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  string(4353) "When former Sen. Mack Mattingly arrived for the grand opening of the new Cherokee County GOP headquarters recently, the woman handing out nametags smiled broadly. "Good to see you again," she told the guest of honor, "It's been a long time."  As the woman filled out his nametag, the candidate — and at least one nearby newspaper columnist — got a none-too-subtle reminder  of just how long it's been: She got his first name wrong.

"That's not my name," he explained, picking up the pen.

Well, it has been a long time. Mack Mattingly — that's M-A-C-K, people — last ran for office in 1986, losing his Senate re-election bid to Democrat Wyche Fowler. In 1992, Mattingly's longtime friend and fellow Republican Paul Coverdell returned the favor, sending Fowler home after a legendary runoff.

Now, 14 years after his last race and some seven weeks since Coverdell's untimely passing, Mattingly is running to reclaim his friend's Senate seat from Democrat Zell Miller.

Most political pundits will tell you Mattingly doesn't have a proverbial snowball's chance in hell against Miller, the popular ex-governor, but the St. Simon's businessman is undeterred. To Mattingly, who never thought he would run for office again, the race is about doing what's right by his late friend — and the people who re-elected Coverdell in 1998.

"This race," Mattingly told the Cherokee faithful, "is not about Mack Mattingly. It's not about Zell Miller. But this race is about Paul Coverdell, the legacy he left, his beliefs and values, his Republican conservative philosophy, and making certain that philosophy continues."

Mattingly makes a good case for himself as Coverdell's logical successor. As he points out, Georgia voters did re-elect a GOP conservative just two years ago, expecting to have him serve six years. And there is, as Mattingly argues, a sense among many Republicans that Coverdell's seat was "stolen" by Gov. Roy Barnes' appointment of Miller.

Mattingly is an appealing would-be heir to Coverdell. He is an experienced legislator but, to his credit, he has not spent his entire career in government. (He worked for IBM for 20 years before entering public life.) Fit and energetic at 69, Mattingly looks 10 years younger.

Mattingly should also be able to raise money quickly, a critical ability in an abbreviated race. He has remained active in GOP politics over the years, quietly supporting and advising others. And he has friends in high places with the Bush organization. (President Bush made Mattingly  an ambassador.)

Yet, even as Mattingly begins to answer the "Why Mack?" question, the odds against him remain long. Given Miller's popularity, the first question for many swing voters is likely to be "Why not Zell?" If Mattingly is to contend seriously, he will need to give people more than a reason to vote for him. He will have to make a  case against Miller, no easy task given the unique circumstances of the race.

Thus far, Mattingly has been reluctant to criticize his opponent directly. He has nipped around the edges, saying Miller can't "fill the shoes of Paul Coverdell" and noting that his rival would, if elected, likely serve in the Senate minority. Mattingly is closer to the mark when he says Miller's election would mean more power for the Senate's liberal Democratic leaders.

Tying Miller to beltway Democrats like Ted Kennedy and Tom Daschle won't be easy, but it may be Mattingly's best hope. Such an approach would also have the benefit of being accurate. For as moderate as Miller may have been as Georgia's governor, he would become, in Washington, a junior member of a decidedly liberal team, a silver-haired cog in the national Democratic machine.

No dope, Miller is deftly dodging high-profile Democratic functions. He skipped his party's L.A. convention — the one where they booed the Boy Scouts — and was conspicuously absent when Al Gore and Joe Lieberman recently campaigned at Centennial Olympic Park.

If Mattingly does manage to make the race interesting, he would still need a couple of breaks to win. Long Bush coattails would help, certainly. Depressed turnout among Democrats would help, too.

Come to think of it, nasty weather on Election Day might be just the ticket for Mattingly's improbable snowball.

Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@ hotmail.com.


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  string(4330) "When former Sen. Mack Mattingly arrived for the grand opening of the new Cherokee County GOP headquarters recently, the woman handing out nametags smiled broadly. "Good to see you again," she told the guest of honor, "It's been a long time."  As the woman filled out his nametag, the candidate -- and at least one nearby newspaper columnist -- got a none-too-subtle reminder  of just how long it's been: She got his first name wrong.

"That's not my name," he explained, picking up the pen.

Well, it ''has'' been a long time. Mack Mattingly -- that's M-A-C-K, people -- last ran for office in 1986, losing his Senate re-election bid to Democrat Wyche Fowler. In 1992, Mattingly's longtime friend and fellow Republican Paul Coverdell returned the favor, sending Fowler home after a legendary runoff.

Now, 14 years after his last race and some seven weeks since Coverdell's untimely passing, Mattingly is running to reclaim his friend's Senate seat from Democrat Zell Miller.

Most political pundits will tell you Mattingly doesn't have a proverbial snowball's chance in hell against Miller, the popular ex-governor, but the St. Simon's businessman is undeterred. To Mattingly, who never thought he would run for office again, the race is about doing what's right by his late friend -- and the people who re-elected Coverdell in 1998.

"This race," Mattingly told the Cherokee faithful, "is not about Mack Mattingly. It's not about Zell Miller. But this race is about Paul Coverdell, the legacy he left, his beliefs and values, his Republican conservative philosophy, and making certain that philosophy continues."

Mattingly makes a good case for himself as Coverdell's logical successor. As he points out, Georgia voters ''did'' re-elect a GOP conservative just two years ago, expecting to have him serve six years. And there is, as Mattingly argues, a sense among many Republicans that Coverdell's seat was "stolen" by Gov. Roy Barnes' appointment of Miller.

Mattingly is an appealing would-be heir to Coverdell. He is an experienced legislator but, to his credit, he has not spent his entire career in government. (He worked for IBM for 20 years before entering public life.) Fit and energetic at 69, Mattingly looks 10 years younger.

Mattingly should also be able to raise money quickly, a critical ability in an abbreviated race. He has remained active in GOP politics over the years, quietly supporting and advising others. And he has friends in high places with the Bush organization. (President Bush made Mattingly  an ambassador.)

Yet, even as Mattingly begins to answer the "Why Mack?" question, the odds against him remain long. Given Miller's popularity, the first question for many swing voters is likely to be "Why not Zell?" If Mattingly is to contend seriously, he will need to give people more than a reason to vote for him. He will have to make a  case against Miller, no easy task given the unique circumstances of the race.

Thus far, Mattingly has been reluctant to criticize his opponent directly. He has nipped around the edges, saying Miller can't "fill the shoes of Paul Coverdell" and noting that his rival would, if elected, likely serve in the Senate minority. Mattingly is closer to the mark when he says Miller's election would mean more power for the Senate's liberal Democratic leaders.

Tying Miller to beltway Democrats like Ted Kennedy and Tom Daschle won't be easy, but it may be Mattingly's best hope. Such an approach would also have the benefit of being accurate. For as moderate as Miller may have been as Georgia's governor, he would become, in Washington, a junior member of a decidedly liberal team, a silver-haired cog in the national Democratic machine.

No dope, Miller is deftly dodging high-profile Democratic functions. He skipped his party's L.A. convention -- the one where they booed the Boy Scouts -- and was conspicuously absent when Al Gore and Joe Lieberman recently campaigned at Centennial Olympic Park.

If Mattingly does manage to make the race interesting, he would still need a couple of breaks to win. Long Bush coattails would help, certainly. Depressed turnout among Democrats would help, too.

Come to think of it, nasty weather on Election Day might be just the ticket for Mattingly's improbable snowball.

''Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@ hotmail.com.''


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  string(4627) "    Coverdell friend challenges Miller   2000-09-09T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Mack's mission September 09 2000   Luke Boggs 1223535 2000-09-09T04:04:00+00:00  When former Sen. Mack Mattingly arrived for the grand opening of the new Cherokee County GOP headquarters recently, the woman handing out nametags smiled broadly. "Good to see you again," she told the guest of honor, "It's been a long time."  As the woman filled out his nametag, the candidate — and at least one nearby newspaper columnist — got a none-too-subtle reminder  of just how long it's been: She got his first name wrong.

"That's not my name," he explained, picking up the pen.

Well, it has been a long time. Mack Mattingly — that's M-A-C-K, people — last ran for office in 1986, losing his Senate re-election bid to Democrat Wyche Fowler. In 1992, Mattingly's longtime friend and fellow Republican Paul Coverdell returned the favor, sending Fowler home after a legendary runoff.

Now, 14 years after his last race and some seven weeks since Coverdell's untimely passing, Mattingly is running to reclaim his friend's Senate seat from Democrat Zell Miller.

Most political pundits will tell you Mattingly doesn't have a proverbial snowball's chance in hell against Miller, the popular ex-governor, but the St. Simon's businessman is undeterred. To Mattingly, who never thought he would run for office again, the race is about doing what's right by his late friend — and the people who re-elected Coverdell in 1998.

"This race," Mattingly told the Cherokee faithful, "is not about Mack Mattingly. It's not about Zell Miller. But this race is about Paul Coverdell, the legacy he left, his beliefs and values, his Republican conservative philosophy, and making certain that philosophy continues."

Mattingly makes a good case for himself as Coverdell's logical successor. As he points out, Georgia voters did re-elect a GOP conservative just two years ago, expecting to have him serve six years. And there is, as Mattingly argues, a sense among many Republicans that Coverdell's seat was "stolen" by Gov. Roy Barnes' appointment of Miller.

Mattingly is an appealing would-be heir to Coverdell. He is an experienced legislator but, to his credit, he has not spent his entire career in government. (He worked for IBM for 20 years before entering public life.) Fit and energetic at 69, Mattingly looks 10 years younger.

Mattingly should also be able to raise money quickly, a critical ability in an abbreviated race. He has remained active in GOP politics over the years, quietly supporting and advising others. And he has friends in high places with the Bush organization. (President Bush made Mattingly  an ambassador.)

Yet, even as Mattingly begins to answer the "Why Mack?" question, the odds against him remain long. Given Miller's popularity, the first question for many swing voters is likely to be "Why not Zell?" If Mattingly is to contend seriously, he will need to give people more than a reason to vote for him. He will have to make a  case against Miller, no easy task given the unique circumstances of the race.

Thus far, Mattingly has been reluctant to criticize his opponent directly. He has nipped around the edges, saying Miller can't "fill the shoes of Paul Coverdell" and noting that his rival would, if elected, likely serve in the Senate minority. Mattingly is closer to the mark when he says Miller's election would mean more power for the Senate's liberal Democratic leaders.

Tying Miller to beltway Democrats like Ted Kennedy and Tom Daschle won't be easy, but it may be Mattingly's best hope. Such an approach would also have the benefit of being accurate. For as moderate as Miller may have been as Georgia's governor, he would become, in Washington, a junior member of a decidedly liberal team, a silver-haired cog in the national Democratic machine.

No dope, Miller is deftly dodging high-profile Democratic functions. He skipped his party's L.A. convention — the one where they booed the Boy Scouts — and was conspicuously absent when Al Gore and Joe Lieberman recently campaigned at Centennial Olympic Park.

If Mattingly does manage to make the race interesting, he would still need a couple of breaks to win. Long Bush coattails would help, certainly. Depressed turnout among Democrats would help, too.

Come to think of it, nasty weather on Election Day might be just the ticket for Mattingly's improbable snowball.

Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@ hotmail.com.


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Talk of the Town

Saturday September 9, 2000 12:04 am EDT
Coverdell friend challenges Miller | more...
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  string(4961) "Fall is on the way and so are a bunch of workshops and classes worth your time. First, though, I encourage you to attend the Heart and Soul Benefit this weekend. It benefits Dan Liss, editor of Oracle 2000 and former editor of Aquarius. Liss, who has been a significant advocate for holistic and alternative spiritual paths in Atlanta, underwent heart surgery recently and was left with a very large debt.

The benefit is a two-day event. Unity North church will host a concert Saturday, Sept. 9 from 8-10 p.m., featuring local musicians Kinan, Makari and Jaywalk. There will also be a silent auction. The church is located at 4255 Sandy Plains Road in Marietta.

The next day, Sunday, will feature an afternoon of classes and a health education forum at Inner Space, 183 Allen Road in Sandy Springs. A $10 contribution is requested for the concert and $25 is requested for classes. A two-day discount is available for $25. For details, call 404-252-4540.


The Asian way

Jason Wirth of the Oglethorpe University philosophy department invites readers to attend a public lecture series on Asian philosophy. These are excellent grounding for those who would like to better understand Chinese, Indian and Japanese philosophies, all of which are gaining increasing attention by ordinary Americans.

The series opens Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 7:30 p.m., when Dr. David Jones of Kennesaw State University speaks on "Walking the Way With Confucius: Tianwen, Emerging Patterns of  Human Heavens."

Next, Geshe Lobsang Tenzin of the Drepung Loseling Institute will speak Wednesday, Oct. 11 at 7 p.m., on "Nagarjuna on Ultimate and Conventional Reality: Two Sides of the Same Coin."

Wirth also invites the public to attend a lecture on Friday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m., by Dr. Thomas Kasulis, chair of comparative studies at Ohio State and author of Zen Action/Zen Person. His planned talk on Buddhist ecology is titled "Intimacy and Integrity: Cultural Perspectives on Nature."

All lectures will take place in  the Oglethorpe University Museum  (404-364-8555).


Christianity and Jung

Journey Into Wholeness is the pre-eminent workshop for Christians interested in the work of Carl Jung. This year's session will be held Oct. 22-27 at Kanuga Conference Center near Hendersonville, N.C.

A typical day at the event includes lectures in the morning, followed by experiential workshops in the afternoon. Among this year's participants is Robert Johnson, an analyst and one of the most prolific writers in the Jungian field. He will be speaking on "The Symbolic Life" and presenting one workshop on dreams, along with two others in which he will engage participants in open-ended dialogue.

John Giannini, an analyst and former Dominican priest, will deliver three lectures, including one on Jungian typology, which is the basis of the popular Meyers-Brigg test. He will also give a workshop on typology.

Two of my own professors from Pacifica Graduate Institute are presenting this year. Dianne Skafte, author of Listening to the Oracle, will give two lectures and a workshop on oracular forms of consciousness. Barry Williams, an analyst with special interest in wilderness work, will speak on the healing power of stories and lead a workshop in dream work.

John Corlett, an independent organizational consultant, will speak on ways to use Jungian thought to "transform" churches, schools and community organizations. His lecture and workshop on the same subject are partly an answer to James Hillman's critique that depth psychology focuses too much on individuals and not enough on "world soul."

This year's event will be preceded by a seminar hosted by John and Carolyn Martin Oct. 20-22. Titled "What Do They Mean? What Does It Matter?," the seminar is intended to provide an introduction to the work of Carl Jung. It's also appropriate for those needing a refresher or who are attending Journey to Wholeness for the first time.

Cost of Journey to Wholeness depends on time of registration, room type, etc. Tuition, without the opening seminar, is about $400, and a double room with meals is about $300. Call 828-877-4809 for details.


The sin of pleasure

"Deadly Sins: Remembering the Body" is the title of a workshop I am conducting one Saturday a month beginning Oct. 28. Partly inspired by the work of Enrique Pardo, the workshop is an effort to rethink the "seven deadly sins" as natural expressions of the body's drive for pleasure.

This is radical work, not for the delicate living in the Bible Belt, that will likely involve body workers and thinkers as co-facilitators. We'll be looking at how we are equally drawn to the forbidden and the myth of innocence and how we can honor our bodies' natural drives without being overwhelmed or, contrarily, succumbing to puritanism. I'll also be examining each of the sins in columns here over the next year. Visit soulworks.net/sin/deadlysin.html for more information or call 404-525-4774. Your input is welcome.


"
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  string(5059) "Fall is on the way and so are a bunch of workshops and classes worth your time. First, though, I encourage you to attend the __Heart and Soul Benefit__ this weekend. It benefits Dan Liss, editor of ''Oracle 2000'' and former editor of ''Aquarius''. Liss, who has been a significant advocate for holistic and alternative spiritual paths in Atlanta, underwent heart surgery recently and was left with a very large debt.

The benefit is a two-day event. Unity North church will host a concert Saturday, Sept. 9 from 8-10 p.m., featuring local musicians Kinan, Makari and Jaywalk. There will also be a silent auction. The church is located at 4255 Sandy Plains Road in Marietta.

The next day, Sunday, will feature an afternoon of classes and a health education forum at Inner Space, 183 Allen Road in Sandy Springs. A $10 contribution is requested for the concert and $25 is requested for classes. A two-day discount is available for $25. For details, call 404-252-4540.


__The Asian way__

__Jason Wirth __of the Oglethorpe University philosophy department invites readers to attend a public lecture series on Asian philosophy. These are excellent grounding for those who would like to better understand Chinese, Indian and Japanese philosophies, all of which are gaining increasing attention by ordinary Americans.

The series opens Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 7:30 p.m., when __Dr. David Jones __of Kennesaw State University speaks on "Walking the Way With Confucius: Tianwen, Emerging Patterns of  Human Heavens."

Next, __Geshe Lobsang Tenzin__ of the Drepung Loseling Institute will speak Wednesday, Oct. 11 at 7 p.m., on "Nagarjuna on Ultimate and Conventional Reality: Two Sides of the Same Coin."

Wirth also invites the public to attend a lecture on Friday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m., by __Dr. Thomas Kasulis__, chair of comparative studies at Ohio State and author of ''Zen Action/Zen Person''. His planned talk on Buddhist ecology is titled "Intimacy and Integrity: Cultural Perspectives on Nature."

All lectures will take place in  the Oglethorpe University Museum  (404-364-8555).


__Christianity and Jung__

__Journey Into Wholeness__ is the pre-eminent workshop for Christians interested in the work of Carl Jung. This year's session will be held Oct. 22-27 at Kanuga Conference Center near Hendersonville, N.C.

A typical day at the event includes lectures in the morning, followed by experiential workshops in the afternoon. Among this year's participants is Robert Johnson, an analyst and one of the most prolific writers in the Jungian field. He will be speaking on "The Symbolic Life" and presenting one workshop on dreams, along with two others in which he will engage participants in open-ended dialogue.

John Giannini, an analyst and former Dominican priest, will deliver three lectures, including one on Jungian typology, which is the basis of the popular Meyers-Brigg test. He will also give a workshop on typology.

Two of my own professors from Pacifica Graduate Institute are presenting this year. Dianne Skafte, author of ''Listening to the Oracle'', will give two lectures and a workshop on oracular forms of consciousness. Barry Williams, an analyst with special interest in wilderness work, will speak on the healing power of stories and lead a workshop in dream work.

John Corlett, an independent organizational consultant, will speak on ways to use Jungian thought to "transform" churches, schools and community organizations. His lecture and workshop on the same subject are partly an answer to James Hillman's critique that depth psychology focuses too much on individuals and not enough on "world soul."

This year's event will be preceded by a seminar hosted by John and Carolyn Martin Oct. 20-22. Titled "What Do They Mean? What Does It Matter?," the seminar is intended to provide an introduction to the work of Carl Jung. It's also appropriate for those needing a refresher or who are attending Journey to Wholeness for the first time.

Cost of Journey to Wholeness depends on time of registration, room type, etc. Tuition, without the opening seminar, is about $400, and a double room with meals is about $300. Call 828-877-4809 for details.


__The sin of pleasure__

__"Deadly Sins: Remembering the Body" __is the title of a workshop I am conducting one Saturday a month beginning Oct. 28. Partly inspired by the work of Enrique Pardo, the workshop is an effort to rethink the "seven deadly sins" as natural expressions of the body's drive for pleasure.

This is radical work, not for the delicate living in the Bible Belt, that will likely involve body workers and thinkers as co-facilitators. We'll be looking at how we are equally drawn to the forbidden and the myth of innocence and how we can honor our bodies' natural drives without being overwhelmed or, contrarily, succumbing to puritanism. I'll also be examining each of the sins in columns here over the next year. Visit [http://soulworks.net/sin/deadlysin.html|soulworks.net/sin/deadlysin.html] for more information or call 404-525-4774. Your input is welcome.


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  string(5236) "    Give Dan a hand, meet the Buddha   2000-09-09T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Weekend worthy September 09 2000   Cliff Bostock 1223527 2000-09-09T04:04:00+00:00  Fall is on the way and so are a bunch of workshops and classes worth your time. First, though, I encourage you to attend the Heart and Soul Benefit this weekend. It benefits Dan Liss, editor of Oracle 2000 and former editor of Aquarius. Liss, who has been a significant advocate for holistic and alternative spiritual paths in Atlanta, underwent heart surgery recently and was left with a very large debt.

The benefit is a two-day event. Unity North church will host a concert Saturday, Sept. 9 from 8-10 p.m., featuring local musicians Kinan, Makari and Jaywalk. There will also be a silent auction. The church is located at 4255 Sandy Plains Road in Marietta.

The next day, Sunday, will feature an afternoon of classes and a health education forum at Inner Space, 183 Allen Road in Sandy Springs. A $10 contribution is requested for the concert and $25 is requested for classes. A two-day discount is available for $25. For details, call 404-252-4540.


The Asian way

Jason Wirth of the Oglethorpe University philosophy department invites readers to attend a public lecture series on Asian philosophy. These are excellent grounding for those who would like to better understand Chinese, Indian and Japanese philosophies, all of which are gaining increasing attention by ordinary Americans.

The series opens Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 7:30 p.m., when Dr. David Jones of Kennesaw State University speaks on "Walking the Way With Confucius: Tianwen, Emerging Patterns of  Human Heavens."

Next, Geshe Lobsang Tenzin of the Drepung Loseling Institute will speak Wednesday, Oct. 11 at 7 p.m., on "Nagarjuna on Ultimate and Conventional Reality: Two Sides of the Same Coin."

Wirth also invites the public to attend a lecture on Friday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m., by Dr. Thomas Kasulis, chair of comparative studies at Ohio State and author of Zen Action/Zen Person. His planned talk on Buddhist ecology is titled "Intimacy and Integrity: Cultural Perspectives on Nature."

All lectures will take place in  the Oglethorpe University Museum  (404-364-8555).


Christianity and Jung

Journey Into Wholeness is the pre-eminent workshop for Christians interested in the work of Carl Jung. This year's session will be held Oct. 22-27 at Kanuga Conference Center near Hendersonville, N.C.

A typical day at the event includes lectures in the morning, followed by experiential workshops in the afternoon. Among this year's participants is Robert Johnson, an analyst and one of the most prolific writers in the Jungian field. He will be speaking on "The Symbolic Life" and presenting one workshop on dreams, along with two others in which he will engage participants in open-ended dialogue.

John Giannini, an analyst and former Dominican priest, will deliver three lectures, including one on Jungian typology, which is the basis of the popular Meyers-Brigg test. He will also give a workshop on typology.

Two of my own professors from Pacifica Graduate Institute are presenting this year. Dianne Skafte, author of Listening to the Oracle, will give two lectures and a workshop on oracular forms of consciousness. Barry Williams, an analyst with special interest in wilderness work, will speak on the healing power of stories and lead a workshop in dream work.

John Corlett, an independent organizational consultant, will speak on ways to use Jungian thought to "transform" churches, schools and community organizations. His lecture and workshop on the same subject are partly an answer to James Hillman's critique that depth psychology focuses too much on individuals and not enough on "world soul."

This year's event will be preceded by a seminar hosted by John and Carolyn Martin Oct. 20-22. Titled "What Do They Mean? What Does It Matter?," the seminar is intended to provide an introduction to the work of Carl Jung. It's also appropriate for those needing a refresher or who are attending Journey to Wholeness for the first time.

Cost of Journey to Wholeness depends on time of registration, room type, etc. Tuition, without the opening seminar, is about $400, and a double room with meals is about $300. Call 828-877-4809 for details.


The sin of pleasure

"Deadly Sins: Remembering the Body" is the title of a workshop I am conducting one Saturday a month beginning Oct. 28. Partly inspired by the work of Enrique Pardo, the workshop is an effort to rethink the "seven deadly sins" as natural expressions of the body's drive for pleasure.

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Art

Five galleries along Buckhead's Gallery Row will participate in a fund-raiser for CARE, the Atlanta-based international emergency relief and development program. Anthony Ardavin, Bender Fine Art, Sportsman's Gallery, Timothy Tew and Vespermann Glass Gallery will host simultaneous openings and will raffle donated works by artists including Anna Carll and Chris Bilton on Sept. 8 from 6-9 p.m. See Arts Agenda for a complete list of openings.

Comedy

Everyone's favorite father figure, Bill Cosby, comes to Atlanta for a one-night-only performance Sept. 10. This star of television, theater and stage will have you rolling with his family high jinks and keen observations of everyday faux pas. 8 p.m. $25-$150. Atlanta Civic Center, 395 Piedmont Ave. Call 404-658-7159 for information.

Attractions

Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey is raising the roof on a whole new kind of circus. Kaleidoscape combines contemporary theatrical production with the tradition of a classic American circus for an up close and personal big top experience. The two-hour event will include a live orchestra, the Golden Statues, Pipo the white-faced clown, jugglers, acrobats and more, all performing under three tents with plush velvet seats and sofas no more than 50 feet away from the circus ring. Sept. 6-10. Wed.-Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m., Sun. 1:30 and 6:30 p.m. $25-$55. Centennial Olympic Park. Call 404-249-6400 or go to www.BarnumsKaleidoscape.com for information.

Theater

The musical comedy I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change by Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Roberts opens Sept. 8 at the Horizon Theater. Take a jaunt through the dating jungle and explore the truths and myths of contemporary relationships. Wed., Thurs. and Fri.  8 p.m., Sat. 8:30 p.m., Sun. 5 p.m. $16-$25. 1083 Austin Ave. Call 404-584-7450 for information.

Film

Head west with Fernbank's latest IMAX feature, Adventures in Wild California. This virtual expedition through the untouched wilderness will take audiences down an icy mountain face with snowboarders, swimming through the ocean with otters, riding massive swells of water and air with surfers of ocean and sky. Sept. 5-March 4. Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m., 1, 3 and 5 p.m. Sun. 1, 3 and 5 p.m. $4.95-$6.95. Fernbank Museum of Natural History, 767 Clifton Road. Call 404-929-6400 for information.

Music

It's tech-house versus trance as this Wednesday night offers two of the most talented, original DJs from across the Atlantic, a rare treat for Atlanta. At the Crescent Room spins Mr. C, formerly of the Shamen, whose "Subterrain" event at London's The End features a mix of techno, electro and acid-etched basslines. And over at the Chamber spins Rolling Stone's "Hot DJ," Paul van Dyk, whose style of trance has helped build up the breakdown of acid-washed melodic manipulation and symphonic sweep. Sept. 6. The Crescent Room is located at 1136 Crescent Ave. For more information call 404-875-5252. The Chamber is located at 2115 Faulkner Road. For more information call 404-248-1612.

Festival

Celebrate medieval, Renaissance and modern British culture at the 25th annual Olde English Festival Sept. 8-10. This charity event will feature live entertainment including Musica Festiva and the Garlandia Ensemble, performances by Mardine the Fire-eating Juggling Queen, readings of "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" by Atlanta actor Tom Key and a giant flea market with arts and crafts, jewelry and fashions. Fri. 6-10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m. $2-$4. St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, 1790 LaVista Road. Call 404-634-3336  for information.


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Art

Five galleries along Buckhead's Gallery Row will participate in a fund-raiser for CARE, the Atlanta-based international emergency relief and development program. Anthony Ardavin, Bender Fine Art, Sportsman's Gallery, Timothy Tew and Vespermann Glass Gallery will host simultaneous openings and will raffle donated works by artists including __Anna Carll__ and __Chris Bilton__ on __Sept. 8__ from 6-9 p.m. See Arts Agenda for a complete list of openings.

Comedy

Everyone's favorite father figure, __Bill Cosby, __comes to Atlanta for a one-night-only performance __Sept. 10__. This star of television, theater and stage will have you rolling with his family high jinks and keen observations of everyday faux pas. 8 p.m. $25-$150. Atlanta Civic Center, 395 Piedmont Ave. Call 404-658-7159 for information.

Attractions

Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey is raising the roof on a whole new kind of circus. __Kaleidoscape__ combines contemporary theatrical production with the tradition of a classic American circus for an up close and personal big top experience. The two-hour event will include a live orchestra, the Golden Statues, Pipo the white-faced clown, jugglers, acrobats and more, all performing under three tents with plush velvet seats and sofas no more than 50 feet away from the circus ring. __Sept. 6-10__. Wed.-Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m., Sun. 1:30 and 6:30 p.m. $25-$55. Centennial Olympic Park. Call 404-249-6400 or go to [www.barnumskaleidoscape.com|www.BarnumsKaleidoscape.com] for information.

Theater

The musical comedy __''I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change''__ by Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Roberts opens __Sept. 8__ at the Horizon Theater. Take a jaunt through the dating jungle and explore the truths and myths of contemporary relationships. Wed., Thurs. and Fri.  8 p.m., Sat. 8:30 p.m., Sun. 5 p.m. $16-$25. 1083 Austin Ave. Call 404-584-7450 for information.

Film

Head west with Fernbank's latest IMAX feature, __''Adventures in Wild California''__. This virtual expedition through the untouched wilderness will take audiences down an icy mountain face with snowboarders, swimming through the ocean with otters, riding massive swells of water and air with surfers of ocean and sky. __Sept. 5-March 4__. Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m., 1, 3 and 5 p.m. Sun. 1, 3 and 5 p.m. $4.95-$6.95. Fernbank Museum of Natural History, 767 Clifton Road. Call 404-929-6400 for information.

Music

It's tech-house versus trance as this Wednesday night offers two of the most talented, original DJs from across the Atlantic, a rare treat for Atlanta. At the Crescent Room spins __Mr. C__, formerly of the Shamen, whose "Subterrain" event at London's The End features a mix of techno, electro and acid-etched basslines. And over at the Chamber spins ''Rolling Stone'''s "Hot DJ," __Paul van Dyk__, whose style of trance has helped build up the breakdown of acid-washed melodic manipulation and symphonic sweep. __Sept. 6__. The Crescent Room is located at 1136 Crescent Ave. For more information call 404-875-5252. The Chamber is located at 2115 Faulkner Road. For more information call 404-248-1612.

Festival

Celebrate medieval, Renaissance and modern British culture at the 25th annual __Olde English Festival__ __Sept. 8-10__. This charity event will feature live entertainment including Musica Festiva and the Garlandia Ensemble, performances by Mardine the Fire-eating Juggling Queen, readings of "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" by Atlanta actor Tom Key and a giant flea market with arts and crafts, jewelry and fashions. Fri. 6-10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m. $2-$4. St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, 1790 LaVista Road. Call 404-634-3336  for information.


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Art

Five galleries along Buckhead's Gallery Row will participate in a fund-raiser for CARE, the Atlanta-based international emergency relief and development program. Anthony Ardavin, Bender Fine Art, Sportsman's Gallery, Timothy Tew and Vespermann Glass Gallery will host simultaneous openings and will raffle donated works by artists including Anna Carll and Chris Bilton on Sept. 8 from 6-9 p.m. See Arts Agenda for a complete list of openings.

Comedy

Everyone's favorite father figure, Bill Cosby, comes to Atlanta for a one-night-only performance Sept. 10. This star of television, theater and stage will have you rolling with his family high jinks and keen observations of everyday faux pas. 8 p.m. $25-$150. Atlanta Civic Center, 395 Piedmont Ave. Call 404-658-7159 for information.

Attractions

Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey is raising the roof on a whole new kind of circus. Kaleidoscape combines contemporary theatrical production with the tradition of a classic American circus for an up close and personal big top experience. The two-hour event will include a live orchestra, the Golden Statues, Pipo the white-faced clown, jugglers, acrobats and more, all performing under three tents with plush velvet seats and sofas no more than 50 feet away from the circus ring. Sept. 6-10. Wed.-Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m., Sun. 1:30 and 6:30 p.m. $25-$55. Centennial Olympic Park. Call 404-249-6400 or go to www.BarnumsKaleidoscape.com for information.

Theater

The musical comedy I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change by Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Roberts opens Sept. 8 at the Horizon Theater. Take a jaunt through the dating jungle and explore the truths and myths of contemporary relationships. Wed., Thurs. and Fri.  8 p.m., Sat. 8:30 p.m., Sun. 5 p.m. $16-$25. 1083 Austin Ave. Call 404-584-7450 for information.

Film

Head west with Fernbank's latest IMAX feature, Adventures in Wild California. This virtual expedition through the untouched wilderness will take audiences down an icy mountain face with snowboarders, swimming through the ocean with otters, riding massive swells of water and air with surfers of ocean and sky. Sept. 5-March 4. Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m., 1, 3 and 5 p.m. Sun. 1, 3 and 5 p.m. $4.95-$6.95. Fernbank Museum of Natural History, 767 Clifton Road. Call 404-929-6400 for information.

Music

It's tech-house versus trance as this Wednesday night offers two of the most talented, original DJs from across the Atlantic, a rare treat for Atlanta. At the Crescent Room spins Mr. C, formerly of the Shamen, whose "Subterrain" event at London's The End features a mix of techno, electro and acid-etched basslines. And over at the Chamber spins Rolling Stone's "Hot DJ," Paul van Dyk, whose style of trance has helped build up the breakdown of acid-washed melodic manipulation and symphonic sweep. Sept. 6. The Crescent Room is located at 1136 Crescent Ave. For more information call 404-875-5252. The Chamber is located at 2115 Faulkner Road. For more information call 404-248-1612.

Festival

Celebrate medieval, Renaissance and modern British culture at the 25th annual Olde English Festival Sept. 8-10. This charity event will feature live entertainment including Musica Festiva and the Garlandia Ensemble, performances by Mardine the Fire-eating Juggling Queen, readings of "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" by Atlanta actor Tom Key and a giant flea market with arts and crafts, jewelry and fashions. Fri. 6-10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m. $2-$4. St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, 1790 LaVista Road. Call 404-634-3336  for information.


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Talk of the Town

Saturday September 9, 2000 12:04 am EDT


Art

Five galleries along Buckhead's Gallery Row will participate in a fund-raiser for CARE, the Atlanta-based international emergency relief and development program. Anthony Ardavin, Bender Fine Art, Sportsman's Gallery, Timothy Tew and Vespermann Glass Gallery will host simultaneous openings and will raffle donated works by artists including Anna Carll and Chris Bilton on Sept. 8 from 6-9...

| more...

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And it just gets weirder.

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And it just gets weirder.

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The Republican-sponsored measure, H.R. 1887 — made necessary by a dearth of local laws against the bizarre activity — passed the House with ease, and was quickly ratified by unanimous consent in the Senate. President Clinton signed it into law on Dec. 9 of last year. The only other Georgia congressman to vote against the measure was the notoriously cantankerous Rep. Charlie Norwood, who almost always votes against any new law, regardless of its merits.

But Barr, who has scratched and clawed his way to prominence in right-wing fringe politics, has outdone himself this time. Never mind that Georgia's self-anointed defender of "family values" has already been revealed to have a rather checkered past, including three marriages, allegations of serial adultery, and most hypocritical of all, arranging an abortion. The congressman has emerged unscathed from those revelations.

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And it just gets weirder.

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Barr's association with Nugent comes as a result of both men holding seats on the National Rifle Association's board of directors. These two bizarre bedfellows have become so close that Barr recently penned an awkward but enthusiastic review of Nugent's new book, God, Guns, and Rock and Roll — a profanity-laden tale of crazed right-wing fanaticism and hackneyed rock 'n' roll clichés. In this tome, Nugent wallows in his own filthy excesses, subtracting significantly from Rep. Barr's dwindling reserve of dignity.

I may be a Democrat, but — contrary to Republican dogma — I believe firmly in family values, and I think that it is inappropriate and undignified for a congressman to associate himself with people like Ted Nugent and the producers of pornographic animal "crush" videos. But Bob Barr seems to think that it's  perfectly acceptable.

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  string(5620) "I don't watch television. I don't mean to imply anything superior in that, because I feel like I miss an awful lot in some ways. But it's never appealed to me. My mother used to tell me that even as a kid, when she would like to have been able to sit me in front of the screen to quiet me, I just wasn't interested. There have been exceptions of course. I love absurdity, so that will get me to turn it on. I couldn't move from the television in the final days of the Monica Lewinsky scandal, for example. And last week I had to join 50 million other Americans to watch the final episode of "Survivor," which I had not seen before.

To fresh eyes like mine, the spectacle was mind-boggling — like a particularly gruesome highway accident from which one can't avert the gaze. Basically, it revealed four assholes attempting to best one another in a greedy competition for a pile of cash. In that, as every critic has observed, it really was like office politics, and it was no surprise that Richard, the corporate trainer, won the million dollars. The troubling irony was that while all America disliked him most, the "Survivor" jury awarded him the prize because, as he kept reminding them, he never pretended to be other than a schemer.

After the show, Bryant Gumbel hosted a revolting "town hall meeting" in which the cast members, having removed the knives from their backs, made nice with one another (as they await the riches of jobs in advertising endorsements). One of the strangest moments was when Richard, who is gay, made excuses for another cast member's homophobia. The man, Rudy, had been in an alliance with Richard, demonstrating that politics does indeed make strange bedfellows.

In the avalanche of material written about the show, I was surprised how little focused on the fact that Rich is gay. I am assuming that political correctness explains that. Most commentary was limited to quoting the consultant's own self-characterization as a "big fat fag." In the gay press itself, however, Rich was often described as a classic "scheming queen" or, even less kindly, as "the evil queen." Still, I think many gay people took satisfaction that one of their tribe won the day.

While shows like "Survivor" are called "reality programming," we should really stress the "programming" part of the phrase. What's "real" about this is mainly the people. The situation itself is quite contrived. Any thinking gay person can't help wonder if Rich wasn't "programmed" from the start through casting and editing as the villain in part because his homosexuality set him apart.

Perhaps what most people don't understand is that many gay people — especially those of Richard's age and older — learn to survive by being hyper-vigilant about their surroundings. At best, this creates a highly sensitive personality. At worst, it creates a scheming and manipulative one. Many gay men become a mix of the two styles. Thus you have Rich, the ruthless corporate strategizer who is also a demonstrably warm counseling student. Consider that Richard was in the U.S. Army for five years and entered West Point. This presumably was before Clinton's "don't ask-don't tell" policy, so his membership in the Armed Forces was technically illegal. He, like many gay men, has learned to work the system that excludes him, partly by becoming quite charming. All of that was played out in "Survivor" to his financial benefit.

It's also worth noting that in the public exhibition of his naked body, Richard demonstrated how gay men, demonized for the appetites of their bodies, must come into a very comfortable relationship with them in order to survive. For all the symptomatic bravura in his exhibitionism, I think he was stating something the culture could learn from openly gay people: The body really is beautiful just as it is, in all its perverse appetites.

I don't mean to imply that Richard's sexual orientation alone explains his persona, but it does cast in high relief the way we — our ethics, our bodies — are shaped both positively and negatively by the forces that exclude us or set us apart. While the logic that Richard deserved the prize because he didn't make apologies for his scheming is troubling, the experience of hearing his final opponent's position really was annoying. Kelly claimed to regret her alliances, her duplicity, her breach of her own professed morality. "I'm not really like that," she said in a million ways, like a sinner issuing regrets on her deathbed as the prospect of eternity in hell approaches.

Of course, all of us really are scheming and withholding in the right circumstances. I think there is some virtue in the cast's recognition of that, having played the game and repeatedly encountered the Richard in themselves. The majority of viewers sitting at home hoped the prize would go to Rudy, the former Navy SEAL who made the stupid remark during the town hall meeting that he wouldn't pick cast members as his friends. He usually hangs out with "military guys who don't curse," he said. There again was a statement in favor of sublimating one's real character behind a mask. Our egos hope, they really wish these masks could hide us.

It's little surprise that the man who came out from behind a mask — literally disrobing in public — won. What was revealed wasn't very pretty, but the act of self-disclosure, and I emphasize "act," for this still was a "program," is what our souls crave most.

Cliff Bostock, M.A., is a doctoral candidate in depth psychology. Reach him at 404-525-4774 or in care of his website www.soulworks.net. 


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To fresh eyes like mine, the spectacle was mind-boggling -- like a particularly gruesome highway accident from which one can't avert the gaze. Basically, it revealed four assholes attempting to best one another in a greedy competition for a pile of cash. In that, as every critic has observed, it really was like office politics, and it was no surprise that Richard, the corporate trainer, won the million dollars. The troubling irony was that while all America disliked him most, the "Survivor" jury awarded him the prize because, as he kept reminding them, he never pretended to be other than a schemer.

After the show, Bryant Gumbel hosted a revolting "town hall meeting" in which the cast members, having removed the knives from their backs, made nice with one another (as they await the riches of jobs in advertising endorsements). One of the strangest moments was when Richard, who is gay, made excuses for another cast member's homophobia. The man, Rudy, had been in an alliance with Richard, demonstrating that politics does indeed make strange bedfellows.

In the avalanche of material written about the show, I was surprised how little focused on the fact that Rich is gay. I am assuming that political correctness explains that. Most commentary was limited to quoting the consultant's own self-characterization as a "big fat fag." In the gay press itself, however, Rich was often described as a classic "scheming queen" or, even less kindly, as "the evil queen." Still, I think many gay people took satisfaction that one of their tribe won the day.

While shows like "Survivor" are called "reality programming," we should really stress the "programming" part of the phrase. What's "real" about this is mainly the people. The situation itself is quite contrived. Any thinking gay person can't help wonder if Rich wasn't "programmed" from the start through casting and editing as the villain in part because his homosexuality set him apart.

Perhaps what most people don't understand is that many gay people -- especially those of Richard's age and older -- learn to survive by being hyper-vigilant about their surroundings. At best, this creates a highly sensitive personality. At worst, it creates a scheming and manipulative one. Many gay men become a mix of the two styles. Thus you have Rich, the ruthless corporate strategizer who is also a demonstrably warm counseling student. Consider that Richard was in the U.S. Army for five years and entered West Point. This presumably was before Clinton's "don't ask-don't tell" policy, so his membership in the Armed Forces was technically illegal. He, like many gay men, has learned to work the system that excludes him, partly by becoming quite charming. All of that was played out in "Survivor" to his financial benefit.

It's also worth noting that in the public exhibition of his naked body, Richard demonstrated how gay men, demonized for the appetites of their bodies, must come into a very comfortable relationship with them in order to survive. For all the symptomatic bravura in his exhibitionism, I think he was stating something the culture could learn from openly gay people: The body really is beautiful just as it is, in all its perverse appetites.

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Of course, all of us really ''are'' scheming and withholding in the right circumstances. I think there is some virtue in the cast's recognition of that, having played the game and repeatedly encountered the Richard in themselves. The majority of viewers sitting at home hoped the prize would go to Rudy, the former Navy SEAL who made the stupid remark during the town hall meeting that he wouldn't pick cast members as his friends. He usually hangs out with "military guys who don't curse," he said. There again was a statement in favor of sublimating one's real character behind a mask. Our egos ''hope'', they really ''wish'' these masks could hide us.

It's little surprise that the man who came out from behind a mask -- literally disrobing in public -- won. What was revealed wasn't very pretty, but the act of self-disclosure, and I emphasize "act," for this still was a "program," is what our souls crave most.

''Cliff Bostock, M.A., is a doctoral candidate in depth psychology. Reach him at 404-525-4774 or in care of his website [http://www.soulworks.net/|www.soulworks.net]. ''


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  string(5910) "    It's not what's revealed but the revealing that matters   2000-09-02T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Evil queen September 02 2000   Cliff Bostock 1223527 2000-09-02T04:04:00+00:00  I don't watch television. I don't mean to imply anything superior in that, because I feel like I miss an awful lot in some ways. But it's never appealed to me. My mother used to tell me that even as a kid, when she would like to have been able to sit me in front of the screen to quiet me, I just wasn't interested. There have been exceptions of course. I love absurdity, so that will get me to turn it on. I couldn't move from the television in the final days of the Monica Lewinsky scandal, for example. And last week I had to join 50 million other Americans to watch the final episode of "Survivor," which I had not seen before.

To fresh eyes like mine, the spectacle was mind-boggling — like a particularly gruesome highway accident from which one can't avert the gaze. Basically, it revealed four assholes attempting to best one another in a greedy competition for a pile of cash. In that, as every critic has observed, it really was like office politics, and it was no surprise that Richard, the corporate trainer, won the million dollars. The troubling irony was that while all America disliked him most, the "Survivor" jury awarded him the prize because, as he kept reminding them, he never pretended to be other than a schemer.

After the show, Bryant Gumbel hosted a revolting "town hall meeting" in which the cast members, having removed the knives from their backs, made nice with one another (as they await the riches of jobs in advertising endorsements). One of the strangest moments was when Richard, who is gay, made excuses for another cast member's homophobia. The man, Rudy, had been in an alliance with Richard, demonstrating that politics does indeed make strange bedfellows.

In the avalanche of material written about the show, I was surprised how little focused on the fact that Rich is gay. I am assuming that political correctness explains that. Most commentary was limited to quoting the consultant's own self-characterization as a "big fat fag." In the gay press itself, however, Rich was often described as a classic "scheming queen" or, even less kindly, as "the evil queen." Still, I think many gay people took satisfaction that one of their tribe won the day.

While shows like "Survivor" are called "reality programming," we should really stress the "programming" part of the phrase. What's "real" about this is mainly the people. The situation itself is quite contrived. Any thinking gay person can't help wonder if Rich wasn't "programmed" from the start through casting and editing as the villain in part because his homosexuality set him apart.

Perhaps what most people don't understand is that many gay people — especially those of Richard's age and older — learn to survive by being hyper-vigilant about their surroundings. At best, this creates a highly sensitive personality. At worst, it creates a scheming and manipulative one. Many gay men become a mix of the two styles. Thus you have Rich, the ruthless corporate strategizer who is also a demonstrably warm counseling student. Consider that Richard was in the U.S. Army for five years and entered West Point. This presumably was before Clinton's "don't ask-don't tell" policy, so his membership in the Armed Forces was technically illegal. He, like many gay men, has learned to work the system that excludes him, partly by becoming quite charming. All of that was played out in "Survivor" to his financial benefit.

It's also worth noting that in the public exhibition of his naked body, Richard demonstrated how gay men, demonized for the appetites of their bodies, must come into a very comfortable relationship with them in order to survive. For all the symptomatic bravura in his exhibitionism, I think he was stating something the culture could learn from openly gay people: The body really is beautiful just as it is, in all its perverse appetites.

I don't mean to imply that Richard's sexual orientation alone explains his persona, but it does cast in high relief the way we — our ethics, our bodies — are shaped both positively and negatively by the forces that exclude us or set us apart. While the logic that Richard deserved the prize because he didn't make apologies for his scheming is troubling, the experience of hearing his final opponent's position really was annoying. Kelly claimed to regret her alliances, her duplicity, her breach of her own professed morality. "I'm not really like that," she said in a million ways, like a sinner issuing regrets on her deathbed as the prospect of eternity in hell approaches.

Of course, all of us really are scheming and withholding in the right circumstances. I think there is some virtue in the cast's recognition of that, having played the game and repeatedly encountered the Richard in themselves. The majority of viewers sitting at home hoped the prize would go to Rudy, the former Navy SEAL who made the stupid remark during the town hall meeting that he wouldn't pick cast members as his friends. He usually hangs out with "military guys who don't curse," he said. There again was a statement in favor of sublimating one's real character behind a mask. Our egos hope, they really wish these masks could hide us.

It's little surprise that the man who came out from behind a mask — literally disrobing in public — won. What was revealed wasn't very pretty, but the act of self-disclosure, and I emphasize "act," for this still was a "program," is what our souls crave most.

Cliff Bostock, M.A., is a doctoral candidate in depth psychology. Reach him at 404-525-4774 or in care of his website www.soulworks.net. 


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Saturday September 2, 2000 12:04 am EDT
It's not what's revealed but the revealing that matters | more...
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  string(3943) "Yeah, uh, Beijing? This is Bill Clinton calling for Jiang Zemin... Hello, Jiang. You staying busy, comrade? With Al and Hillary gone, things have really slowed down here. I did wow 'em at the L.A. convention, but I don't know if I helped Al. He looked pretty silly, kissing Tipper like it was V-J Day and talking about being his own man. I guess we'll see about that, huh?

Well, I'm calling about this human rights stuff again. I'm just looking for a little quid pro quo here, a little I-scratch-your-back-you-scratch-mine.

I mean, I really went to bat for you guys on the UN's global religion get-together. You said inviting the Dalai Lama would be embarrassing, and we made sure his name didn't get on the guest list. Having him there would have been a big reminder of your, uh, complicated past, like when Paula Jones showed up at that gala for me a few years back. I feel your pain, man.

I can also understand you've gotta' do what you've gotta' do with that Falun Gong outfit, all those nuts hanging out in parks humming and stretching like the Karate Kid or something. But now your police have gone and arrested 130 more Christians, three of whom are Americans from California...

Yes, I know they were breaking your rules. And I understand rules are rules. After all, when that poor Cuban kid's uncle didn't hand him over right away, I told Janet Reno to roll through Little Havana with a gang of federal agents toting machine guns. That showed them, all right.

So, while I can appreciate a good show of force now and then, this Christian persecution deal has gone too far. Now I hear your government is claiming this evangelical group is some sort of "evil cult" and you've already given the leader two years of "re-education through labor." To me, that seems a little harsh.

I'm a Christian too, you know, and I don't like the idea of people being tossed in jail just for believing in Jesus. A lot of my old Arkansas friends have been, uh, incarcerated, and, let me tell you, jail's no picnic, even in this country.

I'm also sad to say that's not all, Jiang. I read a pretty shocking report the other day about how some of your bureaucrats got more than a little carried away enforcing your country's one-child policy. Now, I'm all for abortion — even partial-birth abortion — but I draw the line at infanticide and that's exactly what these people did.

Newspapers here say doctors tried to abort the kid at the hospital, but the baby came out alive. When the family took the child home, five government enforcers were already there, waiting on them. These agents snatched the kid from the parents and drowned it right outside in a rice paddy, in front of the mom and dad ...

I know you've got your own way of handling religious minorities and controlling population growth, but I honestly don't know how much more of this stuff you can do without people in this country noticing. I realize most Americans are more concerned with who won "Survivor" than how folks are surviving in China, but sooner or later they just may notice.

And if the American people ever wake up, we could have a serious battle on our hands trying to get Congress to renew your Most Favored Nation trading status. I'm not saying I'd ever raise a fuss, but there's only so much I can do to keep the far left and the far right from teaming up against all the easy free trade now enriching big business here and big communists there...

Well, uh, Jiang, you've certainly got a point there. Of course you're right, we did give you that permanent special trading status earlier this year. And with no annual vote in Congress anymore to worry about, you fellas can pretty much do what you want without any real fear of economic reprisal.

So, uh, would it help if I said please? Or pretty please? Would you shape up then? Just let me know because I'll be glad to say whatever it takes. I always have.

Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@hotmail.com"
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  string(3968) "Yeah, uh, Beijing? This is Bill Clinton calling for Jiang Zemin... Hello, Jiang. You staying busy, comrade? With Al and Hillary gone, things have really slowed down here. I did wow 'em at the L.A. convention, but I don't know if I helped Al. He looked pretty silly, kissing Tipper like it was V-J Day and talking about being his own man. I guess we'll see about that, huh?

Well, I'm calling about this human rights stuff again. I'm just looking for a little quid pro quo here, a little I-scratch-your-back-you-scratch-mine.

I mean, I really went to bat for you guys on the UN's global religion get-together. You said inviting the Dalai Lama would be embarrassing, and we made sure his name didn't get on the guest list. Having him there would have been a big reminder of your, uh, complicated past, like when Paula Jones showed up at that gala for me a few years back. I feel your pain, man.

I can also understand you've gotta' do what you've gotta' do with that Falun Gong outfit, all those nuts hanging out in parks humming and stretching like the Karate Kid or something. But now your police have gone and arrested 130 more Christians, three of whom are Americans from California...

Yes, I know they were breaking your rules. And I understand rules are rules. After all, when that poor Cuban kid's uncle didn't hand him over right away, I told Janet Reno to roll through Little Havana with a gang of federal agents toting machine guns. That showed them, all right.

So, while I can appreciate a good show of force now and then, this Christian persecution deal has gone too far. Now I hear your government is claiming this evangelical group is some sort of "evil cult" and you've already given the leader two years of "re-education through labor." To me, that seems a little harsh.

I'm a Christian too, you know, and I don't like the idea of people being tossed in jail just for believing in Jesus. A lot of my old Arkansas friends have been, uh, incarcerated, and, let me tell you, jail's no picnic, even in this country.

I'm also sad to say that's not all, Jiang. I read a pretty shocking report the other day about how some of your bureaucrats got more than a little carried away enforcing your country's one-child policy. Now, I'm all for abortion -- even partial-birth abortion -- but I draw the line at infanticide and that's exactly what these people did.

Newspapers here say doctors tried to abort the kid at the hospital, but the baby came out alive. When the family took the child home, five government enforcers were already there, waiting on them. These agents snatched the kid from the parents and drowned it right outside in a rice paddy, in front of the mom and dad ...

I know you've got your own way of handling religious minorities and controlling population growth, but I honestly don't know how much more of this stuff you can do without people in this country noticing. I realize most Americans are more concerned with who won "Survivor" than how folks are surviving in China, but sooner or later they just may notice.

And if the American people ever wake up, we could have a serious battle on our hands trying to get Congress to renew your Most Favored Nation trading status. I'm not saying I'd ever raise a fuss, but there's only so much I can do to keep the far left and the far right from teaming up against all the easy free trade now enriching big business here and big communists there...

Well, uh, Jiang, you've certainly got a point there. Of course you're right, we did give you that permanent special trading status earlier this year. And with no annual vote in Congress anymore to worry about, you fellas can pretty much do what you want without any real fear of economic reprisal.

So, uh, would it help if I said please? Or pretty please? Would you shape up then? Just let me know because I'll be glad to say whatever it takes. I always have.

''Contact Luke Boggs at [mailto:lukeboggs@hotmail.com|lukeboggs@hotmail.com]''"
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Well, I'm calling about this human rights stuff again. I'm just looking for a little quid pro quo here, a little I-scratch-your-back-you-scratch-mine.

I mean, I really went to bat for you guys on the UN's global religion get-together. You said inviting the Dalai Lama would be embarrassing, and we made sure his name didn't get on the guest list. Having him there would have been a big reminder of your, uh, complicated past, like when Paula Jones showed up at that gala for me a few years back. I feel your pain, man.

I can also understand you've gotta' do what you've gotta' do with that Falun Gong outfit, all those nuts hanging out in parks humming and stretching like the Karate Kid or something. But now your police have gone and arrested 130 more Christians, three of whom are Americans from California...

Yes, I know they were breaking your rules. And I understand rules are rules. After all, when that poor Cuban kid's uncle didn't hand him over right away, I told Janet Reno to roll through Little Havana with a gang of federal agents toting machine guns. That showed them, all right.

So, while I can appreciate a good show of force now and then, this Christian persecution deal has gone too far. Now I hear your government is claiming this evangelical group is some sort of "evil cult" and you've already given the leader two years of "re-education through labor." To me, that seems a little harsh.

I'm a Christian too, you know, and I don't like the idea of people being tossed in jail just for believing in Jesus. A lot of my old Arkansas friends have been, uh, incarcerated, and, let me tell you, jail's no picnic, even in this country.

I'm also sad to say that's not all, Jiang. I read a pretty shocking report the other day about how some of your bureaucrats got more than a little carried away enforcing your country's one-child policy. Now, I'm all for abortion — even partial-birth abortion — but I draw the line at infanticide and that's exactly what these people did.

Newspapers here say doctors tried to abort the kid at the hospital, but the baby came out alive. When the family took the child home, five government enforcers were already there, waiting on them. These agents snatched the kid from the parents and drowned it right outside in a rice paddy, in front of the mom and dad ...

I know you've got your own way of handling religious minorities and controlling population growth, but I honestly don't know how much more of this stuff you can do without people in this country noticing. I realize most Americans are more concerned with who won "Survivor" than how folks are surviving in China, but sooner or later they just may notice.

And if the American people ever wake up, we could have a serious battle on our hands trying to get Congress to renew your Most Favored Nation trading status. I'm not saying I'd ever raise a fuss, but there's only so much I can do to keep the far left and the far right from teaming up against all the easy free trade now enriching big business here and big communists there...

Well, uh, Jiang, you've certainly got a point there. Of course you're right, we did give you that permanent special trading status earlier this year. And with no annual vote in Congress anymore to worry about, you fellas can pretty much do what you want without any real fear of economic reprisal.

So, uh, would it help if I said please? Or pretty please? Would you shape up then? Just let me know because I'll be glad to say whatever it takes. I always have.

Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@hotmail.com             13001032 1226127                          Talk of the Town - Calling China September 02 2000 "
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Saturday September 2, 2000 12:04 am EDT
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Saturday September 2, 2000 12:04 am EDT
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  string(3772) "I understand that I do not understand everything, but I like to at least think I have a clue. Which makes it even more difficult for me to understand when things occur that the rest of our city accepts as normal. For instance, Bill Campbell's mustache. Well, let's not go there. But I do want to discuss "Survivor," CBS' wildly popular reality television show on which a collection of loony toons were stranded on a deserted isle. "Survivor" pulled in banner numbers of viewers all summer for the Tiffany network. Still, I managed to go the summer without watching a single episode, until last Wednesday's grand finale.

Color me surprised: The show was great. I found myself pulling hard for Kelly, the dumb contestant that bore a striking resemblance to one of Popeye's goons. I was aghast with delight when truck drivin' Susan (who they kept calling "Sue") ripped into Kelly and when Rich the bitch wrested away votes at the last second.

After watching "Survivor," the appeal was obvious to me. Who wouldn't like to watch a bunch of lonely people stranded with other lonely people who they can't trust? But even after coming to that conclusion, there were other questions that I needed answered.

Take the AJC, a newspaper written and laid out so that basically every day is "News For Kids," with big goofy graphics and completely useless articles. I enjoy, "Peach Buzz" and Terence Moore's sports columns, but when the first thing you turn to in a newspaper is the crossword puzzle, that's not a good sign. Still, the paper remains popular. I can't wrap my mind around this one. Hey Ted Turner, I heard this week that you get my column in your clippings, so please give me a call. Let's start a daily that'll blow everyone away. And I promise I won't write anything about your marriages.

And then there's the Atlanta restaurant scene, in which the same eight people open and close restaurants at will as the favorable buzz continues to follow them around. One of these days, even the erudite will wake up and realize that there's a reason places like Fusebox only stay open 18 months while the Waffle House can't stay open long enough.

Occasionally even the coolest joints have to close. The popular Yin Yang Music Cafe downtown is closing shop Sept. 9 thanks to a weird situation, even though they still are packing 'em in on Thursdays when local group the Chronicle throws down. We hear that club manager Freddie Luster and his gal, local writer A.S. Reid, are heading to New York.

The rock music industry is crazy here, too. 99X rules with an iron fist, deciding who gets to be a star and who doesn't. If you're nice to Barnes, Leslie and Jimmy, you're in. But occasionally talent gets a say. Last week it was announced that the single "Reasons Why" from local band Brand New Immortals has been added to the 99X playlist. Featuring former Black Crowes bassist Johnny Colt and ex-Follow For Now thrasher David Ryan Harris, BNI are the local group that should make it big. And, after making nice with the Morning X zoo crew, BNI will be headlining the locals stage at the Big Day Out show at Lakewood on Oct. 1.

And in the most bizarre news of the week, jettisoned Atlanta Hawks bad boy Isaiah "J.R. for the ladies" Rider signed with the L.A. Lakers. Think about it: If J.R. had acted right last year, he would have signed a multi-million dollar deal to stay with the middling Hawks. Instead, he did some serious partying, got to leave the Hawks and now he gets to play on the best team in the NBA. Talk about a survivor.

And then there are anonymous callers like the one I had last week who asserted that I was a "fucking wigger." Sorry sir, but it's "Whitaker," not Wigger.

What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623 x.1502 or lang@creativeloafing.com.


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  string(3894) "I understand that I do not understand everything, but I like to at least think I have a clue. Which makes it even more difficult for me to understand when things occur that the rest of our city accepts as normal. For instance, __Bill Campbell__'s mustache. Well, let's not go there. But I do want to discuss "Survivor," CBS' wildly popular reality television show on which a collection of loony toons were stranded on a deserted isle. "Survivor" pulled in banner numbers of viewers all summer for the Tiffany network. Still, I managed to go the summer without watching a single episode, until last Wednesday's grand finale.

Color me surprised: The show was great. I found myself pulling hard for __Kelly__, the dumb contestant that bore a striking resemblance to one of Popeye's goons. I was aghast with delight when truck drivin' __Susan__ (who they kept calling "Sue") ripped into __Kelly__ and when __Rich__ the bitch wrested away votes at the last second.

After watching "Survivor," the appeal was obvious to me. Who wouldn't like to watch a bunch of lonely people stranded with other lonely people who they can't trust? But even after coming to that conclusion, there were other questions that I needed answered.

Take the ''AJC,'' a newspaper written and laid out so that basically every day is "News For Kids," with big goofy graphics and completely useless articles. I enjoy, "Peach Buzz" and __Terence Moore__'s sports columns, but when the first thing you turn to in a newspaper is the crossword puzzle, that's not a good sign. Still, the paper remains popular. I can't wrap my mind around this one. Hey __Ted Turner__, I heard this week that you get my column in your clippings, so please give me a call. Let's start a daily that'll blow everyone away. And I promise I won't write anything about your marriages.

And then there's the Atlanta restaurant scene, in which the same eight people open and close restaurants at will as the favorable buzz continues to follow them around. One of these days, even the erudite will wake up and realize that there's a reason places like __Fusebox__ only stay open 18 months while the __Waffle House__ can't stay open long enough.

Occasionally even the coolest joints have to close. The popular __Yin Yang Music Cafe__ downtown is closing shop Sept. 9 thanks to a weird situation, even though they still are packing 'em in on Thursdays when local group the Chronicle throws down. We hear that club manager __Freddie Luster__ and his gal, local writer __A.S. Reid__, are heading to New York.

The rock music industry is crazy here, too. __99X__ rules with an iron fist, deciding who gets to be a star and who doesn't. If you're nice to __Barnes, Leslie__ and __Jimmy__, you're in. But occasionally talent gets a say. Last week it was announced that the single "Reasons Why" from local band __Brand New Immortals__ has been added to the 99X playlist. Featuring former Black Crowes bassist __Johnny Colt__ and ex-Follow For Now thrasher __David Ryan Harris__, BNI are the local group that should make it big. And, after making nice with the Morning X zoo crew, BNI will be headlining the locals stage at the Big Day Out show at Lakewood on Oct. 1.

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''What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623 x.1502 or [mailto:lang@creativeloafing.com|lang@creativeloafing.com].''


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  string(4044) "    Some things I'll never understand   2000-09-02T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Why ask why? September 02 2000   Lang Whitaker 1223537 2000-09-02T04:04:00+00:00  I understand that I do not understand everything, but I like to at least think I have a clue. Which makes it even more difficult for me to understand when things occur that the rest of our city accepts as normal. For instance, Bill Campbell's mustache. Well, let's not go there. But I do want to discuss "Survivor," CBS' wildly popular reality television show on which a collection of loony toons were stranded on a deserted isle. "Survivor" pulled in banner numbers of viewers all summer for the Tiffany network. Still, I managed to go the summer without watching a single episode, until last Wednesday's grand finale.

Color me surprised: The show was great. I found myself pulling hard for Kelly, the dumb contestant that bore a striking resemblance to one of Popeye's goons. I was aghast with delight when truck drivin' Susan (who they kept calling "Sue") ripped into Kelly and when Rich the bitch wrested away votes at the last second.

After watching "Survivor," the appeal was obvious to me. Who wouldn't like to watch a bunch of lonely people stranded with other lonely people who they can't trust? But even after coming to that conclusion, there were other questions that I needed answered.

Take the AJC, a newspaper written and laid out so that basically every day is "News For Kids," with big goofy graphics and completely useless articles. I enjoy, "Peach Buzz" and Terence Moore's sports columns, but when the first thing you turn to in a newspaper is the crossword puzzle, that's not a good sign. Still, the paper remains popular. I can't wrap my mind around this one. Hey Ted Turner, I heard this week that you get my column in your clippings, so please give me a call. Let's start a daily that'll blow everyone away. And I promise I won't write anything about your marriages.

And then there's the Atlanta restaurant scene, in which the same eight people open and close restaurants at will as the favorable buzz continues to follow them around. One of these days, even the erudite will wake up and realize that there's a reason places like Fusebox only stay open 18 months while the Waffle House can't stay open long enough.

Occasionally even the coolest joints have to close. The popular Yin Yang Music Cafe downtown is closing shop Sept. 9 thanks to a weird situation, even though they still are packing 'em in on Thursdays when local group the Chronicle throws down. We hear that club manager Freddie Luster and his gal, local writer A.S. Reid, are heading to New York.

The rock music industry is crazy here, too. 99X rules with an iron fist, deciding who gets to be a star and who doesn't. If you're nice to Barnes, Leslie and Jimmy, you're in. But occasionally talent gets a say. Last week it was announced that the single "Reasons Why" from local band Brand New Immortals has been added to the 99X playlist. Featuring former Black Crowes bassist Johnny Colt and ex-Follow For Now thrasher David Ryan Harris, BNI are the local group that should make it big. And, after making nice with the Morning X zoo crew, BNI will be headlining the locals stage at the Big Day Out show at Lakewood on Oct. 1.

And in the most bizarre news of the week, jettisoned Atlanta Hawks bad boy Isaiah "J.R. for the ladies" Rider signed with the L.A. Lakers. Think about it: If J.R. had acted right last year, he would have signed a multi-million dollar deal to stay with the middling Hawks. Instead, he did some serious partying, got to leave the Hawks and now he gets to play on the best team in the NBA. Talk about a survivor.

And then there are anonymous callers like the one I had last week who asserted that I was a "fucking wigger." Sorry sir, but it's "Whitaker," not Wigger.

What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623 x.1502 or lang@creativeloafing.com.


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  string(4745) "Labor Day

Star light, star bright, which bands and movies will I see tonight? Well, if you're attending Drive-Invasion 2000 at the Starlight Sept. 2-4 you'll get to choose from bands including the Immortal Lee County Killers, Drive-By Truckers, Truckadelic, Johnny Legend, the Subsonics, the X-Impossibles, the Belmont Playboys, Catfight!, the Woggles and the Blacktop Rockets, among many others. Movies include Barbed Wire Girls, Reform School Girl, Cheech & Chong's Still Smokin', Thunder Road and Speedway, and more. $10 per day. Gates open at  2 p.m. Sat. & Sun. and 11 a.m. Mon. for the classic car show. The Starlight Six Drive-In is located at 2000 Moreland Ave. Call 404-627-5786 or visit www.starlightdrivein.com for more information.

Atlanta's on a roll  Aug. 31-Sept. 3 as Roll With It Productions and KISS 104.7 present the Fifth Annual National Skate Jam 2000 for "mature skaters 25 and over." Activities include an Old Skool Welcome, the Rollers' Ball, the "Pool Party Cookout" and skate parties at Skate Towne and Skate Station. $6.99-$26.99 depending on event and venue. Venues vary. Call 404-822-3790 or visit www.rollwithitproductions.com for more information.

Lake Lanier Islands Resort presents fun in the sun and more sounds than the surf this Labor Day weekend. Cumberland performs Sept. 1 and Sept. 3; the latter show also includes a performance by Chad Brock and a fireworks display. 7 p.m. Beach & water park day passes are $13.99-$23.99. For more information call 770-945-8787 or visit www.lakelanier islands.com.

Music

Get into the groove as New York City's Groove Collective do the honors of entertaining in Centennial Olympic Park during the Montreux Atlanta Music Festival's Wednesday Night Winddown,  Aug. 30. Free. 5:30-8 p.m. Call 404-817-6851 or visit www.atlantafestivals.com for more information.

Before professional wrestling and without the need for face paint, Sting made his name after a series of albums with the Police and well-received solo work. Now Sting has returned like many other '80s artists (Cher, Madonna, etc.) with an electronica-friendly production. And he's returning to Lakewood Sept. 5. Supposedly he can do it all night. $36.50-$101.50. 7:30 p.m. 2002 Lakewood Way. For more information call  404-249-6400.

Nightlife

On Sept. 2 the Masquerade hosts   Outerlimits, featuring a live performance by P.M. Dawn (yeah, yeah, we all thought they were dead, but they just released a "best of" — go figure) as well as DJs Scott Henry, Terry Mullan, Sandy, Brett Long, Mickey Finn, A-Sides, Flooressence & Freakquincy, Clay Ivey and more. $25. 10 p.m.-7 a.m. 695 North Ave. Call  404-577.8178, 404-650-4378 or  e-mail outerlimits@23d.com for more information.

Nomenclature Museum sends off some strong signals Sept. 4 as WRAS 88.5, Georgia State University's student-run 100,000-watt radio station, presents the Beatcollaborative Benefit for their Houseworks, Subterranean and Planet8 electronica shows. DJs filling the three rooms include Fumanchu, Kemit, Eve & Motomasa, Team Rollers, Rydim Ryderz, a live performance by Drums 'n' Effects, Fonix, T-Mouse Kid Skillz and Patrick Scott, among others. 4 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. 44 12th St. Call 404-874-6344 or visit beatcollaborative @hotmail.com for more information.

Movies

Practice your aim as the Earl hosts a viewing of The Target Shoots First, the winner of Best Documentary and the Audience Award at SXSW, Aug. 30 at 8:30 p.m. The film chronicles Chris Wilcha's experiences in the early '90s when he helped create Columbia House's "alternative" section. Break out the flannel and fly that freak flag high. 488 Flat Shoals Road. For more information call 404-522-3950.

Sports

Put summer to bed, folks. Labor Day is upon us. You can tiptoe around the diamond with those girly guys of baseball for a while longer, or you can get down and dirty with the rough and tumble, full-contact fellas of football. Bigger balls, harder hits ... better game, right? See for yourself as the Falcons take on the 49ers Sept. 3 at the Georgia Dome. Colleges get in the game, too. Georgia Tech plays Central Florida Sept. 2 at Bobbie Dodd Stadium. The Georgia Bulldogs woof it up with the Georgia Southern Eagles Sept. 2 at Sanford Stadium. Clark Atlanta and Morehouse duke it out Sept. 4 at the Labor Day Classic, an all-out football extravaganza featuring a pre-game gospel show at  the Georgia Dome. Call stadiums for ticket information.

Theater

The second stage of the 14th St. Playhouse features Faggot, a play written and performed by Lynwoodt B. Jenkins about what it means and costs to be black and gay, through Sept. 3. $10. Wed.-Fri. 8 p.m. Sat. 3 & 8 p.m. and Sun. 3 & 7:30 p.m. 173 14th St. Call  404-733-4750 for more information.


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Star light, star bright, which bands and movies will I see tonight? Well, if you're attending __Drive-Invasion 2000__ at the Starlight __Sept. 2-4__ you'll get to choose from bands including the Immortal Lee County Killers, Drive-By Truckers, Truckadelic, Johnny Legend, the Subsonics, the X-Impossibles, the Belmont Playboys, Catfight!, the Woggles and the Blacktop Rockets, among many others. Movies include ''Barbed Wire Girls'', ''Reform School Girl'', ''Cheech & Chong's Still Smokin''', ''Thunder Road'' and ''Speedway'', and more. $10 per day. Gates open at  2 p.m. Sat. & Sun. and 11 a.m. Mon. for the classic car show. The Starlight Six Drive-In is located at 2000 Moreland Ave. Call 404-627-5786 or visit [http://www.starlightdrivein.com/|www.starlightdrivein.com] for more information.

Atlanta's on a roll  __Aug. 31-Sept. 3__ as Roll With It Productions and KISS 104.7 present the __Fifth Annual National Skate Jam 2000__ for "mature skaters 25 and over." Activities include an Old Skool Welcome, the Rollers' Ball, the "Pool Party Cookout" and skate parties at Skate Towne and Skate Station. $6.99-$26.99 depending on event and venue. Venues vary. Call 404-822-3790 or visit [http://www.rollwithitproductions.com/|www.rollwithitproductions.com] for more information.

Lake Lanier Islands Resort presents fun in the sun and more sounds than the surf this Labor Day weekend. Cumberland performs __Sept. 1 and Sept. 3__; the latter show also includes a performance by Chad Brock and a fireworks display. 7 p.m. Beach & water park day passes are $13.99-$23.99. For more information call 770-945-8787 or visit www.lakelanier islands.com.

Music

Get into the groove as New York City's __Groove Collective__ do the honors of entertaining in Centennial Olympic Park during the Montreux Atlanta Music Festival's Wednesday Night Winddown,  __Aug. 30__. Free. 5:30-8 p.m. Call 404-817-6851 or visit [http://www.atlantafestivals.com/|www.atlantafestivals.com] for more information.

Before professional wrestling and without the need for face paint, __Sting__ made his name after a series of albums with the Police and well-received solo work. Now Sting has returned like many other '80s artists (Cher, Madonna, etc.) with an electronica-friendly production. And he's returning to Lakewood __Sept. 5__. Supposedly he can do it all night. $36.50-$101.50. 7:30 p.m. 2002 Lakewood Way. For more information call  404-249-6400.

Nightlife

On __Sept. 2__ the Masquerade hosts   __Outerlimits__, featuring a live performance by __P.M. Dawn__ (yeah, yeah, we all thought they were dead, but they just released a "best of" -- go figure) as well as DJs __Scott Henry, Terry Mullan, Sandy, Brett Long, Mickey Finn, A-Sides, Flooressence & Freakquincy, Clay Ivey__ and more. $25. 10 p.m.-7 a.m. 695 North Ave. Call  404-577.8178, 404-650-4378 or  e-mail outerlimits@23[http://d.com/|d.com] for more information.

Nomenclature Museum sends off some strong signals __Sept. 4__ as WRAS 88.5, Georgia State University's student-run 100,000-watt radio station, presents the __Beatcollaborative Benefit__ for their Houseworks, Subterranean and Planet8 electronica shows. DJs filling the three rooms include Fumanchu, Kemit, Eve & Motomasa, Team Rollers, Rydim Ryderz, a live performance by Drums 'n' Effects, Fonix, T-Mouse Kid Skillz and Patrick Scott, among others. 4 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. 44 12th St. Call 404-874-6344 or visit beatcollaborative @[http://hotmail.com/|hotmail.com] for more information.

Movies

Practice your aim as the Earl hosts a viewing of __''The Target Shoots First''__, the winner of Best Documentary and the Audience Award at SXSW, __Aug. 30__ at 8:30 p.m. The film chronicles Chris Wilcha's experiences in the early '90s when he helped create Columbia House's "alternative" section. Break out the flannel and fly that freak flag high. 488 Flat Shoals Road. For more information call 404-522-3950.

Sports

Put summer to bed, folks. Labor Day is upon us. You can tiptoe around the diamond with those girly guys of baseball for a while longer, or you can get down and dirty with the rough and tumble, full-contact fellas of football. Bigger balls, harder hits ... better game, right? See for yourself as the __Falcons__ take on the 49ers __Sept. 3__ at the Georgia Dome. Colleges get in the game, too. __Georgia Tech__ plays __Central Florida__ Sept. 2 at Bobbie Dodd Stadium. The __Georgia Bulldogs__ woof it up with the __Georgia Southern Eagles Sept. 2__ at Sanford Stadium. Clark Atlanta and Morehouse duke it out __Sept. 4__ at the __Labor Day Classic__, an all-out football extravaganza featuring a pre-game gospel show at  the Georgia Dome. Call stadiums for ticket information.

Theater

The second stage of the 14th St. Playhouse features __''Faggot''__, a play written and performed by Lynwoodt B. Jenkins about what it means and costs to be black and gay, through __Sept. 3__. $10. Wed.-Fri. 8 p.m. Sat. 3 & 8 p.m. and Sun. 3 & 7:30 p.m. 173 14th St. Call  404-733-4750 for more information.


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Star light, star bright, which bands and movies will I see tonight? Well, if you're attending Drive-Invasion 2000 at the Starlight Sept. 2-4 you'll get to choose from bands including the Immortal Lee County Killers, Drive-By Truckers, Truckadelic, Johnny Legend, the Subsonics, the X-Impossibles, the Belmont Playboys, Catfight!, the Woggles and the Blacktop Rockets, among many others. Movies include Barbed Wire Girls, Reform School Girl, Cheech & Chong's Still Smokin', Thunder Road and Speedway, and more. $10 per day. Gates open at  2 p.m. Sat. & Sun. and 11 a.m. Mon. for the classic car show. The Starlight Six Drive-In is located at 2000 Moreland Ave. Call 404-627-5786 or visit www.starlightdrivein.com for more information.

Atlanta's on a roll  Aug. 31-Sept. 3 as Roll With It Productions and KISS 104.7 present the Fifth Annual National Skate Jam 2000 for "mature skaters 25 and over." Activities include an Old Skool Welcome, the Rollers' Ball, the "Pool Party Cookout" and skate parties at Skate Towne and Skate Station. $6.99-$26.99 depending on event and venue. Venues vary. Call 404-822-3790 or visit www.rollwithitproductions.com for more information.

Lake Lanier Islands Resort presents fun in the sun and more sounds than the surf this Labor Day weekend. Cumberland performs Sept. 1 and Sept. 3; the latter show also includes a performance by Chad Brock and a fireworks display. 7 p.m. Beach & water park day passes are $13.99-$23.99. For more information call 770-945-8787 or visit www.lakelanier islands.com.

Music

Get into the groove as New York City's Groove Collective do the honors of entertaining in Centennial Olympic Park during the Montreux Atlanta Music Festival's Wednesday Night Winddown,  Aug. 30. Free. 5:30-8 p.m. Call 404-817-6851 or visit www.atlantafestivals.com for more information.

Before professional wrestling and without the need for face paint, Sting made his name after a series of albums with the Police and well-received solo work. Now Sting has returned like many other '80s artists (Cher, Madonna, etc.) with an electronica-friendly production. And he's returning to Lakewood Sept. 5. Supposedly he can do it all night. $36.50-$101.50. 7:30 p.m. 2002 Lakewood Way. For more information call  404-249-6400.

Nightlife

On Sept. 2 the Masquerade hosts   Outerlimits, featuring a live performance by P.M. Dawn (yeah, yeah, we all thought they were dead, but they just released a "best of" — go figure) as well as DJs Scott Henry, Terry Mullan, Sandy, Brett Long, Mickey Finn, A-Sides, Flooressence & Freakquincy, Clay Ivey and more. $25. 10 p.m.-7 a.m. 695 North Ave. Call  404-577.8178, 404-650-4378 or  e-mail outerlimits@23d.com for more information.

Nomenclature Museum sends off some strong signals Sept. 4 as WRAS 88.5, Georgia State University's student-run 100,000-watt radio station, presents the Beatcollaborative Benefit for their Houseworks, Subterranean and Planet8 electronica shows. DJs filling the three rooms include Fumanchu, Kemit, Eve & Motomasa, Team Rollers, Rydim Ryderz, a live performance by Drums 'n' Effects, Fonix, T-Mouse Kid Skillz and Patrick Scott, among others. 4 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. 44 12th St. Call 404-874-6344 or visit beatcollaborative @hotmail.com for more information.

Movies

Practice your aim as the Earl hosts a viewing of The Target Shoots First, the winner of Best Documentary and the Audience Award at SXSW, Aug. 30 at 8:30 p.m. The film chronicles Chris Wilcha's experiences in the early '90s when he helped create Columbia House's "alternative" section. Break out the flannel and fly that freak flag high. 488 Flat Shoals Road. For more information call 404-522-3950.

Sports

Put summer to bed, folks. Labor Day is upon us. You can tiptoe around the diamond with those girly guys of baseball for a while longer, or you can get down and dirty with the rough and tumble, full-contact fellas of football. Bigger balls, harder hits ... better game, right? See for yourself as the Falcons take on the 49ers Sept. 3 at the Georgia Dome. Colleges get in the game, too. Georgia Tech plays Central Florida Sept. 2 at Bobbie Dodd Stadium. The Georgia Bulldogs woof it up with the Georgia Southern Eagles Sept. 2 at Sanford Stadium. Clark Atlanta and Morehouse duke it out Sept. 4 at the Labor Day Classic, an all-out football extravaganza featuring a pre-game gospel show at  the Georgia Dome. Call stadiums for ticket information.

Theater

The second stage of the 14th St. Playhouse features Faggot, a play written and performed by Lynwoodt B. Jenkins about what it means and costs to be black and gay, through Sept. 3. $10. Wed.-Fri. 8 p.m. Sat. 3 & 8 p.m. and Sun. 3 & 7:30 p.m. 173 14th St. Call  404-733-4750 for more information.


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Talk of the Town

Saturday September 2, 2000 12:04 am EDT

Labor Day

Star light, star bright, which bands and movies will I see tonight? Well, if you're attending Drive-Invasion 2000 at the Starlight Sept. 2-4 you'll get to choose from bands including the Immortal Lee County Killers, Drive-By Truckers, Truckadelic, Johnny Legend, the Subsonics, the X-Impossibles, the Belmont Playboys, Catfight!, the Woggles and the Blacktop Rockets, among many others....

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Al Gore can win Georgia's 12 electoral votes. Currently, the Peach State is — at best — in the "toss-up" column for Gore, with most polls showing W. holding the lead. But with Labor Day at hand, if I were a Gore strategist I'd unload a ton of money here, work like hell to get a massive voter turnout, and force W. to really fight for it. First of all, the Gore people have to coax Sen. Zell Miller aboard. Miller, an astute politico, has distanced himself from Al and Joe, even staying away from the L.A. convention. The ex-governor needn't fear that Gore could damage Miller's own November chances; he really can't. Miller is "Mr. HOPE Scholarship," the father of the Georgia Lottery — and all those transplanted "Yankee" Republicans love him for it, especially for helping send their kids to college.

No, Zell doesn't have to worry about Gore taking him down, but Gore has to be concerned that Miller and other "blue dog" Democrats are not rushing forward to support him

Let's make it clear, neither Zell nor Al can win Georgia without a big black vote. Black voters are the base of the Georgia Democratic party, and a big turnout is essential. Come election day, Gore and Miller had better be on the same page, or the books could slam shut on both of them. It makes no sense for Miller to campaign in black churches and not to mention Gore's name. For Georgia's black voters, the national ticket is as important as state contests.

Gore also needs to win a majority of the white women's vote, since white men detest him. With the exception of gay males, a scattering of intown neighborhood types, a handful of urban intellectuals, a few organized labor stalwarts and non-frat boy students, Gore's support among white males is extremely thin. However, Gore might be aided by a higher turnout among male Jewish voters with Lieberman on the ticket.

Since Miller and Gore are essentially going after the same vote, it would make sense for Miller and his legion of conservative supporters to help Gore. It doesn't add up for Miller and Gore not to work in tandem with each other. I know this column is not going to make the Miller campaign too happy, but W. Bush has very little to offer the Miller voter.

Gore's popular appeal with working families, women and minorities ought to be attractive here. Eight years ago, Bill Clinton narrowly won Georgia. Unlike neighboring Southern states, we still have a strong Democratic party and, in Gov. Roy Barnes, a proven vote-getter capable at utilizing the state's well-oiled political machine.

Yet, because of the conservative nature of voters on issues like guns, taxes and abortion, most political observers are either penciling Georgia into the Bush column or, by a smaller margin, giving Gore a long shot at winning. I disagree.

The Gore campaign should view Georgia as winnable and invest as much time an effort here as in the battleground states of the Rust Belt. Ultimately, our 12 electoral votes are as important as Iowa's and Wisconsin's. With or without Zell, Al and Joe need to latch onto the Barnes machine, Mayor Bill Campbell, Reps. Cynthia McKinney and John Lewis and their supporters, and ride the highway to victory.

Al Gore need not write off Georgia. If his campaign starts organizing seriously now, Gore may enjoy the pleasant November sensation of watching CNN project the state's dozen votes going his way.

And with the Georgia vote, Al Gore may well lock up the presidency.

HOUCKLINE: Call, 404-614-1886; e-mail: thouck@mindspring.com


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Al Gore can win Georgia's 12 electoral votes. Currently, the Peach State is -- at best -- in the "toss-up" column for Gore, with most polls showing W. holding the lead. But with Labor Day at hand, if I were a Gore strategist I'd unload a ton of money here, work like hell to get a massive voter turnout, and force W. to really fight for it. First of all, the Gore people have to coax Sen. Zell Miller aboard. Miller, an astute politico, has distanced himself from Al and Joe, even staying away from the L.A. convention. The ex-governor needn't fear that Gore could damage Miller's own November chances; he really can't. Miller is "Mr. HOPE Scholarship," the father of the Georgia Lottery -- and all those transplanted "Yankee" Republicans love him for it, especially for helping send their kids to college.

No, Zell doesn't have to worry about Gore taking him down, but Gore has to be concerned that Miller and other "blue dog" Democrats are not rushing forward to support him

Let's make it clear, neither Zell nor Al can win Georgia without a big black vote. Black voters are the base of the Georgia Democratic party, and a big turnout is essential. Come election day, Gore and Miller had better be on the same page, or the books could slam shut on both of them. It makes no sense for Miller to campaign in black churches and not to mention Gore's name. For Georgia's black voters, the national ticket is as important as state contests.

Gore also needs to win a majority of the white women's vote, since white men detest him. With the exception of gay males, a scattering of intown neighborhood types, a handful of urban intellectuals, a few organized labor stalwarts and non-frat boy students, Gore's support among white males is extremely thin. However, Gore might be aided by a higher turnout among male Jewish voters with Lieberman on the ticket.

Since Miller and Gore are essentially going after the same vote, it would make sense for Miller and his legion of conservative supporters to help Gore. It doesn't add up for Miller and Gore not to work in tandem with each other. I know this column is not going to make the Miller campaign too happy, but W. Bush has very little to offer the Miller voter.

Gore's popular appeal with working families, women and minorities ought to be attractive here. Eight years ago, Bill Clinton narrowly won Georgia. Unlike neighboring Southern states, we still have a strong Democratic party and, in Gov. Roy Barnes, a proven vote-getter capable at utilizing the state's well-oiled political machine.

Yet, because of the conservative nature of voters on issues like guns, taxes and abortion, most political observers are either penciling Georgia into the Bush column or, by a smaller margin, giving Gore a long shot at winning. I disagree.

The Gore campaign should view Georgia as winnable and invest as much time an effort here as in the battleground states of the Rust Belt. Ultimately, our 12 electoral votes are as important as Iowa's and Wisconsin's. With or without Zell, Al and Joe need to latch onto the Barnes machine, Mayor Bill Campbell, Reps. Cynthia McKinney and John Lewis and their supporters, and ride the highway to victory.

Al Gore need not write off Georgia. If his campaign starts organizing seriously now, Gore may enjoy the pleasant November sensation of watching CNN project the state's dozen votes going his way.

And with the Georgia vote, Al Gore may well lock up the presidency.

''HOUCKLINE: Call, 404-614-1886; e-mail: [mailto:thouck@mindspring.com|thouck@mindspring.com]''


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  string(3825) "    Gore can take Georgia if he makes the effort   2000-09-02T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Election reflection September 02 2000   Tom Houck 1223536 2000-09-02T04:04:00+00:00  
Al Gore can win Georgia's 12 electoral votes. Currently, the Peach State is — at best — in the "toss-up" column for Gore, with most polls showing W. holding the lead. But with Labor Day at hand, if I were a Gore strategist I'd unload a ton of money here, work like hell to get a massive voter turnout, and force W. to really fight for it. First of all, the Gore people have to coax Sen. Zell Miller aboard. Miller, an astute politico, has distanced himself from Al and Joe, even staying away from the L.A. convention. The ex-governor needn't fear that Gore could damage Miller's own November chances; he really can't. Miller is "Mr. HOPE Scholarship," the father of the Georgia Lottery — and all those transplanted "Yankee" Republicans love him for it, especially for helping send their kids to college.

No, Zell doesn't have to worry about Gore taking him down, but Gore has to be concerned that Miller and other "blue dog" Democrats are not rushing forward to support him

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Gore also needs to win a majority of the white women's vote, since white men detest him. With the exception of gay males, a scattering of intown neighborhood types, a handful of urban intellectuals, a few organized labor stalwarts and non-frat boy students, Gore's support among white males is extremely thin. However, Gore might be aided by a higher turnout among male Jewish voters with Lieberman on the ticket.

Since Miller and Gore are essentially going after the same vote, it would make sense for Miller and his legion of conservative supporters to help Gore. It doesn't add up for Miller and Gore not to work in tandem with each other. I know this column is not going to make the Miller campaign too happy, but W. Bush has very little to offer the Miller voter.

Gore's popular appeal with working families, women and minorities ought to be attractive here. Eight years ago, Bill Clinton narrowly won Georgia. Unlike neighboring Southern states, we still have a strong Democratic party and, in Gov. Roy Barnes, a proven vote-getter capable at utilizing the state's well-oiled political machine.

Yet, because of the conservative nature of voters on issues like guns, taxes and abortion, most political observers are either penciling Georgia into the Bush column or, by a smaller margin, giving Gore a long shot at winning. I disagree.

The Gore campaign should view Georgia as winnable and invest as much time an effort here as in the battleground states of the Rust Belt. Ultimately, our 12 electoral votes are as important as Iowa's and Wisconsin's. With or without Zell, Al and Joe need to latch onto the Barnes machine, Mayor Bill Campbell, Reps. Cynthia McKinney and John Lewis and their supporters, and ride the highway to victory.

Al Gore need not write off Georgia. If his campaign starts organizing seriously now, Gore may enjoy the pleasant November sensation of watching CNN project the state's dozen votes going his way.

And with the Georgia vote, Al Gore may well lock up the presidency.

HOUCKLINE: Call, 404-614-1886; e-mail: thouck@mindspring.com


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  string(3616) "?Music?

The nine-man Wu-Tang Clan comes out of the 36 Chambers like hollow-tip bullets, aiming for maximum lyrical damage. Mixing solo work and collaborations, the Wu are touring to promote their upcoming album. While the ODB will be MIA, and there's always a chance another member will go AWOL, there are bound to be enough high kicks (and we mean high) to satisfy. Aug. 24 8 p.m. $26-$29. The Tabernacle, 152 Luckie St. For more information call 404-659-9022.

So Tommy Lee's left the band, and they dropped Anthrax from the tour, and their wives may no longer want them looking at girls, girls, girls, but it's still Motley Crue, the band that immortalized Atlanta's Tattletales. Need I say more? Dr. Feelgood is in. Megadeth opens. Aug. 25. 7 p.m. $21.50-$49. Lakewood Amphitheatre, 2002 Lakewood Way. For more information call 404-249-6400.

Legendary artists Al Jarreau, Roberta Flack, David Sanborn, Joe Sample and George Duke kick off the Montreux Music Festival with a performance on Aug. 27 at Chastain Amphitheater. This week-long world music event makes stops at venues throughout the city before culminating with a free concert series at Piedmont Park Sept. 2-4 featuring jazz, blues, Latin, rock and reggae from performers such as Machet-T, Fishbone, Angie Aparo and Zap Mama. Park concerts are from 2-10 p.m. daily. Call the festival hotline at 404-817-6851 or visit www.atlantafestivals.com for a full schedule of events.

?Books?

Tony Hawk goes from punk to publishing with his latest book Hawk. The skateboarding icon will promote the venture with a raffle of an autographed board, on view at Chapter 11 Bookstores through Oct. 2. For details on the raffle, contact your local Chapter 11 Bookstore.

?Dance?

Debbie Allen takes command of the stage at the Alliance for her dance-drama, Soul Possessed, which she wrote, directed and choreographed. The tragic love story is set in the Louisiana bayou and tells the tale of Ysabel, a woman who leaves her childhood sweetheart for a drifter. Aug. 24-Sept. 24 Tues.-Sat. at 8 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 2:30 and 8 p.m. Sun. 7:30 p.m. $16-$45. Alliance Theatre, 1280 Peachtree St. Call 404-733-5000 for information.

?Festivals and events?

If you're hungry for a taste of the blues, get your fill at the sixth annual Barbecue and Blues Festival Aug. 26 featuring steaming hot blues by headliner Dr. John "the Night Tripper," as well as Luther Allison, Bernard Allison, Lotsa Poppa and the Atlanta Heat Blues Review. Barbecue teams have a smoky showdown, competing for $5,000 in prize money, and they'll shell out some hearty samplings of their barbecue delicacies. Noon-10 p.m. $8. Gwinnett County Fairgrounds. Call 404-222-7368 for information.

Meet up with the gamblers on Lake Lanier Aug. 26 when more than 200 boats compete in the Poker Run. Participants will sail their vessels to five checkpoints located around the lake, drawing one card at each stop. The best hand wins $2,000 and five of a kind wins a 30-foot boat and trailer. 9 a.m. $55. Lanier Harbor Marina, 2066 Pine Tree Drive, Buford. Call 770-945-2884 or log on to www.thepokerrun.com for information.

The catwalk will be purring with fine fall fashions at this year's Fashion Cares. Get your paws on designs by Bob Ellis, Jeffrey and Jil Sander as they unveil their fall and winter collections. And keep an eye out for garments by Prada, Richard Tyler, Guy Laroche and Helmut Lang. Proceeds benefit The Living Room, which provides housing for people with AIDS, and the St. Joseph's Breast Cancer Program. Aug. 29 at 8 p.m. Roxy Theater, 3110 Roswell Road. Call 404-841-0215 for information.


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The nine-man __Wu-Tang Clan__ comes out of the 36 Chambers like hollow-tip bullets, aiming for maximum lyrical damage. Mixing solo work and collaborations, the Wu are touring to promote their upcoming album. While the ODB will be MIA, and there's always a chance another member will go AWOL, there are bound to be enough high kicks (and we mean ''high'') to satisfy. __Aug. 24__ 8 p.m. $26-$29. The Tabernacle, 152 Luckie St. For more information call 404-659-9022.

So Tommy Lee's left the band, and they dropped Anthrax from the tour, and their wives may no longer want them looking at girls, girls, girls, but it's still __Motley Crue__, the band that immortalized Atlanta's Tattletales. Need I say more? Dr. Feelgood is in. Megadeth opens. __Aug. 25. __7 p.m. $21.50-$49. Lakewood Amphitheatre, 2002 Lakewood Way. For more information call 404-249-6400.

Legendary artists Al Jarreau, Roberta Flack, David Sanborn, Joe Sample and George Duke kick off the __Montreux Music Festival__ with a performance on __Aug. 27__ at Chastain Amphitheater. This week-long world music event makes stops at venues throughout the city before culminating with a free concert series at Piedmont Park Sept. 2-4 featuring jazz, blues, Latin, rock and reggae from performers such as Machet-T, Fishbone, Angie Aparo and Zap Mama. Park concerts are from 2-10 p.m. daily. Call the festival hotline at 404-817-6851 or visit [http://www.atlantafestivals.com/|www.atlantafestivals.com] for a full schedule of events.

__?Books?__

__Tony Hawk__ goes from punk to publishing with his latest book ''Hawk''. The skateboarding icon will promote the venture with a raffle of an autographed board, on view at Chapter 11 Bookstores through Oct. 2. For details on the raffle, contact your local Chapter 11 Bookstore.

__?Dance?__

Debbie Allen takes command of the stage at the Alliance for her dance-drama, __''Soul Possessed''__, which she wrote, directed and choreographed. The tragic love story is set in the Louisiana bayou and tells the tale of Ysabel, a woman who leaves her childhood sweetheart for a drifter. __Aug. 24-Sept. 24__ Tues.-Sat. at 8 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 2:30 and 8 p.m. Sun. 7:30 p.m. $16-$45. Alliance Theatre, 1280 Peachtree St. Call 404-733-5000 for information.

__?Festivals and events?__

If you're hungry for a taste of the blues, get your fill at the sixth annual __Barbecue and Blues Festival__ __Aug. 26__ featuring steaming hot blues by headliner Dr. John "the Night Tripper," as well as Luther Allison, Bernard Allison, Lotsa Poppa and the Atlanta Heat Blues Review. Barbecue teams have a smoky showdown, competing for $5,000 in prize money, and they'll shell out some hearty samplings of their barbecue delicacies. Noon-10 p.m. $8. Gwinnett County Fairgrounds. Call 404-222-7368 for information.

Meet up with the gamblers on Lake Lanier __Aug. 26__ when more than 200 boats compete in the __Poker Run__. Participants will sail their vessels to five checkpoints located around the lake, drawing one card at each stop. The best hand wins $2,000 and five of a kind wins a 30-foot boat and trailer. 9 a.m. $55. Lanier Harbor Marina, 2066 Pine Tree Drive, Buford. Call 770-945-2884 or log on to [http://www.thepokerrun.com/|www.thepokerrun.com] for information.

The catwalk will be purring with fine fall fashions at this year's __Fashion Cares__. Get your paws on designs by Bob Ellis, Jeffrey and Jil Sander as they unveil their fall and winter collections. And keep an eye out for garments by Prada, Richard Tyler, Guy Laroche and Helmut Lang. Proceeds benefit The Living Room, which provides housing for people with AIDS, and the St. Joseph's Breast Cancer Program. __Aug. 29__ at 8 p.m. Roxy Theater, 3110 Roswell Road. Call 404-841-0215 for information.


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  string(3837) "       2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Week at a Glance August 26 2000     2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00  ?Music?

The nine-man Wu-Tang Clan comes out of the 36 Chambers like hollow-tip bullets, aiming for maximum lyrical damage. Mixing solo work and collaborations, the Wu are touring to promote their upcoming album. While the ODB will be MIA, and there's always a chance another member will go AWOL, there are bound to be enough high kicks (and we mean high) to satisfy. Aug. 24 8 p.m. $26-$29. The Tabernacle, 152 Luckie St. For more information call 404-659-9022.

So Tommy Lee's left the band, and they dropped Anthrax from the tour, and their wives may no longer want them looking at girls, girls, girls, but it's still Motley Crue, the band that immortalized Atlanta's Tattletales. Need I say more? Dr. Feelgood is in. Megadeth opens. Aug. 25. 7 p.m. $21.50-$49. Lakewood Amphitheatre, 2002 Lakewood Way. For more information call 404-249-6400.

Legendary artists Al Jarreau, Roberta Flack, David Sanborn, Joe Sample and George Duke kick off the Montreux Music Festival with a performance on Aug. 27 at Chastain Amphitheater. This week-long world music event makes stops at venues throughout the city before culminating with a free concert series at Piedmont Park Sept. 2-4 featuring jazz, blues, Latin, rock and reggae from performers such as Machet-T, Fishbone, Angie Aparo and Zap Mama. Park concerts are from 2-10 p.m. daily. Call the festival hotline at 404-817-6851 or visit www.atlantafestivals.com for a full schedule of events.

?Books?

Tony Hawk goes from punk to publishing with his latest book Hawk. The skateboarding icon will promote the venture with a raffle of an autographed board, on view at Chapter 11 Bookstores through Oct. 2. For details on the raffle, contact your local Chapter 11 Bookstore.

?Dance?

Debbie Allen takes command of the stage at the Alliance for her dance-drama, Soul Possessed, which she wrote, directed and choreographed. The tragic love story is set in the Louisiana bayou and tells the tale of Ysabel, a woman who leaves her childhood sweetheart for a drifter. Aug. 24-Sept. 24 Tues.-Sat. at 8 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 2:30 and 8 p.m. Sun. 7:30 p.m. $16-$45. Alliance Theatre, 1280 Peachtree St. Call 404-733-5000 for information.

?Festivals and events?

If you're hungry for a taste of the blues, get your fill at the sixth annual Barbecue and Blues Festival Aug. 26 featuring steaming hot blues by headliner Dr. John "the Night Tripper," as well as Luther Allison, Bernard Allison, Lotsa Poppa and the Atlanta Heat Blues Review. Barbecue teams have a smoky showdown, competing for $5,000 in prize money, and they'll shell out some hearty samplings of their barbecue delicacies. Noon-10 p.m. $8. Gwinnett County Fairgrounds. Call 404-222-7368 for information.

Meet up with the gamblers on Lake Lanier Aug. 26 when more than 200 boats compete in the Poker Run. Participants will sail their vessels to five checkpoints located around the lake, drawing one card at each stop. The best hand wins $2,000 and five of a kind wins a 30-foot boat and trailer. 9 a.m. $55. Lanier Harbor Marina, 2066 Pine Tree Drive, Buford. Call 770-945-2884 or log on to www.thepokerrun.com for information.

The catwalk will be purring with fine fall fashions at this year's Fashion Cares. Get your paws on designs by Bob Ellis, Jeffrey and Jil Sander as they unveil their fall and winter collections. And keep an eye out for garments by Prada, Richard Tyler, Guy Laroche and Helmut Lang. Proceeds benefit The Living Room, which provides housing for people with AIDS, and the St. Joseph's Breast Cancer Program. Aug. 29 at 8 p.m. Roxy Theater, 3110 Roswell Road. Call 404-841-0215 for information.


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Talk of the Town

Saturday August 26, 2000 12:04 am EDT

?Music?

The nine-man Wu-Tang Clan comes out of the 36 Chambers like hollow-tip bullets, aiming for maximum lyrical damage. Mixing solo work and collaborations, the Wu are touring to promote their upcoming album. While the ODB will be MIA, and there's always a chance another member will go AWOL, there are bound to be enough high kicks (and we mean high) to satisfy. Aug. 24 8 p.m. $26-$29. The...

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  string(3493) "The most response I've ever received from this column came a few months ago, when I mentioned in passing that an NBA All-Star told me he had a house in Vinings that he used, "you know, for sex." When he told me that, it was under the condition that I not identify him. The avalanche of feedback got me thinking: If I could reveal all the dirt that I knew "off the record," it would be the best column ever. But I couldn't do that, because I'd get run out of town on a rail, right? Then again, I'm moving anyway, so ... why not? Still, to keep it fun, you'll have to figure these out for yourself.

Did you hear about the local politician who sleeps around behind his wife's back? Wait a minute. That could be a lot of people. Let's get more specific: There's a politician running for a major office in the near future whose staffers told me, off the record, of course, "We're not interested in black voters in Atlanta."

Enough with the politics, already. How about the big-time local businessman who spends more time on drugs than he does off of them? Somehow, he conti-nues making appearances around town, at parties, fund-raisers and the like. This same guy leads a cabal of other big-name business types who like to push things to the extreme. They meet up at a high-priced private bar in town on the weekends, where women are brought in to cater to their "needs." Meanwhile, their wives unsuccessfully try to keep tabs via cell phone.

Or what about the successful businessman who found his wife through a mail-order catalog? Hell, one catalog that hooks up American men with Eastern European women is produced right here in Atlanta, its office staffed mostly by soccer moms.

But of course, the real playas are the players. How about the local jock who kept a Buckhead apartment where he had visits from three to four women at a time per night? He's now moved on to bigger and better things. Then, there was one of my most memorable experiences, when I hung with a local rap star at a strip club while his posse received, um, favors all around us. Or there was the world-famous DJ who lit up a joint in my car downtown while stopped at a light, right next to a Georgia State University cop.

I didn't even get to the Channel 11 personality who wears a hairpiece, or the Atlantan reportedly caught on tape in the throes of passion with his wife and another woman, or the AJC writer who has turned and walked away two separate times as I introduced myself. But I probably shouldn't be talking about this anyway, because this is all, of course, off the record.

This and that: Channel 11 sports anchor Fred Kalil (who doesn't wear a rug) is recovering after surgery last Wednesday to remove a non-cancerous cyst near his brain. He is expected to make a full recovery, though it looks as if he'll be off the air until October. Kalil has been looking great after losing over 30 pounds in the last year. Get well fast, Fred. ... Former Atlanta fashion diva Jeffrey Kalinsky will return from the Big Apple next week for his annual "Fashion Cares" benefit runway show, which will go down Aug. 29 at the Roxy. Proceeds will benefit the Living Room housing assistance program for AIDS patients and Mercy Mobile Health Care for the poor. ... This Friday, Aug. 25, spoken word will again collide with soulful music downtown at the Fairlie-Poplar Cafe at "Lingo," the coolest poetry slam in town. ... I'm out.

What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623     x. 1502 or lang@creativeloafing.com.


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Did you hear about the local politician who sleeps around behind his wife's back? Wait a minute. That could be a lot of people. Let's get more specific: There's a politician running for a major office in the near future whose staffers told me, off the record, of course, "We're not interested in black voters in Atlanta."

Enough with the politics, already. How about the big-time local businessman who spends more time on drugs than he does off of them? Somehow, he conti-nues making appearances around town, at parties, fund-raisers and the like. This same guy leads a cabal of other big-name business types who like to push things to the extreme. They meet up at a high-priced private bar in town on the weekends, where women are brought in to cater to their "needs." Meanwhile, their wives unsuccessfully try to keep tabs via cell phone.

Or what about the successful businessman who found his wife through a mail-order catalog? Hell, one catalog that hooks up American men with Eastern European women is produced right here in Atlanta, its office staffed mostly by soccer moms.

But of course, the real playas are the players. How about the local jock who kept a Buckhead apartment where he had visits from three to four women at a time ''per night''? He's now moved on to bigger and better things. Then, there was one of my most memorable experiences, when I hung with a local rap star at a strip club while his posse received, um, favors all around us. Or there was the world-famous DJ who lit up a joint in my car downtown while stopped at a light, right next to a Georgia State University cop.

I didn't even get to the Channel 11 personality who wears a hairpiece, or the Atlantan reportedly caught on tape in the throes of passion with his wife and another woman, or the ''AJC'' writer who has turned and walked away two separate times as I introduced myself. But I probably shouldn't be talking about this anyway, because this is all, of course, off the record.

''This and that:'' Channel 11 sports anchor __Fred Kalil__ (who ''doesn't'' wear a rug) is recovering after surgery last Wednesday to remove a non-cancerous cyst near his brain. He is expected to make a full recovery, though it looks as if he'll be off the air until October. Kalil has been looking great after losing over 30 pounds in the last year. Get well fast, Fred. ... Former Atlanta fashion diva __Jeffrey Kalinsky__ will return from the Big Apple next week for his annual "Fashion Cares" benefit runway show, which will go down Aug. 29 at the Roxy. Proceeds will benefit the Living Room housing assistance program for AIDS patients and Mercy Mobile Health Care for the poor. ... This Friday, Aug. 25, spoken word will again collide with soulful music downtown at the Fairlie-Poplar Cafe at "Lingo," the coolest poetry slam in town. ... I'm out.

''What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623     x. 1502 or [mailto:lang@creativeloafing.com|lang@creativeloafing.com].''


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  string(3757) "    Come play in the dirt again   2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Off the record August 26 2000   Lang Whitaker 1223537 2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00  The most response I've ever received from this column came a few months ago, when I mentioned in passing that an NBA All-Star told me he had a house in Vinings that he used, "you know, for sex." When he told me that, it was under the condition that I not identify him. The avalanche of feedback got me thinking: If I could reveal all the dirt that I knew "off the record," it would be the best column ever. But I couldn't do that, because I'd get run out of town on a rail, right? Then again, I'm moving anyway, so ... why not? Still, to keep it fun, you'll have to figure these out for yourself.

Did you hear about the local politician who sleeps around behind his wife's back? Wait a minute. That could be a lot of people. Let's get more specific: There's a politician running for a major office in the near future whose staffers told me, off the record, of course, "We're not interested in black voters in Atlanta."

Enough with the politics, already. How about the big-time local businessman who spends more time on drugs than he does off of them? Somehow, he conti-nues making appearances around town, at parties, fund-raisers and the like. This same guy leads a cabal of other big-name business types who like to push things to the extreme. They meet up at a high-priced private bar in town on the weekends, where women are brought in to cater to their "needs." Meanwhile, their wives unsuccessfully try to keep tabs via cell phone.

Or what about the successful businessman who found his wife through a mail-order catalog? Hell, one catalog that hooks up American men with Eastern European women is produced right here in Atlanta, its office staffed mostly by soccer moms.

But of course, the real playas are the players. How about the local jock who kept a Buckhead apartment where he had visits from three to four women at a time per night? He's now moved on to bigger and better things. Then, there was one of my most memorable experiences, when I hung with a local rap star at a strip club while his posse received, um, favors all around us. Or there was the world-famous DJ who lit up a joint in my car downtown while stopped at a light, right next to a Georgia State University cop.

I didn't even get to the Channel 11 personality who wears a hairpiece, or the Atlantan reportedly caught on tape in the throes of passion with his wife and another woman, or the AJC writer who has turned and walked away two separate times as I introduced myself. But I probably shouldn't be talking about this anyway, because this is all, of course, off the record.

This and that: Channel 11 sports anchor Fred Kalil (who doesn't wear a rug) is recovering after surgery last Wednesday to remove a non-cancerous cyst near his brain. He is expected to make a full recovery, though it looks as if he'll be off the air until October. Kalil has been looking great after losing over 30 pounds in the last year. Get well fast, Fred. ... Former Atlanta fashion diva Jeffrey Kalinsky will return from the Big Apple next week for his annual "Fashion Cares" benefit runway show, which will go down Aug. 29 at the Roxy. Proceeds will benefit the Living Room housing assistance program for AIDS patients and Mercy Mobile Health Care for the poor. ... This Friday, Aug. 25, spoken word will again collide with soulful music downtown at the Fairlie-Poplar Cafe at "Lingo," the coolest poetry slam in town. ... I'm out.

What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623     x. 1502 or lang@creativeloafing.com.


             13000953 1225997                          Talk of the Town - Off the record August 26 2000 "
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Come play in the dirt again | more...
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  string(4847) "I've noticed you often make positive references to Freud in your column. This surprises me. I thought everyone had abandoned Freud and his crazy theories about penis envy, the Oedipus Complex and so forth. Also, I thought you were more interested in Carl Jung's work. For a layman like myself, what advantage would there be in reading Freud now?

You are partly correct. My main interest in formal psychology has been in Carl Jung's work but it is important to realize that the Swiss psychologist's work was in large part inspired by Freud's. He was Freud's star pupil and was supposed to inherit the mantle of psychoanalysis' development.

Instead, Jung rebelled against Freud's notion that sexual libido is primary and developed his own school of analytical psychology. Jung, a believing Christian, investigated the paranormal, religion, mythology, alchemy, astrology and the imagination as a tool of healing. All of this was uninteresting to Freud who, as an atheist, viewed religion as pathology. Thus, Freud became viewed as the scientist while Jung acquired a reputation as a mystical flake.

Nonetheless, Jung has had an enormous influence on our culture, particularly where spirituality and psychology have attempted a meaningful rapprochement (as in transpersonal psychology and in other outcomes of the New Age, when it still retained an adventurous and iconoclastic spirit of inquiry instead of becoming a new variety of fundamentalism).

But Freud has had a far more extensive influence than Jung, and I don't think it would be an exaggeration to say that his mind was the most influential of the 20th century, commencing with the publication of The Interpretation of Dreams in 1900.

The primary thing to understand about Freud is that his work can be read very differently from the way it's represented in the formal canon of psychoanalysis, as science — or in the equally predictable canon of criticism of his work, as pseudo-science. I always cite the following quote by Freud from a 1934 interview by Gianni Papini, an Italian journalist:

"Everybody thinks that I stand by the scientific character of my work and that my principal scope lies in curing mental maladies. This is a terrible error that has prevailed for years and that I have been unable to set right. I am a scientist by necessity and not by vocation. I am really by nature an artist. And of this there lies an irrefutable proof, which is that in all countries in to which psychoanalysis has penetrated, it has been better understood and applied by writers and artists than by doctors. My books in fact more resemble works of imagination than treatises on pathology."

To actually read Freud — and he should be read in every literature class — is to encounter a brilliantly imaginative mind. While Jung undertook a more formal study of mythology, it was Freud who actually framed psychology in mythical terms by making the story of Oedipus its primary metaphor. His case histories read like fascinating myths themselves and, in terms of pure readability, display narrative gifts far superior to Jung's elliptical (but also fascinating) style.

Much of what has become dogmatized in Freud as fixed concepts is the result of the committee assembled to formally translate his work in the Standard Edition. It is no secret that the translators attempted to make the work seem as "scientific" as possible. Thus, many of Freud's actually mysterious concepts, including the structure of the ego, were subjected to profound reductionism. Many of his utterly bizarre flights of imagination were eliminated from the text, re-interpreted more acceptably or consigned to the status of footnotes.

For that reason, Penguin is publishing an entirely new translation of Freud's work next year. The translations are being made by literary types who have a much higher tolerance for the poetic and ambiguous meanings  of Freud's concepts. Naturally, the  psychoanalytical institutes oppose the new translations.

But why read Freud in any case?

Because he understood, even if he went overboard, that sexual repression has been an enormously damaging effect of modern life.

Because, through his notion of the unconscious, he teaches us that things are never completely as they seem on  the surface.

Because he stands for the capacity of human beings to make meaning out of their suffering rather than to spiritualize or eliminate it.

Because he understood that the psyche and the body cannot be separated.

Because he teaches us that the past lives with us in the present. As such, he understood completely that memory is in service to the present and is heavily infused with fantasy.

I could go on, but primarily I recommend you read Freud for the structure of his thought and the brilliance of his imagining. Read him with an open mind and an imagination.


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  string(4848) "__I've noticed you often make positive references to Freud in your column. This surprises me. I thought everyone had abandoned Freud and his crazy theories about penis envy, the Oedipus Complex and so forth. Also, I thought you were more interested in Carl Jung's work. For a layman like myself, what advantage would there be in reading Freud now?__

You are partly correct. My main interest in formal psychology has been in Carl Jung's work but it is important to realize that the Swiss psychologist's work was in large part inspired by Freud's. He was Freud's star pupil and was supposed to inherit the mantle of psychoanalysis' development.

Instead, Jung rebelled against Freud's notion that sexual libido is primary and developed his own school of analytical psychology. Jung, a believing Christian, investigated the paranormal, religion, mythology, alchemy, astrology and the imagination as a tool of healing. All of this was uninteresting to Freud who, as an atheist, viewed religion as pathology. Thus, Freud became viewed as the scientist while Jung acquired a reputation as a mystical flake.

Nonetheless, Jung has had an enormous influence on our culture, particularly where spirituality and psychology have attempted a meaningful rapprochement (as in transpersonal psychology and in other outcomes of the New Age, when it still retained an adventurous and iconoclastic spirit of inquiry instead of becoming a new variety of fundamentalism).

But Freud has had a far more extensive influence than Jung, and I don't think it would be an exaggeration to say that his mind was the most influential of the 20th century, commencing with the publication of ''The Interpretation of Dreams'' in 1900.

The primary thing to understand about Freud is that his work can be read very differently from the way it's represented in the formal canon of psychoanalysis, as science -- or in the equally predictable canon of criticism of his work, as pseudo-science. I always cite the following quote by Freud from a 1934 interview by Gianni Papini, an Italian journalist:

"Everybody thinks that I stand by the scientific character of my work and that my principal scope lies in curing mental maladies. This is a terrible error that has prevailed for years and that I have been unable to set right. I am a scientist by necessity and not by vocation. I am really by nature an artist. And of this there lies an irrefutable proof, which is that in all countries in to which psychoanalysis has penetrated, it has been better understood and applied by writers and artists than by doctors. My books in fact more resemble works of imagination than treatises on pathology."

To actually read Freud -- and he should be read in every literature class -- is to encounter a brilliantly imaginative mind. While Jung undertook a more formal study of mythology, it was Freud who actually framed psychology in mythical terms by making the story of Oedipus its primary metaphor. His case histories read like fascinating myths themselves and, in terms of pure readability, display narrative gifts far superior to Jung's elliptical (but also fascinating) style.

Much of what has become dogmatized in Freud as fixed concepts is the result of the committee assembled to formally translate his work in the'' Standard Edition''. It is no secret that the translators attempted to make the work seem as "scientific" as possible. Thus, many of Freud's actually mysterious concepts, including the structure of the ego, were subjected to profound reductionism. Many of his utterly bizarre flights of imagination were eliminated from the text, re-interpreted more acceptably or consigned to the status of footnotes.

For that reason, Penguin is publishing an entirely new translation of Freud's work next year. The translations are being made by literary types who have a much higher tolerance for the poetic and ambiguous meanings  of Freud's concepts. Naturally, the  psychoanalytical institutes oppose the new translations.

But why read Freud in any case?

Because he understood, even if he went overboard, that sexual repression has been an enormously damaging effect of modern life.

Because, through his notion of the unconscious, he teaches us that things are ''never'' completely as they seem on  the surface.

Because he stands for the capacity of human beings to make meaning out of their suffering rather than to spiritualize or eliminate it.

Because he understood that the psyche and the body cannot be separated.

Because he teaches us that the past lives with us in the present. As such, he understood completely that memory is in service to the present and is heavily infused with fantasy.

I could go on, but primarily I recommend you read Freud for the structure of his thought and the brilliance of his imagining. Read him with an open mind and an imagination.


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You are partly correct. My main interest in formal psychology has been in Carl Jung's work but it is important to realize that the Swiss psychologist's work was in large part inspired by Freud's. He was Freud's star pupil and was supposed to inherit the mantle of psychoanalysis' development.

Instead, Jung rebelled against Freud's notion that sexual libido is primary and developed his own school of analytical psychology. Jung, a believing Christian, investigated the paranormal, religion, mythology, alchemy, astrology and the imagination as a tool of healing. All of this was uninteresting to Freud who, as an atheist, viewed religion as pathology. Thus, Freud became viewed as the scientist while Jung acquired a reputation as a mystical flake.

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But Freud has had a far more extensive influence than Jung, and I don't think it would be an exaggeration to say that his mind was the most influential of the 20th century, commencing with the publication of The Interpretation of Dreams in 1900.

The primary thing to understand about Freud is that his work can be read very differently from the way it's represented in the formal canon of psychoanalysis, as science — or in the equally predictable canon of criticism of his work, as pseudo-science. I always cite the following quote by Freud from a 1934 interview by Gianni Papini, an Italian journalist:

"Everybody thinks that I stand by the scientific character of my work and that my principal scope lies in curing mental maladies. This is a terrible error that has prevailed for years and that I have been unable to set right. I am a scientist by necessity and not by vocation. I am really by nature an artist. And of this there lies an irrefutable proof, which is that in all countries in to which psychoanalysis has penetrated, it has been better understood and applied by writers and artists than by doctors. My books in fact more resemble works of imagination than treatises on pathology."

To actually read Freud — and he should be read in every literature class — is to encounter a brilliantly imaginative mind. While Jung undertook a more formal study of mythology, it was Freud who actually framed psychology in mythical terms by making the story of Oedipus its primary metaphor. His case histories read like fascinating myths themselves and, in terms of pure readability, display narrative gifts far superior to Jung's elliptical (but also fascinating) style.

Much of what has become dogmatized in Freud as fixed concepts is the result of the committee assembled to formally translate his work in the Standard Edition. It is no secret that the translators attempted to make the work seem as "scientific" as possible. Thus, many of Freud's actually mysterious concepts, including the structure of the ego, were subjected to profound reductionism. Many of his utterly bizarre flights of imagination were eliminated from the text, re-interpreted more acceptably or consigned to the status of footnotes.

For that reason, Penguin is publishing an entirely new translation of Freud's work next year. The translations are being made by literary types who have a much higher tolerance for the poetic and ambiguous meanings  of Freud's concepts. Naturally, the  psychoanalytical institutes oppose the new translations.

But why read Freud in any case?

Because he understood, even if he went overboard, that sexual repression has been an enormously damaging effect of modern life.

Because, through his notion of the unconscious, he teaches us that things are never completely as they seem on  the surface.

Because he stands for the capacity of human beings to make meaning out of their suffering rather than to spiritualize or eliminate it.

Because he understood that the psyche and the body cannot be separated.

Because he teaches us that the past lives with us in the present. As such, he understood completely that memory is in service to the present and is heavily infused with fantasy.

I could go on, but primarily I recommend you read Freud for the structure of his thought and the brilliance of his imagining. Read him with an open mind and an imagination.


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Talk of the Town

Saturday August 26, 2000 12:04 am EDT
Why read Freud? | more...
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  string(4379) "A blockbuster civil rights lawsuit filed earlier this month has ripped the lid off an egregious case of racial and sexual discrimination by officials at the Atlanta-Fulton County Library System. On May 25, eight librarians were abruptly reassigned and demoted in a bizarre effort by library board Chairman William McClure, system Director Mary Hooker and others to impose diversity at the Central Library by, as the lawsuit quotes McClure, "getting rid of all the old, white women."Seven of the eight librarians were shipped out because they are white women. Another librarian, a black woman, was also reassigned when she objected to plans to remove her colleagues on the basis of race and gender.On Aug. 11, the eight women filed suit, charging McClure, Hooker and the entire library board with violating the white plaintiffs' 14th Amendment equal protection guarantees, and the black plaintiff's First Amendment right to free speech.McClure has denied the charges, telling the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that the plaintiffs were not reassigned based on race and describing the reorganization as "a business decision." But CL's review of the case files makes it clear that — assuming there's any justice left in the American legal system's strange hall of mirrors — the defendants will be hard pressed to refute the damning evidence against them.Concerned about the racial mix at the downtown branch, the board late last year told Hooker to create a system-wide list compiling the race, gender and job level of all managers and administrators. Hooker's Jan. 4 list found, among the system's 44 managers, 26 black females, 13 white females, four white males and one black male. (The breakdown was similar for administrators.)On Jan. 6, according to board meeting minutes, Vice-Chair Mary Ward spoke of the "problem of a white dominated administration" at Central. In a letter attached to the lawsuit, a former board member recalls Ward saying, at a meeting early this year, "There are too many white faces in management at the Central Library." McClure wanted something done.While Hooker had compiled the racial tally sheet in January, by spring she appears to have become concerned about possible legal fallout from reshuffling librarians along racial lines. In an April 13 memo, she urges McClure to "refrain from advancing the reorganization," warning of possibly "significant legal ramifications."On the same day, Hooker sent board members three newspaper articles detailing several reverse-discrimination cases against Fulton, including successful bias complaints by a white firefighter, a white deputy county manager and a group of white sheriff's deputies. (In 1998, the county paid $500,000 just to settle the firefighter's complaint.)Hooker forwarded the news clips with a simple "for your information," but her intent seems clear. Without directly contradicting McClure, she wanted to dissuade the board from precipitously reorganizing the Central Library — and adding yet another chapter to Fulton's growing reverse-discrimination saga.A day later, on April 14, Hooker called County Attorney June Green for an opinion. Green did not mince words in a reply memo: "The reorganization that has been proposed by the board will likely violate Fulton County Personnel Policies and Procedures."None of this, it seems, mattered to McClure, who wanted the white women out of Central — no ifs, ands, buts, county policies or constitutional niceties about it. In an April 17 letter, he ordered Hooker to proceed "in accordance with the timeline you established of April 2000." Six weeks later, the dirty business was done, the offending white faces scattered far and wide in branch libraries across the county.While it is all well and good to celebrate America's diversity, it is something wholly different and profoundly sinister to assign people to jobs based on race and gender in the name of diversity. Such schemes are anathema to the American system — and they are unconstitutional.The next time some pathetic, power-drunk board of public functionaries considers imposing diversity by decree, it would do well to listen to itself in Technicolor. Perhaps someday the very idea of complaining about "too many" whites or blacks or Hispanics will be foreign to us. Until then, there are the courts.Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@hotmail.com.


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  string(4648) "    Fulton targets whites (again)   2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Diversity debacle August 26 2000   Luke Boggs 1223535 2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00  A blockbuster civil rights lawsuit filed earlier this month has ripped the lid off an egregious case of racial and sexual discrimination by officials at the Atlanta-Fulton County Library System. On May 25, eight librarians were abruptly reassigned and demoted in a bizarre effort by library board Chairman William McClure, system Director Mary Hooker and others to impose diversity at the Central Library by, as the lawsuit quotes McClure, "getting rid of all the old, white women."Seven of the eight librarians were shipped out because they are white women. Another librarian, a black woman, was also reassigned when she objected to plans to remove her colleagues on the basis of race and gender.On Aug. 11, the eight women filed suit, charging McClure, Hooker and the entire library board with violating the white plaintiffs' 14th Amendment equal protection guarantees, and the black plaintiff's First Amendment right to free speech.McClure has denied the charges, telling the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that the plaintiffs were not reassigned based on race and describing the reorganization as "a business decision." But CL's review of the case files makes it clear that — assuming there's any justice left in the American legal system's strange hall of mirrors — the defendants will be hard pressed to refute the damning evidence against them.Concerned about the racial mix at the downtown branch, the board late last year told Hooker to create a system-wide list compiling the race, gender and job level of all managers and administrators. Hooker's Jan. 4 list found, among the system's 44 managers, 26 black females, 13 white females, four white males and one black male. (The breakdown was similar for administrators.)On Jan. 6, according to board meeting minutes, Vice-Chair Mary Ward spoke of the "problem of a white dominated administration" at Central. In a letter attached to the lawsuit, a former board member recalls Ward saying, at a meeting early this year, "There are too many white faces in management at the Central Library." McClure wanted something done.While Hooker had compiled the racial tally sheet in January, by spring she appears to have become concerned about possible legal fallout from reshuffling librarians along racial lines. In an April 13 memo, she urges McClure to "refrain from advancing the reorganization," warning of possibly "significant legal ramifications."On the same day, Hooker sent board members three newspaper articles detailing several reverse-discrimination cases against Fulton, including successful bias complaints by a white firefighter, a white deputy county manager and a group of white sheriff's deputies. (In 1998, the county paid $500,000 just to settle the firefighter's complaint.)Hooker forwarded the news clips with a simple "for your information," but her intent seems clear. Without directly contradicting McClure, she wanted to dissuade the board from precipitously reorganizing the Central Library — and adding yet another chapter to Fulton's growing reverse-discrimination saga.A day later, on April 14, Hooker called County Attorney June Green for an opinion. Green did not mince words in a reply memo: "The reorganization that has been proposed by the board will likely violate Fulton County Personnel Policies and Procedures."None of this, it seems, mattered to McClure, who wanted the white women out of Central — no ifs, ands, buts, county policies or constitutional niceties about it. In an April 17 letter, he ordered Hooker to proceed "in accordance with the timeline you established of April 2000." Six weeks later, the dirty business was done, the offending white faces scattered far and wide in branch libraries across the county.While it is all well and good to celebrate America's diversity, it is something wholly different and profoundly sinister to assign people to jobs based on race and gender in the name of diversity. Such schemes are anathema to the American system — and they are unconstitutional.The next time some pathetic, power-drunk board of public functionaries considers imposing diversity by decree, it would do well to listen to itself in Technicolor. Perhaps someday the very idea of complaining about "too many" whites or blacks or Hispanics will be foreign to us. Until then, there are the courts.Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@hotmail.com.


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Talk of the Town

Saturday August 26, 2000 12:04 am EDT
Fulton targets whites (again) | more...
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  string(3596) "What could Mack Mattingly be thinking?  Mattingly, the Republican former senator who is challenging Zell Miller for the U.S. Senate seat vacated by the death of Paul Coverdell, is lagging miserably in the early polls, having trouble raising money, and is generally considered by most pundits to be a long-shot candidate.

Why is he running?

Such a question is rarely asked in politics, mainly because so many unlikely winners have emerged in recent political history, confounding the so-called experts. But this election is different. It's a special statewide election, and Zell Miller is running in it.

In the days following Sen. Coverdell's untimely death, a bruising battle erupted to decide who the party would annoint.  State GOP Director Chuck Clay made it known early on that he believed only a single, well-known candidate would be able to compete seriously against Miller, the wildly popular former governor appointed to the seat by Gov. Roy Barnes. Lewis Jordan, the former chairman of ValuJet Airlines and a Republican contributor, wanted to be that candidate.

Jordan was heavily schmoozed by Georgia's Republican leadership immediately after Coverdell's death, most likely because of his past financial support for Republican candidates. But as soon as Mattingly emerged and indicated a willingness to challenge Miller, state Republicans dropped Jordan like a hot potato. Some reportedly admonished Jordan to drop out. Jordan was apparently incensed at the slight, and privately grumbled afterward about the poor treatment he received.

But Jordan's aggravation was merely a surface distraction. Mattingly, who has much better statewide name recognition, may have little chance of besting Miller in November, but the GOP was right to send its best hope into the ring, even if he is unlikely to win. In the grand scheme of state Republican politics, Mack Mattingly is expendable. He isn't a rising star, but rather one whose time has already come and gone.

So perhaps Mattingly is running to answer the call that no other credible candidate would heed. Since none of Georgia's eight Republican congressmen were willing to enter the race and no other party leader would step to the plate, the GOP desperately needed someone who could thwart the perception that it is essentially devoid of viable, big-name talent.

Whatever the reason Mattingly decided to run, he is to be pitied for the fate that he will most certainly meet. Zell Miller is Georgia's political Lion of Judah, and a veritable monster of a senatorial candidate. Almost nobody on the Republican side of the aisle, no matter their credentials, could be expected to mount a serious threat against him.

According to current polls, there is every reason to believe that Mattingly could receive in excess of 30 percent of the vote this November, a far cry from his history-making victory in 1980 over longtime Democratic Sen. Herman Talmadge.

Which brings me back to my original question: What is Mack Mattingly thinking?

Here is a man who has a comfortable life down on tony St. Simon's Island, a boatload of political connections, and the clout to influence state and national GOP politics for years to come. A humiliating blowout at the hands of Zell Miller can only do damage to his reputation — which puts Georgia's GOP at the added disadvantage of diminishing the luster of one of its top operatives.

The world may never know what motivated Mattingly to embark on what is sure to be a suicide mission. But one thing is for sure: Zell Miller will win this election hands down, with no problem whatsoever.


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  string(3591) "What could Mack Mattingly be thinking?  Mattingly, the Republican former senator who is challenging Zell Miller for the U.S. Senate seat vacated by the death of Paul Coverdell, is lagging miserably in the early polls, having trouble raising money, and is generally considered by most pundits to be a long-shot candidate.

Why is he running?

Such a question is rarely asked in politics, mainly because so many unlikely winners have emerged in recent political history, confounding the so-called experts. But this election is different. It's a special statewide election, and Zell Miller is running in it.

In the days following Sen. Coverdell's untimely death, a bruising battle erupted to decide who the party would annoint.  State GOP Director Chuck Clay made it known early on that he believed only a single, well-known candidate would be able to compete seriously against Miller, the wildly popular former governor appointed to the seat by Gov. Roy Barnes. Lewis Jordan, the former chairman of ValuJet Airlines and a Republican contributor, wanted to be that candidate.

Jordan was heavily schmoozed by Georgia's Republican leadership immediately after Coverdell's death, most likely because of his past financial support for Republican candidates. But as soon as Mattingly emerged and indicated a willingness to challenge Miller, state Republicans dropped Jordan like a hot potato. Some reportedly admonished Jordan to drop out. Jordan was apparently incensed at the slight, and privately grumbled afterward about the poor treatment he received.

But Jordan's aggravation was merely a surface distraction. Mattingly, who has much better statewide name recognition, may have little chance of besting Miller in November, but the GOP was right to send its best hope into the ring, even if he is unlikely to win. In the grand scheme of state Republican politics, Mack Mattingly is expendable. He isn't a rising star, but rather one whose time has already come and gone.

So perhaps Mattingly is running to answer the call that no other credible candidate would heed. Since none of Georgia's eight Republican congressmen were willing to enter the race and no other party leader would step to the plate, the GOP desperately needed someone who could thwart the perception that it is essentially devoid of viable, big-name talent.

Whatever the reason Mattingly decided to run, he is to be pitied for the fate that he will most certainly meet. Zell Miller is Georgia's political Lion of Judah, and a veritable monster of a senatorial candidate. Almost nobody on the Republican side of the aisle, no matter their credentials, could be expected to mount a serious threat against him.

According to current polls, there is every reason to believe that Mattingly could receive in excess of 30 percent of the vote this November, a far cry from his history-making victory in 1980 over longtime Democratic Sen. Herman Talmadge.

Which brings me back to my original question: What is Mack Mattingly thinking?

Here is a man who has a comfortable life down on tony St. Simon's Island, a boatload of political connections, and the clout to influence state and national GOP politics for years to come. A humiliating blowout at the hands of Zell Miller can only do damage to his reputation -- which puts Georgia's GOP at the added disadvantage of diminishing the luster of one of its top operatives.

The world may never know what motivated Mattingly to embark on what is sure to be a suicide mission. But one thing is for sure: Zell Miller will win this election hands down, with no problem whatsoever.


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  string(3894) "    Former GOP senator simply cannon fodder for state Dems' guns   2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Mack vs. Goliath August 26 2000   Jeff Berry 1223551 2000-08-26T04:04:00+00:00  What could Mack Mattingly be thinking?  Mattingly, the Republican former senator who is challenging Zell Miller for the U.S. Senate seat vacated by the death of Paul Coverdell, is lagging miserably in the early polls, having trouble raising money, and is generally considered by most pundits to be a long-shot candidate.

Why is he running?

Such a question is rarely asked in politics, mainly because so many unlikely winners have emerged in recent political history, confounding the so-called experts. But this election is different. It's a special statewide election, and Zell Miller is running in it.

In the days following Sen. Coverdell's untimely death, a bruising battle erupted to decide who the party would annoint.  State GOP Director Chuck Clay made it known early on that he believed only a single, well-known candidate would be able to compete seriously against Miller, the wildly popular former governor appointed to the seat by Gov. Roy Barnes. Lewis Jordan, the former chairman of ValuJet Airlines and a Republican contributor, wanted to be that candidate.

Jordan was heavily schmoozed by Georgia's Republican leadership immediately after Coverdell's death, most likely because of his past financial support for Republican candidates. But as soon as Mattingly emerged and indicated a willingness to challenge Miller, state Republicans dropped Jordan like a hot potato. Some reportedly admonished Jordan to drop out. Jordan was apparently incensed at the slight, and privately grumbled afterward about the poor treatment he received.

But Jordan's aggravation was merely a surface distraction. Mattingly, who has much better statewide name recognition, may have little chance of besting Miller in November, but the GOP was right to send its best hope into the ring, even if he is unlikely to win. In the grand scheme of state Republican politics, Mack Mattingly is expendable. He isn't a rising star, but rather one whose time has already come and gone.

So perhaps Mattingly is running to answer the call that no other credible candidate would heed. Since none of Georgia's eight Republican congressmen were willing to enter the race and no other party leader would step to the plate, the GOP desperately needed someone who could thwart the perception that it is essentially devoid of viable, big-name talent.

Whatever the reason Mattingly decided to run, he is to be pitied for the fate that he will most certainly meet. Zell Miller is Georgia's political Lion of Judah, and a veritable monster of a senatorial candidate. Almost nobody on the Republican side of the aisle, no matter their credentials, could be expected to mount a serious threat against him.

According to current polls, there is every reason to believe that Mattingly could receive in excess of 30 percent of the vote this November, a far cry from his history-making victory in 1980 over longtime Democratic Sen. Herman Talmadge.

Which brings me back to my original question: What is Mack Mattingly thinking?

Here is a man who has a comfortable life down on tony St. Simon's Island, a boatload of political connections, and the clout to influence state and national GOP politics for years to come. A humiliating blowout at the hands of Zell Miller can only do damage to his reputation — which puts Georgia's GOP at the added disadvantage of diminishing the luster of one of its top operatives.

The world may never know what motivated Mattingly to embark on what is sure to be a suicide mission. But one thing is for sure: Zell Miller will win this election hands down, with no problem whatsoever.


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Talk of the Town

Saturday August 26, 2000 12:04 am EDT
Former GOP senator simply cannon fodder for state Dems' guns | more...
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  string(4242) "Despite the best efforts of social scientists, crime and punishment has never been complicated business, and two recent news reports confirm what common sense has been telling us all along. If you want to reduce crime, focus on controlling criminals, not average citizens.  Early this month, the New York Times reported that America's prison population — also known as the number of killers, rapists, armed robbers and drug pushers safely cut off from the rest of us — expanded again last year, by 3.4 percent.With crime declining over the past eight years, the paper seemed puzzled by the continuing growth in the prison population. The headline summed it up: "Number in Prison Population Grows Despite Crime Reduction."A better headline might have explained, "Number in Prison Population Grows in Tandem with Crime Rate Decline."There is no contradiction, after all, between a rising prison population and a falling crime rate. In recent years, crime has declined, not disappeared. Innocents continue to be robbed, raped and killed every day. Predators continue to be brought to justice. And, even with crime rates down, the number of criminals going into prison is greater than the number coming out.Instead of a contradiction, there is a straightforward connection between incarceration and crime rates: The two are inversely related, with one tending to go up as the other comes down.America's incarceration rate has quadrupled since 1980. With so many more lawbreakers behind bars, it should be no surprise that crime rates have declined. But it is surprising — at least to the Times' liberal news staff. Trying to refute the obvious connection, the reporter noted that growth in the nation's prison population "hit a high of 8.7 percent in 1994, well after the crime wave began to decline in 1991."Yet, growth in the overall prison population is a function not only of the number of people entering the system but also the number exiting. As such, get-tough sentencing policies enacted well before 1994 contributed to that year's steep rise in prison population — and the ongoing slide in crime rates.Even as the Times was unwittingly making the case for America's high rate of incarceration, the Journal of the American Medical Association was reporting that restrictions imposed by the Brady gun law on average citizens were utterly ineffectual in reducing firearm homicides.Passed with great fanfare in 1993 and relentlessly trumpeted by Bill Clinton and Al Gore ever since, the Brady Act requires gun retailers across the country to impose a five-day waiting period on handgun purchases and conduct background checks of all buyers.By comparing post-Brady homicide rates in states where the restrictions were new to rates in states with similar, existing restrictions, study authors Jens Ludwig and Philip J. Cook found "no evidence that implementation of the Brady Act was associated with a reduction in homicide rates."The study won't dissuade gun control advocates, who remain convinced that limiting legal access to firearms for everyone will reduce gun crime. This notion is based not on hard evidence — as the JAMA study shows — but on the flawed assumption that every would-be gun buyer in America is a potential killer. And that just isn't so.This fall, the presidential election will offer voters a real choice on the issues of gun control and crime prevention.In recent years, crime has gone down in spite of Clinton Administration policies that hassle gun buyers while going soft on gun criminals. The president made soccer moms swoon with empty blather about "protecting our kids," but the hard truth is that federal gun prosecutions plunged 46 percent between 1992 and 1998.Gore would see Clinton's approach and raise him big time. He's vowing to ban inexpensive handguns, license handgun owners and compile a federal database of all new gun buyers.George W. Bush, on the other hand, would bring a more thoughtful approach to crime and guns, taking aim at criminals with aggressive enforcement of current gun laws while giving law-abiding gun buyers a break with instant background checks, not waiting periods.Sounds like a winner to me.Contact Luke Boggs at lukeboggs@hotmail.com


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  string(4362) "Despite the best efforts of social scientists, crime and punishment has never been complicated business, and two recent news reports confirm what common sense has been telling us all along. If you want to reduce crime, focus on controlling criminals, not average citizens.  Early this month, the ''New York Times'' reported that America's prison population -- also known as the number of killers, rapists, armed robbers and drug pushers safely cut off from the rest of us -- expanded again last year, by 3.4 percent.%%%%%%With crime declining over the past eight years, the paper seemed puzzled by the continuing growth in the prison population. The headline summed it up: "Number in Prison Population Grows Despite Crime Reduction."%%%%%%A better headline might have explained, "Number in Prison Population Grows in Tandem with Crime Rate Decline."%%%%%%There is no contradiction, after all, between a rising prison population and a falling crime rate. In recent years, crime has declined, not disappeared. Innocents continue to be robbed, raped and killed every day. Predators continue to be brought to justice. And, even with crime rates down, the number of criminals going into prison is greater than the number coming out.%%%%%%Instead of a contradiction, there is a straightforward connection between incarceration and crime rates: The two are inversely related, with one tending to go up as the other comes down.%%%%%%America's incarceration rate has quadrupled since 1980. With so many more lawbreakers behind bars, it should be no surprise that crime rates have declined. But it is surprising -- at least to the ''Times''' liberal news staff. Trying to refute the obvious connection, the reporter noted that growth in the nation's prison population "hit a high of 8.7 percent in 1994, well after the crime wave [[began] to decline in 1991."%%%%%%Yet, growth in the overall prison population is a function not only of the number of people entering the system but also the number exiting. As such, get-tough sentencing policies enacted well before 1994 contributed to that year's steep rise in prison population -- and the ongoing slide in crime rates.%%%%%%Even as the ''Times'' was unwittingly making the case for America's high rate of incarceration, the ''Journal of the American Medical Association'' was reporting that restrictions imposed by the Brady gun law on average citizens were utterly ineffectual in reducing firearm homicides.%%%%%%Passed with great fanfare in 1993 and relentlessly trumpeted by Bill Clinton and Al Gore ever since, the Brady Act requires gun retailers across the country to impose a five-day waiting period on handgun purchases and conduct background checks of all buyers.%%%%%%By comparing post-Brady homicide rates in states where the restrictions were new to rates in states with similar, existing restrictions, study authors Jens Ludwig and Philip J. Cook found "no evidence that implementation of the Brady Act was associated with a reduction in homicide rates."%%%%%%The study won't dissuade gun control advocates, who remain convinced that limiting legal access to firearms for everyone will reduce gun crime. This notion is based not on hard evidence -- as the JAMA study shows -- but on the flawed assumption that every would-be gun buyer in America is a potential killer. And that just isn't so.%%%%%%This fall, the presidential election will offer voters a real choice on the issues of gun control and crime prevention.%%%%%%In recent years, crime has gone down in spite of Clinton Administration policies that hassle gun buyers while going soft on gun criminals. The president made soccer moms swoon with empty blather about "protecting our kids," but the hard truth is that federal gun prosecutions plunged 46 percent between 1992 and 1998.%%%%%%Gore would see Clinton's approach and raise him big time. He's vowing to ban inexpensive handguns, license handgun owners and compile a federal database of all new gun buyers.%%%%%%George W. Bush, on the other hand, would bring a more thoughtful approach to crime and guns, taking aim at criminals with aggressive enforcement of current gun laws while giving law-abiding gun buyers a break with instant background checks, not waiting periods.%%%%%%Sounds like a winner to me.%%%%%%''Contact Luke Boggs at [mailto:lukeboggs@hotmail.com|lukeboggs@hotmail.com]''


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Talk of the Town

Saturday August 19, 2000 12:04 am EDT
Focus on criminals, not buyers | more...
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  string(3942) "Atlantis goes hip-hop1 celeb, 3 panelists make nice to LangBY LANG WHITAKER

It's been three years since the Atlantis Music Conference hit town, and several bands have gotten major label deals as a result. The weekend-long gig is a mixture of concerts and panels. This year, for the first time, extensive attention was given to Atlanta's booming urban music scene. Months ago, I accepted an invitation to serve on the "Covering Hip-Hop, Whose Story Is It Anyway?" panel Aug. 11 at Studio Central downtown. A few weeks before the panel took place, the Atlanta Press Club sent out flyers announcing the panel, noting that conversation would focus on the question: "Can a predominantly white media industry fairly cover a predominantly black music genre?" Though I thought the panel was supposed to be about the music and not the color, I went ahead with my plans to participate. I did find it odd that my name was listed first on the flyer. "Come needle the white boy!" was all that was missing.

When the event finally went down last weekend, my anxieties were running high. But it went smoothly. CL's own Rhonda Baraka moderated the panel impeccably; fellow panelists, AJC writer Sonia Murray and Noontime Recordings' Johnathan Floyd, contributed to the exchange.

Everyone seemed to quickly dismiss the race card as irrelevant. My favorite moment: Michael Fields, Southern bureau chief for National Public Radio stood up and asked a question about the hip-hop culture, mentioning "one of the Geto Boyz, I believe it was the short gentleman," perhaps marking the first time that midget rapper Bushwick Bill has ever been referred to as a gentleman.

Return of the Fan?: WCNN 680's plans to develop an all-black talk radio format have fallen by the wayside. The station recently announced plans to resurrect the all-sports format it popularized in the early '90s.

Rumor has WCNN trying to woo popular 790 the Zone anchor Chris Dimino, though Dimino has told friends that he isn't going anywhere.

To compete with the Zone, WCNN is calling in the big guns: former Thrashers play-by-play announcer Scott Ferrall's syndicated show from L.A. will reportedly be part of the lineup, with Ferrall making bi-weekly visits to Atlanta to broadcast live.

Twin Peaks: I print a lot of celebrity sleaze, but celebs can occasionally help the little guys. Last week, I made a jaunt to New York City to attend a party thrown by Paper magazine, where I frequently contribute, at Gotham hotspot Lotus. I was assured I'd have no problem getting in.

Isabel and I showed up at 11 p.m. and found a line stretching from the door far down the block. The emotionless doorman told me the line was people on the guest list and to wait my turn. After standing in the same spot for about 15 minutes, we approached the door gestapo one more time before calling it a night; we were turned away again. But as we left, we noticed actor Kyle McLachlan leaving the club along with his girlfriend, NYC publicist Desiree Gruber, who is a lifelong friend of Atlanta publicist Liz Lapidus. Invoking Lapidus' name, we introduced ourselves to the power duo and explained our dilemma. McLachlan said, "Come with me," and led us to the door. We all immediately marched in, right past the poor souls stuck in line. I informed Kyle that from now on, whenever I go out, I'll need his services. He laughed and agreed to lend his fame whenever.

This and that: Designer Keith Brown's website, www. hushbox.com, is almost ready to launch. The site will be a Web-based version of his popular e-mail list of Atlanta people and events. ... If you have a cell phone, check out www.yourmobile.com for a list of thousands of song titles, from Sinatra to Sisqo, that you can have sent to your cell phone to replace the standard boring ringing sounds. Best of all, it's free. ... I'm out.

What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623 x.1502 or lang@creativeloafing.com.


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  string(4119) "Atlantis goes hip-hop1 celeb, 3 panelists make nice to LangBY LANG WHITAKER

It's been three years since the Atlantis Music Conference hit town, and several bands have gotten major label deals as a result. The weekend-long gig is a mixture of concerts and panels. This year, for the first time, extensive attention was given to Atlanta's booming urban music scene. Months ago, I accepted an invitation to serve on the "Covering Hip-Hop, Whose Story Is It Anyway?" panel Aug. 11 at Studio Central downtown. A few weeks before the panel took place, the Atlanta Press Club sent out flyers announcing the panel, noting that conversation would focus on the question: "Can a predominantly white media industry fairly cover a predominantly black music genre?" Though I thought the panel was supposed to be about the music and not the color, I went ahead with my plans to participate. I did find it odd that my name was listed first on the flyer. "Come needle the white boy!" was all that was missing.

When the event finally went down last weekend, my anxieties were running high. But it went smoothly. ''CL'''s own __Rhonda Baraka__ moderated the panel impeccably; fellow panelists, ''AJC'' writer __Sonia Murray__ and Noontime Recordings' __Johnathan Floyd__, contributed to the exchange.

Everyone seemed to quickly dismiss the race card as irrelevant. My favorite moment: __Michael Fields__, Southern bureau chief for National Public Radio stood up and asked a question about the hip-hop culture, mentioning "one of the Geto Boyz, I believe it was the short gentleman," perhaps marking the first time that midget rapper __Bushwick Bill__ has ever been referred to as a gentleman.

__''Return of the Fan?''__: WCNN 680's plans to develop an all-black talk radio format have fallen by the wayside. The station recently announced plans to resurrect the all-sports format it popularized in the early '90s.

Rumor has WCNN trying to woo popular 790 the Zone anchor __Chris Dimino__, though Dimino has told friends that he isn't going anywhere.

To compete with the Zone, WCNN is calling in the big guns: former Thrashers play-by-play announcer __Scott Ferrall__'s syndicated show from L.A. will reportedly be part of the lineup, with Ferrall making bi-weekly visits to Atlanta to broadcast live.

__''Twin Peaks''__: I print a lot of celebrity sleaze, but celebs can occasionally help the little guys. Last week, I made a jaunt to New York City to attend a party thrown by ''Paper'' magazine, where I frequently contribute, at Gotham hotspot Lotus. I was assured I'd have no problem getting in.

Isabel and I showed up at 11 p.m. and found a line stretching from the door far down the block. The emotionless doorman told me the line was people on the guest list and to wait my turn. After standing in the same spot for about 15 minutes, we approached the door gestapo one more time before calling it a night; we were turned away again. But as we left, we noticed actor __Kyle McLachlan__ leaving the club along with his girlfriend, NYC publicist __Desiree Gruber__, who is a lifelong friend of Atlanta publicist __Liz Lapidus__. Invoking Lapidus' name, we introduced ourselves to the power duo and explained our dilemma. McLachlan said, "Come with me," and led us to the door. We all immediately marched in, right past the poor souls stuck in line. I informed Kyle that from now on, whenever I go out, I'll need his services. He laughed and agreed to lend his fame whenever.

__''This and that''__: Designer __Keith Brown__'s website, www. [http://hushbox.com/|hushbox.com], is almost ready to launch. The site will be a Web-based version of his popular e-mail list of Atlanta people and events. ... If you have a cell phone, check out [http://www.yourmobile.com/|www.yourmobile.com] for a list of thousands of song titles, from __Sinatra__ to __Sisqo__, that you can have sent to your cell phone to replace the standard boring ringing sounds. Best of all, it's free. ... I'm out.

''What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623 x.1502 or [mailto:lang@creativeloafing.com|lang@creativeloafing.com].''


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  string(4315) "   atlantis conference 1 celeb, 3 panelists make nice to Lang   2000-08-19T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Atlantis goes hip-hop August 19 2000 ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Lang Whitaker 1223537 2000-08-19T04:04:00+00:00  Atlantis goes hip-hop1 celeb, 3 panelists make nice to LangBY LANG WHITAKER

It's been three years since the Atlantis Music Conference hit town, and several bands have gotten major label deals as a result. The weekend-long gig is a mixture of concerts and panels. This year, for the first time, extensive attention was given to Atlanta's booming urban music scene. Months ago, I accepted an invitation to serve on the "Covering Hip-Hop, Whose Story Is It Anyway?" panel Aug. 11 at Studio Central downtown. A few weeks before the panel took place, the Atlanta Press Club sent out flyers announcing the panel, noting that conversation would focus on the question: "Can a predominantly white media industry fairly cover a predominantly black music genre?" Though I thought the panel was supposed to be about the music and not the color, I went ahead with my plans to participate. I did find it odd that my name was listed first on the flyer. "Come needle the white boy!" was all that was missing.

When the event finally went down last weekend, my anxieties were running high. But it went smoothly. CL's own Rhonda Baraka moderated the panel impeccably; fellow panelists, AJC writer Sonia Murray and Noontime Recordings' Johnathan Floyd, contributed to the exchange.

Everyone seemed to quickly dismiss the race card as irrelevant. My favorite moment: Michael Fields, Southern bureau chief for National Public Radio stood up and asked a question about the hip-hop culture, mentioning "one of the Geto Boyz, I believe it was the short gentleman," perhaps marking the first time that midget rapper Bushwick Bill has ever been referred to as a gentleman.

Return of the Fan?: WCNN 680's plans to develop an all-black talk radio format have fallen by the wayside. The station recently announced plans to resurrect the all-sports format it popularized in the early '90s.

Rumor has WCNN trying to woo popular 790 the Zone anchor Chris Dimino, though Dimino has told friends that he isn't going anywhere.

To compete with the Zone, WCNN is calling in the big guns: former Thrashers play-by-play announcer Scott Ferrall's syndicated show from L.A. will reportedly be part of the lineup, with Ferrall making bi-weekly visits to Atlanta to broadcast live.

Twin Peaks: I print a lot of celebrity sleaze, but celebs can occasionally help the little guys. Last week, I made a jaunt to New York City to attend a party thrown by Paper magazine, where I frequently contribute, at Gotham hotspot Lotus. I was assured I'd have no problem getting in.

Isabel and I showed up at 11 p.m. and found a line stretching from the door far down the block. The emotionless doorman told me the line was people on the guest list and to wait my turn. After standing in the same spot for about 15 minutes, we approached the door gestapo one more time before calling it a night; we were turned away again. But as we left, we noticed actor Kyle McLachlan leaving the club along with his girlfriend, NYC publicist Desiree Gruber, who is a lifelong friend of Atlanta publicist Liz Lapidus. Invoking Lapidus' name, we introduced ourselves to the power duo and explained our dilemma. McLachlan said, "Come with me," and led us to the door. We all immediately marched in, right past the poor souls stuck in line. I informed Kyle that from now on, whenever I go out, I'll need his services. He laughed and agreed to lend his fame whenever.

This and that: Designer Keith Brown's website, www. hushbox.com, is almost ready to launch. The site will be a Web-based version of his popular e-mail list of Atlanta people and events. ... If you have a cell phone, check out www.yourmobile.com for a list of thousands of song titles, from Sinatra to Sisqo, that you can have sent to your cell phone to replace the standard boring ringing sounds. Best of all, it's free. ... I'm out.

What's up, Atlanta? Hit me up at 404-688-5623 x.1502 or lang@creativeloafing.com.


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Talk of the Town, Festivals

Saturday August 19, 2000 12:04 am EDT
1 celeb, 3 panelists make nice to Lang | more...
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Talk of the Town

Saturday August 19, 2000 12:04 am EDT
image-1?image-2?image-3?image-4?image-5 | more...