __Murder By Death__, ''Barrence Whitfield & the Savages'', one-time Atlantan __Kelly Hogan__ and the man who refuses to quit when he quits, __Dexter Romweber__. And __John Legend__ sings the standards straight on his new album, ''A Legendary Christmas''.

There are plenty of old standards worth seeking out — and I’m still not talking __Dean Martin__, __Nat “King” Cole__ or __Frank Sinatra__. __Arthur Lyman__’s ''With A Christmas Vibe'' is a bachelor pad staple; __Jerry Jeff Walker__’s ''Christmas Gonzo Style'' rides high; __Martin Atkins and the Chicago Industrial League__ pound a white noise Christmas with ''The Industrial Christmas Carol''; __Morgan Fisher__ presents the perfect hybrid of styles with ''Claws''; and you can’t do wrong with __James Brown__ when he proclaims, ''Santa’s Got A Brand New Bag''.

Want to go the more traditional route, without the syrupy-sweet hangover? Get back with __Ethan James__, ''The Ancient Music''; __Marta Sebestyen__, ''Apocrypha''; __Les Voix Bulgares__, ''Chants de Noel''; and for those not wanting to go too far back in time, there’s the beautiful contemporary take on the past, ''Manzanera and MacKay present Christmas'' by __The Players__ to make your spirits bright.

Locally, __Michelle Malone and the Hot Toddies__ have a new holiday EP, ''Toddie Time'' out this week, sure to compliment her 1992 offering, ''A Swingin’ Christmas in the Attic''. __Indigo Girls__ give a beautiful holiday offering with ''Holly Happy Days''. You can hear __The Black Lips__ perform “Christmas in Baghdad” on a split single b/w “Plump Righteous” from __King Khan and BBQ Show__. Not too (too) long ago, __The Woggles__ released a fine Christmas single, the original “Santa’s Coming (Ho, Ho, Ho)” b/w “Back Door Santa.” If you look in the right places, and you’re lucky, you can find “Red Lights (Merry Christmas)” by __Dreams So Real__. The same holds true for those willing to search for If your luck holds up, and your willing to dig, you’ll also strike gold with the “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) 45 by __Face of Concern__.

This is by no means a comprehensive list of local Christmas recordings, nor is it but a sampling of those by national and international artists. But, it’s a start. A good start.

!!!__The 45 List__
Many of the best Yuletide rock songs have been released only as singles. It's rare that an artist will include a Christmas song on an album, but it has been done. __The Pretenders__' "2000 Years" is on ''Learning To Crawl'' and the __Payola$__' "Christmas Is Coming" is on ''Hammer On A Drum'', just as the __Bongos__ released "Tree Wise Men" on ''Drums Along The Hudson'' and __"Weird" Al Yankovic__ included "Christmas At Ground Zero" on ''Polka Party!''. But that's the exception rather than the rule.

When the songs do appear on 45s, they are usually "B"-sides, unless its a special seasonal release, in which case usually both sides have a holiday theme. A number of seven and twelve-inch singles have been released, many of which are still available. Some are worth shopping for. You decide. Here are a few of them:

*Adams, Bryan: "Christmas Time" b/w "Reggae Christmas" (A&M)
*Blondie/Fab Five Freddy/Snuky Tate: “[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJpVE_Wvcyk|Christmas Rapture]” (Flexi)
*Billy Jackson and the Citizen's Band: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVk0j5VyXwk|Have A Happy Christmas ('Twas The Night Before Christmas)]" (London)
*The Black Lips: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epWdUosmYwc|Christmas in Baghdad]" b/w The King Khan & BBQ Show: "Plump Righteous" (Norton)
*The Blacktop Rockets: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPfBJOrHp5w|Yuletide Blues]" b/w Thee Kustom Kings"El Rudolfo"(Straight8)
*Bowie, Davis and Bing Crosby: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADbJLo4x-tk|Peace On Earth"/"Little Drummer Boy]" b/w "Fantastic Voyage" (RCA)
*The Buzz of Delight: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGY1XWSOxHA|Christmas]" (DB Recs)
*Can: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iInAuoio-pQ|Silent Night]" b/w "Cascade Waltz" (EMI)
*Cannibals: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfyBhHAgmpY|Christmas Rock 'N' Roll]" b/w "New Year's Eve Song" (Hit)
*Captain Kangaroo: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEAVczc2YH0|When Santa Claus Gets Your Letter]" b/w "Sleigh Ride" (Golden)
*Captain Sensible: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM9k5PRF3Oc&t=64s|One Christmas Catalogue]" b/w "Relax" (A&M)
*Cocteau Twins: “[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Vm9_mXmtKo|Winter Wonderland]” and “[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e874vKfYfuU|Frosty The Snowman]” (Capitol)
*Damned: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oN8n99BUO-A|There Ain't No Sanity Clause]" b/w "Looking At You" (Big Beat)
*Dreams So Real: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDsP2vv1KaQ|Red Lights (Merry Christmas)]" b/w "Bearing Witness" (Arista)
*Dumbells (Roxy Music): "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpU6ydV32Co|Giddy-Up (inc. 'Sleigh Rides')]" b/w "A Christmas Dream" (EG)
*Eagles: "Please Come Home For Christmas" b/w "Funky New Year" (Elektra)
*Elmo & Patsy: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LMMRXyr00c|Grandma got Run Over by a Reindeer]" [[original] (Stiff)
*Elton John: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN-Yka-73PE|Step Into Christmas]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzoBDSQAb-c|Ho Ho Ho (Who'd Be A Turkey At Christmas)]" (MCA)
*Enya: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Odihck81MZA|Oiche Chiun] (Silent Night)" (Reprise)
*Face Of Concern: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGN4mjmfB28|Christmas (Baby, Please Come Home)]" (Press)
*Face Of Concern: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RkOleh4R9M|Peace By Tomorrow]" (Dragon Path)
*Father Guido Sarducci: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qW_5lXPAk_8|I Won't Be Twisting This Christmas]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2p0b4UruXM|Santa's Lament]"(Warner Bros.)
*Fear: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Zgol2NQhlM|Fuck Christmas]" b/w "(Beep) Christmas" (Slash)
*Foghat: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMnRKaqUxyU|Goin' Home For Christmas]" b/w "Santa Claus Is Back In Town" (Merry Christmas 1986)
*Freddy King: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NfOoIRFOug|I Hear Jingle Bells" b/w " Christmas Tears]" (Federal)
*George Thorogood and the Destroyers: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGnyYrBR8-M|Rock 'N' Roll Christmas]" b/w "New Year's Eve Party" (EMI)
*Greg Lake: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMtteocAA80|I Believe in Father Christmas]" (Manticore)
*Greedies: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEU_m2fH7TM|A Merry Jingle]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAveSu_Yip4|A Merry Jangle]" (Vertigo)
*Headroom, Max: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE4vvAxepz4|Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You're A Lovely Guy)]" b/w "Gimme Shades" (Chrysalis)
*Jethro Tull: ""[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJS9TjjHxx8&list=RDXJS9TjjHxx8&start_radio=1|Ring Out, Solstice Bells]" b/w " Christmas Song" (Chyrsalis)
*Jimi Hendrix: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFMzCpQ6VlQ&t=27s|Little Drummer Boy/Silent Night/Auld Lang Syne]" (Reprise)
*Jimmy: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWc_CkYmc2s|White Christmas]" b/w "Spin The Bottle" (Fatima)
*John Lennon & Yoko Ono: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkfJe5awin0|Happy Christmas (War Is Over)]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQG46cHgZ4E|Listen (The Snow Is Falling)]" (Apple/Capitol)
*Karen Mantler: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hagCmTJej7M|I Love Christmas]" (Watt)
*Kate Bush: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SldDENZ_jU|December Will Be Magic Again]" (EMI)
*Keith Richards: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDMDMLF2j1A|Run Rudolph Run]" (Rolling Stones)
*King Diamond: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK9auBEWS1I|No Presents For Christmas]" (Roadrunner)
*Kinks: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPPCPqDINEk|Father Christmas]" b/w "Wish I Could Fly Like Superman" (Arista)
*Korgis: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJYnr6NfQlM|Wish You A Merry Christmas]" b/w "Dumb Waiters" (WEA)
*Kurtis Blow: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xUFnGWWtoQ|Christmas Rappin']" (Mercury)
*McCartney, Paul: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9BZDpni56Y|Wonderful Christmastime]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQaeknSw80k|Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reggae]" (Columbia)
*Mike Lorenz: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkcV-Nmo4R0|The Rap Before Christmas]" b/w "Auld Lang Syne (Go Go)" (Hottrax)
*Miracle Legion: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTPzBvXanqc|Little Drummer Boy]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msJdt0Cu6SA|Blue Christmas]" (Incas)
*Patti Smith Group: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysFCXYYWWHs|White Christmas]" (Jason)
*Payola$: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEuMPAP3sdU|Christmas Is Coming]"
*Prince and the Revolution: "I Would Die 4 U" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1yFp9P-5Wg|Another Lonely Christmas]" (Warner Bros.)
*Ramones: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTgaD3pwRTc|Merry Christmas (I Don't Want To Fight)]" (WEA)
*Residents: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sF19pIjgYRI|Santa Dog] 1978" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6UoYi1EADs|Santa Dog] 1972" (Ralph)
*Richards, Keith: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDMDMLF2j1A|Run Rudolph Run]" b/w "The Harder They Come" (Rolling Stones)
*Robert Fripp: “[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFAENQ2uVzs|Silent Night]” (EG flexi)
*Roy Wood's Wizzard: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJPc7esgvsA|I Wish it Could be Christmas Everyday]" (UA)
*Russell, Leon: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yg8CxbcHq0|Slipping Into Christmas]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1VsWgR0cfU|Christmas In Chicago]" (Shelter)
*Siouxsie & The Banshees: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_2QaNWQs3s|Il Est Ne Le Divin Enfant]" (Polydor)
*Spinal Tap: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWKN-EYFxbs|Christmas With The Devil]" b/w "Scratch Mix" (Enigma)
*Springsteen, Bruce: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76WFkKp8Tjs|Santa Claus Is Coming To Town]" (Columbia)
*Springsteen, Bruce: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeMY6R72XKE|Merry Christmas, Baby]" (Columbia)
*Squeeze: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IB6BIYjPeHM|Christmas Day]" (A&M)
*Squier, Billy: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUN0xXBJF1k|Christmas Is The Time To Say 'I Love You']" b/w "White Christmas" (Capitol)
*Tapper Zukie: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ux9C6TD7rDQ|Archie, The Rednose Reindeer]" (Mer)
*Thick Pigeon: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVfhmAa7_Zg|Jingle Bell Rock]" b/w The French Impressionists: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdrLAzpbIvc|Santa Baby]" (Operation Twilight)
*Three Wise Men (XTC): "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xtvp1u0lgGw|Thanks For Christmas]" b/w "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwocnJQ3Lr0|Countdown To Christmas Partytime]" (Virgin)
*Timbuk 3: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SsvqDUTZqc|All I Want For Christmas]" b/w "Blue Christmas"/"I Love You X 3" (I.R.S.)
*U.K. Subs: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8FSXXeDAUI|Hey Santa]" b/w "Thunderbird" (Fallout)
*Wham!: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8gmARGvPlI|Last Christmas]" b/w "Everything She Wants" (CBS)
*Wilde, Kim & Mel Smith: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nq0WR0I4Rkc|Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree]" b/w "Deck The Blooming Halls" (10 Records)
*Wilson, Ann & Nancy: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WxNyFUY4No|Here Is Christmas]" b/w "Bring A Torch Jeanette Isabella" (Capitol)
*The Woggles: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGXXeuX2ZE4|Santa's Coming (Ho, Ho, Ho)]" b/w "Back Door Santa" (Wicked Cool)
*Yobs: "[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4FBJ6yaJKg|Stille Nacht]" b/w ""Silent Nite" (Yob)
!!!__ROCK & POP:__
*Aimee Mann: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tG-BjRSwz-w|One More Drifter In The Snow]''
*Annie Lennox: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sw_JTkhDLvs|A Christmas Cornucopia]''
*Arthur Lyman: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sXBBOGsoEw&list=PLtUS14-iG6NsIVL3zXV8FvNfavGaWxPxA|With A Christmas Vibe]''
*Bob Dylan: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8qE6WQmNus&list=PLGbb9KO9XC_Mbx6Az9MVdNn9o_uDzONRw|Christmas In The Heart]''
*Brian Wilson: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEgLe6x8j64&index=1&list=RDEEgLe6x8j64|What I Really Want For Christmas]''
*Canned Heat: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KrzyOQZ48I|Christmas Album]''
*Carly Simon: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZcyeQvEW8M&list=PL-UAvgJ-qe5-xG2h6ZyWc6WfbpPjM2nCd|Christmas Is Almost Here]''
*Carole King: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rp4TMxB8hRE&list=PL8Z7cWD-PWoCrVpmoIlPQgjxUibiQaIx9|A Holiday Carole]''
*Chris Stamey Group: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MhEhoDaRDg|Christmas Time]''
*Christina Aguilera: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMMsoB1oe-s|My Kind Of Christmas]''
*Chuck Leavell: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GIYfnTxZSQ&list=PLVPt81KEhhs9qXH4fmjtlXRy6Q6Gous1x|What's In The Bag]?''
*Dan Hicks & The Hot Licks: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcgdgpGBIOM&list=PLNf_NkEwN77pppJ65ozhiyYh9KhplRMm7|Crazy For Christmas]''
*Darlene Love: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwBPeZOLSU8&list=PLk2b6Hnz-CbCPOROUJz6uOu7ftMP1cuHV|It's Christmas, of Course]''
*Dwight Twilley: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_VcpMIzip4|Have A Twilley Christmas]'' EP
*Dwight Yoakam: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRDU3BDQATo&list=PLwuxvfSoK1RmCrgD5Y6c3aBxcbujW3oUD|Come On Christmas]''
*Eric Clapton: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUpDAbP2d_Y&list=PLEcMA7bon66lQ8-4WZOd5mIgtPKdna5Ym|Merry Xmas]''
*Esquivel: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTLmTyVwtu4&list=PLqAuMFNQKW2TFuyPaMXsfDVnC_Qpo3vKt|Merry Xmas From The Space-Age Bachelor Pad]''
*JD McPherson: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opktLUqP2Ek&list=PLe-WQQHddpPP1A7lng3Md1K06UrXkOw29|"Socks"]''
*Indio Girls:'' [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWK6djHizfk&list=PL1q6sskV1AjizK4lnIgg0QY9Q5j92USvG|Holly Happy Days]''
*Jorma Kaukonen:'' [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbigWwHY0Do|Christmas]''
*League Of Decency: ''A Swingin' Christmas''
*Los Straitjackets: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6o4HIh5AFI|'Tis The Season For Los Straitjackets!]''
*Low: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IippcraBPKA&list=PLPaztBWnatcifcyPsq5cymXi4V8kYhXab|Christmas]''
*Martin Atkins and the Chicago Industrial League: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3KopkjZQFo&list=OLAK5uy_nfkEGg9XZ43GnLW0MU-eI9xeVm4YaO16M|The Industrial Christmas Carol]''
*Michelle Malone: ''A Swinging Christmas In The Attic''
*Michelle Malone: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GAGfWhRWHQ&list=RD4GAGfWhRWHQ&start_radio=1&t=18|A Very SOTA Christmas]''
*Michelle Malone & the Hot Toddies:'' Toddie Time ''[https://michellemalone.com/store|(SBS)]
*Morgan Fisher: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3lftvsgnzw|Hybrid Kids] 2:''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA7fw3UzfTQ|Claws]''
*Nick Lowe: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhnZMTi8mDs&list=PL2VJOk2t-ON0YUlBvjHCfEWLMrd4qdLeI|Quality Street: A Seasonal Selection For All The Family]''
*Pink Martini: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apRprBTv_WE&list=PLSJ7HQJnuqc4LP2tpQoKyIGJw3cYiSGK2|Joy To The World]''
*The Players:'' [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JFlIMq_PhM|Manzanera and MacKay present Christmas]'' (Ryko)
*The Raveonettes: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvsZFO2j_dY|Wishing You A Rave Christmas]'' (Vice)
*Ringo Starr: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaguXYTXYoA&list=PLNEwXhuF1SE01McNHI7P8uGGTDqKe3Wqd|I Wanna Be Santa Claus]''
*The Roches: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ostlplqrwXc&list=PLoXPzHGCzJbNDt8t7grkX8cuE3PxWEzsj|We Three Kings]''
*Rotary Connection: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDhq9QlLT0M&list=PLIiAjR80kJrOzBxyRAv6GB94aCS4wJwo3|Peace]''
*RuPaul: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQ5dTb_NhJg&list=PLX80ClrhgquBI2qkFw1gD2AgDeQN3O99d|Ho Ho Ho]''
*Sarah McLachlan: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZi4zxBVYv4|Wintersong]''
*Shawn Colvin: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5i1QzXdezU&list=PLB0xGdhVdMlb4yRyOHlLaSkbgi9DKpax2|Holiday Songs And Lullabies]''
*She & Him: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rz4oG4eh5J0&list=PLEC2FCC95451E0F6E|A Very She & Him Christmas]''
*Sufjan Stevens: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooxEOjkM1V8&list=PLX68ZEYlh74t81rRCh2-oMSYUENChlpHr|Songs For Christmas] ''Box Set:
*  Sufjan Stevens: ''Vol. I: Noel''
*  Sufjan Stevens: ''Vol. II: Hark!''
*  Sufjan Stevens: ''Vol. III: Ding! Dong!''
*  Sufjan Stevens: ''Vol. IV: Joy!''
*  Sufjan Stevens: ''Vol. V: Peace!''
*Tracey Thorn: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maRckqODJnA&list=PLAMBqesEcu2KIszD7RH6I0tA35oTtqcW0|Tinsel And Lights]''
!!!__Various Artists:__
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-04y9DqYSA4|The Christmas Album]'' (Sony)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Su5xXfUROPA|Christmas in Stereo]'' and ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruguvrJEAXE&list=PLUk2XTg6BUUrnznMQ5fddJQEyqdkEKVyr|Christmas 2]'' (Kindercore)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuhvjgKa2xY&list=OLAK5uy_m9rYYybSI5wJEvDEDpBqlota4hG5S_icw|A Christmas Record]'' (Ze)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGJDEzmp7YY|Christmas Present 1992]'' (Sister Ruby)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMIWwAcPJ-w|Christmas Present Vol. 2] ''(Sister Ruby)
*''Christmas Present, Vol. 3'' (Sister Ruby)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNfo14L4I00&list=PLB4vWt6ylsDeT2sCFqooO-tlPKl8GEZ4l|Christmas Vols. 1, 1987 — 7, 1993]'' (Perimeter)
*''Flagpole 1990: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTnEy6J3iQw|A Flagpole Christmas Album]''
*''Flagpole 1991: Son of the Flagpole Christmas Album''
*''Flagpole 1992: The Daughter of the Flagpole Christmas Album''
*''Flagpole 1992: The Mother of All Flagpole Christmas Albums''
*''Flagpole 1993: The Red-Headed Stepchild of the Flagpole Christmas Album''
*''Flagpole 1994: The Soft-Spoken Beatnik Cousin of the Flagpole Christmas Album'' (Long Play)
*''Flagpole 1995: Chilly, the Flagpole Christmas Album That Could Not Love''
*''Flagpole 1996: The Flagpole Christmas Album: The "white" album.''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owDsmEtBGRw|The Mother Of All Flagpole Christmas Albums]'' (Ortone)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9rQZHQYh5g|Ghosts Of Christmas Past]'' (Les Disques Du Crepuscule)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yD3kWv_nGHg|Ghosts Of Christmas Past]'' (LTM 2-CD)
*''Happy Birthday, Baby Jesus, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OteCvloIlzQ|Vols. 1] and [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBf-cFJ4fYU|2]'' (Sympathy For The Record Industry)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwxI7YehpCE|Hardcore Holiday]'' (Essential Noise)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bNmZlBSfY8|A Lump Of Coal] ''(First Warning)
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hceuc7Ri3_w|A Midnight Christmas Mess] (Midnight)''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEndUghf4e0&list=PLsGtetDZxMkd0wyO4TB7cCcCy_BULGiiq|Riot Grrrl Christmas] (Cleopatra)''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xa5Vorr_2TQ|A Very Special Christmas]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKScb-iKRZA|A Very Special Christmas 2]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E365JZzlJHU|A Very Special Christmas — Jazz To The World]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLxm0ztpfr8|A Very Special Christmas — World Christmas]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MN8ZVQ2fYEE|A Very Special Christmas 3]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stdQzb3exTE|A Very Special Christmas 4 — Live From Washington, D.C.]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xb6J7N8UncE|A Very Special Christmas 5]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXo16s5RYrE|A Very Special Christmas 6 — Acoustic Christmas]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3JETFQHeEI|A Very Special Christmas 7]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EbJEK7DG_k&list=PLp4WAZupv4cxjaqvmtvVgI9fhodXggNgI|A Very Special Christmas: 25 Years Bringing Joy to the World]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HplQLTVMe5w&list=PLTeYHB0ZYiiEWb6DU63i3qYKxjOyGEnop|A Very Special Christmas: Bringing Peace on Earth]''
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmnMarFEg6Q&list=PLPihO8lCpef68T86GelN86KR81ZMcVGWX|VH1: The Big 80's Christmas]'' (Rhino)
*''The World Shines Brightly, Parts [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XynizvjqpUs|One], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDyUpXkVTf8|Two,] [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gko_jQkpTqk|Three] & [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvkOe4Euk8M|Four]'' — Trattoria Calendar O.S.T.
!!!__RAP:__
*MC M: ''Xmaz N The Hood'' (Priority)
*Fishbone: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFXxTzFriTk|It's A Wonderful Life (Gonna Have A Good Time)]'' (Columbia)
*Various Artists: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OR07r0ZMFb8&list=PL775379B495167545|Christmas Rap] (Profile).
!!!__SOUL and R&B:__
*Blind Boys of Alabama: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBnZNFum7lA&list=PLbvfZq25KkgT3yST3xMYM9stENPWJRNvo|Go Tell it on the Mountain]'' (RealWorld)
*Booker T. & the MG's: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7t6nYXsJj4Y&list=PLsgrzvnJh6uYiyCPKjUxZwHgfEcHU21qJ|In The Christmas Spirit]'' (Atlantic)
*James Brown: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cz48PR__uSo|Santa's Got A Brand New Bag]'' (Rhino)
*Jackie Wilson: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXatM0bmEBc&list=PLby01Twvr2sNq-Sm8hZJfy1DrIARVqjFR|Merry Christmas From Jackie Wilson]'' (Rhino)
*John Legend: ''A Legendary Christmas''
*New Edition: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBct5LFvqMo&list=PLoVy35FDnV3Zm5ZMDVER9Ie4TPI0XoTm1|Christmas All Over The World]'' (MCA)
*Ray Charles: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pn9oq0Piupg&list=PLmxGDTmqIb1_cN02BXtHcEGC0RBSVNhy6|The Spirit Of Christmas]'' (Columbia/Rhino)
*The Sounds Of Blackness: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhRpbQx-cWc&list=PLT4Leya58_OquvKI9CvO9m2NuZCyOfvUq|The Night Before Christmas — A Musical Fantasy]'' (Perspective)
!!!__OLDIES:__
*The Beach Boys: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbgxDgVmMF0&list=PLEx1wRI-Ly4ybCjpvZuP56_iZocbmUXFJ|Christmas Album]'' (Capitol)
*Bobby Darin: ''The 25th Day Of December'' (Atco)
*Elvis Presley: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZDcbfWzap8|Elvis' Christmas Album]'' (RCA)
*The Four Seasons: ''Christmas Album'' (Rhino)
*The Partridge Family: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bm3ZOMDS8Gw&list=PL4rT3Z_mEM3VvjAclrAtIhHNcKXRTykuB|A Christmas Card]'' (Razor & Tie)
*Phil Spector & Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pVon5xDARc|A Christmas Gift For You]'' (Rhino)
!!!__FOLK & BLUES:__
*Boys of the Lough: ''Midwinter Night's Dream'' (Blix Street)
*Brave Combo: ''"It's Christmas, Man!"'' (Rounder)
*Joan Baez: ''Noel'' (Vanguard)
*John Wesley Harding: ''God Made Me Do It'' (Sire/Reprise)
*Johnny Winter: ''Please Come Home for Christmas'' (Pointblank/Charisma)
*Jorma Kaukonen: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbigWwHY0Do|Christmas]'' (Relix)
*Marta Sebestyen: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6SP-WbDDag|Apochrya] (Hannibal)
*John Fahey: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fw5WXJh01c&list=PLKiEBsOXrNf4Gk_puDBafCP0RvmU06WeZ|The New Possibility]'' and ''Christmas, Vol. 2'' (Takoma)
*Leon Redbone: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_Ooam_DePw&list=PLRDZXQMN5aW3erpnWOzU16a4Fkgximnbq|Christmas Island]'' (August)
*Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2U77wC1dpM&list=OLAK5uy_kfKA3EjafADWkh14zbSxhplMANt-veCKI|Death Might Be Your Santa Claus]'' (Columbia)
*Various Artists: ''Even Santa Gets The Blues'' (Pointblank)
!!!__WORLD:__
*Bulgarian Voices: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcAq_aQLzf4|Christmas Sacrament]'' (Fremeaux)
*Les Voix Bulgares, ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4e6GeWCQhg|Chants de Noel] (Fremeaux)''
*Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppS5mQMkqXM&list=PLEE_NFEZXSc7r2SIT-kblncS6R8OmWHzM|Mas! A Caribbean Christmas Party]'' (Ryko)
*Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75nm7Wuktnk|Reggae Christmas From Studio One]'' (Heartbeat)
!!!__JAZZ:__
*Chet Baker: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIGcnviSuqM|Silent Nights]'' (DineMec)
*Cyrus Chestnut: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zADeSsdh8V8&list=PLot-PV0i6toLuLDhcv4TxwOGeT5t3njdk|Blessed Quietness: A Collection Of Hymns, Spirituals And Carols]''
*Ella Fitzgerald: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=59xvZhJFQRQ&list=PL5A20A6534F2F8200|Wishes You A Swinging Christmas] (Verve)
*Vince Guaraldi Trio: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fh133ZO1AE&list=PLEpZan9S2GOFesp-gJqsdD80a7zoaflHa|A Charlie Brown Christmas]''
*Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UJiN8DQWsE&list=PL0KF_S_yJp7Fu9uqqKKwNUjksq27XmIFo|Hipster's Holiday — Vocal Jazz and R&B Classics]'' (Rhino)
*Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=os7aC70vQ9A|Hot Jazz for a Cool Night]'' (MusicMasters)
*Various Artists: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5U5HpTqOTDQ|God Rest Ye Merry, Jazzmen] (Columbia)
!!!__NEW AGE:__
*John Boswell: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7os1eIDmWQ&list=PLMMI15nH5ZnSTK-PHTfKWaU0cauiuM61U|Festival Of The Heart]'' (Hearts Of Space)
*Kitaro: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UivXFfMYvQk&list=PLYrSaDwJaL0_zMt9fi-nzscQBWMmrahtr|Peace on Earth]'' (Domo)
*Susan Mazer & Dallas Smith: ''Carol For The Planet'' (Intersound)
*David Lanz/Michael Jones: ''Solstice'' (Narada)
*Eric Tingstad/Nancy Rumble: ''The Gift'' (Sona Gaia)
*George Winston: ''December'' (Windham Hill)
*The Joy Circuit: ''Crystal Clear Christmas'' (A&M)
*Shane Keister: ''The Sounds Of Christmas'' (RCA)
!!!__COUNTRY:__
*Ben Keith: ''Christmas — Seven Gates'' (Reprise)
*Emmylou Harris: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yem_U7lcW3U&list=PLUX_40RI2machxwTUnAiMJjhxcmYh7-KW|Light Of The Stable]'' (Warner Bros.) —
*Jerry Jeff Walker: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrX1Qf5uXbQ&list=PLn7WpZNe80SfDKDbUQngdPxCCh6i_ti5v|Christmas Gonzo Style]'' (Rykodisc)
*Travis Tritt: ''Loving Time Of The Year'' (Warner Bros.)
*Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhkUySpBIEU&list=PLJlf561shgDiQc05pzn6f6ohGefRCqiY8|Christmas On The Range]'' (Capitol)
*Various Artists: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plT2sgkU-Ck&list=PL3U_qZxitgIUEPOE3nWpWHt6YCaGTFRGK|Hillbilly Holiday]'' (Rhino)
!!!__NOVELTY & COMEDY:__
*Bob Rivers Comedy Corp: ''Twisted Christmas'' (Atco)
*Elmo & Patsy: ''Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer'' (Epic)
*Spike Jones: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y--AclYidTM&list=PLWKQHRrrhxmYkxKewRGmSyDebYZi6Lf_0|It's A Spike Jones Christmas]'' (Rhino)
*The Scrooge Brothers: ''Commercial Christmasland'' (Rhino)
*The Three Stooges: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-PcG0XjCBc&list=PL9NX9KVRUrr_MMmJsQcVzeq2BHycKg2bk|Christmas Time With]'' (Rhino)
*Various Artists: Dr. Demento — ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBpLEtkXC4U|The Greatest Christmas Novelty CD Of All Time]'' (Rhino)
!!!__VOCALISTS:__
*Amy Grant: ''Home For Christmas'' (A&M)
*Dean Martin: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pmhgOaTbC0&list=PL9pRcaYn5Sdyq5XwfNmCCQ4PK69WqxnMP|The Christmas Album ]''(Reprise)
*Dean Martin: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crFQpOCDfEc&list=PL8atuXZmD6_s-8T49U5d1FdbYr1hK4crb|Christmas With Dino] ''(Capitol)
*Frank Sinatra: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgbORtSeCpo&list=PLh_3sIP0AdUmJRAvkHNe4kPNJLPzey25J|A Jolly Christmas]'' (Capitol)
*Frank Sinatra: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ohZDizbYKk&list=PLo183F6Kf9SQYue7suN20Pf1OdoQEsQO7|Christmas Dreaming] ''(Columbia)
*Frank Sinatra: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uc_ycgzYd0c&list=PLfqC7HSvKOoDtne9bS2FP3PeeWVtRLyac|Ultimate Christmas] ''(Capitol)
*The Manhattan Transfer: ''The Christmas Album'' (Columbia)
!!!__EASY LISTENING:__
*Ferrante & Teicher: ''Snowbound/We Wish You A Merry Christmas'' (United Artists/EMI)
*Lawrence Welk, His Orchestra and Chorus: ''22 Merry Christmas Favorites'' (Ranwwood)
*Mantovani And His Orchestra: ''Christmas Favourites'' and ''The Great Songs Of Christmas'' (London and Bainbridge).
!!!__CLASSICAL:__
*''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HT-qcDHQt5A|A Christmas Tree]'' (Columbia)
*Brian Slawson: ''A Yule Log'' (CBS)
*The Hampton String Quartet: ''What If MOZART Wrote "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas?”'' (RCA Red Seal)
*Mannhein Steamroller: ''Christmas'' and ''A Fresh Aire Christmas by Chip Davis'' (American Gramophone)
*Sarah Brightman: ''[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vrnzKA7ok0&list=PLDbl53HrCo6cmgXRhw_sd9_0Ln2VmSXyg|A Winter Symphony] (Angel)''
 

''A shortened version of this column appears in the December, 2018, print edition of ''Creative Loafing''.''"
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  string(21034) " HIFREQS Print  2018-12-08T17:16:57+00:00 HIFREQS print.jpg    christmasmusic christmassongs holidaytunes Do you hear what I hear? 11750  2018-12-23T19:22:00+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Sounds Like Christmas tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-12-23T19:22:00+00:00  At some point, marketing teams realized that Christmas time is big business, not only for general retail sales, but for music sales — and the best way to exploit the fact during the holiday season is for recording artists to release Christmas albums. Forget that since the advent of the phonograph record there have been Christmas records; the last two decades have seen the market flooded with them.

While such recordings may be a way to cash in — I mean, Neil Diamond and Barbra “Four Christmas Albums For Chrissake” Streisand — I’ve always enjoyed listening to Christmas music this time of the year, maybe even more than Christmas itself. Okay, maybe not being hammered over the head everywhere I go with Christmas songs, but having the option and a reason for playing the music in December sure beats the hell out of playing Christmas songs in May. Or July. Twenty years ago was the last Christmas and holiday music recap I published, but, just like you dragging decorations out of the basement  and down from the attic, I couldn’t resist bringing the list out another time.

And there’s so much more from which to choose! Forget the old standards from when I was a kid, the voices of Bing Crosby and Mario Lanza filling the house, the former singing the holiday carols and the latter delivering the more traditional hymns, leading up to Christmas day. It always struck me a little funny: All year long contemporary rock and pop would be played on the family stereo — a (now) vintage in-wall RCA BK2 with a pair of three-foot by one-and-a-half foot three-way speakers with crossovers — but between Thanksgiving and Christmas, this other music, by these other singers, would come out of the closet for a few weeks, then the records would be put away until the next year.

It was pretty standard seasonal sounds, alright, until the mid-‘60s. Then A Christmas Gift For You From Phil Spector was released. And things changed. Darlene Love, The Ronettes, and The Crystals hit us with that Wall Of Sound. In mono! The next year, The Beach Boys’ Christmas Album followed, then the Supremes released Merry Christmas The Beatles started releasing their fan club Christmas singles, and before you know it, it’s 2009 and Bob fucking Dylan is releasing Christmas In The Heart! Not only is it good, it’s incredible, embodying all that’s right about Christmas music: hymns, carols and popular songs that are spirited, upbeat, fun and sincere. Almost a decade after its release, many still scoff at it, some don’t even know it exists, but Dylan really captures the spirit and warmth of the holidays in this unexpected gem that few others can match.

That’s not to diminish others who have tossed their wreath in the snow. Walk into any good record store or search online and you'll find holiday music available in every genre — rock, pop, soul, rap, new age, jazz, classical, punk, post-industrial, Goth — more artists than ever are releasing Christmas music, and they’re doing so in interesting ways. While many take the old, familiar carols that many of us grew up on and reinterpret them in their own style, others have written their own Christmas songs, taking the time to pen original compositions that either retell the traditional tales or comment on society during a time that, for many, is one of reflection, as some look back, others forward, with everyone looking for a better day. Aimee Mann does a great job with One More Drifter in the Snow. Annie Lennox is rockin’ around the right Christmas tree on A Christmas Cornucopia. Others who hit the mark with their seasonal offerings are Tracey Thorn with Tinsel And Lights; Sarah McLachlan, Wintersong; Kim Wilde, Wilde Winter Songbook; M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel with A She & Him Christmas; Pink Martini brings it with Joy To The World; Sufjan Stevens, whose five-CD box set, Songs For Christmas Sing-A-Long (In Stereo Hi-Fi) should not be missed, and the Jesus of Cool himself, Nick Lowe, knocks it outta the park with Quality Street — A Seasonal Selection For All The Family. These are just some of the newer releases.

This year, Eric Clapton, who recently released Merry Xmas, gives Christmas songs their props with this formidable reinterpretation of the classics — and an original or two, with his latter day blues riffs spicing up the holidays just fine. JD McPherson, whose “Socks” is also welcome Christmas fare, plays it just right with his roots Americana approach. The same holds true for Bloodshot Records’ release from last year, The 13 Days of Xmas, the various artists compilation with tracks from Murder By Death, Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, one-time Atlantan Kelly Hogan and the man who refuses to quit when he quits, Dexter Romweber. And John Legend sings the standards straight on his new album, A Legendary Christmas.

There are plenty of old standards worth seeking out — and I’m still not talking Dean Martin, Nat “King” Cole or Frank Sinatra. Arthur Lyman’s With A Christmas Vibe is a bachelor pad staple; Jerry Jeff Walker’s Christmas Gonzo Style rides high; Martin Atkins and the Chicago Industrial League pound a white noise Christmas with The Industrial Christmas Carol; Morgan Fisher presents the perfect hybrid of styles with Claws; and you can’t do wrong with James Brown when he proclaims, Santa’s Got A Brand New Bag.

Want to go the more traditional route, without the syrupy-sweet hangover? Get back with Ethan James, The Ancient Music; Marta Sebestyen, Apocrypha; Les Voix Bulgares, Chants de Noel; and for those not wanting to go too far back in time, there’s the beautiful contemporary take on the past, Manzanera and MacKay present Christmas by The Players to make your spirits bright.

Locally, Michelle Malone and the Hot Toddies have a new holiday EP, Toddie Time out this week, sure to compliment her 1992 offering, A Swingin’ Christmas in the Attic. Indigo Girls give a beautiful holiday offering with Holly Happy Days. You can hear The Black Lips perform “Christmas in Baghdad” on a split single b/w “Plump Righteous” from King Khan and BBQ Show. Not too (too) long ago, The Woggles released a fine Christmas single, the original “Santa’s Coming (Ho, Ho, Ho)” b/w “Back Door Santa.” If you look in the right places, and you’re lucky, you can find “Red Lights (Merry Christmas)” by Dreams So Real. The same holds true for those willing to search for If your luck holds up, and your willing to dig, you’ll also strike gold with the “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) 45 by Face of Concern.

This is by no means a comprehensive list of local Christmas recordings, nor is it but a sampling of those by national and international artists. But, it’s a start. A good start.

!!!The 45 List
Many of the best Yuletide rock songs have been released only as singles. It's rare that an artist will include a Christmas song on an album, but it has been done. The Pretenders' "2000 Years" is on Learning To Crawl and the Payola$' "Christmas Is Coming" is on Hammer On A Drum, just as the Bongos released "Tree Wise Men" on Drums Along The Hudson and "Weird" Al Yankovic included "Christmas At Ground Zero" on Polka Party!. But that's the exception rather than the rule.

When the songs do appear on 45s, they are usually "B"-sides, unless its a special seasonal release, in which case usually both sides have a holiday theme. A number of seven and twelve-inch singles have been released, many of which are still available. Some are worth shopping for. You decide. Here are a few of them:

*Adams, Bryan: "Christmas Time" b/w "Reggae Christmas" (A&M)
*Blondie/Fab Five Freddy/Snuky Tate: “Christmas Rapture” (Flexi)
*Billy Jackson and the Citizen's Band: "Have A Happy Christmas ('Twas The Night Before Christmas)" (London)
*The Black Lips: "Christmas in Baghdad" b/w The King Khan & BBQ Show: "Plump Righteous" (Norton)
*The Blacktop Rockets: "Yuletide Blues" b/w Thee Kustom Kings"El Rudolfo"(Straight8)
*Bowie, Davis and Bing Crosby: "Peace On Earth"/"Little Drummer Boy" b/w "Fantastic Voyage" (RCA)
*The Buzz of Delight: "Christmas" (DB Recs)
*Can: "Silent Night" b/w "Cascade Waltz" (EMI)
*Cannibals: "Christmas Rock 'N' Roll" b/w "New Year's Eve Song" (Hit)
*Captain Kangaroo: "When Santa Claus Gets Your Letter" b/w "Sleigh Ride" (Golden)
*Captain Sensible: "One Christmas Catalogue" b/w "Relax" (A&M)
*Cocteau Twins: “Winter Wonderland” and “Frosty The Snowman” (Capitol)
*Damned: "There Ain't No Sanity Clause" b/w "Looking At You" (Big Beat)
*Dreams So Real: "Red Lights (Merry Christmas)" b/w "Bearing Witness" (Arista)
*Dumbells (Roxy Music): "Giddy-Up (inc. 'Sleigh Rides')" b/w "A Christmas Dream" (EG)
*Eagles: "Please Come Home For Christmas" b/w "Funky New Year" (Elektra)
*Elmo & Patsy: "Grandma got Run Over by a Reindeer" original (Stiff)
*Elton John: "Step Into Christmas" b/w "Ho Ho Ho (Who'd Be A Turkey At Christmas)" (MCA)
*Enya: "Oiche Chiun (Silent Night)" (Reprise)
*Face Of Concern: "Christmas (Baby, Please Come Home)" (Press)
*Face Of Concern: "Peace By Tomorrow" (Dragon Path)
*Father Guido Sarducci: "I Won't Be Twisting This Christmas" b/w "Santa's Lament"(Warner Bros.)
*Fear: "Fuck Christmas" b/w "(Beep) Christmas" (Slash)
*Foghat: "Goin' Home For Christmas" b/w "Santa Claus Is Back In Town" (Merry Christmas 1986)
*Freddy King: "I Hear Jingle Bells" b/w " Christmas Tears" (Federal)
*George Thorogood and the Destroyers: "Rock 'N' Roll Christmas" b/w "New Year's Eve Party" (EMI)
*Greg Lake: "I Believe in Father Christmas" (Manticore)
*Greedies: "A Merry Jingle" b/w "A Merry Jangle" (Vertigo)
*Headroom, Max: "Merry Christmas Santa Claus (You're A Lovely Guy)" b/w "Gimme Shades" (Chrysalis)
*Jethro Tull: ""Ring Out, Solstice Bells" b/w " Christmas Song" (Chyrsalis)
*Jimi Hendrix: "Little Drummer Boy/Silent Night/Auld Lang Syne" (Reprise)
*Jimmy: "White Christmas" b/w "Spin The Bottle" (Fatima)
*John Lennon & Yoko Ono: "Happy Christmas (War Is Over)" b/w "Listen (The Snow Is Falling)" (Apple/Capitol)
*Karen Mantler: "I Love Christmas" (Watt)
*Kate Bush: "December Will Be Magic Again" (EMI)
*Keith Richards: "Run Rudolph Run" (Rolling Stones)
*King Diamond: "No Presents For Christmas" (Roadrunner)
*Kinks: "Father Christmas" b/w "Wish I Could Fly Like Superman" (Arista)
*Korgis: "Wish You A Merry Christmas" b/w "Dumb Waiters" (WEA)
*Kurtis Blow: "Christmas Rappin'" (Mercury)
*McCartney, Paul: "Wonderful Christmastime" b/w "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reggae" (Columbia)
*Mike Lorenz: "The Rap Before Christmas" b/w "Auld Lang Syne (Go Go)" (Hottrax)
*Miracle Legion: "Little Drummer Boy" b/w "Blue Christmas" (Incas)
*Patti Smith Group: "White Christmas" (Jason)
*Payola$: "Christmas Is Coming"
*Prince and the Revolution: "I Would Die 4 U" b/w "Another Lonely Christmas" (Warner Bros.)
*Ramones: "Merry Christmas (I Don't Want To Fight)" (WEA)
*Residents: "Santa Dog 1978" b/w "Santa Dog 1972" (Ralph)
*Richards, Keith: "Run Rudolph Run" b/w "The Harder They Come" (Rolling Stones)
*Robert Fripp: “Silent Night” (EG flexi)
*Roy Wood's Wizzard: "I Wish it Could be Christmas Everyday" (UA)
*Russell, Leon: "Slipping Into Christmas" b/w "Christmas In Chicago" (Shelter)
*Siouxsie & The Banshees: "Il Est Ne Le Divin Enfant" (Polydor)
*Spinal Tap: "Christmas With The Devil" b/w "Scratch Mix" (Enigma)
*Springsteen, Bruce: "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town" (Columbia)
*Springsteen, Bruce: "Merry Christmas, Baby" (Columbia)
*Squeeze: "Christmas Day" (A&M)
*Squier, Billy: "Christmas Is The Time To Say 'I Love You'" b/w "White Christmas" (Capitol)
*Tapper Zukie: "Archie, The Rednose Reindeer" (Mer)
*Thick Pigeon: "Jingle Bell Rock" b/w The French Impressionists: "Santa Baby" (Operation Twilight)
*Three Wise Men (XTC): "Thanks For Christmas" b/w "Countdown To Christmas Partytime" (Virgin)
*Timbuk 3: "All I Want For Christmas" b/w "Blue Christmas"/"I Love You X 3" (I.R.S.)
*U.K. Subs: "Hey Santa" b/w "Thunderbird" (Fallout)
*Wham!: "Last Christmas" b/w "Everything She Wants" (CBS)
*Wilde, Kim & Mel Smith: "Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree" b/w "Deck The Blooming Halls" (10 Records)
*Wilson, Ann & Nancy: "Here Is Christmas" b/w "Bring A Torch Jeanette Isabella" (Capitol)
*The Woggles: "Santa's Coming (Ho, Ho, Ho)" b/w "Back Door Santa" (Wicked Cool)
*Yobs: "Stille Nacht" b/w ""Silent Nite" (Yob)
!!!ROCK & POP:
*Aimee Mann: One More Drifter In The Snow
*Annie Lennox: A Christmas Cornucopia
*Arthur Lyman: With A Christmas Vibe
*Bob Dylan: Christmas In The Heart
*Brian Wilson: What I Really Want For Christmas
*Canned Heat: Christmas Album
*Carly Simon: Christmas Is Almost Here
*Carole King: A Holiday Carole
*Chris Stamey Group: Christmas Time
*Christina Aguilera: My Kind Of Christmas
*Chuck Leavell: What's In The Bag?
*Dan Hicks & The Hot Licks: Crazy For Christmas
*Darlene Love: It's Christmas, of Course
*Dwight Twilley: Have A Twilley Christmas EP
*Dwight Yoakam: Come On Christmas
*Eric Clapton: Merry Xmas
*Esquivel: Merry Xmas From The Space-Age Bachelor Pad
*JD McPherson: "Socks"
*Indio Girls: Holly Happy Days
*Jorma Kaukonen: Christmas
*League Of Decency: A Swingin' Christmas
*Los Straitjackets: 'Tis The Season For Los Straitjackets!
*Low: Christmas
*Martin Atkins and the Chicago Industrial League: The Industrial Christmas Carol
*Michelle Malone: A Swinging Christmas In The Attic
*Michelle Malone: A Very SOTA Christmas
*Michelle Malone & the Hot Toddies: Toddie Time (SBS)
*Morgan Fisher: Hybrid Kids 2:Claws
*Nick Lowe: Quality Street: A Seasonal Selection For All The Family
*Pink Martini: Joy To The World
*The Players: Manzanera and MacKay present Christmas (Ryko)
*The Raveonettes: Wishing You A Rave Christmas (Vice)
*Ringo Starr: I Wanna Be Santa Claus
*The Roches: We Three Kings
*Rotary Connection: Peace
*RuPaul: Ho Ho Ho
*Sarah McLachlan: Wintersong
*Shawn Colvin: Holiday Songs And Lullabies
*She & Him: A Very She & Him Christmas
*Sufjan Stevens: Songs For Christmas Box Set:
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. I: Noel
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. II: Hark!
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. III: Ding! Dong!
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. IV: Joy!
*  Sufjan Stevens: Vol. V: Peace!
*Tracey Thorn: Tinsel And Lights
!!!Various Artists:
*The Christmas Album (Sony)
*Christmas in Stereo and Christmas 2 (Kindercore)
*A Christmas Record (Ze)
*Christmas Present 1992 (Sister Ruby)
*Christmas Present Vol. 2 (Sister Ruby)
*Christmas Present, Vol. 3 (Sister Ruby)
*Christmas Vols. 1, 1987 — 7, 1993 (Perimeter)
*Flagpole 1990: A Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1991: Son of the Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1992: The Daughter of the Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1992: The Mother of All Flagpole Christmas Albums
*Flagpole 1993: The Red-Headed Stepchild of the Flagpole Christmas Album
*Flagpole 1994: The Soft-Spoken Beatnik Cousin of the Flagpole Christmas Album (Long Play)
*Flagpole 1995: Chilly, the Flagpole Christmas Album That Could Not Love
*Flagpole 1996: The Flagpole Christmas Album: The "white" album.
*The Mother Of All Flagpole Christmas Albums (Ortone)
*Ghosts Of Christmas Past (Les Disques Du Crepuscule)
*Ghosts Of Christmas Past (LTM 2-CD)
*Happy Birthday, Baby Jesus, Vols. 1 and 2 (Sympathy For The Record Industry)
*Hardcore Holiday (Essential Noise)
*A Lump Of Coal (First Warning)
*A Midnight Christmas Mess (Midnight)
*Riot Grrrl Christmas (Cleopatra)
*A Very Special Christmas
*A Very Special Christmas 2
*A Very Special Christmas — Jazz To The World
*A Very Special Christmas — World Christmas
*A Very Special Christmas 3
*A Very Special Christmas 4 — Live From Washington, D.C.
*A Very Special Christmas 5
*A Very Special Christmas 6 — Acoustic Christmas
*A Very Special Christmas 7
*A Very Special Christmas: 25 Years Bringing Joy to the World
*A Very Special Christmas: Bringing Peace on Earth
*VH1: The Big 80's Christmas (Rhino)
*The World Shines Brightly, Parts One, Two, Three & Four — Trattoria Calendar O.S.T.
!!!RAP:
*MC M: Xmaz N The Hood (Priority)
*Fishbone: It's A Wonderful Life (Gonna Have A Good Time) (Columbia)
*Various Artists: Christmas Rap (Profile).
!!!SOUL and R&B:
*Blind Boys of Alabama: Go Tell it on the Mountain (RealWorld)
*Booker T. & the MG's: In The Christmas Spirit (Atlantic)
*James Brown: Santa's Got A Brand New Bag (Rhino)
*Jackie Wilson: Merry Christmas From Jackie Wilson (Rhino)
*John Legend: A Legendary Christmas
*New Edition: Christmas All Over The World (MCA)
*Ray Charles: The Spirit Of Christmas (Columbia/Rhino)
*The Sounds Of Blackness: The Night Before Christmas — A Musical Fantasy (Perspective)
!!!OLDIES:
*The Beach Boys: Christmas Album (Capitol)
*Bobby Darin: The 25th Day Of December (Atco)
*Elvis Presley: Elvis' Christmas Album (RCA)
*The Four Seasons: Christmas Album (Rhino)
*The Partridge Family: A Christmas Card (Razor & Tie)
*Phil Spector & Various Artists: A Christmas Gift For You (Rhino)
!!!FOLK & BLUES:
*Boys of the Lough: Midwinter Night's Dream (Blix Street)
*Brave Combo: "It's Christmas, Man!" (Rounder)
*Joan Baez: Noel (Vanguard)
*John Wesley Harding: God Made Me Do It (Sire/Reprise)
*Johnny Winter: Please Come Home for Christmas (Pointblank/Charisma)
*Jorma Kaukonen: Christmas (Relix)
*Marta Sebestyen: Apochrya (Hannibal)
*John Fahey: The New Possibility and Christmas, Vol. 2 (Takoma)
*Leon Redbone: Christmas Island (August)
*Various Artists: Death Might Be Your Santa Claus (Columbia)
*Various Artists: Even Santa Gets The Blues (Pointblank)
!!!WORLD:
*Bulgarian Voices: Christmas Sacrament (Fremeaux)
*Les Voix Bulgares, Chants de Noel (Fremeaux)
*Various Artists: Mas! A Caribbean Christmas Party (Ryko)
*Various Artists: Reggae Christmas From Studio One (Heartbeat)
!!!JAZZ:
*Chet Baker: Silent Nights (DineMec)
*Cyrus Chestnut: Blessed Quietness: A Collection Of Hymns, Spirituals And Carols
*Ella Fitzgerald: Wishes You A Swinging Christmas (Verve)
*Vince Guaraldi Trio: A Charlie Brown Christmas
*Various Artists: Hipster's Holiday — Vocal Jazz and R&B Classics (Rhino)
*Various Artists: Hot Jazz for a Cool Night (MusicMasters)
*Various Artists: God Rest Ye Merry, Jazzmen (Columbia)
!!!NEW AGE:
*John Boswell: Festival Of The Heart (Hearts Of Space)
*Kitaro: Peace on Earth (Domo)
*Susan Mazer & Dallas Smith: Carol For The Planet (Intersound)
*David Lanz/Michael Jones: Solstice (Narada)
*Eric Tingstad/Nancy Rumble: The Gift (Sona Gaia)
*George Winston: December (Windham Hill)
*The Joy Circuit: Crystal Clear Christmas (A&M)
*Shane Keister: The Sounds Of Christmas (RCA)
!!!COUNTRY:
*Ben Keith: Christmas — Seven Gates (Reprise)
*Emmylou Harris: Light Of The Stable (Warner Bros.) —
*Jerry Jeff Walker: Christmas Gonzo Style (Rykodisc)
*Travis Tritt: Loving Time Of The Year (Warner Bros.)
*Various Artists: Christmas On The Range (Capitol)
*Various Artists: Hillbilly Holiday (Rhino)
!!!NOVELTY & COMEDY:
*Bob Rivers Comedy Corp: Twisted Christmas (Atco)
*Elmo & Patsy: Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer (Epic)
*Spike Jones: It's A Spike Jones Christmas (Rhino)
*The Scrooge Brothers: Commercial Christmasland (Rhino)
*The Three Stooges: Christmas Time With (Rhino)
*Various Artists: Dr. Demento — The Greatest Christmas Novelty CD Of All Time (Rhino)
!!!VOCALISTS:
*Amy Grant: Home For Christmas (A&M)
*Dean Martin: The Christmas Album (Reprise)
*Dean Martin: Christmas With Dino (Capitol)
*Frank Sinatra: A Jolly Christmas (Capitol)
*Frank Sinatra: Christmas Dreaming (Columbia)
*Frank Sinatra: Ultimate Christmas (Capitol)
*The Manhattan Transfer: The Christmas Album (Columbia)
!!!EASY LISTENING:
*Ferrante & Teicher: Snowbound/We Wish You A Merry Christmas (United Artists/EMI)
*Lawrence Welk, His Orchestra and Chorus: 22 Merry Christmas Favorites (Ranwwood)
*Mantovani And His Orchestra: Christmas Favourites and The Great Songs Of Christmas (London and Bainbridge).
!!!CLASSICAL:
*A Christmas Tree (Columbia)
*Brian Slawson: A Yule Log (CBS)
*The Hampton String Quartet: What If MOZART Wrote "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas?” (RCA Red Seal)
*Mannhein Steamroller: Christmas and A Fresh Aire Christmas by Chip Davis (American Gramophone)
*Sarah Brightman: A Winter Symphony (Angel)
 

A shortened version of this column appears in the December, 2018, print edition of Creative Loafing.    Tony Paris Archives AND SO THIS IS CHRISTMAS: A joyful noise.      christmasmusic christmassongs holidaytunes                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Sounds Like Christmas "
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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies

Sunday December 23, 2018 02:22 pm EST
Do you hear what I hear? | more...
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  string(6162) "Fun for the whole family? Sure it is. It’s Christmas! How could an evening with Puddles Pity Party, Krampus, and Really Big Santa be anything but?

Puddles Pity Party, hosted and performed by a seven-foot clown who doesn’t speak, but can sing until your heart melts, has long been an ITP secret treasured by those who like pathos with a bit of humor. But with YouTube videos gaining views, and an appearance last year on “America’s Got Talent,” where harsh judge Simon Cowell was brought to tears by Puddles Pity Party’s basso profundo, the cat was out of the bag.

And rightly so. Puddles Pity Party, more a theatrical experience than just a concert, deserves a larger audience than the one he would attract in Little Five Points. Presenting his “Holiday Jubilee” onstage at the Fox Theatre Tuesday, December 18, gives him a larger stage on which to present his magical wonderland, while allowing him to invite friends and other creatures.

Joining Puddles Pity Party will be Krampus and Really Big Santa, among other mythical beings and surprise guests. As Puddles can’t speak, and communicates only through song, CL was able to get Krampus to take a few minutes out of his (its?) busy holiday schedule to tell us about what’s in store at the Fox.

Creative Loafing: Krampus, do you have a long history with Puddles, or have the two of you only recently met?

Nein! Poodles und I have known each other for a very long time. Ve are both mystical and mythical creatures. Vhere Poodles is around hoomans year 'round, like Santa Claus, I can only be seen during ze holidays!

Will the two of you be singing a duet together?

Ve vill. Along with Herr Lucky Yates und Matthew Kaminski, ze organist for Ze Atlunta Braves on Ze Mighty Mo Organ!

Is it hard for the two of you to collaborate on projects, Puddles not speaking and you only appearing this time of year … how do you two communicate?

As ve are both magical creatures, ve only speak a language magical creatures unterstand. Human speech isn’t musical, while our communication is musical, tangible, und luminous.

Really Big Santa is appearing at this show. I’m not familiar with him. Is he your antithesis or your nemesis?

He is Santa. He und I are ze same side of ze coin. He is a dear friend. My techniques of dealing with naughty kinder are somewhat more antique. There are naughty kinder that Santa is made for und naughty kinder that requires Krampus!

Is this fun for the entire family? I mean, clowns frighten kids, Santa frightens kids, you frighten kids … .

Ja! Ja! Ja! This is to be for EVERYONE! Ve are happy when everyone is joyful. I can see ze wonder in a child that is frightened of us. That means ze imagination is working in that child the vay it should!

Clowns und Santas und Krampus! Ve are dreams und wishes und parties made true! That is sometimes scary! Children know this, adults are ze ones that forget!

What to you, is the spirit of Christmas?

A nest of fresh balsam boughs, a good brushing, und the little Krampuses nestled in stolen shoes by ze fire — dreaming of terribly behaved kinder, their little hooves pawing ze air!

Ahhhhh …

Simply horrible!

(Thanks to Jas. M. Stacy, who was instrumental in connecting  CL with Krampus.)

Making spirits bright dept. ... No matter how many Christmas songs you listen to, if you’re not into it, this time of year can really suck. The build-up. The expectations. The family gatherings. The holiday cheer — whether real or forced. Maybe that’s it. Feigning happiness when there is so much wrong in the world. Wars. Starvation. Disease. Senseless attacks on others. Hatred. Prejudice. These are a few of my (not) favorite things that don’t take a holiday at Christmas. At Chanukah. During Kwanzaa or any Eid.

The songs tell you, “Christmas is the time to say, ‘I love you.’” Your heart says, “Bah, humbug.” But you try to put on a smile anyway. You load up your credit card with purchases you won’t pay off for another 12 months — and then the bad dream repeats itself.

The depression may not always be about you. It could have to do with the useless gifts you receive, or the large amounts of money being spent on gifts given to others that are accepted with indifference rather than appreciation. Maybe Christmas is the time to say, “Screw you!” People are starving in shelters. Others homeless and cold. Instead of bestowing gifts on the fortunate, lend a helping hand to those in need. Those suffering from abuse. Those unable to celebrate the gift of another day, much less the holiday, on their own.

Street song serenade dept. ... Buteco is a Brazilian-inspired coffee house and bar located in the new Beacon shopping district in Grant Park at the end of Grant Street. Though Buteco is not that wide, the space stretches long, with a bar that spans from end to end. Brazilian street foods are served, along with similarly-inspired cachaça-based cocktails (and, yes, they do a helluva job with Brazil's national drink, the Caipirinha).

Having added a new area behind the building proper, Buteco has begun offering live music in what amounts to an outdoor patio with more tables and chairs than inside the restaurant. Right now, sheets of plastic hang from the rafters to protect patrons from the elements — and powerful gas heaters are used to warm the place — but don’t let the fact you have to “rough it” stop you from dropping by. Thursday, December 6, Anna Kramer & the Lost Cause warmed the place with a rockin’ and raucous set of country-inspired tunes that made it easy to understand why they were chosen to close out this year’s Bubbapalooza. A power trio of the honky-tonk kind, for sure. The following Thursday, FLAP appeared, with more bands scheduled for upcoming Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights. Booking bands on a regular basis is apparently something the owners of Buteco are just getting used to, and as of press time, no one was booked for this week. During a quick call to the place, I was told to check their social media for who would be playing. You should do the same."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(6787) "Fun for the whole family? Sure it is. It’s Christmas! How could an evening with [http://www.puddlespityparty.com|Puddles Pity Party], Krampus, and Really Big Santa be anything but?

Puddles Pity Party, hosted and performed by a seven-foot clown who doesn’t speak, but can sing until your heart melts, has long been an ITP secret treasured by those who like pathos with a bit of humor. But with YouTube videos gaining views, and an appearance last year on “[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzW_VPgJ53E|America’s Got Talent],” where harsh judge Simon Cowell was brought to tears by Puddles Pity Party’s basso profundo, the cat was out of the bag.

And rightly so. Puddles Pity Party, more a theatrical experience than just a concert, deserves a larger audience than the one he would attract in Little Five Points. Presenting his “[https://www.foxtheatre.org/events/detail/puddles-pity-party|Holiday Jubilee]” onstage at the Fox Theatre Tuesday, December 18, gives him a larger stage on which to present his magical wonderland, while allowing him to invite friends and other creatures.

Joining Puddles Pity Party will be Krampus and Really Big Santa, among other mythical beings and surprise guests. As Puddles can’t speak, and communicates only through song, ''CL'' was able to get Krampus to take a few minutes out of his (its?) busy holiday schedule to tell us about what’s in store at the Fox.

__''Creative Loafing'': Krampus, do you have a long history with Puddles, or have the two of you only recently met?__

Nein! Poodles und I have known each other for a very long time. Ve are both mystical and mythical creatures. Vhere Poodles is around hoomans year 'round, like Santa Claus, I can only be seen during ze holidays!

__Will the two of you be singing a duet together?__

Ve vill. Along with Herr Lucky Yates und [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B59pFr4l85c|Matthew Kaminski], ze organist for Ze Atlunta Braves on Ze Mighty Mo Organ!

__Is it hard for the two of you to collaborate on projects, Puddles not speaking and you only appearing this time of year … how do you two communicate?__

As ve are both magical creatures, ve only speak a language magical creatures unterstand. Human speech isn’t musical, while our communication is musical, tangible, und luminous.

__Really Big Santa is appearing at this show. I’m not familiar with him. Is he your antithesis or your nemesis?__

He is Santa. He und I are ze same side of ze coin. He is a dear friend. My techniques of dealing with naughty kinder are somewhat more antique. There are naughty kinder that Santa is made for und naughty kinder that requires Krampus!

__Is this fun for the entire family? I mean, clowns frighten kids, Santa frightens kids, you frighten kids … .__

Ja! Ja! Ja! This is to be for EVERYONE! Ve are happy when everyone is joyful. I can see ze wonder in a child that is frightened of us. That means ze imagination is working in that child the vay it should!

Clowns und Santas und Krampus! Ve are dreams und wishes und parties made true! That is sometimes scary! Children know this, adults are ze ones that forget!

__What to you, is the spirit of Christmas?__

A nest of fresh balsam boughs, a good brushing, und the little Krampuses nestled in stolen shoes by ze fire — dreaming of terribly behaved kinder, their little hooves pawing ze air!

Ahhhhh …

Simply horrible!

''(Thanks to [https://www.facebook.com/bigjimstacy/|Jas. M. Stacy], who was instrumental in connecting''  CL ''with Krampus.)''

__Making spirits bright dept. ...__ No matter how many Christmas songs you listen to, if you’re not into it, this time of year can [https://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/therese-borchard-sanity-break/ways-ease-holiday-depression/|really suck]. The build-up. The expectations. The family gatherings. The holiday cheer — whether real or forced. Maybe that’s it. Feigning happiness when there is so much wrong in the world. Wars. Starvation. Disease. Senseless attacks on others. Hatred. Prejudice. These are a few of my (not) favorite things that don’t take a holiday at Christmas. At Chanukah. During Kwanzaa or any Eid.

The songs tell you, “Christmas is the time to say, ‘I love you.’” Your heart says, “[https://www.mentalhelp.net/articles/mental-health-hotline/|Bah, humbug].” But you try to put on a smile anyway. You load up your credit card with purchases you won’t pay off for another 12 months — and then the bad dream repeats itself.

The depression may not always be about you. It could have to do with the useless gifts you receive, or the large amounts of money being spent on [https://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20550695,00.html|gifts] given to others that are accepted with indifference rather than appreciation. Maybe Christmas is the time to say, “Screw you!” People are starving in shelters. Others homeless and cold. Instead of bestowing gifts on the fortunate, lend a helping hand to those in need. Those suffering from abuse. Those unable to celebrate the gift of another day, much less the holiday, on their own.

__Street song serenade dept. ... [https://www.butecoatlanta.com|Buteco]__ is a Brazilian-inspired coffee house and bar located in the new Beacon shopping district in Grant Park at the end of Grant Street. Though Buteco is not that wide, the space stretches long, with a bar that spans from end to end. Brazilian street foods are served, along with similarly-inspired cachaça-based cocktails (and, yes, they do a helluva job with Brazil's national drink, the Caipirinha).

Having added a new area behind the building proper, Buteco has begun offering live music in what amounts to an outdoor patio with more tables and chairs than inside the restaurant. Right now, sheets of plastic hang from the rafters to protect patrons from the elements — and powerful gas heaters are used to warm the place — but don’t let the fact you have to “rough it” stop you from dropping by. Thursday, December 6, __[https://www.facebook.com/annakramerandthelostcause/|Anna Kramer & the Lost Cause]__ warmed the place with a rockin’ and raucous set of country-inspired tunes that made it easy to understand why they were chosen to close out this year’s Bubbapalooza. A power trio of the honky-tonk kind, for sure. The following Thursday, __[https://flapmusic.bandcamp.com|FLAP]__ appeared, with more bands scheduled for upcoming Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights. Booking bands on a regular basis is apparently something the owners of Buteco are just getting used to, and as of press time, no one was booked for this week. During a quick call to the place, I was told to check their social media for who would be playing. You should do the same."
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  string(6730) " FOX 9417 Edit  2018-12-18T13:46:30+00:00 FOX 9417-Edit.jpg    puddlespityparty krampus The giant clown gets a little holiday help from his friends 11992  2018-12-18T12:58:35+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Puddles Pity Party goes big tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-12-18T12:58:35+00:00  Fun for the whole family? Sure it is. It’s Christmas! How could an evening with Puddles Pity Party, Krampus, and Really Big Santa be anything but?

Puddles Pity Party, hosted and performed by a seven-foot clown who doesn’t speak, but can sing until your heart melts, has long been an ITP secret treasured by those who like pathos with a bit of humor. But with YouTube videos gaining views, and an appearance last year on “America’s Got Talent,” where harsh judge Simon Cowell was brought to tears by Puddles Pity Party’s basso profundo, the cat was out of the bag.

And rightly so. Puddles Pity Party, more a theatrical experience than just a concert, deserves a larger audience than the one he would attract in Little Five Points. Presenting his “Holiday Jubilee” onstage at the Fox Theatre Tuesday, December 18, gives him a larger stage on which to present his magical wonderland, while allowing him to invite friends and other creatures.

Joining Puddles Pity Party will be Krampus and Really Big Santa, among other mythical beings and surprise guests. As Puddles can’t speak, and communicates only through song, CL was able to get Krampus to take a few minutes out of his (its?) busy holiday schedule to tell us about what’s in store at the Fox.

Creative Loafing: Krampus, do you have a long history with Puddles, or have the two of you only recently met?

Nein! Poodles und I have known each other for a very long time. Ve are both mystical and mythical creatures. Vhere Poodles is around hoomans year 'round, like Santa Claus, I can only be seen during ze holidays!

Will the two of you be singing a duet together?

Ve vill. Along with Herr Lucky Yates und Matthew Kaminski, ze organist for Ze Atlunta Braves on Ze Mighty Mo Organ!

Is it hard for the two of you to collaborate on projects, Puddles not speaking and you only appearing this time of year … how do you two communicate?

As ve are both magical creatures, ve only speak a language magical creatures unterstand. Human speech isn’t musical, while our communication is musical, tangible, und luminous.

Really Big Santa is appearing at this show. I’m not familiar with him. Is he your antithesis or your nemesis?

He is Santa. He und I are ze same side of ze coin. He is a dear friend. My techniques of dealing with naughty kinder are somewhat more antique. There are naughty kinder that Santa is made for und naughty kinder that requires Krampus!

Is this fun for the entire family? I mean, clowns frighten kids, Santa frightens kids, you frighten kids … .

Ja! Ja! Ja! This is to be for EVERYONE! Ve are happy when everyone is joyful. I can see ze wonder in a child that is frightened of us. That means ze imagination is working in that child the vay it should!

Clowns und Santas und Krampus! Ve are dreams und wishes und parties made true! That is sometimes scary! Children know this, adults are ze ones that forget!

What to you, is the spirit of Christmas?

A nest of fresh balsam boughs, a good brushing, und the little Krampuses nestled in stolen shoes by ze fire — dreaming of terribly behaved kinder, their little hooves pawing ze air!

Ahhhhh …

Simply horrible!

(Thanks to Jas. M. Stacy, who was instrumental in connecting  CL with Krampus.)

Making spirits bright dept. ... No matter how many Christmas songs you listen to, if you’re not into it, this time of year can really suck. The build-up. The expectations. The family gatherings. The holiday cheer — whether real or forced. Maybe that’s it. Feigning happiness when there is so much wrong in the world. Wars. Starvation. Disease. Senseless attacks on others. Hatred. Prejudice. These are a few of my (not) favorite things that don’t take a holiday at Christmas. At Chanukah. During Kwanzaa or any Eid.

The songs tell you, “Christmas is the time to say, ‘I love you.’” Your heart says, “Bah, humbug.” But you try to put on a smile anyway. You load up your credit card with purchases you won’t pay off for another 12 months — and then the bad dream repeats itself.

The depression may not always be about you. It could have to do with the useless gifts you receive, or the large amounts of money being spent on gifts given to others that are accepted with indifference rather than appreciation. Maybe Christmas is the time to say, “Screw you!” People are starving in shelters. Others homeless and cold. Instead of bestowing gifts on the fortunate, lend a helping hand to those in need. Those suffering from abuse. Those unable to celebrate the gift of another day, much less the holiday, on their own.

Street song serenade dept. ... Buteco is a Brazilian-inspired coffee house and bar located in the new Beacon shopping district in Grant Park at the end of Grant Street. Though Buteco is not that wide, the space stretches long, with a bar that spans from end to end. Brazilian street foods are served, along with similarly-inspired cachaça-based cocktails (and, yes, they do a helluva job with Brazil's national drink, the Caipirinha).

Having added a new area behind the building proper, Buteco has begun offering live music in what amounts to an outdoor patio with more tables and chairs than inside the restaurant. Right now, sheets of plastic hang from the rafters to protect patrons from the elements — and powerful gas heaters are used to warm the place — but don’t let the fact you have to “rough it” stop you from dropping by. Thursday, December 6, Anna Kramer & the Lost Cause warmed the place with a rockin’ and raucous set of country-inspired tunes that made it easy to understand why they were chosen to close out this year’s Bubbapalooza. A power trio of the honky-tonk kind, for sure. The following Thursday, FLAP appeared, with more bands scheduled for upcoming Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights. Booking bands on a regular basis is apparently something the owners of Buteco are just getting used to, and as of press time, no one was booked for this week. During a quick call to the place, I was told to check their social media for who would be playing. You should do the same.    Fox Marketing GOOD TIDINGS: Krampus, Matthew Kaminski at the Mighty "Mo" Moller organ, and Puddles Pity Party join forces at the Fox Theatre.      PuddlesPityParty Krampus                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Puddles Pity Party goes big "
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Tuesday December 18, 2018 07:58 am EST
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  string(7202) "Guitarist Richard Thompson performed with his Electric Trio at the Variety Playhouse Saturday, Dec. 1. Thompson has performed in Atlanta countless times, first as a member of the traditional British folk rock group Fairport Convention, though mostly as leader of bands he’s put together during his long and varied solo career. In all that time, he’s never given a bad performance in this city. How many musicians can you say that about? Exactly. You can count them on one hand. Maybe one finger.

It’s because he’s always so good that I wasn’t planning on seeing his most recent show in Little 5 Points. It was going to be good. It always is. And Dec. 1 was a busy night for music in Atlanta. Magnapop, Come, 86 and a number of other bands were playing at the Earl and 529 in East Atlanta Village for Henry Owing’s fiftieth birthday parties. David Franklin and Chris Edmonds were both scheduled at Smith’s Olde Bar. The original Mudcat and the Atlanta Horns, with Mandi Strachota and Little Joey Hoegger, were celebrating the release of Castaway (Original Cast Recording) with a live performance of the piece at the Avondale Towne Cinema. Certainly, a lot more risks would be taken on any one of those stages.

When the Electric Trio — Thompson, bassist Taras Prodaniuk and drummer Michael Jerome — took the Variety stage, it was obvious this was not to be an ordinary Richard Thompson show. No. This was something special.

They kicked off the set with “Bones of Gilead,” followed by “Her Love was Meant for Me,” two songs off of Thompson’s powerful new album, 13 Rivers. From the moment he strapped on his Fender Stratocaster, Thompson exhibited a dazzling display of guitar work, even for someone as accomplished as himself, and the band, in high gear from the start, never let up.

In the power trio format, no member of the band can afford not to hold their own. A trio can be devastating — or, fall flat, if the three musicians aren’t in sync — playing off each other while propelling each other. Saturday night, Thompson, Prodaniuk, and Jerome destroyed any preconceived notions of how good a Richard Thompson show can be. When Thompson was onstage alone, to sing a crowd favorite like “1952 Vincent Black Lightning,” he crushed versions he’s played in Atlanta before. Even the idea of the trio was stretched. For many songs, the group was joined by Bobby Eichorn from the crew on guitar, adding appropriate fills while not getting in the way.

Throughout the evening Thompson assured those in the audience he’d get to his older, more familiar songs they’d come to hear after performing material from the 13 Rivers. But no one expected just how far back he would go, pulling out songs he’d written for Fairport Convention in 1968, “Tale in Hard Time” and "Meet on the Ledge." The guitarist appeared to enjoy playing up the nostalgia of having written songs fifty years ago that still stand the test of time, but the concert was no career retrospective. Other than a couple of songs recorded with ex-wife Linda Thompson, “Dimming of the Day” (1975) and “Wall of Death” (1982), Thompson drew primarily from the ‘90s forward, though “Can’t Win,” (1988) was a tremendous treat.

That, too, was part of what made the Variety show so special. Instead of playing favorites, old stand-stand-by and familiar tunes — the one’s he’s played over and over and over — Thompson focused more on deep cuts and new material. In doing so, he played to no one’s expectations other than his own, allowing himself a freedom manifested in some of his best guitar playing ever. At 69 years old, he was playing with the fire and intensity of someone half his age, not with the wild abandon of youth, but the confidence and feel of someone in control of every note he wrenched out of his guitar.

It was an amazing show. Absolutely.

Something from nothing dept. … It wasn’t that long ago that Lucy Freas, co-founder with Josh Antenucci of Atlanta’s Rival Entertainment, was posting photos of her office — expansive views of the Georgia State Stadium — on her Facebook page as Rival was preparing for the inaugural concert at the former site of Turner Field with Foo Fighters headlining. Now, with Super Bowl LIII being hosted at Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Freas and company are preparing for another first, building a concert venue at Atlantic Station from the ground up to present the annual DIRECTV Super Saturday Night the evening prior to the the big game. Construction has already started on the three-tiered, 72,000-square foot structure for the event, which brings Foo Fighters with special guests Run The Jewels back to Atlanta for the second time in less than a year. Once the concert is over, the same crews will work to dismantle it, offering those who attend a truly “once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

Baby, it’s cold outside dept. … This Thursday evening Michelle Malone and the Hot Toddies, the singer/songwriter’s cool Yule holiday incarnation, celebrates the release of Toddie Time, an EP of soulful and jazzy takes on traditional Christmas songs, at Eddie's Attic. The trio reinterprets classic Christmas tunes — think Nat King Cole, Rosemary Clooney, Ella Fitzgerald, Dean Martin and Elvis Presley — creating new jazz and blues arrangements that display Malone’s vocal prowess and innate ability to let the music take you to  another time and place. Joining Malone and guitarist Doug Kees this season is bassist Tommy Dean, no stranger to Atlanta music fans, nor to holiday merriment, having released A Swingin’ Christmas with his band, The League of Decency, in 1995. Expect spirits to be bright. … If you get to Decatur early enough, be sure to stop by Different Trains Gallery 2 at Cornerstone Bank, for a Holiday Open House from 5 to 8 p.m. featuring the exhibition of Atlanta artists Eben Dunn & Jim Johnson.

Unaspeckles meowl love dept. … Atlanta artist R. Land held quite an open house of his own at his Waddell Street Studios in the 30307, Sunday, Dec. 2. Featuring the debut of his new, limited edition Christmas ornaments, Hanukkah Claus,  as well as the artist’s more familiar works — who doesn’t know his iconic “Pray for Atlanta” design — more people were lined up to purchase items to take home then they were for the free pizza, beer, and wine Land provided. While verging on visual art sensory overload, the party took on a more musical direction with two performances by Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel, the group for which Land provided the artwork on its album 10.

Last splash dept. … As many already know, it’s time to say goodbye to the Avondale Towne Cinema. After four years of trying to make it work as a live music venue, owner Tony Longval has decided it’s time to close the multi-level performance space and move on. It’s sad to see such a great old theater go dark once again, especially with all of the work Longval put into it. While this Saturday, Dec. 8, The Rainmen play their final gig there, other shows are booked until the final curtain call Dec. 15 with the Third Annual Christmas Holiday Music Jam."
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It’s because he’s always so good that I wasn’t planning on seeing his most recent show in Little 5 Points. It was going to be good. It always is. And Dec. 1 was a busy night for music in Atlanta. __Magnapop__, __Come__, __86__ and a number of other bands were playing at the Earl and 529 in East Atlanta Village for __Henry Owing__’s fiftieth birthday parties. __David Franklin__ and __Chris Edmonds__ were both scheduled at Smith’s Olde Bar. The original __Mudcat and the Atlanta Horns__, with __Mandi Strachota__ and __Little Joey Hoegger__, were celebrating the release of ''Castaway (Original Cast Recording)'' with a live performance of the piece at the Avondale Towne Cinema. Certainly, a lot more risks would be taken on any one of those stages.

When the Electric Trio — Thompson, bassist __[http://tarasprodaniuk.com|Taras Prodaniuk]__ and drummer __[http://michaeljeromeondrums.com|Michael Jerome]__ — took the Variety stage, it was obvious this was not to be an ordinary Richard Thompson show. No. This was something special.

They kicked off the set with “Bones of Gilead,” followed by “Her Love was Meant for Me,” two songs off of Thompson’s powerful new album, ''[https://www.npr.org/2018/09/06/644565625/first-listen-richard-thompson-13-rivers|13 Rivers]''. From the moment he strapped on his Fender Stratocaster, Thompson exhibited a dazzling display of guitar work, even for someone as accomplished as himself, and the band, in high gear from the start, never let up.

In the power trio format, no member of the band can afford not to hold their own. A trio can be devastating — or, fall flat, if the three musicians aren’t in sync — playing off each other while propelling each other. Saturday night, Thompson, Prodaniuk, and Jerome destroyed any preconceived notions of how good a Richard Thompson show can be. When Thompson was onstage alone, to sing a crowd favorite like “1952 Vincent Black Lightning,” he crushed versions he’s played in Atlanta before. Even the idea of the trio was stretched. For many songs, the group was joined by Bobby Eichorn from the crew on guitar, adding appropriate fills while not getting in the way.

Throughout the evening Thompson assured those in the audience he’d get to his older, more familiar songs they’d come to hear after performing material from the ''13 Rivers''. But no one expected just how far back he would go, pulling out songs he’d written for Fairport Convention in 1968, “Tale in Hard Time” and "Meet on the Ledge." The guitarist appeared to enjoy playing up the nostalgia of having written songs fifty years ago that still stand the test of time, but the concert was no career retrospective. Other than a couple of songs recorded with ex-wife Linda Thompson, “Dimming of the Day” (1975) and “Wall of Death” (1982), Thompson drew primarily from the ‘90s forward, though “[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlA1PPwcRFo|Can’t Win],” (1988) was a tremendous treat.

That, too, was part of what made the Variety show so special. Instead of playing favorites, old stand-stand-by and familiar tunes — the one’s he’s played over and over and over — Thompson focused more on deep cuts and new material. In doing so, he played to no one’s expectations other than his own, allowing himself a freedom manifested in some of his best guitar playing ever. At 69 years old, he was playing with the fire and intensity of someone half his age, not with the wild abandon of youth, but the confidence and feel of someone in control of every note he wrenched out of his guitar.

It was an amazing show. Absolutely.

__Something from nothing dept. …__ It wasn’t that long ago that __Lucy Freas__, co-founder with __Josh Antenucci__ of Atlanta’s __Rival Entertainment__, was posting photos of her office — expansive views of the Georgia State Stadium — on her Facebook page as Rival was preparing for the inaugural concert at the former site of Turner Field with __Foo Fighters__ headlining. Now, with Super Bowl LIII being hosted at Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Freas and company are preparing for another first, ''building'' a concert venue at Atlantic Station from the ground up to present the annual __[http://rivalentertainment.com/events/super-saturday-night-foo-fighters-on-feb-2/|DIRECTV Super Saturday Night]__ the evening prior to the the big game. Construction has already started on the three-tiered, 72,000-square foot structure for the event, which brings Foo Fighters with special guests Run The Jewels back to Atlanta for the second time in less than a year. Once the concert is over, the same crews will work to dismantle it, offering [https://www1.ticketmaster.com/event/0E00557ACF5A274D?dma_id=220#efeat6916|those who attend] a truly “once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

__Baby, it’s cold outside dept. …__ This Thursday evening __[https://michellemalone.com/the-hot-toddies|Michelle Malone and the Hot Toddies]__, the singer/songwriter’s cool Yule holiday incarnation, celebrates the release of ''Toddie Time'', an EP of soulful and jazzy takes on traditional Christmas songs, at [http://www.ticketfly.com/event/1760862?utm_medium=api|Eddie's Attic]. The trio reinterprets classic Christmas tunes — think __Nat King Cole__, __Rosemary Clooney__, __Ella Fitzgerald__, __Dean Martin__ and __Elvis Presley__ — creating new jazz and blues arrangements that display Malone’s vocal prowess and innate ability to let the music take you to  another time and place. Joining Malone and guitarist __Doug Kees__ this season is bassist __Tommy Dean__, no stranger to Atlanta music fans, nor to holiday merriment, having released ''A Swingin’ Christmas'' with his band, __The League of Decency__, in 1995. Expect spirits to be bright. … If you get to Decatur early enough, be sure to stop by __[http://www.differenttrainsgallery.com/eben-dunn-amplification-and-de-amplification.html|Different Trains Gallery 2]__ at Cornerstone Bank, for a Holiday Open House from 5 to 8 p.m. featuring the exhibition of Atlanta artists __Eben Dunn__ & __Jim Johnson__.

__Unaspeckles meowl love dept. …__ Atlanta artist __[https://www.rlandart.com|R. Land]__ held quite an open house of his own at his Waddell Street Studios in the 30307, Sunday, Dec. 2. Featuring the debut of his new, limited edition Christmas ornaments, Hanukkah Claus,  as well as the artist’s more familiar works — who doesn’t know his iconic “Pray for Atlanta” design — more people were lined up to purchase items to take home then they were for the free pizza, beer, and wine Land provided. While verging on visual art sensory overload, the party took on a more musical direction with two performances by __[https://www.duetonline.net|Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel]__, the group for which Land provided the artwork on its album ''10''.

__Last splash dept. …__ As many already know, it’s time to say goodbye to the __[http://www.mytownecinema.com|Avondale Towne Cinema]__. After four years of trying to make it work as a live music venue, owner __Tony Longval__ has decided it’s time to close the multi-level performance space and move on. It’s sad to see such a great old theater go dark once again, especially with all of the work Longval put into it. While this Saturday, Dec. 8, __The Rainmen__ play their final gig there, other shows are booked until the final curtain call Dec. 15 with the __Third Annual Christmas Holiday Music Jam__."
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  string(7739) " IMG 6085 3  2018-12-04T21:52:34+00:00 IMG_6085 3.jpg    richard thompson Richard Thompson continues on a ‘restless highway’ 11603  2018-12-04T21:59:59+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Richard Thompson  —  Playing for the faithful tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-12-04T21:59:59+00:00  Guitarist Richard Thompson performed with his Electric Trio at the Variety Playhouse Saturday, Dec. 1. Thompson has performed in Atlanta countless times, first as a member of the traditional British folk rock group Fairport Convention, though mostly as leader of bands he’s put together during his long and varied solo career. In all that time, he’s never given a bad performance in this city. How many musicians can you say that about? Exactly. You can count them on one hand. Maybe one finger.

It’s because he’s always so good that I wasn’t planning on seeing his most recent show in Little 5 Points. It was going to be good. It always is. And Dec. 1 was a busy night for music in Atlanta. Magnapop, Come, 86 and a number of other bands were playing at the Earl and 529 in East Atlanta Village for Henry Owing’s fiftieth birthday parties. David Franklin and Chris Edmonds were both scheduled at Smith’s Olde Bar. The original Mudcat and the Atlanta Horns, with Mandi Strachota and Little Joey Hoegger, were celebrating the release of Castaway (Original Cast Recording) with a live performance of the piece at the Avondale Towne Cinema. Certainly, a lot more risks would be taken on any one of those stages.

When the Electric Trio — Thompson, bassist Taras Prodaniuk and drummer Michael Jerome — took the Variety stage, it was obvious this was not to be an ordinary Richard Thompson show. No. This was something special.

They kicked off the set with “Bones of Gilead,” followed by “Her Love was Meant for Me,” two songs off of Thompson’s powerful new album, 13 Rivers. From the moment he strapped on his Fender Stratocaster, Thompson exhibited a dazzling display of guitar work, even for someone as accomplished as himself, and the band, in high gear from the start, never let up.

In the power trio format, no member of the band can afford not to hold their own. A trio can be devastating — or, fall flat, if the three musicians aren’t in sync — playing off each other while propelling each other. Saturday night, Thompson, Prodaniuk, and Jerome destroyed any preconceived notions of how good a Richard Thompson show can be. When Thompson was onstage alone, to sing a crowd favorite like “1952 Vincent Black Lightning,” he crushed versions he’s played in Atlanta before. Even the idea of the trio was stretched. For many songs, the group was joined by Bobby Eichorn from the crew on guitar, adding appropriate fills while not getting in the way.

Throughout the evening Thompson assured those in the audience he’d get to his older, more familiar songs they’d come to hear after performing material from the 13 Rivers. But no one expected just how far back he would go, pulling out songs he’d written for Fairport Convention in 1968, “Tale in Hard Time” and "Meet on the Ledge." The guitarist appeared to enjoy playing up the nostalgia of having written songs fifty years ago that still stand the test of time, but the concert was no career retrospective. Other than a couple of songs recorded with ex-wife Linda Thompson, “Dimming of the Day” (1975) and “Wall of Death” (1982), Thompson drew primarily from the ‘90s forward, though “Can’t Win,” (1988) was a tremendous treat.

That, too, was part of what made the Variety show so special. Instead of playing favorites, old stand-stand-by and familiar tunes — the one’s he’s played over and over and over — Thompson focused more on deep cuts and new material. In doing so, he played to no one’s expectations other than his own, allowing himself a freedom manifested in some of his best guitar playing ever. At 69 years old, he was playing with the fire and intensity of someone half his age, not with the wild abandon of youth, but the confidence and feel of someone in control of every note he wrenched out of his guitar.

It was an amazing show. Absolutely.

Something from nothing dept. … It wasn’t that long ago that Lucy Freas, co-founder with Josh Antenucci of Atlanta’s Rival Entertainment, was posting photos of her office — expansive views of the Georgia State Stadium — on her Facebook page as Rival was preparing for the inaugural concert at the former site of Turner Field with Foo Fighters headlining. Now, with Super Bowl LIII being hosted at Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Freas and company are preparing for another first, building a concert venue at Atlantic Station from the ground up to present the annual DIRECTV Super Saturday Night the evening prior to the the big game. Construction has already started on the three-tiered, 72,000-square foot structure for the event, which brings Foo Fighters with special guests Run The Jewels back to Atlanta for the second time in less than a year. Once the concert is over, the same crews will work to dismantle it, offering those who attend a truly “once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

Baby, it’s cold outside dept. … This Thursday evening Michelle Malone and the Hot Toddies, the singer/songwriter’s cool Yule holiday incarnation, celebrates the release of Toddie Time, an EP of soulful and jazzy takes on traditional Christmas songs, at Eddie's Attic. The trio reinterprets classic Christmas tunes — think Nat King Cole, Rosemary Clooney, Ella Fitzgerald, Dean Martin and Elvis Presley — creating new jazz and blues arrangements that display Malone’s vocal prowess and innate ability to let the music take you to  another time and place. Joining Malone and guitarist Doug Kees this season is bassist Tommy Dean, no stranger to Atlanta music fans, nor to holiday merriment, having released A Swingin’ Christmas with his band, The League of Decency, in 1995. Expect spirits to be bright. … If you get to Decatur early enough, be sure to stop by Different Trains Gallery 2 at Cornerstone Bank, for a Holiday Open House from 5 to 8 p.m. featuring the exhibition of Atlanta artists Eben Dunn & Jim Johnson.

Unaspeckles meowl love dept. … Atlanta artist R. Land held quite an open house of his own at his Waddell Street Studios in the 30307, Sunday, Dec. 2. Featuring the debut of his new, limited edition Christmas ornaments, Hanukkah Claus,  as well as the artist’s more familiar works — who doesn’t know his iconic “Pray for Atlanta” design — more people were lined up to purchase items to take home then they were for the free pizza, beer, and wine Land provided. While verging on visual art sensory overload, the party took on a more musical direction with two performances by Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel, the group for which Land provided the artwork on its album 10.

Last splash dept. … As many already know, it’s time to say goodbye to the Avondale Towne Cinema. After four years of trying to make it work as a live music venue, owner Tony Longval has decided it’s time to close the multi-level performance space and move on. It’s sad to see such a great old theater go dark once again, especially with all of the work Longval put into it. While this Saturday, Dec. 8, The Rainmen play their final gig there, other shows are booked until the final curtain call Dec. 15 with the Third Annual Christmas Holiday Music Jam.    Tony Paris WALKING ON A WIRE: From left, Richard Thompson, Michael Jerome, and Taras Prodaniuk.      "richard thompson"                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Richard Thompson  —  Playing for the faithful "
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Music, High Frequencies

Tuesday December 4, 2018 04:59 pm EST
Richard Thompson continues on a ‘restless highway’ | more...
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post-Thanksgiving songwriting feast at Red Clay Music Foundry"
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  string(6357) "As the guitarist and a founding member of Mother’s Finest, the funk rock band that helped propel Atlanta into the national spotlight as a viable music scene in the mid-’70s, Moses Mo doesn’t need to prove himself these days. He’s done his time in rock ’n’ roll Babylon, toured the world, and shared stages with a veritable who’s who of performers.

Nevertheless, he’s always been a bit restless over the years, finding his way onto Atlanta stages with local and touring bands remember Illusion?), always expressing a side of himself that’s certainly a part of his Mother’s Finest oeuvre, but also pushing the boundaries of what his followers expect.

Almost two years ago, Atlantans were fortunate enough to see Mo sit in with Bobby Whitlock and CoCo Carmel at Eddie’s Attic. Whitlock, known for his contributions to Derek & the Dominos’ Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (Eric Clapton’s attempt at forming a band after his first solo album), not to mention George Harrison’s first solo venture, All Things Must Pass, had invited Mo to join them as the singer/keyboardist/guitarist took the audience on a musical journey through the songs he’d recorded with his stellar friends. Mo was the perfect compliment to Whitlock’s work. Not attempting to replicate the guitar parts as on record, Mo instead added his own soulful and stirring slide and fret work to every song.

After the show, Mo handed me a CD as I headed to my car. A six-song EP, Two Ton Message, it was an impressively heavy offering of rock from a power trio, but sounded like Mo was still searching, rather than having found his groove.

This Thursday, Mo returns to Eddie’s Attic with Moses Mo and the Real Cool Band ( Mo; Kerry Denton, drums; Mikey Long, bass; ZeroBasement, rap verses; and PoiZen EV, percussion and background vocals) to celebrate the band’s debut release, Drive In. A mixture of rock with rap accents, there’s also a Southern-inspired grittiness to the music that makes this third “solo” album from Mo his most realized yet.

Solo, as used above, is in quotes, because, while most of the songs are his compositions, Mo prefers to work in a band setting. “Bands have always been used as promotional tools for the music,” he observes. “I realize the need to perform the songs for them to be heard, but I'm not comfortable as a solo performer. Also, I didn’t really want a group of highly skilled performers, often high-strung, and needing a different kind of attention, than I was willing to provide for them. I wanted a group I was comfortable with, made up of people skilled, talented, but still needing polish, as I see myself. People who lived close to me, so we could work together and grow a sound together. Knowing these things take time, I was also looking for a friendly, like-minded group; each person with an artistic passion for music, wanting to grow. Most exciting is watching and listening to how far we have come!  We're making it together. It's not just about me; there is a lot of personality and artistic expression going on here. I’m feeling it, they're feeling it, the audience is beginning to feel it — and it's fun.  We look forward to sharing what we have with all who show up on Thursday.”

Feast of friends dept. … Thanksgiving has come and gone. Thankfully. The holiday seemed relatively quiet this year. Thanksgiving used to be a busy night in Atlanta: More bars and clubs were open, people were out with friends rather than getting claustrophobic at home surrounded by family long after the turkey had gotten cold. There was the run of R.E.M. “homecoming” shows at the Fox Theatre, which actually occurred less often than people remember; Keith Richards’ unforgettable solo show at the Fox Theatre in 1988; and in the mid-’70s, Bruce Hampton and Glenn Phillips seemed to always find a stage to call home on Thanksgiving night. That’s not the case at local venues any longer, other than the annual Star Bar get together — at least that’s advertised. Phillips has claimed the night after Thanksgiving for his annual event, with most clubs following suit, booking local acts the nights following Thanksgiving, while staying dark Thanksgiving night. Tinsley Ellis sold out the City Winery last Friday, Shawn Mullins held court at the Variety Playhouse Saturday night, the Black Lips descended upon the Earl for two nights, Mother’s Finest rocked the Buckhead Theatre for two nights, Blackberry Smoke had a homecoming at the Tabernacle, and Southern transplant David Lowery was at Eddie’s Attic.

Friday night in Duluth, Eddie Owen Presents at the Red Clay Music Foundry filled the theater with its Songwriters Open Mic Shootout #10, the culmination of a year’s worth of winners of its monthly Songwriter’s Open Mic nights, or “hootenannies,” as Owen calls them. It’s a smart idea, holding the grand finale just after Thanksgiving, guaranteeing that people will be drawn to the Foundry to see their son, daughter, sibling, or friend vying for first place. During the first three rounds, I picked the songwriters I thought should win. Each time, my choice placed second out of the two, making it clear the seven judges and I have different ideas about good and better.

One singer-songwriter we seemed to agree on was Walter Parks, a tall, lean guitarist with a forked beard and a wide-brimmed hat. He had a way with words, not only in how he put them together, but how he sang them, his voice as much an instrument as the one he held in his hands. His songs were new to me, but his face looked familiar. When Owen announced Parks used to play in a guitar/cello duo, I knew my memory hadn’t failed me. Parks and Stephanie Winters made up The Nudes, who played 688 many times in the ’80s. They were a favorite of mine then, and though Parks’ current approach is different, his music still has my attention. Seeing that solid songwriting is still his strength, I found myself hoping he’d advance over the course of the shootout (especially after my dog in the race got put out). Parks held his own, placing in the final round, until Nathan Evans Fox, who was riding a hot streak of judges’ votes, prevailed. I was surprised Parks didn’t win, even if, more times than not Friday night, the judges and I heard and saw things differently."
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Nevertheless, he’s always been a bit restless over the years, finding his way onto Atlanta stages with local and touring bands remember Illusion?), always expressing a side of himself that’s certainly a part of his Mother’s Finest oeuvre, but also pushing the boundaries of what his followers expect.

Almost two years ago, Atlantans were fortunate enough to see Mo sit in with __[http://www.bobbywhitlockandcococarmel.com|Bobby Whitlock]__ and __CoCo Carmel__ at Eddie’s Attic. Whitlock, known for his contributions to Derek & the Dominos’ ''Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs'' (Eric Clapton’s attempt at forming a band after his first solo album), not to mention George Harrison’s first solo venture, ''All Things Must Pass'', had invited Mo to join them as the singer/keyboardist/guitarist took the audience on a musical journey through the [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRaWlfrg4J0|songs he’d recorded] with his stellar friends. Mo was the perfect compliment to Whitlock’s work. Not attempting to replicate the guitar parts as on record, Mo instead added his own soulful and stirring slide and fret work to every song.

After the show, Mo handed me a CD as I headed to my car. A six-song EP, ''Two Ton Message'', it was an impressively heavy offering of rock from a power trio, but sounded like Mo was still searching, rather than having found his groove.

This [http://www.ticketfly.com/event/1715652?utm_medium=api|Thursday], Mo returns to [http://eddiesattic.com|Eddie’s Attic] with __Moses Mo and the Real Cool Band__ ( Mo; __Kerry Denton__, drums; __Mikey Long__, bass; __ZeroBasement__, rap verses; and __PoiZen EV__, percussion and background vocals) to celebrate the band’s debut release, ''Drive In''. A mixture of rock with rap accents, there’s also a Southern-inspired grittiness to the music that makes this third “solo” album from Mo his most realized yet.

Solo, as used above, is in quotes, because, while most of the songs are his compositions, Mo prefers to work in a band setting. “Bands have always been used as promotional tools for the music,” he observes. “I realize the need to perform the songs for them to be heard, but I'm not comfortable as a solo performer. Also, I didn’t really want a group of highly skilled performers, often high-strung, and needing a different kind of attention, than I was willing to provide for them. I wanted a group I was comfortable with, made up of people skilled, talented, but still needing polish, as I see myself. People who lived close to me, so we could work together and grow a sound together. Knowing these things take time, I was also looking for a friendly, like-minded group; each person with an artistic passion for music, wanting to grow. Most exciting is watching and listening to how far we have come!  We're making it together. It's not just about me; there is a lot of personality and artistic expression going on here. I’m feeling it, they're feeling it, the audience is beginning to feel it — and it's fun.  We look forward to sharing what we have with all who show up on Thursday.”

__Feast of friends dept. …__ Thanksgiving has come and gone. Thankfully. The holiday seemed relatively quiet this year. Thanksgiving used to be a busy night in Atlanta: More bars and clubs were open, people were out with friends rather than getting claustrophobic at home surrounded by family long after the turkey had gotten cold. There was the run of __R.E.M.__ “homecoming” shows at the Fox Theatre, which actually occurred less often than people remember; __Keith Richards__’ unforgettable solo show at the Fox Theatre in 1988; and in the mid-’70s, __Bruce Hampton__ and __Glenn Phillips__ seemed to always find a stage to call home on Thanksgiving night. That’s not the case at local venues any longer, other than the annual Star Bar get together — at least that’s advertised. Phillips has claimed the night after Thanksgiving for his annual event, with most clubs following suit, booking local acts the nights following Thanksgiving, while staying dark Thanksgiving night. __Tinsley Ellis__ sold out the City Winery last Friday, __Shawn Mullins__ held court at the Variety Playhouse Saturday night, the __Black Lips__ descended upon the Earl for two nights, __Mother’s Finest__ rocked the Buckhead Theatre for two nights, __Blackberry Smoke__ had a homecoming at the Tabernacle, and Southern transplant __David Lowery__ was at Eddie’s Attic.

Friday night in Duluth, __[http://eddieowenpresents.com|Eddie Owen Presents at the Red Clay Music Foundry]__ filled the theater with its Songwriters Open Mic Shootout #10, the culmination of a year’s worth of winners of its monthly Songwriter’s Open Mic nights, or “hootenannies,” as Owen calls them. It’s a smart idea, holding the grand finale just after Thanksgiving, guaranteeing that people will be drawn to the Foundry to see their son, daughter, sibling, or friend vying for first place. During the first three rounds, I picked the songwriters I thought should win. Each time, my choice placed second out of the two, making it clear the seven judges and I have different ideas about good and better.

One singer-songwriter we seemed to agree on was __[https://www.walterparks.com/website/|Walter Parks]__, a tall, lean guitarist with a forked beard and a wide-brimmed hat. He had a way with words, not only in how he put them together, but how he sang them, his voice as much an instrument as the one he held in his hands. His [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYMBPky-BUc|songs] were new to me, but his face looked familiar. When Owen announced Parks used to play in a guitar/cello duo, I knew my memory hadn’t failed me. Parks and Stephanie Winters made up __The Nudes, __who played 688 many times in the ’80s. They were a favorite of mine then, and though Parks’ current approach is different, his music still has my attention. Seeing that solid [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBdg5RQS3LU|songwriting] is still his strength, I found myself hoping he’d advance over the course of the shootout (especially after my dog in the race got put out). Parks held his own, placing in the final round, until __[http://www.nathanevansfox.com/epk/|Nathan Evans Fox], __who was riding a hot streak of judges’ votes, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGMuytwnvgc|prevailed]. I was surprised Parks didn’t win, even if, more times than not Friday night, the judges and I heard and saw things differently."
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post-Thanksgiving songwriting feast at Red Clay Music Foundry 11324  2018-11-27T19:32:29+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Moses Mo’s Finest tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-11-27T19:32:29+00:00  As the guitarist and a founding member of Mother’s Finest, the funk rock band that helped propel Atlanta into the national spotlight as a viable music scene in the mid-’70s, Moses Mo doesn’t need to prove himself these days. He’s done his time in rock ’n’ roll Babylon, toured the world, and shared stages with a veritable who’s who of performers.

Nevertheless, he’s always been a bit restless over the years, finding his way onto Atlanta stages with local and touring bands remember Illusion?), always expressing a side of himself that’s certainly a part of his Mother’s Finest oeuvre, but also pushing the boundaries of what his followers expect.

Almost two years ago, Atlantans were fortunate enough to see Mo sit in with Bobby Whitlock and CoCo Carmel at Eddie’s Attic. Whitlock, known for his contributions to Derek & the Dominos’ Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (Eric Clapton’s attempt at forming a band after his first solo album), not to mention George Harrison’s first solo venture, All Things Must Pass, had invited Mo to join them as the singer/keyboardist/guitarist took the audience on a musical journey through the songs he’d recorded with his stellar friends. Mo was the perfect compliment to Whitlock’s work. Not attempting to replicate the guitar parts as on record, Mo instead added his own soulful and stirring slide and fret work to every song.

After the show, Mo handed me a CD as I headed to my car. A six-song EP, Two Ton Message, it was an impressively heavy offering of rock from a power trio, but sounded like Mo was still searching, rather than having found his groove.

This Thursday, Mo returns to Eddie’s Attic with Moses Mo and the Real Cool Band ( Mo; Kerry Denton, drums; Mikey Long, bass; ZeroBasement, rap verses; and PoiZen EV, percussion and background vocals) to celebrate the band’s debut release, Drive In. A mixture of rock with rap accents, there’s also a Southern-inspired grittiness to the music that makes this third “solo” album from Mo his most realized yet.

Solo, as used above, is in quotes, because, while most of the songs are his compositions, Mo prefers to work in a band setting. “Bands have always been used as promotional tools for the music,” he observes. “I realize the need to perform the songs for them to be heard, but I'm not comfortable as a solo performer. Also, I didn’t really want a group of highly skilled performers, often high-strung, and needing a different kind of attention, than I was willing to provide for them. I wanted a group I was comfortable with, made up of people skilled, talented, but still needing polish, as I see myself. People who lived close to me, so we could work together and grow a sound together. Knowing these things take time, I was also looking for a friendly, like-minded group; each person with an artistic passion for music, wanting to grow. Most exciting is watching and listening to how far we have come!  We're making it together. It's not just about me; there is a lot of personality and artistic expression going on here. I’m feeling it, they're feeling it, the audience is beginning to feel it — and it's fun.  We look forward to sharing what we have with all who show up on Thursday.”

Feast of friends dept. … Thanksgiving has come and gone. Thankfully. The holiday seemed relatively quiet this year. Thanksgiving used to be a busy night in Atlanta: More bars and clubs were open, people were out with friends rather than getting claustrophobic at home surrounded by family long after the turkey had gotten cold. There was the run of R.E.M. “homecoming” shows at the Fox Theatre, which actually occurred less often than people remember; Keith Richards’ unforgettable solo show at the Fox Theatre in 1988; and in the mid-’70s, Bruce Hampton and Glenn Phillips seemed to always find a stage to call home on Thanksgiving night. That’s not the case at local venues any longer, other than the annual Star Bar get together — at least that’s advertised. Phillips has claimed the night after Thanksgiving for his annual event, with most clubs following suit, booking local acts the nights following Thanksgiving, while staying dark Thanksgiving night. Tinsley Ellis sold out the City Winery last Friday, Shawn Mullins held court at the Variety Playhouse Saturday night, the Black Lips descended upon the Earl for two nights, Mother’s Finest rocked the Buckhead Theatre for two nights, Blackberry Smoke had a homecoming at the Tabernacle, and Southern transplant David Lowery was at Eddie’s Attic.

Friday night in Duluth, Eddie Owen Presents at the Red Clay Music Foundry filled the theater with its Songwriters Open Mic Shootout #10, the culmination of a year’s worth of winners of its monthly Songwriter’s Open Mic nights, or “hootenannies,” as Owen calls them. It’s a smart idea, holding the grand finale just after Thanksgiving, guaranteeing that people will be drawn to the Foundry to see their son, daughter, sibling, or friend vying for first place. During the first three rounds, I picked the songwriters I thought should win. Each time, my choice placed second out of the two, making it clear the seven judges and I have different ideas about good and better.

One singer-songwriter we seemed to agree on was Walter Parks, a tall, lean guitarist with a forked beard and a wide-brimmed hat. He had a way with words, not only in how he put them together, but how he sang them, his voice as much an instrument as the one he held in his hands. His songs were new to me, but his face looked familiar. When Owen announced Parks used to play in a guitar/cello duo, I knew my memory hadn’t failed me. Parks and Stephanie Winters made up The Nudes, who played 688 many times in the ’80s. They were a favorite of mine then, and though Parks’ current approach is different, his music still has my attention. Seeing that solid songwriting is still his strength, I found myself hoping he’d advance over the course of the shootout (especially after my dog in the race got put out). Parks held his own, placing in the final round, until Nathan Evans Fox, who was riding a hot streak of judges’ votes, prevailed. I was surprised Parks didn’t win, even if, more times than not Friday night, the judges and I heard and saw things differently.    KAY FREEMAN PROPERLY NAMED: Moses Mo and the Real Cool Band.      MosesMo Mother'sFinest Walter Parks                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Moses Mo’s Finest "
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Music, High Frequencies

Tuesday November 27, 2018 02:32 pm EST
The guitarist debuts "Drive In" at Eddie’s Attic;



post-Thanksgiving songwriting feast at Red Clay Music Foundry

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  string(8087) "With Georgia’s gubernatorial election yet to be decided — Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams demanding every vote be accounted for in her hotly contested race against Republican Brian Kemp — and the outcome of other elections across the U.S. being overturned and run-offs being forced, some Americans are certainly heading into the 2020s taking a stand, demonstrating that the hatred, fear-mongering and bigotry of the man in the White House will not be tolerated. While many hang on his every word, seemingly acting out by killing others as if being told to do so by his reckless and uncaring words and demeanor, others have taken to the polls to say “enough,” voting to turn their states from red to blue. A fitting choice of colors. Red the color of blood bleeding out of a dying victim of a stabbing or gunshot wound; blue the perceived color of blood pumping through our veins, giving us life and a chance at survival. In the 2018 midterm elections, the turning of the House gives us hope, the Senate still a casualty of racism and greed.

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Everyone can take a stand, no matter how small. As Laozi (not Confucius) stated, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”

Singer Mike Veal has taken a stand, aiding a fellow musician overwhelmed with medical bills and the loss of income due to illness. Expect a number of old friends, familiar faces and and a few surprise guests onstage at the Vista Room Friday, Nov. 16, when the Oak Grove club hosts a benefit concert organized by Veal for musician Tommy Talton. An effort to help the longtime singer/songwriter with medical expenses incurred after doctors successfully removed three cancerous lesions in his lungs in October, the show features Wet Willie and the Mike Veal Band, with a number of other Georgia musicians rearranging their schedules to take part.



Talton has extended ties to the Georgia music scene, having been a member of Cowboy, the band he co-founded with the late Scott Boyer before releasing a series of albums on Phil Walden’s Macon-based Capricorn Records. Cowboy, whose vocal harmonies and peaceful, easy feeling lyrics should’ve given the Eagles a run for their money, never fully established itself in the shadows of other artists on the label like the Allman Brothers Band, the Marshall Tucker Band, Wet Willie and the Dixie Dregs. Nevertheless, the band’s first two albums, Reach for the Sky and 5’ll Getcha Ten stand as certified classics, helping define the genre of Southern Rock, with Talton continuing to write inspired and exceptional songs throughout his career.

Talton knows he is lucky. Thanks to a preventive x-ray, the lesions were discovered early in their development and were removed during surgery Oct. 23. While the prognosis is positive, Talton says he is “moved and amazed by the outpouring of love , prayers and well-wishes from so many people all over the U.S. and the world.” Recovering at home, the guitarist is ready to move forward. “I am getting stronger,” he says,  “and working to get out to play more music!”

Veal, a longtime friend of Talton’s, describes him as “a Southern singer-songwriter who's passion for music has carried across decades.” Veal, whose own band will be performing Friday night, has worked hard to bring musicians together to aid Talton. Wet Willie, led by brothers Jimmy and Jack Hall, top the bill. Rev Jeff Mosier, who at the time of this posting was still putting a band together, says he “will be performing a short set that will include two songs of Tommy Talton’s. I will have Neal Fountain on bass (from Project Z with Jimmy Herring) and Tyler Neal on slide guitar (from the Madrid Express, Col. Bruce Hampton’s last band, and the Tyler Neal Band).” Caroline Aiken will also perform, as will Kelvin Holly and Eddie Stone.

Sean Keenan, owner/operator of the Vista Room, says, “because it's a benefit, and the nature of these shows tend to have more people get on board as it gets closer, it's still a work in progress.” He expects others “from the jam/folk/Americana scene” to sign up in the days leading up to the show.

With all proceeds from ticket sales and table fees, and a percentage of food and beverage sales going to the Talton’s medical fund, it’s a good time to get to the Vista Room early and order some items for dinner off the menu of the club’s adjacent restaurant, Napoleon’s Grill. As Keenan urges, “Let’s celebrate Tommy and help him get back on his feet and back on stage!”

The Athens-based of Montreal, playing Terminal West this Saturday, Nov. 17, has taken a stand. In September of this year, the Kevin Barnes-led group said no to apartheid and cancelled its performance at the Meteor Festival in Israel, joining Roger Waters, Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel, Lorde, Lana Del Ray, and others in supporting the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement, which seeks to end international support for Israel’s oppression of Palestinians and pressure Israel to comply with international law. Known as members of the Elephant 6 collective, of Montreal with over 20 years and seeminly as many releases behind them, has enjoyed a large international following, with more success overseas than stateside. Saturday night’s gig should prove to be a welcomed  homecoming.


 

Congratulations to both Wuxtry Records and the Swimming Pool Q’s for surviving forty years in the Atlanta music scene. They celebrated Friday, Nov. 9 with a tag-team party at the Vista Room. Surprise knock-out of the night was 3, the band opening the show, comprised of two-thirds of 86, Ken Schenck and Max Koshewa on guitar and bass, respectively, joined by Wuxtry manager Richard Kuykendall on drums. Their set rocked — and certainly gives 86, regrouping at the end of the month with original drummer Mac McNeilly, a lot to live up to. 86 plays Henry Owings’ 50th birthday celebration Friday, Nov. 30, for an early bird special at the Earl, followed by a late set Saturday, Dec. 1, at 529.


Pylon Reenactment Society, the Athens band lead by former Pylon vocalist Vanessa Briscoe Hay, release a new single, “Messenger” b/w “Cliff Notes” via Chunklet Industries at the end of the month. The band is taking a stand, releasing the seven-inch vinyl in clear blue (“Let’s turn GA blue y’all!,” is the members’s reasoning), clear and traditional black. At the band’s recent 529 gig, a limited number of test pressings were sold — and a few lucky people also were able to get their hands on small, plastic pylons autographed by all the members of the band.

The two songs were recorded and mixed by Jason NeSmith at his home studio; he mastered them at Chase Park Transduction. Graphics are by Pylon bassist Michael Lachowski utilizing photography by John Boydston. The video was directed and edited by Tony Brazier, who is currently working on “Athens, GA…30 Year On” and is an amalgamation of live footage interspersed with home movies and clips shot by the band members on their cell phone cameras.

James Kelly once again takes a stand, hosting the 8th Semi-Annual RECORD/CD sale to raise funds for various people’s medical expenses on Saturday Nov. 17, from 9AM - 3PM at 170 Pearl Street (30316) in Cabbagetown. Kelly says to "Look for the big blue "PABST" banner." As usual, Greg Germani will be one of the beneficiaries, with Kelly also sending a portion of the proceeds to the victims of the recent hurricane in Mexico Beach, and part to Atlanta musician Joe Foy."
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Yes, it’s time to take a stand. No more laughing at the absurdity and unbelievability of of our political landscape. And people are doing so, from the devastating fires of California to the voter suppression in Georgia, people are not admitting defeat, but fighting the good fight. Neil Young, who just turned 73 and lost yet another home to climate change enabling the wildfires of Southern California, has taken a stand, rebuffing illogical tweets. Abrams, demanding every vote in Georgia be counted, is taking a stand.

Everyone can take a stand, no matter how small. As Laozi (not Confucius) stated, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”

Singer __Mike Veal__ has taken a stand, aiding a fellow musician overwhelmed with medical bills and the loss of income due to illness. Expect a number of old friends, familiar faces and and a few surprise guests onstage at the [https://www.thevistaroom.com|Vista Room] Friday, Nov. 16, when the Oak Grove club [https://www.freshtix.com/events/tommytaltonbenefit|hosts a benefit] concert organized by Veal for musician __[http://www.tommytaltonmusic.com|Tommy Talton]__. An effort to help the longtime singer/songwriter with medical expenses incurred after doctors successfully removed three cancerous lesions in his lungs in October, the show features [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet_Willie|Wet Willie] and the [http://www.mikevealband.com|Mike Veal Band], with a number of other Georgia musicians rearranging their schedules to take part.

{img fileId="7777" imalign="center" link="http://loafdeals.com/deals/all/15?utm_source=CL_High_Freq_LD"}

Talton has extended ties to the Georgia music scene, having been a member of __Cowboy__, the band he co-founded with the late Scott Boyer before releasing a series of albums on Phil Walden’s Macon-based Capricorn Records. Cowboy, whose vocal harmonies and peaceful, easy feeling lyrics should’ve given the Eagles a run for their money, never fully established itself in the shadows of other artists on the label like the Allman Brothers Band, the Marshall Tucker Band, Wet Willie and the Dixie Dregs. Nevertheless, the band’s first two albums, ''Reach for the Sky'' and ''5’ll Getcha Ten'' stand as certified classics, helping define the genre of Southern Rock, with Talton continuing to write inspired and exceptional songs throughout his career.

Talton knows he is lucky. Thanks to a preventive x-ray, the lesions were discovered early in their development and were removed during surgery Oct. 23. While the prognosis is positive, Talton says he is “moved and amazed by the outpouring of love , prayers and well-wishes from so many people all over the U.S. and the world.” Recovering at home, the guitarist is ready to move forward. “I am getting stronger,” he says,  “and working to get out to play more music!”

Veal, a longtime friend of Talton’s, describes him as “a Southern singer-songwriter who's passion for music has carried across decades.” Veal, whose own band will be performing Friday night, has worked hard to bring musicians together to aid Talton. Wet Willie, led by brothers Jimmy and Jack Hall, top the bill. __[http://www.revjeffmosier.com|Rev Jeff Mosier]__, who at the time of this posting was still putting a band together, says he “will be performing a short set that will include two songs of Tommy Talton’s. I will have Neal Fountain on bass (from Project Z with Jimmy Herring) and Tyler Neal on slide guitar (from the Madrid Express, Col. Bruce Hampton’s last band, and the [https://soundcloud.com/tylernealband|Tyler Neal Band]).” __[http://carolineaiken.com|Caroline Aiken]__ will also perform, as will Kelvin Holly and Eddie Stone.

__Sean Keenan__, owner/operator of the Vista Room, says, “because it's a benefit, and the nature of these shows tend to have more people get on board as it gets closer, it's still a work in progress.” He expects others “from the jam/folk/Americana scene” to sign up in the days leading up to the show.

With all proceeds from ticket sales and table fees, and a percentage of food and beverage sales going to the Talton’s medical fund, it’s a good time to get to the Vista Room early and order some items for dinner off the [https://www.napoleonsgrill.com/menus-1|menu] of the club’s adjacent restaurant, __Napoleon’s Grill__. As Keenan urges, “Let’s celebrate Tommy and help him get back on his feet and back on stage!”

The Athens-based __[https://www.ofmontreal.net|of Montreal]__, playing [http://terminalwestatl.com|Terminal West] this [https://www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/1719886?utm_medium=api|Saturday, Nov. 17], has taken a stand. In September of this year, the Kevin Barnes-led group said no to apartheid and cancelled its performance at the Meteor Festival in Israel, joining Roger Waters, Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel, Lorde, Lana Del Ray, and others in supporting the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions [https://bdsmovement.net|movement], which seeks to end international support for Israel’s oppression of Palestinians and pressure Israel to comply with international law. Known as members of the __Elephant 6__ collective, of Montreal with over 20 years and seeminly as many releases behind them, has enjoyed a large international following, with more success overseas than stateside. Saturday night’s gig should prove to be a welcomed  homecoming.

{img fileId="10954" align="center" width="900" desc="BEHIND MAC’S BACK: 3 (Schenck, Kuykendall, Koshewa) relive 86 at the Vista Room. Photo by Tony Paris"}
 

Congratulations to both __[http://www.wuxtryrecords.com|Wuxtry Records]__ and the __[http://www.swimmingpoolqs.com|Swimming Pool Q’s]__ for surviving forty years in the Atlanta music scene. They celebrated Friday, Nov. 9 with a tag-team party at the Vista Room. Surprise knock-out of the night was 3, the band opening the show, comprised of two-thirds of __86__, __Ken__ __Schenck__ and __Max Koshewa__ on guitar and bass, respectively, joined by Wuxtry manager __Richard Kuykendall__ on drums. Their set rocked — and certainly gives 86, regrouping at the end of the month with original drummer __Mac McNeilly__, a lot to live up to. 86 plays __[https://creativeloafing.com/content-416367-HIGH-FREQUENCIES-Henry-Owings-is-having-a-birthday-party-and-you-re-not|Henry Owings]__’ 50th birthday celebration Friday, Nov. 30, for an early bird special at [http://www.badearl.com/events/4932/H2O50-Party-NIGHT-1|the Earl], followed by a late set Saturday, Dec. 1, at [https://www.freshtix.com/events/h2o50pass-night2|529].


__[https://www.pylonreenactmentsociety.com|Pylon Reenactment Society]__, the Athens band lead by former Pylon vocalist __Vanessa Briscoe Hay,__ release a new single, “Messenger” b/w “Cliff Notes” via [https://chunklet.bandcamp.com|Chunklet Industries] at the end of the month. The band is taking a stand, releasing the seven-inch vinyl in clear blue (“Let’s turn GA blue y’all!,” is the members’s reasoning), clear and traditional black. At the band’s recent 529 gig, a limited number of test pressings were sold — and a few lucky people also were able to get their hands on small, plastic pylons autographed by all the members of the band.

The two songs were recorded and mixed by __Jason NeSmith__ at his home studio; he mastered them at __Chase Park Transduction__. Graphics are by Pylon bassist __Michael Lachowski__ utilizing photography by __John Boydston__. The [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0BNoYEg_wo|video] was directed and edited by __Tony Brazier__, who is currently working on “Athens, GA…30 Year On” and is an amalgamation of live footage interspersed with home movies and clips shot by the band members on their cell phone cameras.

__James Kelly__ once again takes a stand, hosting the __8th Semi-Annual RECORD/CD sale__ to raise funds for various people’s medical expenses on [https://www.facebook.com/events/350595752360338/|Saturday Nov. 17], from 9AM - 3PM at 170 Pearl Street (30316) in Cabbagetown. Kelly says to "Look for the big blue "PABST" banner." As usual, Greg Germani will be one of the beneficiaries, with Kelly also sending a portion of the proceeds to the victims of the recent hurricane in Mexico Beach, and part to Atlanta musician Joe Foy."
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  string(8519) " Lead Photo Tommy Talton  2018-11-13T16:33:16+00:00 Lead photo Tommy Talton.jpeg     The Vista Room hosts a benefit for Tommy Talton 10945  2018-11-13T16:36:01+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Fight the good fight tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-11-13T16:36:01+00:00  With Georgia’s gubernatorial election yet to be decided — Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams demanding every vote be accounted for in her hotly contested race against Republican Brian Kemp — and the outcome of other elections across the U.S. being overturned and run-offs being forced, some Americans are certainly heading into the 2020s taking a stand, demonstrating that the hatred, fear-mongering and bigotry of the man in the White House will not be tolerated. While many hang on his every word, seemingly acting out by killing others as if being told to do so by his reckless and uncaring words and demeanor, others have taken to the polls to say “enough,” voting to turn their states from red to blue. A fitting choice of colors. Red the color of blood bleeding out of a dying victim of a stabbing or gunshot wound; blue the perceived color of blood pumping through our veins, giving us life and a chance at survival. In the 2018 midterm elections, the turning of the House gives us hope, the Senate still a casualty of racism and greed.

Yes, it’s time to take a stand. No more laughing at the absurdity and unbelievability of of our political landscape. And people are doing so, from the devastating fires of California to the voter suppression in Georgia, people are not admitting defeat, but fighting the good fight. Neil Young, who just turned 73 and lost yet another home to climate change enabling the wildfires of Southern California, has taken a stand, rebuffing illogical tweets. Abrams, demanding every vote in Georgia be counted, is taking a stand.

Everyone can take a stand, no matter how small. As Laozi (not Confucius) stated, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”

Singer Mike Veal has taken a stand, aiding a fellow musician overwhelmed with medical bills and the loss of income due to illness. Expect a number of old friends, familiar faces and and a few surprise guests onstage at the Vista Room Friday, Nov. 16, when the Oak Grove club hosts a benefit concert organized by Veal for musician Tommy Talton. An effort to help the longtime singer/songwriter with medical expenses incurred after doctors successfully removed three cancerous lesions in his lungs in October, the show features Wet Willie and the Mike Veal Band, with a number of other Georgia musicians rearranging their schedules to take part.



Talton has extended ties to the Georgia music scene, having been a member of Cowboy, the band he co-founded with the late Scott Boyer before releasing a series of albums on Phil Walden’s Macon-based Capricorn Records. Cowboy, whose vocal harmonies and peaceful, easy feeling lyrics should’ve given the Eagles a run for their money, never fully established itself in the shadows of other artists on the label like the Allman Brothers Band, the Marshall Tucker Band, Wet Willie and the Dixie Dregs. Nevertheless, the band’s first two albums, Reach for the Sky and 5’ll Getcha Ten stand as certified classics, helping define the genre of Southern Rock, with Talton continuing to write inspired and exceptional songs throughout his career.

Talton knows he is lucky. Thanks to a preventive x-ray, the lesions were discovered early in their development and were removed during surgery Oct. 23. While the prognosis is positive, Talton says he is “moved and amazed by the outpouring of love , prayers and well-wishes from so many people all over the U.S. and the world.” Recovering at home, the guitarist is ready to move forward. “I am getting stronger,” he says,  “and working to get out to play more music!”

Veal, a longtime friend of Talton’s, describes him as “a Southern singer-songwriter who's passion for music has carried across decades.” Veal, whose own band will be performing Friday night, has worked hard to bring musicians together to aid Talton. Wet Willie, led by brothers Jimmy and Jack Hall, top the bill. Rev Jeff Mosier, who at the time of this posting was still putting a band together, says he “will be performing a short set that will include two songs of Tommy Talton’s. I will have Neal Fountain on bass (from Project Z with Jimmy Herring) and Tyler Neal on slide guitar (from the Madrid Express, Col. Bruce Hampton’s last band, and the Tyler Neal Band).” Caroline Aiken will also perform, as will Kelvin Holly and Eddie Stone.

Sean Keenan, owner/operator of the Vista Room, says, “because it's a benefit, and the nature of these shows tend to have more people get on board as it gets closer, it's still a work in progress.” He expects others “from the jam/folk/Americana scene” to sign up in the days leading up to the show.

With all proceeds from ticket sales and table fees, and a percentage of food and beverage sales going to the Talton’s medical fund, it’s a good time to get to the Vista Room early and order some items for dinner off the menu of the club’s adjacent restaurant, Napoleon’s Grill. As Keenan urges, “Let’s celebrate Tommy and help him get back on his feet and back on stage!”

The Athens-based of Montreal, playing Terminal West this Saturday, Nov. 17, has taken a stand. In September of this year, the Kevin Barnes-led group said no to apartheid and cancelled its performance at the Meteor Festival in Israel, joining Roger Waters, Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel, Lorde, Lana Del Ray, and others in supporting the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement, which seeks to end international support for Israel’s oppression of Palestinians and pressure Israel to comply with international law. Known as members of the Elephant 6 collective, of Montreal with over 20 years and seeminly as many releases behind them, has enjoyed a large international following, with more success overseas than stateside. Saturday night’s gig should prove to be a welcomed  homecoming.


 

Congratulations to both Wuxtry Records and the Swimming Pool Q’s for surviving forty years in the Atlanta music scene. They celebrated Friday, Nov. 9 with a tag-team party at the Vista Room. Surprise knock-out of the night was 3, the band opening the show, comprised of two-thirds of 86, Ken Schenck and Max Koshewa on guitar and bass, respectively, joined by Wuxtry manager Richard Kuykendall on drums. Their set rocked — and certainly gives 86, regrouping at the end of the month with original drummer Mac McNeilly, a lot to live up to. 86 plays Henry Owings’ 50th birthday celebration Friday, Nov. 30, for an early bird special at the Earl, followed by a late set Saturday, Dec. 1, at 529.


Pylon Reenactment Society, the Athens band lead by former Pylon vocalist Vanessa Briscoe Hay, release a new single, “Messenger” b/w “Cliff Notes” via Chunklet Industries at the end of the month. The band is taking a stand, releasing the seven-inch vinyl in clear blue (“Let’s turn GA blue y’all!,” is the members’s reasoning), clear and traditional black. At the band’s recent 529 gig, a limited number of test pressings were sold — and a few lucky people also were able to get their hands on small, plastic pylons autographed by all the members of the band.

The two songs were recorded and mixed by Jason NeSmith at his home studio; he mastered them at Chase Park Transduction. Graphics are by Pylon bassist Michael Lachowski utilizing photography by John Boydston. The video was directed and edited by Tony Brazier, who is currently working on “Athens, GA…30 Year On” and is an amalgamation of live footage interspersed with home movies and clips shot by the band members on their cell phone cameras.

James Kelly once again takes a stand, hosting the 8th Semi-Annual RECORD/CD sale to raise funds for various people’s medical expenses on Saturday Nov. 17, from 9AM - 3PM at 170 Pearl Street (30316) in Cabbagetown. Kelly says to "Look for the big blue "PABST" banner." As usual, Greg Germani will be one of the beneficiaries, with Kelly also sending a portion of the proceeds to the victims of the recent hurricane in Mexico Beach, and part to Atlanta musician Joe Foy.    Courtesy Tommy Talton YOU GET WHAT YOU GIVE: Tommy Talton.                                   HIGH FREQUENCIES: Fight the good fight "
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Homepage, Music, High Frequencies

Tuesday November 13, 2018 11:36 am EST
The Vista Room hosts a benefit for Tommy Talton | more...
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  string(6078) "This Sunday, November 4, it’s time to “fall back,” to set our clocks back one hour to standard time from summer’s daylight savings time. With the midterm elections coming up on Tuesday, social media is filled with reminders for people to vote — and reminders that Republican wins this election could see the country itself fall back, erasing the decades of progress the United States has made in civil rights, human rights, and in  the rights of people of color, women, and LGBTQ people. It’s important to vote this Tuesday, now more than ever, to make your voice heard.


It’s especially true in our own state of Georgia, where Brian Kemp, the Republican candidate running for the office of governor is also the Secretary of State, and by being so, virtually runs the election. Not surprisingly, with the fox guarding the hen house, Kemp has been instrumental in purging voters from the state’s voter rolls and creating “can’t vote” lists, and even attempted to close voting locations in places with high African-American populations, so as to eliminate possible votes for Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams, herself an African-American. Yes, the candidate too scared to face Abrams in the final gubernatorial debate has been attempting to steal the election right under constituents’ noses. Luckily, people have stood up to his egregious actions, and, in most cases, have kept the man who likes to point shotguns at children at bay. Tuesday, it’s up to you to vote. Remember the words of the late Vernon Dahmer, who died leading voter registration drives in Hattiesburg, MS, in the ’60s: “If you don’t vote, you don’t count.”


Turning the clocks back, the possibility of an election turning progress back, the fact that so many people want to reverse hard-won changes instead of embrace them — something I can’t understand — reminds me of “Back in Time,” a song by the Atlanta band Blue TV, with its refrain, “I don’t want to go back in time.”

 


Singer Doug Hamilton, who wrote the song in the early ’80s, after punk and new wave had made their musical impact and college radio was heralding “new music,” remembers it was not the zeitgeist of the Reagan years, when many Americans first started to look back socially and politically, but the then-nascent nostalgia for music of the ’60s that inspired it—though the music itself meant nothing to him. “At that age (late teens to early 20s), you always think the time you're living in is the coolest, and the early ’80s was a pretty cool time, musically at least. Politically, maybe not so much!”


“It definitely has more of a coherent theme than most other lyrics I wrote,” the singer acknowledges, “but I'm pretty sure the idea came about like they all did: I would listen to the music and a phrase would pop into my head — in this case, ‘I don't wanna go back in time’ — and then I'd build the rest of the song around that phrase. This process usually involved me replaying the practice cassette over and over and then pacing around my bedroom, muttering to myself!”


I mention to Hamilton — who now lives in England, a country plagued with Brexit, its own journey to the past — that three decades later, “Back in Time” is just as relevant now as it was when he wrote it, albeit for different reasons.


“I broadened the idea to include all nostalgia,” he admits. “We were seeing a lot about ‘the good old days’ in the media from Reagan and the Religious Right and stuff,” he recalls of the time when Blue TV — Hamilton on vocals with guitarist Jeff Cohen, bassist Jan Dykes, and a revolving cast of drummers — was a draw in Atlanta, “but I didn't set out to make a statement. The idea just came to me organically.”


Those of you registered to vote can make a statement Tuesday, November 6. It’s simple. Vote.


Hamilton and fans of Blue TV, as well as any nightly patron of 688 or the Bistro, may not have wanted anything to do with the nostalgia for music of the ’60s back then, but that’s hardly the case today. With the golden anniversary of 1968 as the rallying cry, record companies are pumping out 50-anniversary editions of albums as fast as they can, capitalizing on some of the landmark records originally released that year. Out November 9 are 50-anniversary editions of both Electric Ladyland by the Jimi Hendrix Experience and “The White Album” by the Beatles.


The deluxe version of the Hendrix masterwork — the first and only album where the guitarist had complete control over the direction and production of his recording process — comes in both 3-CD/1-Blu-ray and 6-LP/1-Blu-ray box sets. The first CD features a newly remastered version of the original Electric Ladyland release (the sound is noticeably better, with better distinction between instrumentation than on previous compact disc releases), along with a second disc of early demos and outtakes from the recording sessions (most of these have not been heard by the casual fan, and while many tracks will be familiar to the hardcore Hendrix collector, even the latter will be surprised at some of the material included). The third disc captures Hendrix in concert at the Hollywood Bowl September 14, 1968, only a month before Electric Ladyland’s original release on October 16. The performance is inspired, though the audio is marred by this not being a professional recording. Nonetheless, it offers a glimpse of the energy and determination with which Hendrix was operating at this point in his career.


The Blu-ray disc includes At Last… The Beginning: The Making of Electric Ladyland, the Classic Albums documentary originally produced in 1997, but now with almost 40 minutes of previously-unseen footage. Perhaps the most exciting news here is that the Blu-ray includes the first 5.1 Surround Sound mix of a Hendrix album, with Hendrix engineer Eddie Kramer at the helm.


Hendrix may not live today, but the music he created continues to inspire — and sell."
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  string(6272) "This Sunday, November 4, it’s time to “fall back,” to set our clocks back one hour to standard time from summer’s daylight savings time. With the midterm elections coming up on Tuesday, social media is filled with reminders for people to vote — and reminders that Republican wins this election could see the country itself fall back, erasing the decades of progress the United States has made in civil rights, human rights, and in  the rights of people of color, women, and LGBTQ people. It’s important to vote this Tuesday, now more than ever, to make your voice heard.


It’s especially true in our own state of Georgia, where Brian Kemp, the Republican candidate running for the office of governor is also the Secretary of State, and by being so, virtually runs the election. Not surprisingly, with the fox guarding the hen house, Kemp has been instrumental in purging voters from the state’s voter rolls and creating “can’t vote” lists, and even attempted to close voting locations in places with high African-American populations, so as to eliminate possible votes for Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams, herself an African-American. Yes, the candidate too scared to face Abrams in the final gubernatorial debate has been attempting to steal the election right under constituents’ noses. Luckily, people have stood up to his egregious actions, and, in most cases, have kept the man who likes to point shotguns at children at bay. Tuesday, it’s up to you to vote. Remember the words of the late Vernon Dahmer, who died leading voter registration drives in Hattiesburg, MS, in the ’60s: “If you don’t vote, you don’t count.”


Turning the clocks back, the possibility of an election turning progress back, the fact that so many people want to reverse hard-won changes instead of embrace them — something I can’t understand — reminds me of [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2uLucXyZEw|“Back in Time,”] a song by the Atlanta band Blue TV, with its refrain, “I don’t want to go back in time.”

{img fileId="7777" imalign="center" link="http://loafdeals.com/deals/all/15?utm_source=CL_High_Freq_LD"} 


Singer Doug Hamilton, who wrote the song in the early ’80s, after punk and new wave had made their musical impact and college radio was heralding “new music,” remembers it was not the zeitgeist of the Reagan years, when many Americans first started to look back socially and politically, but the then-nascent nostalgia for music of the ’60s that inspired it—though the music itself meant nothing to him. “At that age (late teens to early 20s), you always think the time you're living in is the coolest, and the early ’80s was a pretty cool time, musically at least. Politically, maybe not so much!”


“It definitely has more of a coherent theme than most other lyrics I wrote,” the singer acknowledges, “but I'm pretty sure the idea came about like they all did: I would listen to the music and a phrase would pop into my head — in this case, ‘I don't wanna go back in time’ — and then I'd build the rest of the song around that phrase. This process usually involved me replaying the practice cassette over and over and then pacing around my bedroom, muttering to myself!”


I mention to Hamilton — who now lives in England, a country plagued with Brexit, its own journey to the past — that three decades later, “Back in Time” is just as relevant now as it was when he wrote it, albeit for different reasons.


“I broadened the idea to include all nostalgia,” he admits. “We were seeing a lot about ‘the good old days’ in the media from Reagan and the Religious Right and stuff,” he recalls of the time when Blue TV — Hamilton on vocals with guitarist Jeff Cohen, bassist Jan Dykes, and a revolving cast of drummers — was a draw in Atlanta, “but I didn't set out to make a statement. The idea just came to me organically.”


Those of you registered to vote can make a statement Tuesday, November 6. It’s simple. Vote.


Hamilton and fans of Blue TV, as well as any nightly patron of 688 or the Bistro, may not have wanted anything to do with the nostalgia for music of the ’60s back then, but that’s hardly the case today. With the golden anniversary of 1968 as the rallying cry, record companies are pumping out 50{SUP()}th{SUP}-anniversary editions of albums as fast as they can, capitalizing on some of the landmark records originally released that year. Out November 9 are 50{SUP()}th{SUP}-anniversary editions of both ''Electric Ladyland'' by the Jimi Hendrix Experience and “The White Album” by the Beatles.


The deluxe version of the Hendrix masterwork — the first and only album where the guitarist had complete control over the direction and production of his recording process — comes in both 3-CD/1-Blu-ray and 6-LP/1-Blu-ray box sets. The first CD features a newly remastered version of the original ''Electric Ladyland'' release (the sound is noticeably better, with better distinction between instrumentation than on previous compact disc releases), along with a second disc of early demos and outtakes from the recording sessions (most of these have not been heard by the casual fan, and while many tracks will be familiar to the hardcore Hendrix collector, even the latter will be surprised at some of the material included). The third disc captures Hendrix in concert at the Hollywood Bowl September 14, 1968, only a month before ''Electric Ladyland''’s original release on October 16. The performance is inspired, though the audio is marred by this not being a professional recording. Nonetheless, it offers a glimpse of the energy and determination with which Hendrix was operating at this point in his career.


The Blu-ray disc includes ''At Last… The Beginning: The Making of Electric Ladyland'', the Classic Albums documentary originally produced in 1997, but now with almost 40 minutes of previously-unseen footage. Perhaps the most exciting news here is that the Blu-ray includes the first 5.1 Surround Sound mix of a Hendrix album, with Hendrix engineer Eddie Kramer at the helm.


Hendrix may not live today, but the music he created continues to inspire — and sell."
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  string(6693) " BLUE TV Vote 1  2018-11-03T21:27:08+00:00 BLUE TV vote 1.jpeg   This writer is so FOS (lies and propaganda) bluetv 2018midterms Don’t look back, good days ahead for those who choose 10717  2018-11-03T21:26:48+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Now ain’t the time for your tears tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-11-03T21:26:48+00:00  This Sunday, November 4, it’s time to “fall back,” to set our clocks back one hour to standard time from summer’s daylight savings time. With the midterm elections coming up on Tuesday, social media is filled with reminders for people to vote — and reminders that Republican wins this election could see the country itself fall back, erasing the decades of progress the United States has made in civil rights, human rights, and in  the rights of people of color, women, and LGBTQ people. It’s important to vote this Tuesday, now more than ever, to make your voice heard.


It’s especially true in our own state of Georgia, where Brian Kemp, the Republican candidate running for the office of governor is also the Secretary of State, and by being so, virtually runs the election. Not surprisingly, with the fox guarding the hen house, Kemp has been instrumental in purging voters from the state’s voter rolls and creating “can’t vote” lists, and even attempted to close voting locations in places with high African-American populations, so as to eliminate possible votes for Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams, herself an African-American. Yes, the candidate too scared to face Abrams in the final gubernatorial debate has been attempting to steal the election right under constituents’ noses. Luckily, people have stood up to his egregious actions, and, in most cases, have kept the man who likes to point shotguns at children at bay. Tuesday, it’s up to you to vote. Remember the words of the late Vernon Dahmer, who died leading voter registration drives in Hattiesburg, MS, in the ’60s: “If you don’t vote, you don’t count.”


Turning the clocks back, the possibility of an election turning progress back, the fact that so many people want to reverse hard-won changes instead of embrace them — something I can’t understand — reminds me of “Back in Time,” a song by the Atlanta band Blue TV, with its refrain, “I don’t want to go back in time.”

 


Singer Doug Hamilton, who wrote the song in the early ’80s, after punk and new wave had made their musical impact and college radio was heralding “new music,” remembers it was not the zeitgeist of the Reagan years, when many Americans first started to look back socially and politically, but the then-nascent nostalgia for music of the ’60s that inspired it—though the music itself meant nothing to him. “At that age (late teens to early 20s), you always think the time you're living in is the coolest, and the early ’80s was a pretty cool time, musically at least. Politically, maybe not so much!”


“It definitely has more of a coherent theme than most other lyrics I wrote,” the singer acknowledges, “but I'm pretty sure the idea came about like they all did: I would listen to the music and a phrase would pop into my head — in this case, ‘I don't wanna go back in time’ — and then I'd build the rest of the song around that phrase. This process usually involved me replaying the practice cassette over and over and then pacing around my bedroom, muttering to myself!”


I mention to Hamilton — who now lives in England, a country plagued with Brexit, its own journey to the past — that three decades later, “Back in Time” is just as relevant now as it was when he wrote it, albeit for different reasons.


“I broadened the idea to include all nostalgia,” he admits. “We were seeing a lot about ‘the good old days’ in the media from Reagan and the Religious Right and stuff,” he recalls of the time when Blue TV — Hamilton on vocals with guitarist Jeff Cohen, bassist Jan Dykes, and a revolving cast of drummers — was a draw in Atlanta, “but I didn't set out to make a statement. The idea just came to me organically.”


Those of you registered to vote can make a statement Tuesday, November 6. It’s simple. Vote.


Hamilton and fans of Blue TV, as well as any nightly patron of 688 or the Bistro, may not have wanted anything to do with the nostalgia for music of the ’60s back then, but that’s hardly the case today. With the golden anniversary of 1968 as the rallying cry, record companies are pumping out 50-anniversary editions of albums as fast as they can, capitalizing on some of the landmark records originally released that year. Out November 9 are 50-anniversary editions of both Electric Ladyland by the Jimi Hendrix Experience and “The White Album” by the Beatles.


The deluxe version of the Hendrix masterwork — the first and only album where the guitarist had complete control over the direction and production of his recording process — comes in both 3-CD/1-Blu-ray and 6-LP/1-Blu-ray box sets. The first CD features a newly remastered version of the original Electric Ladyland release (the sound is noticeably better, with better distinction between instrumentation than on previous compact disc releases), along with a second disc of early demos and outtakes from the recording sessions (most of these have not been heard by the casual fan, and while many tracks will be familiar to the hardcore Hendrix collector, even the latter will be surprised at some of the material included). The third disc captures Hendrix in concert at the Hollywood Bowl September 14, 1968, only a month before Electric Ladyland’s original release on October 16. The performance is inspired, though the audio is marred by this not being a professional recording. Nonetheless, it offers a glimpse of the energy and determination with which Hendrix was operating at this point in his career.


The Blu-ray disc includes At Last… The Beginning: The Making of Electric Ladyland, the Classic Albums documentary originally produced in 1997, but now with almost 40 minutes of previously-unseen footage. Perhaps the most exciting news here is that the Blu-ray includes the first 5.1 Surround Sound mix of a Hendrix album, with Hendrix engineer Eddie Kramer at the helm.


Hendrix may not live today, but the music he created continues to inspire — and sell.    Courtesy Tony Paris Archives BACK IN THE DAY, NOT BACK IN TIME: Blue TV (from left): Jeff Cohen, Doug Hamilton, and JD Dykes onstage at 688.      BlueTV 2018Midterms                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Now ain’t the time for your tears "
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Don’t look back, good days ahead for those who choose | more...
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  string(8796) "I'd been complaining to Henry Owings that there was no one place to find information about the different events he has planned for his 50th birthday celebration. You know, no h2o website detailing the shows in Athens, Atlanta, and Roswell; no place to see which bands are performing and where.

"It’s my birthday. Not a branding experience," he says matter-of-factly. "People want to come? Cool."

It's that nonchalant manner of his that some might construe as arrogant or difficult, but really it's just Owings moving forward with his plans, not concerned about getting the recognition others might seek, but more focused on getting the job done. And having a good time while doing it.

It was earlier this year when the entrepreneur — he has a publishing company, a recording label that has released records and CDs by local and national touring bands, a fanzine website, and he's responsible for those ubiquitous "Mueller" buttons you've seen being worn by people concerned with the direction our country is headed — realized this year was a milestone for him that many mark in extravagant ways.

“I was standing in the Baltimore airport with my daughter back in March,” he recalls. “While we were waiting to board a flight back to Atlanta, a little voice in my head said, ‘Oh … I turn 50 this year!’ So, in the minutes before I boarded, I texted about four or five friends asking if they’d play my 50th birthday. By the time the door to the plane was shut, three bands had already confirmed. At that point, I felt it my duty to go as big as possible. Have bands that haven’t played in eons play more than once. Have friends mingle with other friends, many of whom had never met. Many who haven’t seen each other in decades. Sounds like a good party to me, especially considering I’ve never thrown a party for myself before! And the legendary 86 is playing their first show in 30 years, fer chrissakes! And Vanessa from Pylon is making me a cake, dammit!”



With so many bands apparently eager to indulge him, I wondered how Owings decided who he would ask to play?

“I just went through my life and was reminded of my favorite bands, not just as musicians, but as people — and who I would want at my birthday. The first band I asked was Man or Astro-Man? but that was only the beginning. Once I started flipping through my mental Rolodex, the bands just materialized. I wanted new bands, old bands, but the common thread I wanted was they were all friends of mine. No booking agents. Only one guarantee. No contracts. It’s my birthday, goddammit. Do I really need to justify anything?”

“I’m in the midst of putting together a program for my birthday parties. Writing about all of the people who are performing really gets me choked up. I’m a very lucky man, Tony,” Owings admits, though he also acknowledges there are those who turned him down.

“To those that are curious, I also am including a list of  bands in the program that I asked, who said ‘Thanks, but no thanks.’ It’s a short list, but even that list is impressive!” he boasts. “Back in my 20s, I couldn’t even imagine it doable, the idea of asking a band like Mission of Burma to play for me.”

In as much as Owings is throwing birthday parties for himself — and we get to live vicariously through his plans while actually being able to buy tickets to the events and take advantage of his celebrations — I mention that, while the shows seem to be about him, they can also be seen as a way of his giving back to the fans of these bands. They play multiple nights, the ticket prices are low, and the scheduling between Athens and Atlanta — and Roswell — doesn’t seem to conflict.

“That’s a nice way of thinking about it,” he agrees, but adds, in typical Owings fashion, “that has nothing to do with it. I just hate the idea of bands coming to town and playing but one show. Seriously? How can you ask The Velvet Monkeys or Come to fly in and just play 45 minutes!? Screw. That. I want to see them play for an entire week! Having Athens right there makes a second show for many of these bands inevitable. And Whirlyball? Well, that’s just the cherry on top. All ages. Brunch. What’s not to love?”

Whirlyball Atlanta, for those not in the know, is an amusement center in Roswell, Georgia, that functions as a place for corporate team building and private parties through fun. Whirleyball, the sport, is a combination of hockey, basketball, and lacrosse played from a bumper car in the complex.

Whirlyball Atlanta is also where Owings promoted countless shows before becoming a father. “Like, a lot. However, being a dad has taken priority. I feel like doing a show at Whirlyball for the first time in eight years is saying to people that maybe there will be more shows there in the future.” His enthusiasm isn’t just for presenting a show there for the first time, but for the place and sport itself. “Have you ever been? Have you ever seen it?” he animatedly asks me. “Dude, you seriously need to check it out!”

Owings’ enthusiasm aside, one wonders why some of these bands, like 86, who haven’t played together in decades, would agree to perform?

He’s quick to offer his explanation. “Because they’re so incredibly terrified of what I’d write about them in my fanzine if they don’t,” he declares, citing his publication, Chunklet, then lets you in on the joke. “You know, my fanzine that I haven’t published in nine years.”

“Joking aside,” he continues, “they’re all friends. Like real friends. Not these disingenuous ‘friends’ vis-a-vis the ‘industry,’ but rather people that have known me (in many cases) for more than 20 years. Through thick and thin. Through golf matches. Through them on tour. Through me on tour. Through us on tour together. Screw it, I just want a kick-ass birthday party, is that too much to ask?”

Owings also plans to mark the occasion of his 50th revolution around the sun with three 45 R.P.M. split singles featuring Man or Astro-man?/Tar; The Gotobeds/Honey Radar; and The Velvet Monkeys/Elf Power. And then there’s the aforementioned program he’s writing — and the poster he’s designing. T-shirts? He hasn’t said. After all, this is not a branding experience.

What bands are playing and where are the shows taking place? The information can be found at the end of this article.

Readers might notice one of the bands performing, Black to Comm, has never played before. They’re an MC5 tribute band — MC5 being one of Owings’ favorite bands — comprised of Shannon Mulvaney, Adam McIntyre, and Adam Renshaw — the three musicians who backed up MC5 co-founder Wayne Kramer for two shows last year in Athens and Atlanta.

When the three musicians were asked to play his birthday party, Owings says, “each gave a resounding, ‘Oh my god, yes.’ But the question on all their minds was who would sing. Well, I would! It’s my birthday after all! My original goal was to be as close to the “Black to Comm” riff as possible. The riff (from the first song MC5 ever wrote as a band), which even a bonehead like me can play, is a raga. Hypnotic. Powerful. And I just wanted to sing the lines to the song and then hear the riff for 30 minutes. Self indulgent? Sure. But you know what? It’s my 50th birthday and I can do what I want.”

“All I know is that we’re doing “Kick Out the Jams,” “Rama Lama Fa Fa Fa,” and “Black to Comm.” That’s how much of a fan I am. Anyway, we might do more. We might have guests performing onstage. I don’t know. Anybody who wants to get up onstage and dance while we ‘do our thang’ is more than welcome to. I wanna see a sea of hands.”

In addition to Henry Owings, others will be performing.

Thurs., Nov. 29, Athens:

40 Watt: Come, Elf Power, Arcwelder, Velvet Monkeys, Stroke Band — $15 adv/$20 dos.

Caledonia Lounge: Man or Astro-Man?, Pylon Reenactment Society, Tar, Gotobeds, Honey Radar — $15 adv/$20 dos. Two stage passes available: $30 adv/$35 dos

Fri., Nov. 30, Atlanta:

529: Man or Astro-Man?, Tar, Arcwelder, Velvet Monkeys, Stroke Band — $20 / $25 dos.

The EARL: Mercyland Historical Abstract, Gotobeds, Air-Sea Dolphin, Honey Radar, 86 — $20/$25 dos. Two stage passes available: $40 adv/$50 dos

Sat., Dec. 1, Atlanta:

529: 86, Come, Dead Now, The Purkinje Shift —  $20/$25 dos.

The EARL: Magnapop, Elf Power, Motherfucker, Black to Comm (MC5 tribute band), The Rock*A*Teens — $20/$25 dos. Two stage passes available: $40adv/$50dos

Sun., Dec. 2, Roswell, Whirlyball Atlanta: Man…or Astro-Man?, Omni, Dead Now — $25/$30 dos."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(10274) "I'd been complaining to Henry Owings that there was no one place to find information about the different events he has planned for his 50th birthday celebration. You know, no h2o website detailing the shows in Athens, Atlanta, and Roswell; no place to see which bands are performing and where.

"It’s my birthday. Not a branding experience," he says matter-of-factly. "People want to come? Cool."

It's that nonchalant manner of his that some might construe as arrogant or difficult, but really it's just Owings moving forward with his plans, not concerned about getting the recognition others might seek, but more focused on getting the job done. And having a good time while doing it.

It was earlier this year when the [http://www.chunklet.com|entrepreneur] — he has a publishing company, a recording label that has released records and CDs by local and national touring bands, a fanzine website, and he's responsible for those ubiquitous "Mueller" buttons you've seen being worn by people concerned with the direction our country is headed — realized this year was a milestone for him that many mark in extravagant ways.

“I was standing in the Baltimore airport with my daughter back in March,” he recalls. “While we were waiting to board a flight back to Atlanta, a little voice in my head said, ‘Oh … I turn 50 this year!’ So, in the minutes before I boarded, I texted about four or five friends asking if they’d play my 50th birthday. By the time the door to the plane was shut, three bands had already confirmed. At that point, I felt it my duty to go as big as possible. Have bands that haven’t played in eons play more than once. Have friends mingle with other friends, many of whom had never met. Many who haven’t seen each other in decades. Sounds like a good party to me, especially considering I’ve never thrown a party for myself before! And the legendary 86 is playing their first show in 30 years, fer chrissakes! And Vanessa from Pylon is making me a cake, dammit!”

{img fileId="7777" imalign="center" link="http://loafdeals.com/deals/all/15?utm_source=CL_High_Freq_LD"}

With so many bands apparently eager to indulge him, I wondered how Owings decided who he would ask to play?

“I just went through my life and was reminded of my favorite bands, not just as musicians, but as people — and who I would want at my birthday. The first band I asked was Man or Astro-Man? but that was only the beginning. Once I started flipping through my mental Rolodex, the bands just materialized. I wanted new bands, old bands, but the common thread I wanted was they were all friends of mine. No booking agents. Only one guarantee. No contracts. It’s my birthday, goddammit. Do I really need to justify anything?”

“I’m in the midst of putting together a program for my birthday parties. Writing about all of the people who are performing really gets me choked up. I’m a very lucky man, Tony,” Owings admits, though he also acknowledges there are those who turned him down.

“To those that are curious, I also am including a list of  bands in the program that I asked, who said ‘Thanks, but no thanks.’ It’s a short list, but even that list is impressive!” he boasts. “Back in my 20s, I couldn’t even imagine it doable, the idea of asking a band like Mission of Burma to play for me.”

In as much as Owings is throwing birthday parties for himself — and we get to live vicariously through his plans while actually being able to buy tickets to the events and take advantage of his celebrations — I mention that, while the shows seem to be about him, they can also be seen as a way of his giving back to the fans of these bands. They play multiple nights, the ticket prices are low, and the scheduling between Athens and Atlanta — and Roswell — doesn’t seem to conflict.

“That’s a nice way of thinking about it,” he agrees, but adds, in typical Owings fashion, “that has nothing to do with it. I just hate the idea of bands coming to town and playing but one show. Seriously? How can you ask The Velvet Monkeys or Come to fly in and just play 45 minutes!? Screw. That. I want to see them play for an entire week! Having Athens right there makes a second show for many of these bands inevitable. And Whirlyball? Well, that’s just the cherry on top. All ages. Brunch. What’s not to love?”

[http://whirlyballatlanta.com|Whirlyball Atlanta], for those not in the know, is an amusement center in Roswell, Georgia, that functions as a place for corporate team building and private parties through fun. Whirleyball, the sport, is a combination of hockey, basketball, and lacrosse played from a bumper car in the complex.

Whirlyball Atlanta is also where Owings promoted countless shows before becoming a father. “Like, a lot. However, being a dad has taken priority. I feel like doing a show at Whirlyball for the first time in eight years is saying to people that maybe there will be more shows there in the future.” His enthusiasm isn’t just for presenting a show there for the first time, but for the place and sport itself. “Have you ever been? Have you ever seen it?” he animatedly asks me. “Dude, you seriously need to check it out!”

Owings’ enthusiasm aside, one wonders why some of these bands, like 86, who haven’t played together in decades, would agree to perform?

He’s quick to offer his explanation. “Because they’re so incredibly terrified of what I’d write about them in my fanzine if they don’t,” he declares, citing his publication, Chunklet, then lets you in on the joke. “You know, my fanzine that I haven’t published in nine years.”

“Joking aside,” he continues, “they’re all friends. Like real friends. Not these disingenuous ‘friends’ vis-a-vis the ‘industry,’ but rather people that have known me (in many cases) for more than 20 years. Through thick and thin. Through golf matches. Through them on tour. Through me on tour. Through us on tour together. Screw it, I just want a kick-ass birthday party, is that too much to ask?”

Owings also plans to mark the occasion of his 50th revolution around the sun with [https://chunklet.bandcamp.com|three 45 R.P.M. split singles] featuring Man or Astro-man?/Tar; The Gotobeds/Honey Radar; and The Velvet Monkeys/Elf Power. And then there’s the aforementioned program he’s writing — and the poster he’s designing. T-shirts? He hasn’t said. After all, this is not a branding experience.

What bands are playing and where are the shows taking place? The information can be found at the end of this article.

Readers might notice one of the bands performing, Black to Comm, has never played before. They’re an MC5 tribute band — MC5 being one of Owings’ favorite bands — comprised of Shannon Mulvaney, Adam McIntyre, and Adam Renshaw — the three musicians who [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_CAvkZfvzs|backed up] MC5 co-founder Wayne Kramer for two shows last year in Athens and Atlanta.

When the three musicians were asked to play his birthday party, Owings says, “each gave a resounding, ‘Oh my god, yes.’ But the question on all their minds was who would sing. Well, I would! It’s my birthday after all! My original goal was to be as close to the [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ew1UygQs930|“Black to Comm”] riff as possible. The riff (from the first song MC5 ever wrote as a band), which even a bonehead like me can play, is a raga. Hypnotic. Powerful. And I just wanted to sing the lines to the song and then hear the riff for 30 minutes. Self indulgent? Sure. But you know what? It’s my 50th birthday and I can do what I want.”

“All I know is that we’re doing “Kick Out the Jams,” “Rama Lama Fa Fa Fa,” and “Black to Comm.” That’s how much of a fan I am. Anyway, we might do more. We might have guests performing onstage. I don’t know. Anybody who wants to get up onstage and dance while we ‘do our thang’ is more than welcome to. I wanna see a sea of hands.”

In addition to Henry Owings, others will be performing.

__Thurs., Nov. 29, Athens:__

__[https://www.40watt.com|40 Watt]:__ [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltIhRgt9ecw|Come], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuKELunyu2I|Elf Power], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNSoOBjh0SQ&list=RDEMeqgMStfpMwOb0119E-xMeg&start_radio=1|Arcwelder], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJ2JeoINTe4|Velvet Monkeys], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t5AG6m6UtY|Stroke Band] — $15 adv/$20 dos.

__[http://caledonialounge.com|Caledonia Lounge]:__ [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezZXLQTQw3U|Man or Astro-Man?], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbPOV9gE7eY|Pylon Reenactment Society], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJwIgdInEy0|Tar], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkFzpywcTtw|Gotobeds], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MQ8D1Cj4hE|Honey Radar] — [https://www.facebook.com/events/179741996165862/|$15 adv/$20 dos.] Two stage passes available: $30 adv/$35 dos

__Fri., Nov. 30, Atlanta:__

__[https://www.facebook.com/events/2258557981078671/|529:]__ Man or Astro-Man?, Tar, Arcwelder, Velvet Monkeys, Stroke Band — $20 / $25 dos.

__[http://www.badearl.com|The EARL]:__ [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKNs_wvc8FE|Mercyland Historical Abstract], Gotobeds, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GsmCUGhg4aQ|Air-Sea Dolphin], Honey Radar, 86 — $20/$25 dos. Two stage passes available: $40 adv/$50 dos

__Sat., Dec. 1, Atlanta:__

__[https://www.facebook.com/events/235245507173506/|529:]__ [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkJtQMvO1do|86], Come, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eokDFHOkYqc|Dead Now], [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RWZws-wB5M|The Purkinje Shift] —  $20/$25 dos.

__The EARL:__ [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItjQmXNgvyQ|Magnapop], Elf Power, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMg2k_pA2vU|Motherfucker], Black to Comm (MC5 tribute band), The [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hm2Q4Eoabo4|Rock*A*Teens] — $20/$25 dos. Two stage passes available: $40adv/$50dos

__Sun., Dec. 2, Roswell, Whirlyball Atlanta:__ Man…or Astro-Man?, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLP1FKjGyJ0|Omni], Dead Now — $25/$30 dos."
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  string(9409) " 86 Crop  2018-10-29T13:08:14+00:00 86 crop.jpg    henry owings h2o50 Bands reunite for the four-day bash — and it feels so good! 10501  2018-10-29T13:11:08+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Henry Owings is having a birthday party — and you're not tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-10-29T13:11:08+00:00  I'd been complaining to Henry Owings that there was no one place to find information about the different events he has planned for his 50th birthday celebration. You know, no h2o website detailing the shows in Athens, Atlanta, and Roswell; no place to see which bands are performing and where.

"It’s my birthday. Not a branding experience," he says matter-of-factly. "People want to come? Cool."

It's that nonchalant manner of his that some might construe as arrogant or difficult, but really it's just Owings moving forward with his plans, not concerned about getting the recognition others might seek, but more focused on getting the job done. And having a good time while doing it.

It was earlier this year when the entrepreneur — he has a publishing company, a recording label that has released records and CDs by local and national touring bands, a fanzine website, and he's responsible for those ubiquitous "Mueller" buttons you've seen being worn by people concerned with the direction our country is headed — realized this year was a milestone for him that many mark in extravagant ways.

“I was standing in the Baltimore airport with my daughter back in March,” he recalls. “While we were waiting to board a flight back to Atlanta, a little voice in my head said, ‘Oh … I turn 50 this year!’ So, in the minutes before I boarded, I texted about four or five friends asking if they’d play my 50th birthday. By the time the door to the plane was shut, three bands had already confirmed. At that point, I felt it my duty to go as big as possible. Have bands that haven’t played in eons play more than once. Have friends mingle with other friends, many of whom had never met. Many who haven’t seen each other in decades. Sounds like a good party to me, especially considering I’ve never thrown a party for myself before! And the legendary 86 is playing their first show in 30 years, fer chrissakes! And Vanessa from Pylon is making me a cake, dammit!”



With so many bands apparently eager to indulge him, I wondered how Owings decided who he would ask to play?

“I just went through my life and was reminded of my favorite bands, not just as musicians, but as people — and who I would want at my birthday. The first band I asked was Man or Astro-Man? but that was only the beginning. Once I started flipping through my mental Rolodex, the bands just materialized. I wanted new bands, old bands, but the common thread I wanted was they were all friends of mine. No booking agents. Only one guarantee. No contracts. It’s my birthday, goddammit. Do I really need to justify anything?”

“I’m in the midst of putting together a program for my birthday parties. Writing about all of the people who are performing really gets me choked up. I’m a very lucky man, Tony,” Owings admits, though he also acknowledges there are those who turned him down.

“To those that are curious, I also am including a list of  bands in the program that I asked, who said ‘Thanks, but no thanks.’ It’s a short list, but even that list is impressive!” he boasts. “Back in my 20s, I couldn’t even imagine it doable, the idea of asking a band like Mission of Burma to play for me.”

In as much as Owings is throwing birthday parties for himself — and we get to live vicariously through his plans while actually being able to buy tickets to the events and take advantage of his celebrations — I mention that, while the shows seem to be about him, they can also be seen as a way of his giving back to the fans of these bands. They play multiple nights, the ticket prices are low, and the scheduling between Athens and Atlanta — and Roswell — doesn’t seem to conflict.

“That’s a nice way of thinking about it,” he agrees, but adds, in typical Owings fashion, “that has nothing to do with it. I just hate the idea of bands coming to town and playing but one show. Seriously? How can you ask The Velvet Monkeys or Come to fly in and just play 45 minutes!? Screw. That. I want to see them play for an entire week! Having Athens right there makes a second show for many of these bands inevitable. And Whirlyball? Well, that’s just the cherry on top. All ages. Brunch. What’s not to love?”

Whirlyball Atlanta, for those not in the know, is an amusement center in Roswell, Georgia, that functions as a place for corporate team building and private parties through fun. Whirleyball, the sport, is a combination of hockey, basketball, and lacrosse played from a bumper car in the complex.

Whirlyball Atlanta is also where Owings promoted countless shows before becoming a father. “Like, a lot. However, being a dad has taken priority. I feel like doing a show at Whirlyball for the first time in eight years is saying to people that maybe there will be more shows there in the future.” His enthusiasm isn’t just for presenting a show there for the first time, but for the place and sport itself. “Have you ever been? Have you ever seen it?” he animatedly asks me. “Dude, you seriously need to check it out!”

Owings’ enthusiasm aside, one wonders why some of these bands, like 86, who haven’t played together in decades, would agree to perform?

He’s quick to offer his explanation. “Because they’re so incredibly terrified of what I’d write about them in my fanzine if they don’t,” he declares, citing his publication, Chunklet, then lets you in on the joke. “You know, my fanzine that I haven’t published in nine years.”

“Joking aside,” he continues, “they’re all friends. Like real friends. Not these disingenuous ‘friends’ vis-a-vis the ‘industry,’ but rather people that have known me (in many cases) for more than 20 years. Through thick and thin. Through golf matches. Through them on tour. Through me on tour. Through us on tour together. Screw it, I just want a kick-ass birthday party, is that too much to ask?”

Owings also plans to mark the occasion of his 50th revolution around the sun with three 45 R.P.M. split singles featuring Man or Astro-man?/Tar; The Gotobeds/Honey Radar; and The Velvet Monkeys/Elf Power. And then there’s the aforementioned program he’s writing — and the poster he’s designing. T-shirts? He hasn’t said. After all, this is not a branding experience.

What bands are playing and where are the shows taking place? The information can be found at the end of this article.

Readers might notice one of the bands performing, Black to Comm, has never played before. They’re an MC5 tribute band — MC5 being one of Owings’ favorite bands — comprised of Shannon Mulvaney, Adam McIntyre, and Adam Renshaw — the three musicians who backed up MC5 co-founder Wayne Kramer for two shows last year in Athens and Atlanta.

When the three musicians were asked to play his birthday party, Owings says, “each gave a resounding, ‘Oh my god, yes.’ But the question on all their minds was who would sing. Well, I would! It’s my birthday after all! My original goal was to be as close to the “Black to Comm” riff as possible. The riff (from the first song MC5 ever wrote as a band), which even a bonehead like me can play, is a raga. Hypnotic. Powerful. And I just wanted to sing the lines to the song and then hear the riff for 30 minutes. Self indulgent? Sure. But you know what? It’s my 50th birthday and I can do what I want.”

“All I know is that we’re doing “Kick Out the Jams,” “Rama Lama Fa Fa Fa,” and “Black to Comm.” That’s how much of a fan I am. Anyway, we might do more. We might have guests performing onstage. I don’t know. Anybody who wants to get up onstage and dance while we ‘do our thang’ is more than welcome to. I wanna see a sea of hands.”

In addition to Henry Owings, others will be performing.

Thurs., Nov. 29, Athens:

40 Watt: Come, Elf Power, Arcwelder, Velvet Monkeys, Stroke Band — $15 adv/$20 dos.

Caledonia Lounge: Man or Astro-Man?, Pylon Reenactment Society, Tar, Gotobeds, Honey Radar — $15 adv/$20 dos. Two stage passes available: $30 adv/$35 dos

Fri., Nov. 30, Atlanta:

529: Man or Astro-Man?, Tar, Arcwelder, Velvet Monkeys, Stroke Band — $20 / $25 dos.

The EARL: Mercyland Historical Abstract, Gotobeds, Air-Sea Dolphin, Honey Radar, 86 — $20/$25 dos. Two stage passes available: $40 adv/$50 dos

Sat., Dec. 1, Atlanta:

529: 86, Come, Dead Now, The Purkinje Shift —  $20/$25 dos.

The EARL: Magnapop, Elf Power, Motherfucker, Black to Comm (MC5 tribute band), The Rock*A*Teens — $20/$25 dos. Two stage passes available: $40adv/$50dos

Sun., Dec. 2, Roswell, Whirlyball Atlanta: Man…or Astro-Man?, Omni, Dead Now — $25/$30 dos.    Courtesy of Gary Held JESUS THEY'RE BACK!: 86, a long, long time ago (from left), Max Koshewa, bass; Ken Schenck, guitar; and Mac McNeilly, drums.      Henry Owings h2o50                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: Henry Owings is having a birthday party — and you're not "
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Music, High Frequencies, Show Preview

Monday October 29, 2018 09:11 am EDT
Bands reunite for the four-day bash — and it feels so good! | more...
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  string(5083) "In a just world, Thalia Zedek and Chris Brokaw would be playing one of the larger venues in town, there would be more high-profile promotion, and advance ticket sales would already have the show at capacity, with someone standing at the door taking money, checking the “will-call” list, and clicking the people-counter as throngs of fans make their way inside for the show. But it’s not a just world, it’s one made up of liars, thieves, dilettantes and evil mothers telling you everything is just dirt. Scum rises to the top and the only way to beat the greed of monied interests is to work. (And to vote — don’t forget, midterm elections are Tuesday, Nov. 6). Zedek and Brokaw — along with Arthur Johnson and Sean O’Brien — worked throughout the ‘90s in Come, a band creating expansive and majestic music that captured the spirit of what many called “grunge” while other musicians with better wardrobes ran the victory laps.

The two perform in Atlanta this Friday, October 19, at Kavarna in Oakhurst, Decatur, a stop on their current “Living Room” tour. That’s right, traveling the East Coast playing wherever they’re asked, usually in someone’s living room. As such, they’ve only been selling advance tickets to their gigs via Undertow. With the Atlanta show in a proper event space — and their having found someone to work the door — tickets will be sold up until showtime, meaning those of you who haven’t purchased advance tickets still have a chance to see these two guitarists perform. According to Brokaw (who has played with Codeine, Steve Wynn, Bedhead and the Lemonheads, among others), he and Zedek (outstanding in Live Skull and Uzi as well as in her solo endeavors) “will each play short solo sets, and a duo set together of Come songs. We play on a couple of songs during each other's sets, too. Electric guitars and vocals.” It sounds so simple, but, like their music, becomes so complex with their musical interplay.



Time marches on dept. … It was in 1993, during my first tenure at Creative Loafing, that the editorial department used to spend Friday afternoons drinking margaritas at a now long-closed Mexican restaurant on Ponce de Leon. Once the sun went down, and the dinner crowd started lining up for tables, we’d leave the place and head over to the Northside Tavern. A dive bar with a good juke box more than anything else, it was there I first heard Daniel “Mudcat” Dudeck perform. He had just started helping owner Ellyn Webb book the joint, and within months he turned the place into a haven for blues, the cinder block building on Howell Mill Road joining Fat Matt’s Rib Shack on Piedmont Road and Blind Willie’s in Virginia-Highland as a place to drink into the night and listen to blues, blues rock and a helluva a lot of of soulful singers who’d paid their dues and were still paying them.

Dudeck is thankful for what he’s accomplished at the Northside Tavern, and, even though he will no longer be booking the club, he hopes the blues legacy he started there will continue. “I booked shows through February,” he says, calling out a list of performers set to play — “Albert (White),  Beverly (“Guitar” Watkins) … Sammy Blue is having his Georgia Music showcase, Freddie Vanderford on a matinee,  there’s more … .”

While Dudeck admits he doesn’t know “what the plans are” for the future bookings at the club, he’s happy to be leaving with success in his wake.

“I had a great band weekend, I had a fantastic Wednesday night, and last weekend I had Beverly (“Guitar” Watkins) and Curtis Smith and Albert White and the Petunia Fest for Cora Mae Bryant with Curley Weaver’s grandsons, and Shelton Powe, and Jontavious Willis and more ... I defy you to find a deeper blues weekend anywhere. And it worked without me having to run the show! Self sustainable! As a farmer I've learned sustainability is the only way to survive and thrive.”

Old ears for new dept. … With vinyl now a highly-publicized niche market, record buyers are realizing you need good equipment on which to listen to the 12-inch, 10-inch, and 7-inch discs. While you can spend thousands of dollars on new, high-end equipment, some are going another route, seeking out vintage equipment. With that being the case, it’s no surprise that Atlanta’s first show featuring used hi-fi gear is set to take place this Saturday at Highland Row Antiques on North Highland Avenue between Ponce De Leon and North Avenue. The “Highland Row Hi-Fi and Vinyl Show” is the idea of Keel Heisler who already has a large space dedicated to mid-century modern vintage collectibles at the antique market — and is a bit of audio geek himself. The show is free to those hunting for great buys — and runs Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. While audio equipment is the focus, expect a number of dealers to set up with collectible and rare records and other music-related memorabilia. And if you’ve got something to sell, check with Heisler. One or two spaces may still be available."
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The two perform in Atlanta this Friday, October 19, at __[https://kavarnadecatur.com|Kavarna]__ in Oakhurst, Decatur, a stop on their current “Living Room” tour. That’s right, traveling the East Coast playing wherever they’re asked, usually in someone’s living room. As such, they’ve only been selling [https://undertowshows.com/collections/chris-brokaw-thalia-zedek/products/atlanta-ga-october-19-8pm|advance tickets] to their gigs via Undertow. With the Atlanta show in a proper event space — and their having found someone to work the door — tickets will be sold up until showtime, meaning those of you who haven’t purchased advance tickets still have a chance to see these two guitarists perform. According to Brokaw (who has played with Codeine, Steve Wynn, Bedhead and the Lemonheads, among others), he and Zedek (outstanding in Live Skull and Uzi as well as in her solo endeavors) “will each play short solo sets, and a duo set together of Come songs. We play on a couple of songs during each other's sets, too. Electric guitars and vocals.” It sounds so simple, but, like their music, becomes so complex with their musical interplay.

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__Time marches on dept.__ … It was in 1993, during my first tenure at ''Creative Loafing'', that the editorial department used to spend Friday afternoons drinking margaritas at a now long-closed Mexican restaurant on Ponce de Leon. Once the sun went down, and the dinner crowd started lining up for tables, we’d leave the place and head over to the __[http://www.northsidetavern.com|Northside Tavern]__. A dive bar with a good juke box more than anything else, it was there I first heard __Daniel “[http://www.mudcatblues.com|Mudcat]” Dudeck__ perform. He had just started helping owner __Ellyn Webb__ book the joint, and within months he turned the place into a haven for blues, the cinder block building on Howell Mill Road joining __[http://www.fatmattsribshack.com|Fat Matt’s Rib Shack]__ on Piedmont Road and __[http://www.blindwilliesblues.com|Blind Willie’s]__ in Virginia-Highland as a place to drink into the night and listen to blues, blues rock and a helluva a lot of of soulful singers who’d paid their dues and were still paying them.

Dudeck is thankful for what he’s accomplished at the Northside Tavern, and, even though he will no longer be booking the club, he hopes the blues legacy he started there will continue. “I booked shows through February,” he says, calling out a list of performers set to play — “Albert (White),  Beverly (“Guitar” Watkins) … Sammy Blue is having his Georgia Music showcase, Freddie Vanderford on a matinee,  there’s more … .”

While Dudeck admits he doesn’t know “what the plans are” for the future bookings at the club, he’s happy to be leaving with success in his wake.

“I had a great band weekend, I had a fantastic Wednesday night, and last weekend I had Beverly (“Guitar” Watkins) and Curtis Smith and Albert White and the Petunia Fest for Cora Mae Bryant with Curley Weaver’s grandsons, and Shelton Powe, and Jontavious Willis and more ... I defy you to find a deeper blues weekend anywhere. And it worked without me having to run the show! Self sustainable! As a farmer I've learned sustainability is the only way to survive and thrive.”

__Old ears for new dept. __…__ __With vinyl now a highly-publicized niche market, record buyers are realizing you need good equipment on which to listen to the 12-inch, 10-inch, and 7-inch discs. While you can spend thousands of dollars on new, high-end equipment, some are going another route, seeking out vintage equipment. With that being the case, it’s no surprise that Atlanta’s first show featuring used hi-fi gear is set to take place this Saturday at __[http://www.highlandrowantiques.com|Highland Row Antiques]__ on North Highland Avenue between Ponce De Leon and North Avenue. The “[https://www.facebook.com/events/1146569622166764/|Highland Row Hi-Fi and Vinyl Show]” is the idea of __Keel Heisler__ who already has a large space dedicated to mid-century modern vintage collectibles at the antique market — and is a bit of audio geek himself. The show is free to those hunting for great buys — and runs Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. While audio equipment is the focus, expect a number of dealers to set up with collectible and rare records and other music-related memorabilia. And if you’ve got something to sell, check with [http://stsvideo.com/?fbclid=IwAR2t_lpvw6TtGJK2ImS5Z4DcW1TYTMTZtn8Xe8mlqVwHWl_oiDtrkTDhYhY|Heisler]. One or two spaces may still be available."
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  string(5674) " Tsw4 Copy  2018-10-18T20:27:13+00:00 tsw4 copy.jpg    thalia zedek chris brokaw come Guitarists duel together, apart 10263  2018-10-19T04:00:00+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: Thalia Zedek and Chris Brokaw come to Atlanta tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-10-19T04:00:00+00:00  In a just world, Thalia Zedek and Chris Brokaw would be playing one of the larger venues in town, there would be more high-profile promotion, and advance ticket sales would already have the show at capacity, with someone standing at the door taking money, checking the “will-call” list, and clicking the people-counter as throngs of fans make their way inside for the show. But it’s not a just world, it’s one made up of liars, thieves, dilettantes and evil mothers telling you everything is just dirt. Scum rises to the top and the only way to beat the greed of monied interests is to work. (And to vote — don’t forget, midterm elections are Tuesday, Nov. 6). Zedek and Brokaw — along with Arthur Johnson and Sean O’Brien — worked throughout the ‘90s in Come, a band creating expansive and majestic music that captured the spirit of what many called “grunge” while other musicians with better wardrobes ran the victory laps.

The two perform in Atlanta this Friday, October 19, at Kavarna in Oakhurst, Decatur, a stop on their current “Living Room” tour. That’s right, traveling the East Coast playing wherever they’re asked, usually in someone’s living room. As such, they’ve only been selling advance tickets to their gigs via Undertow. With the Atlanta show in a proper event space — and their having found someone to work the door — tickets will be sold up until showtime, meaning those of you who haven’t purchased advance tickets still have a chance to see these two guitarists perform. According to Brokaw (who has played with Codeine, Steve Wynn, Bedhead and the Lemonheads, among others), he and Zedek (outstanding in Live Skull and Uzi as well as in her solo endeavors) “will each play short solo sets, and a duo set together of Come songs. We play on a couple of songs during each other's sets, too. Electric guitars and vocals.” It sounds so simple, but, like their music, becomes so complex with their musical interplay.



Time marches on dept. … It was in 1993, during my first tenure at Creative Loafing, that the editorial department used to spend Friday afternoons drinking margaritas at a now long-closed Mexican restaurant on Ponce de Leon. Once the sun went down, and the dinner crowd started lining up for tables, we’d leave the place and head over to the Northside Tavern. A dive bar with a good juke box more than anything else, it was there I first heard Daniel “Mudcat” Dudeck perform. He had just started helping owner Ellyn Webb book the joint, and within months he turned the place into a haven for blues, the cinder block building on Howell Mill Road joining Fat Matt’s Rib Shack on Piedmont Road and Blind Willie’s in Virginia-Highland as a place to drink into the night and listen to blues, blues rock and a helluva a lot of of soulful singers who’d paid their dues and were still paying them.

Dudeck is thankful for what he’s accomplished at the Northside Tavern, and, even though he will no longer be booking the club, he hopes the blues legacy he started there will continue. “I booked shows through February,” he says, calling out a list of performers set to play — “Albert (White),  Beverly (“Guitar” Watkins) … Sammy Blue is having his Georgia Music showcase, Freddie Vanderford on a matinee,  there’s more … .”

While Dudeck admits he doesn’t know “what the plans are” for the future bookings at the club, he’s happy to be leaving with success in his wake.

“I had a great band weekend, I had a fantastic Wednesday night, and last weekend I had Beverly (“Guitar” Watkins) and Curtis Smith and Albert White and the Petunia Fest for Cora Mae Bryant with Curley Weaver’s grandsons, and Shelton Powe, and Jontavious Willis and more ... I defy you to find a deeper blues weekend anywhere. And it worked without me having to run the show! Self sustainable! As a farmer I've learned sustainability is the only way to survive and thrive.”

Old ears for new dept. … With vinyl now a highly-publicized niche market, record buyers are realizing you need good equipment on which to listen to the 12-inch, 10-inch, and 7-inch discs. While you can spend thousands of dollars on new, high-end equipment, some are going another route, seeking out vintage equipment. With that being the case, it’s no surprise that Atlanta’s first show featuring used hi-fi gear is set to take place this Saturday at Highland Row Antiques on North Highland Avenue between Ponce De Leon and North Avenue. The “Highland Row Hi-Fi and Vinyl Show” is the idea of Keel Heisler who already has a large space dedicated to mid-century modern vintage collectibles at the antique market — and is a bit of audio geek himself. The show is free to those hunting for great buys — and runs Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. While audio equipment is the focus, expect a number of dealers to set up with collectible and rare records and other music-related memorabilia. And if you’ve got something to sell, check with Heisler. One or two spaces may still be available.    Courtesy Zedek & Brokaw [Bed photo: Amsterdam, 1992, by Arthur Johnson]. FROM THE NORTH COAST: Chris Brokaw and Thalia Zedek, then and now (inset).      "Thalia Zedek" "Chris Brokaw" Come                              HIGH FREQUENCIES: Thalia Zedek and Chris Brokaw come to Atlanta "
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Crib Notes
News You May Have Missed
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Music, Crib Notes, News You May Have Missed, High Frequencies

Friday October 19, 2018 12:00 am EDT
Guitarists duel together, apart | more...
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  string(70) "HIGH FREQUENCIES: John Lydon/Public Image Ltd.  —  USELESS MEMORIES?"
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  string(54) "John Lydon's 'songs from the heart' propel him forward"
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  string(22479) "John Lydon, make that Public Image Ltd., because, as both the documentary and career-retrospective box set agree, “The Public Image is Rotten,” is in New Orleans, readying for the first date of the U.S. leg of the band’s world tour, celebrating forty years of all things PiL, and of course, all things Lydon. After the Civic Theater show Tuesday night, the band and crew load in to the tour bus for the overnight ride to Atlanta, and a show at the Variety Playhouse, Wednesday, Oct. 10.

Lydon is just waking up as we get set to speak, having been dragged out of bed — and out of the toilet — by his manager and lifelong mate John “Rambo” Stevens. Their time together goes way back, fifty years at least, when they were just children in the schoolyard. It’s that bond, that trust built upon over the years, that has allowed Lydon to accept him as manager and — perhaps, just a bit — as co-conspirator in business decisions. For all things musical, however, Lydon has his band of almost ten years now  —  Lu Edmonds, Brian Smith and Scott Firth.

The travels and travails of Public Image Ltd. are long, from the early days of Lydon, Keith Levene, Jah Wobble, and John Walker, through the period when Martin Atkins joined the group, through Pete Jones replacing Wobble, until the band seemed to implode. When the dust settled, Lydon had Edmonds and Smith at his side, with John McGeoch and Allan Dias joining them.

“Two sides to every story,” John Lydon exclaimed in Public Image Ltd.’s debut single, “Public Image.” his first recorded work after leaving the Sex Pistols following that band’s a highly-calculated first U.S. tour. Lydon as Johnny Rotten was was picked to fill the role of lead singer in arguably the world’s first punk band, but he proved to be more dangerous than any of the tactics and P.R. schemes manager Malcolm McLaren dared to dream up to establish the band as such.



Lydon, for all intents and purposes is, and has always been, his own person, one not wanting to take direction, but to look at the circumstances and deal with them in a way that best suits his needs. His whims. His moral compass. His instincts are what he’s always trusted in a business that for all it’s perceived freedoms is highly-structured and regimented.

Over the years, Lydon, being Lydon, has infuriated musicians and fans alike. If he hadn’t, chances are he wouldn’t be as interesting, nor as inspiring, as he’s made his way through the music business on his own terms. It’s all well-explained in “The Public Image is Rotten,” the new feature-length film documenting the forty years of PiL, that is slowing making its way to theater screens across the U.S. as Public Image Ltd. embarks on the U.S. leg of a world tour in support of the career retrospective box set, The Public Image is Rotten (Songs from the Heart).

In addition to there being “two sides to every story,” there’s the adage, “There’s three sides to every story — yours, mine and the truth.” Lydon attempts to make it clear at the beginning of “The Public Image is Rotten” documentary, that his side is the truth, and that all he’s achieved in his life is “through being honest.” It’s quite an interesting and telling film, one that includes interviews with all the major players throughout PiL’s illustrious history, along with many of those who the band worked with or influenced, Ginger Baker, Thurston Moore, Flea, Julian Temple, Don Letts and Vivien Goldman among them. The film, distributed by Abramorama, is not only a look inside PiL, but a look inside the workings of Lydon, a man whose memory was wiped clean by meningitis as a child, and needed the honesty of others to rebuild his fondest memories, even of his own father and mother.

“The Public Image is Rotten” is a quick view. A lot of people and a lot of stories are packed into its 1hour and 44 minutes, but the time goes by like nothing at all, reminding me of something Peter Tosh once told me, “A thousand years is like a day gone by in the search for truth.”

And the truth presented in “The Public Image is Rotten” (the play on words in the title says it all) not only recounts the past, but consecrates the present, providing a take on latter-day PiL that has me re-evaluating their work, and reassessing PiL as a whole. I remember seeing the first Public Image Ltd. U.S. tour thirty-eight years ago, watching from the side of the stage at the Agora Ballroom in Atlanta, wondering what Lydon, Levene, Wobble and Atkins had wrought on pop music — and I certainly never heard anything the same again.

Rising out of his New Orleans slumber, Lydon is quick to discuss the documentary, admitting that it was “very, very, very hard for us to relinquish responsibility into other people's hands when it's your own career,” but agrees “everybody involved did a really, really, really good job!

“Normally it's about me, I'm usually barking orders. But everybody told me to shut up and just get on with it. And I did and it's so much better for it."

The documentary is so well done, I’m surprised it wasn’t released before the tour, to drum up interest for the shows.

“Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. I know what you mean,” he concurs, stopping to blow what some might consider trademarked Johnny Rotten snot out of his nose (it’s explained in the film), “but it's impossible to coordinate these things favorably, because the film world and the rock and roll circus we all love and adore are not compatible.

“The two things are separate issues,” he continues. “That film started out, it was just going to be about the last two albums, but it expanded into this enormous, all over the place documentary. I mean its a full history now. And everybody who was anybody to do with anything, from the Pistols to PiL, was asked if they wanted to have a say in it. And that's the grand conclusion of it. You either see it or you don't. I 'd rather you did, regardless of when we will be playing in a town near you."

It paints a broad picture and it allows allows everyone to have their say, something I didn’t expect. It also offers a lot of insight into the latter days of the band that, maybe myself or others don’t find as interesting as the early days. It offers a lot of answers to previously unaddressed questions.

Lydon is in complete agreement of the assessment.

At the beginning of the film, Lydon discusses honesty, crediting whatever he’s achieved through being honest. That theme is reiterated when he recounts the honesty of his words to his mother on her deathbed.

Has he always been honest?

“With my Mom and Dad, yeah, but you know, all kids are naughty from time to time. I'm not perfect. I want to be. But I can't bear total out and out horrible liars. That's one of my major things. I'll give you one or two or three chances, but if you go beyond that with me, you're really just ... Get out. And don't come back. There've been very few of those people in my life, but the ones that have been that way are obviously not there no more.

“I'd rather let the viewer work it out for themselves, rather than me lecturing,’that one's a git and that one's a chump’ ... because I don't think any of us get out of it without a good hammering. All our warts and sores are there. That's what, I thinkmakes it deeply funny.”

“The Public Image is Rotten” certainly offers a varied view of what was going on, rather than just one person's opinion.

Lydon is proud of that. “It's far more than what people expect. I can't be boring the viewer, can I, with forty years of the ins and outs of daily activities?”

With the documentary and two autobiographies, “Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs” and “Anger Is An Energy,” is there something Lydon wants to get across that maybe people have missed?

He’s quick to dismiss that thought. “I never asked for the documentary. They came to us. I hemmed and hawed in my mind about what that would mean — and what they would put together. But after working with Tabbert (Fiiller, the film’s director), I'm really, really pleased. He's great! He's wonderfully honest, in a different way than I am. Sorry, but there it is. Bloody excellent working with him. Hard work at times, too!

“You're relinquishing the reins — and you're letting someone else come in and poke around in your life. It's a frightening thing!"

In the film, many of the interviews with Lydon take place in the kitchen of his and his wife Nora’s home. And throughout the many days days of filming, with Lydon seen in different clothing, the dishwasher remains wide-open. Was Lydon tryiing to make some sort of statement,  as if to say he's allowing all of his dirty bits to be displayed out in the open?

Lydon laughs that mischievous and familiar laugh of his. “It's broken!” he exclaims.

“If you're an art student you’d come up with that!” he surmises, asking, “Are you an art student? No! The damn thing's broken and I'm too fucking lazy to buy a new one!”

“That's how I am, really, a house falls down around me. I live kind of a duffer's life, really, but I am looking forward to the gig in New Orleans! Hopefully, I'll get enough for a dishwasher out of this tour! You never know! I need one. I live in three different places, and, I just realized, everyone of them's got a broken dishwasher! So keep on with that art student, you’re onto something!

“Three dishwashers. What does a dishwasher cost? I reckon about three hundred dollars, right? No, nine hundred. You're going to spend a grand on something you can do quicker in your sink?

“So there's PiL explained!” he concludes. “Why bother with an over-elaborate recording studio when you can use what's basically a cowshed made out of bricks? That explains the last two albums nicely.

“I mean cheap and cheerful can be a very, very good outlet musically, it really can. I've worked in very fine studios and I've worked in rundown ones ... to me, it's like a bad workman blames his tools. You get on with what you got to get on with and what's available. And that's half of, probably three-quarters, of the fun of making records. You enjoy the calamity of the situation a lot.

Is that sort of thought what binds together the PiL members of today?

“I think it describes PiL in all of its different functions and environments. And people-wise. I would have love to have kept a band more solid, but I'm not blaming record companies for their involvement or lack of involvement, or controlling the purse strings to the point of creating poisonous situations, but its kind of noticeable that for the last two albums, it's the same people, and, to me, that's historical. And now we're touring, and here we are, celebrating forty years of all things PiL, and we're in the middle of a third album, too!"

At this point, I surmise "congratulations" and "job well done" are in order.

“Yes, it is, really. But this workload we've taken on this year, it's practically killing me! There's so many personal issues too that I have to deal with. I've got some serious family health problems wrapped all around me and the pressure is overwhelming, but still, the gigs must count. My wife's seriously ill, and it's just getting worse. ‘And the days go by …' It's all the time pressure, pressure, pressure. Is it the gods that be, or Mother Nature, who deliberately brings these things on me so that I don't get cozy and comfortable. I think that that would be the ruination, ultimately.

“You know, ‘stiff upper lip,’" he says, mocking the British belief. “Bloody hell! Be British? Not bad for an Irishman. Who lives in America. And, in fact, is an American now.”

Lydon claims that his path to citizenship in this country was two-fold, one, because he’s lived here for so long, two, “I quite enjoyed the potential of Obama's years. Look at the rewards unleashed on me!”

Despite the health calamities surrounding Lydon, it’s good to see he’s still the fun-loving young man he’s always been.He certainly hasn’t changed in that respect.

“I've always thought that the best lesson you can learn in life is through humor,” the man who once sang, “God save the Queen, she ain’t no human being,” contends, “and boring intellectuals never get any way near it. Nowhere near the truth. The truth is in the comedy of it all!”

Years ago, first starting out as a young Sex Pistol, did Lydon make plans for this comedy of errors we call life?

“I don't know if I made plans, it was more like wishes. I wanted some sense of continuity in all this and that's really not what I've been able to achieve up until the last decade. But even with that, there's still more issues that keep creeping in and make life very, very difficult. But then, if you didn't make an effort, what would any of this be worth? It's the effort and the struggle that count more than anything.”

Your philosophy in the early days of PiL was “not to worry about the money, just do what you believe in — and it will come.” You said that after plopping down a hundred dollar bill for a ten dollar breakfast, and telling the waitress to keep the change.

“Oh yeah. Never bother with that. In those days we had no chance of grabbing that purse string. Now, we're running our own label and we're kind of like financially responsible to ourselves."

So that wasn't just some youthful idealism or naiveté?

“No, there was a proper business plan in my head,” he admits. “All of this would function far better if we are responsible to ourselves and only to ourselves.

“That's why the box set is coming out in such a professional manner,” Lydon explains of The Public Image is Rotten (Songs from the Heart), the five CD, two DVD retrospective, chock full of singles, b-sides, remixes, rare and previously-unreleased tracks, as well as live concert audio and two DVDs of performances, “because if we ever left it up to a record label, they would just turn it into some hokey fucking nonsense. We're using the labels, but it's to our benefit, our control. And so, the manipulation is on an artistic level rather than left to a bunch of accountants.

“I'd rather spend all the money raising the level of quality of the film work that's available in there, and making sure that every track is the highest quality you can get rather than pocketing the money and and chucking it out in a very cheap, lackadaisical, carbon (copy) fashion. I've always been like that. This is the reputation I have earned from record labels, that I'm 'difficult to work with.' Well, yeah! Because quality to me must come first. It's my life story. Why shouldn't it?“

If you read the press being generated on this tour, many journalists claim Lydon took twenty years off, as if to say he led an idyllic life away from the the music industry, at home with his wife. That’s not the case.

“I didn't take twenty years off. I had no choice in the matter,” he snarls, his blood pressure seemingly rising at the suggestion. “It was Catch-22, I owed them (the record labels) much money, and anything I did, the money must go automatically to them. And so I couldn't even make the funds to open a rehearsal studio, because that money, they would want it immediately. I couldn't tour. I couldn't make any product … ousted from the only thing that I feel I've been any good at, and that's "singer-songwriter," he says with a positive, upward lilt and a laugh in his voice. “I'm laughing at the term, because I realize how pretentious that sounds! Well, fucking hell — that's all I am good at! I'm not saying I'm the world's greatest, but that is something I can do!”

To pull himself and the band out of debt, Lydon says he embarked on many different projects, TV shows, TV productions, internet broadcasts.

“All of these ideas collapsed because the manipulation started creeping in and I wouldn't be told what to do. But it got me on the right foot,” he concedes, noting that without them, he wouldn’t have been asked to participate in the now-infamous “butter campaign.”

“One thing led to another and an advertising company in Britain spotted my activities and offered us the butter campaign, he tells the story, as incredulous of the offer as those who viewed the commercial. “I never thought of such a thing in my life. Me? Promoting butter? Well, the basic question I had to ask myself was, ‘Do I eat butter?’ ‘Yes I do! A helluva a lot of it, too!’ Hence, the body shape,” he chuckles.

“But it helped. It helped! And I was given a free hand in the script. The agreement was they'd have a script —  and I could ignore it! And I thought that was a beautiful compromise. It worked for both sides. Sales of British dairy product went up by 87 percent! So, I did good all around for them. And the money from that, although not huge, we got enough where we could put some money towards the debt to the record labels and start rehearsing. And from that very first rehearsal, it's been like smiles all around. And all of it handled wonderfully by Rambo! He knows what the rules are, but he also knows that three-quarters of those rules are for fools!”

How does Rambo put up with him?

“Well, you'd have to ask him!,” Lydon says, yelling across the room, "Hey, Rambo, how d'ya you put up with me?"

A deeper, rougher voice suddenly booms across the cellphone, “I don’t."

“Short, sharp and straight to the point!,” Lydon laughs. “We're mates, and there it is. We have arguments, you know, but that's how things work. It's not ‘bang the door on each other and vanish for the rest of your career’ — that's what was happening, in early PiL.

“But, it was like a blackmail letter,” he recalls, “because they knew I was desperate. And so they were upping their prices, the bad bad members, but the good ones ... that's why, when it came to PiL's affirmation, Bruce and Lu were at the top of my list. And we really needed a good bass player ... because we hadn't really had one up until this point. And Scott was purrfect. Yes, I know those words can bite!”

In the film, it’s apparent Wobble was considered to re-join PiL.

“Yeah. He was given the opportunity,” Lydon admits. “I talked to him. He was going on about dental chairs and and banjos. It all sounded like Deliverance, a pizza would be quicker. It was all grandiose. And grandiose goes way beyond his station. And that initially was his problem anyway. He was rowing really, really badly with other members, and all manner of disputes were going on, tapes were going missing ... I couldn't cope with it. That's not how a band should be. You do things because you're loyal to each other.”

“He'll always be a friend, because that's what he was before, but how he misused that opportunity, well, that's his own decision, and consequences to do matter.

Lydon gets a little wound up, or, maybe, he’s waking up. “They’ve all spent years being negative,” he says of past PiL members, “and here we go, now he's in the documentary, and he's not so negative after all. Hello!"

Despite whatever problems ex-members may have with Lydon, it is telling that none of them complain on the level one might expect. Were they just not wanting to appear confrontational?

“I don't know. It has nothing to do with me,” he claims. “If you had asked me, emotionally, off the top of my head, I would've said, 'No, don’t you dare film any of them swine,’ but, I think the decision was made more positively. Yes, you should have them in. And I agree with that. I sat down and thought about it long and hard and what can anybody say? They can either tell the truth, or they can lie. Either way, that's a voyage of discovery, isn't it?”

“I can be just as irrational as anybody else,” Lydon continues, “and sometimes, you know, that's a problem for me. But it does make for some great song material later on down the line,” he laughs. “Sometimes, after many, many years of endurance, I can have a short fuse, but I'd rather not."

The documentary, the box set, the world tour, it all seems to be big business for Lydon. Yet he doesn’t see it as crossing over to the other side. More to the point, “It's all hard work. It's seriously hard work. I really don't have ten spare minutes. I didn't quite think celebrating forty years would be the endurance course it's turning into. But then, I suppose that is the only real way to celebrate forty years of hard work — one year of extremely hard work.

“The few times I've allowed myself to 'party it up' on this tour," he admits, “I’ve absolutely destroyed myself physically. I don't want to do that anymore. So, for the rest of this year, particularly now in America, I'm taking it ‘serious.’ Why, I don't know? It's too late. The damage is done.”

“It's always good for me to look at the physical aspects of the tour, do I have the stamina to carry on? I think so. I force myself to strive a little bit further, otherwise, what's the point? The older you get, the harder you should be driving yourself. This is what they're all telling me! Majority rules! The democracy has out voted me.

“Of course, it's all a matter of how you see yourself,” Lydon suddenly waxes philosophically. “Do you accept old age, the way it's slung on you by society? I mean, I'll know when I'm old, and I certainly don't feel old! These lovely tours — when I feel myself every night in that bunk on that tour bus, that doesn't feel old to me. Those wrinkles are wrinkles I've always had. (laughter).


What has the man who’s mere stare seems to have intimidated a generation, whose words have painted disarmingly brutal pictures of life, learned in his 62 years?

“Nothing comes easy unless you really bloody strive for it,” he declares. “And don't stand there with your hand out, expecting an easy ride, because that ain't ever gonna happen. Just do it yourself, nobody's going to do it for you. Plain and simple.”

With that, Lydon says goodbye, but not without first gleefully admitting his anticipation of Tuesday night’s New Orleans gig. He’s looking forward to the first night of this U.S. tour as if his life depends on it."
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  string(22761) "John Lydon, make that Public Image Ltd., because, as both the documentary and career-retrospective box set agree, “The Public Image is Rotten,” is in New Orleans, readying for the [https://www.civicnola.com/event/1724216-public-image-ltd-new-orleans/|first date] of the U.S. leg of the band’s world tour, celebrating forty years of all things PiL, and of course, all things Lydon. After the [https://www.civicnola.com/shows/|Civic Theater] show Tuesday night, the band and crew load in to the tour bus for the overnight ride to Atlanta, and a show at the [http://www.variety-playhouse.com/event/public-image-ltd/|Variety Playhouse], Wednesday, Oct. 10.

Lydon is just waking up as we get set to speak, having been dragged out of bed — and out of the toilet — by his manager and lifelong mate John “Rambo” Stevens. Their time together goes way back, fifty years at least, when they were just children in the schoolyard. It’s that bond, that trust built upon over the years, that has allowed Lydon to accept him as manager and — perhaps, just a bit — as co-conspirator in business decisions. For all things musical, however, Lydon has his band of almost ten years now  —  Lu Edmonds, Brian Smith and Scott Firth.

The travels and travails of Public Image Ltd. are long, from the early days of Lydon, Keith Levene, Jah Wobble, and John Walker, through the period when Martin Atkins joined the group, through Pete Jones replacing Wobble, until the band seemed to implode. When the dust settled, Lydon had Edmonds and Smith at his side, with John McGeoch and Allan Dias joining them.

“Two sides to every story,” John Lydon exclaimed in Public Image Ltd.’s debut single, “Public Image.” his first recorded work after leaving the Sex Pistols following that band’s a highly-calculated first U.S. tour. Lydon as Johnny Rotten was was picked to fill the role of lead singer in arguably the world’s first punk band, but he proved to be more dangerous than any of the tactics and P.R. schemes manager Malcolm McLaren dared to dream up to establish the band as such.

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Lydon, for all intents and purposes is, and has always been, his own person, one not wanting to take direction, but to look at the circumstances and deal with them in a way that best suits his needs. His whims. His moral compass. His instincts are what he’s always trusted in a business that for all it’s perceived freedoms is highly-structured and regimented.

Over the years, Lydon, being Lydon, has infuriated musicians and fans alike. If he hadn’t, chances are he wouldn’t be as interesting, nor as inspiring, as he’s made his way through the music business on his own terms. It’s all well-explained in “The Public Image is Rotten,” the new feature-length film documenting the forty years of PiL, that is slowing making its way to theater screens across the U.S. as Public Image Ltd. embarks on the U.S. leg of a world tour in support of the career retrospective box set, ''The Public Image is Rotten (Songs from the Heart)''.

In addition to there being “two sides to every story,” there’s the adage, “There’s three sides to every story — yours, mine and the truth.” Lydon attempts to make it clear at the beginning of “The Public Image is Rotten” documentary, that his side is the truth, and that all he’s achieved in his life is “through being honest.” It’s quite an interesting and telling film, one that includes interviews with all the major players throughout PiL’s illustrious history, along with many of those who the band worked with or influenced, Ginger Baker, Thurston Moore, Flea, Julian Temple, Don Letts and Vivien Goldman among them. The film, distributed by Abramorama, is not only a look inside PiL, but a look inside the workings of Lydon, a man whose memory was wiped clean by meningitis as a child, and needed the honesty of others to rebuild his fondest memories, even of his own father and mother.

“The Public Image is Rotten” is a quick view. A lot of people and a lot of stories are packed into its 1hour and 44 minutes, but the time goes by like nothing at all, reminding me of something Peter Tosh once told me, “A thousand years is like a day gone by in the search for truth.”

And the truth presented in “The Public Image is Rotten” (the play on words in the title says it all) not only recounts the past, but consecrates the present, providing a take on latter-day PiL that has me re-evaluating their work, and reassessing PiL as a whole. I remember seeing the first Public Image Ltd. U.S. tour thirty-eight years ago, watching from the side of the stage at the Agora Ballroom in Atlanta, wondering what Lydon, Levene, Wobble and Atkins had wrought on pop music — and I certainly never heard anything the same again.

Rising out of his New Orleans slumber, Lydon is quick to discuss the documentary, admitting that it was “very, very, very hard for us to relinquish responsibility into other people's hands when it's your own career,” but agrees “everybody involved did a really, really, really good job!

“Normally it's about me, I'm usually barking orders. But everybody told me to shut up and just get on with it. And I did and it's so much better for it."

The documentary is so well done, I’m surprised it wasn’t released before the tour, to drum up interest for the shows.

“Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. I know what you mean,” he concurs, stopping to blow what some might consider trademarked Johnny Rotten snot out of his nose (it’s explained in the film), “but it's impossible to coordinate these things favorably, because the film world and the rock and roll circus we all love and adore are not compatible.

“The two things are separate issues,” he continues. “That film started out, it was just going to be about the last two albums, but it expanded into this enormous, all over the place documentary. I mean its a full history now. And everybody who was anybody to do with anything, from the Pistols to PiL, was asked if they wanted to have a say in it. And that's the grand conclusion of it. You either see it or you don't. I 'd rather you did, regardless of when we will be playing in a town near you."

It paints a broad picture and it allows allows everyone to have their say, something I didn’t expect. It also offers a lot of insight into the latter days of the band that, maybe myself or others don’t find as interesting as the early days. It offers a lot of answers to previously unaddressed questions.

Lydon is in complete agreement of the assessment.

At the beginning of the film, Lydon discusses honesty, crediting whatever he’s achieved through being honest. That theme is reiterated when he recounts the honesty of his words to his mother on her deathbed.

Has he always been honest?

“With my Mom and Dad, yeah, but you know, all kids are naughty from time to time. I'm not perfect. I want to be. But I can't bear total out and out horrible liars. That's one of my major things. I'll give you one or two or three chances, but if you go beyond that with me, you're really just ... Get out. And don't come back. There've been very few of those people in my life, but the ones that have been that way are obviously not there no more.

“I'd rather let the viewer work it out for themselves, rather than me lecturing,’that one's a git and that one's a chump’ ... because I don't think any of us get out of it without a good hammering. All our warts and sores are there. That's what, I thinkmakes it deeply funny.”

“The Public Image is Rotten” certainly offers a varied view of what was going on, rather than just one person's opinion.

Lydon is proud of that. “It's far more than what people expect. I can't be boring the viewer, can I, with forty years of the ins and outs of daily activities?”

With the documentary and two autobiographies, “Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs” and “Anger Is An Energy,” is there something Lydon wants to get across that maybe people have missed?

He’s quick to dismiss that thought. “I never asked for the documentary. They came to us. I hemmed and hawed in my mind about what that would mean — and what they would put together. But after working with Tabbert (Fiiller, the film’s director), I'm really, really pleased. He's great! He's wonderfully honest, in a different way than I am. Sorry, but there it is. Bloody excellent working with him. Hard work at times, too!

“You're relinquishing the reins — and you're letting someone else come in and poke around in your life. It's a frightening thing!"

In the film, many of the interviews with Lydon take place in the kitchen of his and his wife Nora’s home. And throughout the many days days of filming, with Lydon seen in different clothing, the dishwasher remains wide-open. Was Lydon tryiing to make some sort of statement,  as if to say he's allowing all of his dirty bits to be displayed out in the open?

Lydon laughs that mischievous and familiar laugh of his. “It's broken!” he exclaims.

“If you're an art student you’d come up with that!” he surmises, asking, “Are you an art student? No! The damn thing's broken and I'm too fucking lazy to buy a new one!”

“That's how I am, really, a house falls down around me. I live kind of a duffer's life, really, but I am looking forward to the gig in New Orleans! Hopefully, I'll get enough for a dishwasher out of this tour! You never know! I need one. I live in three different places, and, I just realized, everyone of them's got a broken dishwasher! So keep on with that art student, you’re onto something!

“Three dishwashers. What does a dishwasher cost? I reckon about three hundred dollars, right? No, nine hundred. You're going to spend a grand on something you can do quicker in your sink?

“So there's PiL explained!” he concludes. “Why bother with an over-elaborate recording studio when you can use what's basically a cowshed made out of bricks? That explains the last two albums nicely.

“I mean cheap and cheerful can be a very, very good outlet musically, it really can. I've worked in very fine studios and I've worked in rundown ones ... to me, it's like a bad workman blames his tools. You get on with what you got to get on with and what's available. And that's half of, probably three-quarters, of the fun of making records. You enjoy the calamity of the situation a lot.

Is that sort of thought what binds together the PiL members of today?

“I think it describes PiL in all of its different functions and environments. And people-wise. I would have love to have kept a band more solid, but I'm not blaming record companies for their involvement or lack of involvement, or controlling the purse strings to the point of creating poisonous situations, but its kind of noticeable that for the last two albums, it's the same people, and, to me, that's historical. And now we're touring, and here we are, celebrating forty years of all things PiL, and we're in the middle of a third album, too!"

At this point, I surmise "congratulations" and "job well done" are in order.

“Yes, it is, really. But this workload we've taken on this year, it's practically killing me! There's so many personal issues too that I have to deal with. I've got some serious family health problems wrapped all around me and the pressure is overwhelming, but still, the gigs must count. My wife's seriously ill, and it's just getting worse. ‘And the days go by …' It's all the time pressure, pressure, pressure. Is it the gods that be, or Mother Nature, who deliberately brings these things on me so that I don't get cozy and comfortable. I think that that would be the ruination, ultimately.

“You know, ‘stiff upper lip,’" he says, mocking the British belief. “Bloody hell! Be British? Not bad for an Irishman. Who lives in America. And, in fact, is an American now.”

Lydon claims that his path to citizenship in this country was two-fold, one, because he’s lived here for so long, two, “I quite enjoyed the potential of Obama's years. Look at the rewards unleashed on me!”

Despite the health calamities surrounding Lydon, it’s good to see he’s still the fun-loving young man he’s always been.He certainly hasn’t changed in that respect.

“I've always thought that the best lesson you can learn in life is through humor,” the man who once sang, “God save the Queen, she ain’t no human being,” contends, “and boring intellectuals never get any way near it. Nowhere near the truth. The truth is in the comedy of it all!”

Years ago, first starting out as a young Sex Pistol, did Lydon make plans for this comedy of errors we call life?

“I don't know if I made plans, it was more like wishes. I wanted some sense of continuity in all this and that's really not what I've been able to achieve up until the last decade. But even with that, there's still more issues that keep creeping in and make life very, very difficult. But then, if you didn't make an effort, what would any of this be worth? It's the effort and the struggle that count more than anything.”

Your philosophy in the early days of PiL was “not to worry about the money, just do what you believe in — and it will come.” You said that after plopping down a hundred dollar bill for a ten dollar breakfast, and telling the waitress to keep the change.

“Oh yeah. Never bother with that. In those days we had no chance of grabbing that purse string. Now, we're running our own label and we're kind of like financially responsible to ourselves."

So that wasn't just some youthful idealism or naiveté?

“No, there was a proper business plan in my head,” he admits. “All of this would function far better if we are responsible to ourselves and only to ourselves.

“That's why the box set is coming out in such a professional manner,” Lydon explains of ''The Public Image is Rotten (Songs from the Heart)'', the five CD, two DVD retrospective, chock full of singles, b-sides, remixes, rare and previously-unreleased tracks, as well as live concert audio and two DVDs of performances, “because if we ever left it up to a record label, they would just turn it into some hokey fucking nonsense. We're using the labels, but it's to our benefit, our control. And so, the manipulation is on an artistic level rather than left to a bunch of accountants.

“I'd rather spend all the money raising the level of quality of the film work that's available in there, and making sure that every track is the highest quality you can get rather than pocketing the money and and chucking it out in a very cheap, lackadaisical, carbon (copy) fashion. I've always been like that. This is the reputation I have earned from record labels, that I'm 'difficult to work with.' Well, yeah! Because quality to me must come first. It's my life story. Why shouldn't it?“

If you read the press being generated on this tour, many journalists claim Lydon took twenty years off, as if to say he led an idyllic life away from the the music industry, at home with his wife. That’s not the case.

“I didn't take twenty years off. I had no choice in the matter,” he snarls, his blood pressure seemingly rising at the suggestion. “It was Catch-22, I owed them (the record labels) much money, and anything I did, the money must go automatically to them. And so I couldn't even make the funds to open a rehearsal studio, because that money, they would want it immediately. I couldn't tour. I couldn't make any product … ousted from the only thing that I feel I've been any good at, and that's "singer-songwriter," he says with a positive, upward lilt and a laugh in his voice. “I'm laughing at the term, because I realize how pretentious that sounds! Well, fucking hell — that's all I am good at! I'm not saying I'm the world's greatest, but that is something I can do!”

To pull himself and the band out of debt, Lydon says he embarked on many different projects, TV shows, TV productions, internet broadcasts.

“All of these ideas collapsed because the manipulation started creeping in and I wouldn't be told what to do. But it got me on the right foot,” he concedes, noting that without them, he wouldn’t have been asked to participate in the now-infamous “butter campaign.”

“One thing led to another and an advertising company in Britain spotted my activities and offered us the butter campaign, he tells the story, as incredulous of the offer as those who viewed the commercial. “I never thought of such a thing in my life. Me? Promoting butter? Well, the basic question I had to ask myself was, ‘Do I eat butter?’ ‘Yes I do! A helluva a lot of it, too!’ Hence, the body shape,” he chuckles.

“But it helped. It helped! And I was given a free hand in the script. The agreement was they'd have a script —  and I could ignore it! And I thought that was a beautiful compromise. It worked for both sides. Sales of British dairy product went up by 87 percent! So, I did good all around for them. And the money from that, although not huge, we got enough where we could put some money towards the debt to the record labels and start rehearsing. And from that very first rehearsal, it's been like smiles all around. And all of it handled wonderfully by Rambo! He knows what the rules are, but he also knows that three-quarters of those rules are for fools!”

How does Rambo put up with him?

“Well, you'd have to ask him!,” Lydon says, yelling across the room, "Hey, Rambo, how d'ya you put up with me?"

A deeper, rougher voice suddenly booms across the cellphone, “I don’t."

“Short, sharp and straight to the point!,” Lydon laughs. “We're mates, and there it is. We have arguments, you know, but that's how things work. It's not ‘bang the door on each other and vanish for the rest of your career’ — that's what was happening, in early PiL.

“But, it was like a blackmail letter,” he recalls, “because they knew I was desperate. And so they were upping their prices, the bad bad members, but the good ones ... that's why, when it came to PiL's affirmation, Bruce and Lu were at the top of my list. And we really needed a good bass player ... because we hadn't really had one up until this point. And Scott was purrfect. Yes, I know those words can bite!”

In the film, it’s apparent Wobble was considered to re-join PiL.

“Yeah. He was given the opportunity,” Lydon admits. “I talked to him. He was going on about dental chairs and and banjos. It all sounded like ''Deliverance'', a pizza would be quicker. It was all grandiose. And grandiose goes way beyond his station. And that initially was his problem anyway. He was rowing really, really badly with other members, and all manner of disputes were going on, tapes were going missing ... I couldn't cope with it. That's not how a band should be. You do things because you're loyal to each other.”

“He'll always be a friend, because that's what he was before, but how he misused that opportunity, well, that's his own decision, and consequences to do matter.

Lydon gets a little wound up, or, maybe, he’s waking up. “They’ve all spent years being negative,” he says of past PiL members, “and here we go, now he's in the documentary, and he's not so negative after all. Hello!"

Despite whatever problems ex-members may have with Lydon, it is telling that none of them complain on the level one might expect. Were they just not wanting to appear confrontational?

“I don't know. It has nothing to do with me,” he claims. “If you had asked me, emotionally, off the top of my head, I would've said, 'No, don’t you dare film any of them swine,’ but, I think the decision was made more positively. Yes, you should have them in. And I agree with that. I sat down and thought about it long and hard and what can anybody say? They can either tell the truth, or they can lie. Either way, that's a voyage of discovery, isn't it?”

“I can be just as irrational as anybody else,” Lydon continues, “and sometimes, you know, that's a problem for me. But it does make for some great song material later on down the line,” he laughs. “Sometimes, after many, many years of endurance, I can have a short fuse, but I'd rather not."

The documentary, the box set, the world tour, it all seems to be big business for Lydon. Yet he doesn’t see it as crossing over to the other side. More to the point, “It's all hard work. It's seriously hard work. I really don't have ten spare minutes. I didn't quite think celebrating forty years would be the endurance course it's turning into. But then, I suppose that is the only real way to celebrate forty years of hard work — one year of extremely hard work.

“The few times I've allowed myself to 'party it up' on this tour," he admits, “I’ve absolutely destroyed myself physically. I don't want to do that anymore. So, for the rest of this year, particularly now in America, I'm taking it ‘serious.’ Why, I don't know? It's too late. The damage is done.”

“It's always good for me to look at the physical aspects of the tour, do I have the stamina to carry on? I think so. I force myself to strive a little bit further, otherwise, what's the point? The older you get, the harder you should be driving yourself. This is what they're all telling me! Majority rules! The democracy has out voted me.

“Of course, it's all a matter of how you see yourself,” Lydon suddenly waxes philosophically. “Do you accept old age, the way it's slung on you by society? I mean, I'll know when I'm old, and I certainly don't feel old! These lovely tours — when I feel myself every night in that bunk on that tour bus, that doesn't feel old to me. Those wrinkles are wrinkles I've always had. (laughter).


What has the man who’s mere stare seems to have intimidated a generation, whose words have painted disarmingly brutal pictures of life, learned in his 62 years?

“Nothing comes easy unless you really bloody strive for it,” he declares. “And don't stand there with your hand out, expecting an easy ride, because that ain't ever gonna happen. Just do it yourself, nobody's going to do it for you. Plain and simple.”

With that, Lydon says goodbye, but not without first gleefully admitting his anticipation of Tuesday night’s New Orleans gig. He’s looking forward to the first night of this U.S. tour as if his life depends on it."
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  string(22996) " Lydon Hands  2018-10-09T17:48:58+00:00 Lydon hands.jpeg    john lydon John Lydon's 'songs from the heart' propel him forward 9940  2018-10-09T17:57:10+00:00 HIGH FREQUENCIES: John Lydon/Public Image Ltd.  —  USELESS MEMORIES? tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Tony Paris Tony Paris 2018-10-09T17:57:10+00:00  John Lydon, make that Public Image Ltd., because, as both the documentary and career-retrospective box set agree, “The Public Image is Rotten,” is in New Orleans, readying for the first date of the U.S. leg of the band’s world tour, celebrating forty years of all things PiL, and of course, all things Lydon. After the Civic Theater show Tuesday night, the band and crew load in to the tour bus for the overnight ride to Atlanta, and a show at the Variety Playhouse, Wednesday, Oct. 10.

Lydon is just waking up as we get set to speak, having been dragged out of bed — and out of the toilet — by his manager and lifelong mate John “Rambo” Stevens. Their time together goes way back, fifty years at least, when they were just children in the schoolyard. It’s that bond, that trust built upon over the years, that has allowed Lydon to accept him as manager and — perhaps, just a bit — as co-conspirator in business decisions. For all things musical, however, Lydon has his band of almost ten years now  —  Lu Edmonds, Brian Smith and Scott Firth.

The travels and travails of Public Image Ltd. are long, from the early days of Lydon, Keith Levene, Jah Wobble, and John Walker, through the period when Martin Atkins joined the group, through Pete Jones replacing Wobble, until the band seemed to implode. When the dust settled, Lydon had Edmonds and Smith at his side, with John McGeoch and Allan Dias joining them.

“Two sides to every story,” John Lydon exclaimed in Public Image Ltd.’s debut single, “Public Image.” his first recorded work after leaving the Sex Pistols following that band’s a highly-calculated first U.S. tour. Lydon as Johnny Rotten was was picked to fill the role of lead singer in arguably the world’s first punk band, but he proved to be more dangerous than any of the tactics and P.R. schemes manager Malcolm McLaren dared to dream up to establish the band as such.



Lydon, for all intents and purposes is, and has always been, his own person, one not wanting to take direction, but to look at the circumstances and deal with them in a way that best suits his needs. His whims. His moral compass. His instincts are what he’s always trusted in a business that for all it’s perceived freedoms is highly-structured and regimented.

Over the years, Lydon, being Lydon, has infuriated musicians and fans alike. If he hadn’t, chances are he wouldn’t be as interesting, nor as inspiring, as he’s made his way through the music business on his own terms. It’s all well-explained in “The Public Image is Rotten,” the new feature-length film documenting the forty years of PiL, that is slowing making its way to theater screens across the U.S. as Public Image Ltd. embarks on the U.S. leg of a world tour in support of the career retrospective box set, The Public Image is Rotten (Songs from the Heart).

In addition to there being “two sides to every story,” there’s the adage, “There’s three sides to every story — yours, mine and the truth.” Lydon attempts to make it clear at the beginning of “The Public Image is Rotten” documentary, that his side is the truth, and that all he’s achieved in his life is “through being honest.” It’s quite an interesting and telling film, one that includes interviews with all the major players throughout PiL’s illustrious history, along with many of those who the band worked with or influenced, Ginger Baker, Thurston Moore, Flea, Julian Temple, Don Letts and Vivien Goldman among them. The film, distributed by Abramorama, is not only a look inside PiL, but a look inside the workings of Lydon, a man whose memory was wiped clean by meningitis as a child, and needed the honesty of others to rebuild his fondest memories, even of his own father and mother.

“The Public Image is Rotten” is a quick view. A lot of people and a lot of stories are packed into its 1hour and 44 minutes, but the time goes by like nothing at all, reminding me of something Peter Tosh once told me, “A thousand years is like a day gone by in the search for truth.”

And the truth presented in “The Public Image is Rotten” (the play on words in the title says it all) not only recounts the past, but consecrates the present, providing a take on latter-day PiL that has me re-evaluating their work, and reassessing PiL as a whole. I remember seeing the first Public Image Ltd. U.S. tour thirty-eight years ago, watching from the side of the stage at the Agora Ballroom in Atlanta, wondering what Lydon, Levene, Wobble and Atkins had wrought on pop music — and I certainly never heard anything the same again.

Rising out of his New Orleans slumber, Lydon is quick to discuss the documentary, admitting that it was “very, very, very hard for us to relinquish responsibility into other people's hands when it's your own career,” but agrees “everybody involved did a really, really, really good job!

“Normally it's about me, I'm usually barking orders. But everybody told me to shut up and just get on with it. And I did and it's so much better for it."

The documentary is so well done, I’m surprised it wasn’t released before the tour, to drum up interest for the shows.

“Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. I know what you mean,” he concurs, stopping to blow what some might consider trademarked Johnny Rotten snot out of his nose (it’s explained in the film), “but it's impossible to coordinate these things favorably, because the film world and the rock and roll circus we all love and adore are not compatible.

“The two things are separate issues,” he continues. “That film started out, it was just going to be about the last two albums, but it expanded into this enormous, all over the place documentary. I mean its a full history now. And everybody who was anybody to do with anything, from the Pistols to PiL, was asked if they wanted to have a say in it. And that's the grand conclusion of it. You either see it or you don't. I 'd rather you did, regardless of when we will be playing in a town near you."

It paints a broad picture and it allows allows everyone to have their say, something I didn’t expect. It also offers a lot of insight into the latter days of the band that, maybe myself or others don’t find as interesting as the early days. It offers a lot of answers to previously unaddressed questions.

Lydon is in complete agreement of the assessment.

At the beginning of the film, Lydon discusses honesty, crediting whatever he’s achieved through being honest. That theme is reiterated when he recounts the honesty of his words to his mother on her deathbed.

Has he always been honest?

“With my Mom and Dad, yeah, but you know, all kids are naughty from time to time. I'm not perfect. I want to be. But I can't bear total out and out horrible liars. That's one of my major things. I'll give you one or two or three chances, but if you go beyond that with me, you're really just ... Get out. And don't come back. There've been very few of those people in my life, but the ones that have been that way are obviously not there no more.

“I'd rather let the viewer work it out for themselves, rather than me lecturing,’that one's a git and that one's a chump’ ... because I don't think any of us get out of it without a good hammering. All our warts and sores are there. That's what, I thinkmakes it deeply funny.”

“The Public Image is Rotten” certainly offers a varied view of what was going on, rather than just one person's opinion.

Lydon is proud of that. “It's far more than what people expect. I can't be boring the viewer, can I, with forty years of the ins and outs of daily activities?”

With the documentary and two autobiographies, “Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs” and “Anger Is An Energy,” is there something Lydon wants to get across that maybe people have missed?

He’s quick to dismiss that thought. “I never asked for the documentary. They came to us. I hemmed and hawed in my mind about what that would mean — and what they would put together. But after working with Tabbert (Fiiller, the film’s director), I'm really, really pleased. He's great! He's wonderfully honest, in a different way than I am. Sorry, but there it is. Bloody excellent working with him. Hard work at times, too!

“You're relinquishing the reins — and you're letting someone else come in and poke around in your life. It's a frightening thing!"

In the film, many of the interviews with Lydon take place in the kitchen of his and his wife Nora’s home. And throughout the many days days of filming, with Lydon seen in different clothing, the dishwasher remains wide-open. Was Lydon tryiing to make some sort of statement,  as if to say he's allowing all of his dirty bits to be displayed out in the open?

Lydon laughs that mischievous and familiar laugh of his. “It's broken!” he exclaims.

“If you're an art student you’d come up with that!” he surmises, asking, “Are you an art student? No! The damn thing's broken and I'm too fucking lazy to buy a new one!”

“That's how I am, really, a house falls down around me. I live kind of a duffer's life, really, but I am looking forward to the gig in New Orleans! Hopefully, I'll get enough for a dishwasher out of this tour! You never know! I need one. I live in three different places, and, I just realized, everyone of them's got a broken dishwasher! So keep on with that art student, you’re onto something!

“Three dishwashers. What does a dishwasher cost? I reckon about three hundred dollars, right? No, nine hundred. You're going to spend a grand on something you can do quicker in your sink?

“So there's PiL explained!” he concludes. “Why bother with an over-elaborate recording studio when you can use what's basically a cowshed made out of bricks? That explains the last two albums nicely.

“I mean cheap and cheerful can be a very, very good outlet musically, it really can. I've worked in very fine studios and I've worked in rundown ones ... to me, it's like a bad workman blames his tools. You get on with what you got to get on with and what's available. And that's half of, probably three-quarters, of the fun of making records. You enjoy the calamity of the situation a lot.

Is that sort of thought what binds together the PiL members of today?

“I think it describes PiL in all of its different functions and environments. And people-wise. I would have love to have kept a band more solid, but I'm not blaming record companies for their involvement or lack of involvement, or controlling the purse strings to the point of creating poisonous situations, but its kind of noticeable that for the last two albums, it's the same people, and, to me, that's historical. And now we're touring, and here we are, celebrating forty years of all things PiL, and we're in the middle of a third album, too!"

At this point, I surmise "congratulations" and "job well done" are in order.

“Yes, it is, really. But this workload we've taken on this year, it's practically killing me! There's so many personal issues too that I have to deal with. I've got some serious family health problems wrapped all around me and the pressure is overwhelming, but still, the gigs must count. My wife's seriously ill, and it's just getting worse. ‘And the days go by …' It's all the time pressure, pressure, pressure. Is it the gods that be, or Mother Nature, who deliberately brings these things on me so that I don't get cozy and comfortable. I think that that would be the ruination, ultimately.

“You know, ‘stiff upper lip,’" he says, mocking the British belief. “Bloody hell! Be British? Not bad for an Irishman. Who lives in America. And, in fact, is an American now.”

Lydon claims that his path to citizenship in this country was two-fold, one, because he’s lived here for so long, two, “I quite enjoyed the potential of Obama's years. Look at the rewards unleashed on me!”

Despite the health calamities surrounding Lydon, it’s good to see he’s still the fun-loving young man he’s always been.He certainly hasn’t changed in that respect.

“I've always thought that the best lesson you can learn in life is through humor,” the man who once sang, “God save the Queen, she ain’t no human being,” contends, “and boring intellectuals never get any way near it. Nowhere near the truth. The truth is in the comedy of it all!”

Years ago, first starting out as a young Sex Pistol, did Lydon make plans for this comedy of errors we call life?

“I don't know if I made plans, it was more like wishes. I wanted some sense of continuity in all this and that's really not what I've been able to achieve up until the last decade. But even with that, there's still more issues that keep creeping in and make life very, very difficult. But then, if you didn't make an effort, what would any of this be worth? It's the effort and the struggle that count more than anything.”

Your philosophy in the early days of PiL was “not to worry about the money, just do what you believe in — and it will come.” You said that after plopping down a hundred dollar bill for a ten dollar breakfast, and telling the waitress to keep the change.

“Oh yeah. Never bother with that. In those days we had no chance of grabbing that purse string. Now, we're running our own label and we're kind of like financially responsible to ourselves."

So that wasn't just some youthful idealism or naiveté?

“No, there was a proper business plan in my head,” he admits. “All of this would function far better if we are responsible to ourselves and only to ourselves.

“That's why the box set is coming out in such a professional manner,” Lydon explains of The Public Image is Rotten (Songs from the Heart), the five CD, two DVD retrospective, chock full of singles, b-sides, remixes, rare and previously-unreleased tracks, as well as live concert audio and two DVDs of performances, “because if we ever left it up to a record label, they would just turn it into some hokey fucking nonsense. We're using the labels, but it's to our benefit, our control. And so, the manipulation is on an artistic level rather than left to a bunch of accountants.

“I'd rather spend all the money raising the level of quality of the film work that's available in there, and making sure that every track is the highest quality you can get rather than pocketing the money and and chucking it out in a very cheap, lackadaisical, carbon (copy) fashion. I've always been like that. This is the reputation I have earned from record labels, that I'm 'difficult to work with.' Well, yeah! Because quality to me must come first. It's my life story. Why shouldn't it?“

If you read the press being generated on this tour, many journalists claim Lydon took twenty years off, as if to say he led an idyllic life away from the the music industry, at home with his wife. That’s not the case.

“I didn't take twenty years off. I had no choice in the matter,” he snarls, his blood pressure seemingly rising at the suggestion. “It was Catch-22, I owed them (the record labels) much money, and anything I did, the money must go automatically to them. And so I couldn't even make the funds to open a rehearsal studio, because that money, they would want it immediately. I couldn't tour. I couldn't make any product … ousted from the only thing that I feel I've been any good at, and that's "singer-songwriter," he says with a positive, upward lilt and a laugh in his voice. “I'm laughing at the term, because I realize how pretentious that sounds! Well, fucking hell — that's all I am good at! I'm not saying I'm the world's greatest, but that is something I can do!”

To pull himself and the band out of debt, Lydon says he embarked on many different projects, TV shows, TV productions, internet broadcasts.

“All of these ideas collapsed because the manipulation started creeping in and I wouldn't be told what to do. But it got me on the right foot,” he concedes, noting that without them, he wouldn’t have been asked to participate in the now-infamous “butter campaign.”

“One thing led to another and an advertising company in Britain spotted my activities and offered us the butter campaign, he tells the story, as incredulous of the offer as those who viewed the commercial. “I never thought of such a thing in my life. Me? Promoting butter? Well, the basic question I had to ask myself was, ‘Do I eat butter?’ ‘Yes I do! A helluva a lot of it, too!’ Hence, the body shape,” he chuckles.

“But it helped. It helped! And I was given a free hand in the script. The agreement was they'd have a script —  and I could ignore it! And I thought that was a beautiful compromise. It worked for both sides. Sales of British dairy product went up by 87 percent! So, I did good all around for them. And the money from that, although not huge, we got enough where we could put some money towards the debt to the record labels and start rehearsing. And from that very first rehearsal, it's been like smiles all around. And all of it handled wonderfully by Rambo! He knows what the rules are, but he also knows that three-quarters of those rules are for fools!”

How does Rambo put up with him?

“Well, you'd have to ask him!,” Lydon says, yelling across the room, "Hey, Rambo, how d'ya you put up with me?"

A deeper, rougher voice suddenly booms across the cellphone, “I don’t."

“Short, sharp and straight to the point!,” Lydon laughs. “We're mates, and there it is. We have arguments, you know, but that's how things work. It's not ‘bang the door on each other and vanish for the rest of your career’ — that's what was happening, in early PiL.

“But, it was like a blackmail letter,” he recalls, “because they knew I was desperate. And so they were upping their prices, the bad bad members, but the good ones ... that's why, when it came to PiL's affirmation, Bruce and Lu were at the top of my list. And we really needed a good bass player ... because we hadn't really had one up until this point. And Scott was purrfect. Yes, I know those words can bite!”

In the film, it’s apparent Wobble was considered to re-join PiL.

“Yeah. He was given the opportunity,” Lydon admits. “I talked to him. He was going on about dental chairs and and banjos. It all sounded like Deliverance, a pizza would be quicker. It was all grandiose. And grandiose goes way beyond his station. And that initially was his problem anyway. He was rowing really, really badly with other members, and all manner of disputes were going on, tapes were going missing ... I couldn't cope with it. That's not how a band should be. You do things because you're loyal to each other.”

“He'll always be a friend, because that's what he was before, but how he misused that opportunity, well, that's his own decision, and consequences to do matter.

Lydon gets a little wound up, or, maybe, he’s waking up. “They’ve all spent years being negative,” he says of past PiL members, “and here we go, now he's in the documentary, and he's not so negative after all. Hello!"

Despite whatever problems ex-members may have with Lydon, it is telling that none of them complain on the level one might expect. Were they just not wanting to appear confrontational?

“I don't know. It has nothing to do with me,” he claims. “If you had asked me, emotionally, off the top of my head, I would've said, 'No, don’t you dare film any of them swine,’ but, I think the decision was made more positively. Yes, you should have them in. And I agree with that. I sat down and thought about it long and hard and what can anybody say? They can either tell the truth, or they can lie. Either way, that's a voyage of discovery, isn't it?”

“I can be just as irrational as anybody else,” Lydon continues, “and sometimes, you know, that's a problem for me. But it does make for some great song material later on down the line,” he laughs. “Sometimes, after many, many years of endurance, I can have a short fuse, but I'd rather not."

The documentary, the box set, the world tour, it all seems to be big business for Lydon. Yet he doesn’t see it as crossing over to the other side. More to the point, “It's all hard work. It's seriously hard work. I really don't have ten spare minutes. I didn't quite think celebrating forty years would be the endurance course it's turning into. But then, I suppose that is the only real way to celebrate forty years of hard work — one year of extremely hard work.

“The few times I've allowed myself to 'party it up' on this tour," he admits, “I’ve absolutely destroyed myself physically. I don't want to do that anymore. So, for the rest of this year, particularly now in America, I'm taking it ‘serious.’ Why, I don't know? It's too late. The damage is done.”

“It's always good for me to look at the physical aspects of the tour, do I have the stamina to carry on? I think so. I force myself to strive a little bit further, otherwise, what's the point? The older you get, the harder you should be driving yourself. This is what they're all telling me! Majority rules! The democracy has out voted me.

“Of course, it's all a matter of how you see yourself,” Lydon suddenly waxes philosophically. “Do you accept old age, the way it's slung on you by society? I mean, I'll know when I'm old, and I certainly don't feel old! These lovely tours — when I feel myself every night in that bunk on that tour bus, that doesn't feel old to me. Those wrinkles are wrinkles I've always had. (laughter).


What has the man who’s mere stare seems to have intimidated a generation, whose words have painted disarmingly brutal pictures of life, learned in his 62 years?

“Nothing comes easy unless you really bloody strive for it,” he declares. “And don't stand there with your hand out, expecting an easy ride, because that ain't ever gonna happen. Just do it yourself, nobody's going to do it for you. Plain and simple.”

With that, Lydon says goodbye, but not without first gleefully admitting his anticipation of Tuesday night’s New Orleans gig. He’s looking forward to the first night of this U.S. tour as if his life depends on it.    Courtesy Abramorama - Photo by Paul Heartfield. IS THE JIG UP: JOHN LYDON .      "John Lydon"                             HIGH FREQUENCIES: John Lydon/Public Image Ltd.  —  USELESS MEMORIES? "
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Music, High Frequencies

Tuesday October 9, 2018 01:57 pm EDT
John Lydon's 'songs from the heart' propel him forward | more...