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The Growlers' Brooks Nielsen dips into the past to discuss their evolution in light of "Chinese Fountain" release

The Growlers’ frontman shares the enigmatic Chinese Fountain" vision while reminiscing about his cactus farming past and DIY warehouse shows."

Image

  • Courtesy of the Growlers



Little did I know that the Growlers formed in 2006 after Brooks Nielsen and Matt Taylor quit their jobs as cactus farmers, after being given a guitar by their supervisor, Dick, as an employee gift, and then established the band after eating a hallucinogenic cactus. Actually, that was a total lie. The story had me convinced, but luckily, I set the record straight and learned that the West Coast tropical-gypsy-rock quintet originated with a DIY mentality.

As it turns out, the Growlers’ frontman, Brooks Nielsen, is just as laidback and happy-go-lucky as you’d expect from any Costa Mesa native. In an effort to grow as a band, the Growlers’ abandoned the suburban cage, and hunted out warehouse spaces to rent for DIY shows. “Everyone thought it was a stupid idea, saying how we need insurance, or we’re gonna get sued,” Nielsen recalls, however “I realized right away that it was going to be impossible to make music in a residential neighborhood. We started renting warehouses, building up stages, and made studios to record. Then, we just crammed it full of kids who were too young to drink and allowed everyone do whatever they wanted to do in there.”

Although cops would break up the parties before their band could even perform half of the time, promoters got word and figured that if they could fill the rooms of warehouses, then they should be playing venues. From then on, Nielsen and the rest of band “started getting into the crazy world.”

The band has dedicated their lifestyle into a busy album-then-tour pattern. “When we’re not working on the road we’re making records, so it’s very back and forth. I’ve never really made plans with this band; it’s more of an unplanned joy ride.” Unplanned or not, the joy ride seems to be continuously kicked into high gear.

Currently, the Growlers just wrapped up their U.S. tour promoting their album, Chinese Fountain, which released Sept. 23, the day after their Atlanta show at the Earl. Even though they have retired their infamous tour vehicle of choice— a yellow school bus — and have “buried it in the ground,” they’ve kept the playful aura alive by bringing along performers from all walks of life; a numb chucks circus performer, a frisky drag queen, and a man who swirls a Chinese Dragon amidst the crowd. Nielsen admits “it’s kind of a freak show.”

Their recent Atlanta performance sold out and came equipped with the presence of a boozed-up drag queen—who spent most of the time crowd-surfing with her 10-pound go-go boots on and flinging squash and other vegetables in the air.



? ? ?
According to Nielsen, Atlanta is a change of pace for the band because it’s a city where “people are a lot more slow and aren’t running around like their heads fell off.” They mostly look forward to swimming, eating fried chicken, and “all of that good ol’ southern cookin” whenever they travel to the Big Peach.

Nielsen, the self-proclaimed “really old soul” says that the album is more “professional” and contains “a lot better production.” However, the Growlers’ support a cornucopia of styles with an enigmatic sphere, which “isn’t too far off the grid from what they’ve always done.” After purchasing Chinese Fountain, I debated on whether I should order a Life Alert in fear that I may collapse from an overwhelming state of wonderment. Songs melt with sorrow-filled poeticism. Imagine if kaleidoscopes could generate soothing reverbs and forensic, purring echoes with chanting gypsy ballads while watching the jewel-toned crystals trickle down and spiral in sync through the lens.

Much like the wordplay on the “Magnificent Sadness” track, “Dull Boy” contributes to other sensory imbalances; a paradoxical combo of upbeat, surf-rock melodies thwarted by discomforting lines like “finally the bottles bone dry with a message inside that says that I’m gone Because I’m a dull boy with a dead dream searching for a pulse.” This is just one of many tracks that sends my emotions on a nosedive into a sea of bittersweet confusion, which isn’t any different to the reactions the Growlers’ discography. You would think that keeping the same style throughout their music-making journey would become monotonous— boring even—but it’s neither. They know what suits them, they absorb it, they stick with it, and they deliver songs that sweep you off your feet while simultaneously crushing your heart.

More additions have been made to their European tour, where they will be accompanying some of Atlanta’s most celebrated ladies, the Coathangers. The Growlers and the Coathangers are teaming up in Charleroi, Belgium in late November for a showcase that will certainly impress the pants off everyone, or maybe you if you happen to be in town. ‘Til then, I’ll be flipping and reflipping Chinese Fountain over until my roommate can no longer bear it.



More By This Writer

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For Atlanta's consumer culture scene, the couple agrees that there is positive upswing for small stores like theirs, and especially pop-ups. "Stores like us are trailblazing their neighborhoods" Kyle says. "They're catering to their own pockets, and the fact that the city can support the small-run businesses and their movement within the first year of opening is great."

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When choosing brands such as Savannah, Ga.-based men's grooming line Prospector Co., and products from design and illustration hub Methane Studios, the Taylors are drawn to other small business ventures. The couple takes pride in doing proper research while simultaneously forming a connection behind each brand's story — such as the husband-and-wife team behind the custom denim line [http://www.rogueterritory.com/|Rogue Territory]. Also, the raw denim brand [http://www.raleighworkshop.com/the-workshop-1|Raleigh Workshop] was an instant favorite between the owners, particularly because it's the only manufacturer of its kind that starts and ends in the same state.

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When choosing brands such as Savannah, Ga.-based men's grooming line Prospector Co., and products from design and illustration hub Methane Studios, the Taylors are drawn to other small business ventures. The couple takes pride in doing proper research while simultaneously forming a connection behind each brand's story — such as the husband-and-wife team behind the custom denim line Rogue Territory. Also, the raw denim brand Raleigh Workshop was an instant favorite between the owners, particularly because it's the only manufacturer of its kind that starts and ends in the same state.

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Tuesday March 10, 2015 04:00 am EDT
Owners are bringing clothing boutique and cafe to Old Fourth Ward | more...
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  string(4311) "Lovebirds turned entrepreneurs, Jim Chambers and Camryn Park opened the Henry & June coffee shop and clothing boutique in late July 2014. Fittingly, they met while sipping the jittery elixir at Octane Coffee in Grant Park. As the story goes, Chambers, a Brooklyn-born writer and coffee aficionado, was after his daily caffeine fix when a fiery photographer grabbed his attention. He remembers seeing Park sitting at the end of the counter. "I went to a person I knew who worked there and said I was going to fall in love with the redhead at the end of the bar," Chambers says. Call it love-at-first-sip or irony, but either way the duo hit it off quickly. Soon enough, their creative spirits combined in pursuit of giving Atlanta a taste of coffee alongside an impressive spread of high-end apparel.

In an effort to share their artistic endeavors and combine them into a possible joint venture, Chambers and Park set out on a cross-country road trip to narrow their vision and find their niche in a more concrete way.

"We ended up driving to Big Sur in California," Chambers says, "and went to the Henry Miller Memorial Library for Valentine's Day. On the way, we planned out stopping at coffee shops and boutiques to do research."

Literary playboy Henry Miller is one of Chambers' writing idols, and the author's bohemian love triangle with June Mansfield and French erotic novelist Anaïs Nin is where Chambers and Park eventually found the inspiration for the shop's name.

Chambers and Park were encouraged by employees at Huckleberry Roasters in Denver to visit Steadbrook, a nearby coffee bar and boutique. At Steadbrook, their vision became tangible: They wanted to test the boundaries of Atlanta's fashion and roast offerings.

"We understood that there is a void in Atlanta in terms of different types of roasters being obtainable," Chambers says. "Steadbrook had a similar bar setup and sold high-end men's street wear. It was a huge inspiration for us, but we wanted to have a more dynamic coffee bar with a full men's and women's upscale boutique."

For Henry & June, Chambers and Park chose collections from Atlanta designers Megan Huntz and Abbey Glass, along with such high-end brands as Creatures of Comfort and Raquel Allegra. The shop also features international labels including Native Youth (British), Henrik Vibskov (Danish), and Margaux Lonnberg (French), which appear throughout the system of stunning copper pipe racks and hairpin-leg wood shelving realized by locals including Jane Garver, Matix woodworking, and Grafite Design.

Henry & June, which nestles along a gated courtyard in Virginia-Highland, proves to be a tempting haven for fashion and coffee addicts. While customers wait on their espressos, they can peruse clothes and accessories that are presented with a premeditated aesthetic and fluency.

The space's interior design carries a minimalist style with personal touches peppered throughout: a customized neon sign that reads "Of Course" in Chambers' mother's handwriting, for example. On the walls are photographs of Paris shot by Brassaï, images that inspired Henry Miller while he was writing, as well as Park's personal vintage camera collection, a blown-up 1908 corset X-ray by Dr. Ludovic O'Followell, and an Art Nouveau-inspired street sign by local artist Peter Ferrari.

Behind the bar is the store's bean chemist, Daniel Mueller, who brings quirky espresso-concocting skills to the shop. Decisions on roasting styles and roasting vendors led Chambers and Park to Nashville-based roasters CREMA, as they both liked everything it offered. However they opted for a diverse selection —"a coffee gallery"— to cater to bean enthusiasts.

"People come in, we brew their coffee, and they sort of peruse around," Park says. "Instead of this being just another empty boutique waiting for the next person to come in, we have people coming in frequently, which keeps it more lively and fun, which is what we want it to be — a lifestyle place."

Whatever the descriptor, to Chambers and Park, they successfully fill a void in the city. "We're not trying to be a high-volume shop selling 500 cups of coffee every day," Chambers says. "We're a small business in a small strip with a wonderful set of stores in an area that deserves revamping.""
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In an effort to share their artistic endeavors and combine them into a possible joint venture, Chambers and Park set out on a cross-country road trip to narrow their vision and find their niche in a more concrete way.

"We ended up driving to Big Sur in California," Chambers says, "and went to the Henry Miller Memorial Library for Valentine's Day. On the way, we planned out stopping at coffee shops and boutiques to do research."

Literary playboy Henry Miller is one of Chambers' writing idols, and the author's bohemian love triangle with June Mansfield and French erotic novelist Anaïs Nin is where Chambers and Park eventually found the inspiration for the shop's name.

Chambers and Park were encouraged by employees at Huckleberry Roasters in Denver to visit Steadbrook, a nearby coffee bar and boutique. At Steadbrook, their vision became tangible: They wanted to test the boundaries of Atlanta's fashion and roast offerings.

"We understood that there is a void in Atlanta in terms of different types of roasters being obtainable," Chambers says. "Steadbrook had a similar bar setup and sold high-end men's street wear. It was a huge inspiration for us, but we wanted to have a more dynamic coffee bar with a full men's and women's upscale boutique."

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Henry & June, which nestles along a gated courtyard in Virginia-Highland, proves to be a tempting haven for fashion and coffee addicts. While customers wait on their espressos, they can peruse clothes and accessories that are presented with a premeditated aesthetic and fluency.

The space's interior design carries a minimalist style with personal touches peppered throughout: a customized neon sign that reads "Of Course" in Chambers' mother's handwriting, for example. On the walls are photographs of Paris shot by Brassaï, images that inspired Henry Miller while he was writing, as well as Park's personal vintage camera collection, a blown-up 1908 corset X-ray by Dr. Ludovic O'Followell, and an Art Nouveau-inspired street sign by local artist Peter Ferrari.

Behind the bar is the store's bean chemist, Daniel Mueller, who brings quirky espresso-concocting skills to the shop. Decisions on roasting styles and roasting vendors led Chambers and Park to Nashville-based roasters CREMA, as they both liked everything it offered. However they opted for a diverse selection —"a coffee gallery"— to cater to bean enthusiasts.

"People come in, we brew their coffee, and they sort of peruse around," Park says. "Instead of this being just another empty boutique waiting for the next person to come in, we have people coming in frequently, which keeps it more lively and fun, which is what we want it to be — a lifestyle place."

Whatever the descriptor, to Chambers and Park, they successfully fill a void in the city. "We're not trying to be a high-volume shop selling 500 cups of coffee every day," Chambers says. "We're a small business in a small strip with a wonderful set of stores in an area that deserves revamping.""
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  string(4622) "    Jim Chambers and Camryn Park's coffee-fueled business venture finds success   2014-12-04T09:00:00+00:00 Henry & June owners share their love story   Natalie Fressell 11207532 2014-12-04T09:00:00+00:00  Lovebirds turned entrepreneurs, Jim Chambers and Camryn Park opened the Henry & June coffee shop and clothing boutique in late July 2014. Fittingly, they met while sipping the jittery elixir at Octane Coffee in Grant Park. As the story goes, Chambers, a Brooklyn-born writer and coffee aficionado, was after his daily caffeine fix when a fiery photographer grabbed his attention. He remembers seeing Park sitting at the end of the counter. "I went to a person I knew who worked there and said I was going to fall in love with the redhead at the end of the bar," Chambers says. Call it love-at-first-sip or irony, but either way the duo hit it off quickly. Soon enough, their creative spirits combined in pursuit of giving Atlanta a taste of coffee alongside an impressive spread of high-end apparel.

In an effort to share their artistic endeavors and combine them into a possible joint venture, Chambers and Park set out on a cross-country road trip to narrow their vision and find their niche in a more concrete way.

"We ended up driving to Big Sur in California," Chambers says, "and went to the Henry Miller Memorial Library for Valentine's Day. On the way, we planned out stopping at coffee shops and boutiques to do research."

Literary playboy Henry Miller is one of Chambers' writing idols, and the author's bohemian love triangle with June Mansfield and French erotic novelist Anaïs Nin is where Chambers and Park eventually found the inspiration for the shop's name.

Chambers and Park were encouraged by employees at Huckleberry Roasters in Denver to visit Steadbrook, a nearby coffee bar and boutique. At Steadbrook, their vision became tangible: They wanted to test the boundaries of Atlanta's fashion and roast offerings.

"We understood that there is a void in Atlanta in terms of different types of roasters being obtainable," Chambers says. "Steadbrook had a similar bar setup and sold high-end men's street wear. It was a huge inspiration for us, but we wanted to have a more dynamic coffee bar with a full men's and women's upscale boutique."

For Henry & June, Chambers and Park chose collections from Atlanta designers Megan Huntz and Abbey Glass, along with such high-end brands as Creatures of Comfort and Raquel Allegra. The shop also features international labels including Native Youth (British), Henrik Vibskov (Danish), and Margaux Lonnberg (French), which appear throughout the system of stunning copper pipe racks and hairpin-leg wood shelving realized by locals including Jane Garver, Matix woodworking, and Grafite Design.

Henry & June, which nestles along a gated courtyard in Virginia-Highland, proves to be a tempting haven for fashion and coffee addicts. While customers wait on their espressos, they can peruse clothes and accessories that are presented with a premeditated aesthetic and fluency.

The space's interior design carries a minimalist style with personal touches peppered throughout: a customized neon sign that reads "Of Course" in Chambers' mother's handwriting, for example. On the walls are photographs of Paris shot by Brassaï, images that inspired Henry Miller while he was writing, as well as Park's personal vintage camera collection, a blown-up 1908 corset X-ray by Dr. Ludovic O'Followell, and an Art Nouveau-inspired street sign by local artist Peter Ferrari.

Behind the bar is the store's bean chemist, Daniel Mueller, who brings quirky espresso-concocting skills to the shop. Decisions on roasting styles and roasting vendors led Chambers and Park to Nashville-based roasters CREMA, as they both liked everything it offered. However they opted for a diverse selection —"a coffee gallery"— to cater to bean enthusiasts.

"People come in, we brew their coffee, and they sort of peruse around," Park says. "Instead of this being just another empty boutique waiting for the next person to come in, we have people coming in frequently, which keeps it more lively and fun, which is what we want it to be — a lifestyle place."

Whatever the descriptor, to Chambers and Park, they successfully fill a void in the city. "We're not trying to be a high-volume shop selling 500 cups of coffee every day," Chambers says. "We're a small business in a small strip with a wonderful set of stores in an area that deserves revamping."       0,0,10      13081100 12865952                          Henry & June owners share their love story "
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Article

Thursday December 4, 2014 04:00 am EST
Jim Chambers and Camryn Park's coffee-fueled business venture finds success | more...
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*Nicholas Buck
*READY TO WEAR: Designer Simon Chang says, "I’m encouraging women to find things that are unique."


Canadian-born women's clothing designer, Simon Chang, made a stop in Atlanta recently, at the Blue Dangles boutique to launch his fall 2014 collection. Chang and shop owner, Tracey Freund collaborated for the in-store event in an effort to benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). During Chang’s visit, a percentage of sales were donated to LLS and the shop quickly turned into a makeshift catwalk for regular clientele. Freund, a fourth generation fashion retailer, has maintained a notable presence in the business with the help of her family’s internationally acclaimed women’s boutique, which has influenced and gained significant prominence in Montreal, Canada since 1953. 

Where Chang has found success is in the idea that style is conversation. “People are moving, and they’re moving fast," Chang says. "They will come up behind you and you better be ready to have something to say with fashion.” 

Chang and Freund have known each other since the latter was born, and while visiting Blue Dangles the internationally renowned designer took some time to talk about the problem with trends, Atlanta’s seasonal advantage in the fashion game, and encouraging the creative spirit.

?      ?        jump?        
What do you do differently from other designers?
Today’s fashion is very confusing for women, because they go to the mall or to a store and they get the same message, or they buy things that already exist, or things they already have. It’s very limited and boring. Even if they do try and reinvent something, it’s usually an idea or a style that is borrowed from a previous era, but it’s tweaked and modernized to remain fresh and young. This in itself makes it hard to be completely original. Shopping should be fun. Whether you shop vintage or seasonal designer collections, it’s important to give things a personal touch. Women today are so dynamic, and the age factor isn’t really there anymore — it’s no longer a reason to say no — so I say why not? It used to be that fashion was only produced for the youth. People always ask me what age I design for and I say "20 years to death!" Because I dress for generations; a mother could come in with her daughter, the mother could bring her mother, and yeah sometimes not everything works for everybody, but I certainly have that in mind.

How do you keep the creative juice flowing? 
It’s a commitment, and you have to stick by it. You have to love it, and you have to get your hands dirty. Everybody’s always very anxious to talk about trends. Trends are just moments, and I don’t want stuff for the moment — I want to produce things that will live in your closet — a keepsake. Designers want a creative edge, so it’s important that the creative things that affect our society inspire me.

What are some of those creative things? 
We’re all influenced by situations that are happening around us all over the world, but I don’t think that inspiration should follow a trend book, instead it should be inspired by life, music, movies, books, street fashion, and people. I love street fashion and I love seeing young people with such style and adding their own spin on things. It’s great if you have classic things because those things are what last, and those things are what have substance. I was just watching a documentary-type film about Brian Wilson from the Beach Boys, and it’s very exciting to watch. He was talking about Pet Sounds, and if the younger generation could understand this man, I mean wow, he definitely struggled, but he stood by his vision. He put himself out there even though his vision was very different. Truly brilliant. I want my collections to be inspiring to others; I want them to send good vibrations. I want people to connect, because our life depends on those connections. 

What are some Canadian trends you see in Atlanta, and vice versa? 
I think today fashion is global. From here to Canada, and to Europe, mostly because the web has made us able to become so in tune with everyone else and there’s hardly anything that we can’t search or find out about. I think the youth is straying away from regional trends, and they’re starting to focus on the world. 

Would you say one place takes more risks than the other?
It depends, because the States have such large markets, but I do find that the U.S. is more conservative because the population is so vast. There’s slightly more celebrity endorsements, which becomes a bigger part of the influence on U.S. fashion. It’s almost an obsession, and it’s a bit sad. Canadians are not as obsessed, because we don’t have the celebrity influence. It’s silly because what we see on the red carpets is not original, and they’re, for the most part, outfits pulled together by stylists — not the celebrities themselves. They don’t have personal styles — they have personal stylists. They’re mannequins. People will say, “The trend on the red carpet tonight is GREEN,” and I’m like well, I don’t care! Who cares? We don’t live on the red carpet, so why does it even matter what that trend it is? 

Do you see Atlanta as a major player in the fashion game? 
Oh, yes. We have shows here, and I think Atlanta could be a market that creates a movement because of the diversity. The climate changes help as well. Each season exists, so that influences a transformation in fashion. For Canada, we mostly have winter and summer clothes. Atlanta is great because there’s an in-between. I believe in season-less clothing as well, so layering is important because Atlanta is so bipolar — one day it’s 90 degrees and the next day it’s rainy and chilly. 

How do you go about encouraging women to develop their own style with your collections?
I’m encouraging women to find things that are unique. We need collectibles. We consume too much stuff that leaves us thinking “Oh, why did I even bother?” So, I want to take the element of making great pieces that women love and is just the right thing to match their personalities. My collection is really to customize a person’s individuality, because I don’t like the cloning of the same message in a mall. And unfortunately, I feel like that’s what is happening in fashion today. I’m fortunate to have a specialty store like Blue Dangles. 

What sort of advice would you give to young designers trying to defeat monotony in fashion?
I’m different from designers, because I own my own business and I’m very involved in my business. I go into the shipping rooms and pack things, I want to be at retail stores to meet the potential customers and style them. 

I support the youth by offering scholarships for third year fashion students. The reason for that is because I want to nurture the future generations. The third year is very important because it’s where students get to the point where they need the extra push and reinforcement to keep moving forward. There are too many dropouts in the first two years, so by the third year you can see more accurately that the student is in it for the right reasons. I like the idea of younger designers producing their own designs rather than following a brand that has no personality and becoming a “ghost designer.” 

Put a spin on it and make it a habit. There is no formula for success — if you win some you lose some. People wont think everything you do is fabulous, and that’s okay. You either hit it at the right time, or you put it away and save it for later. A true act of creativity is never a waste of time — it’s just a matter of finding the right moment to release it. That’s what fashion should be today."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
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*Nicholas Buck
*READY TO WEAR: Designer Simon Chang says, "I’m encouraging women to find things that are unique."


Canadian-born women's clothing designer, [http://www.simonchang.com/|Simon Chang,] made a stop in Atlanta recently, at the [http://www.bluedangles.com/|Blue Dangles] boutique to launch his fall 2014 collection. Chang and shop owner, Tracey Freund collaborated for the in-store event in an effort to benefit the [http://www.lls.org/|Leukemia & Lymphoma Society] (LLS). During Chang’s visit, a percentage of sales were donated to LLS and the shop quickly turned into a makeshift catwalk for regular clientele. Freund, a fourth generation fashion retailer, has maintained a notable presence in the business with the help of her family’s internationally acclaimed women’s boutique, which has influenced and gained significant prominence in Montreal, Canada since 1953. 

Where Chang has found success is in the idea that style is conversation. “People are moving, and they’re moving fast," Chang says. "They will come up behind you and you better be ready to have something to say with fashion.” 

Chang and Freund have known each other since the latter was born, and while visiting Blue Dangles the internationally renowned designer took some time to talk about the problem with trends, Atlanta’s seasonal advantage in the fashion game, and encouraging the creative spirit.

?      ?        [jump]?        
__What do you do differently from other designers?__
Today’s fashion is very confusing for women, because they go to the mall or to a store and they get the same message, or they buy things that already exist, or things they already have. It’s very limited and boring. Even if they do try and reinvent something, it’s usually an idea or a style that is borrowed from a previous era, but it’s tweaked and modernized to remain fresh and young. This in itself makes it hard to be completely original. Shopping should be fun. Whether you shop vintage or seasonal designer collections, it’s important to give things a personal touch. Women today are so dynamic, and the age factor isn’t really there anymore — it’s no longer a reason to say no — so I say why not? It used to be that fashion was only produced for the youth. People always ask me what age I design for and I say "20 years to death!" Because I dress for generations; a mother could come in with her daughter, the mother could bring her mother, and yeah sometimes not everything works for everybody, but I certainly have that in mind.
____
__How do you keep the creative juice flowing? __
It’s a commitment, and you have to stick by it. You have to love it, and you have to get your hands dirty. Everybody’s always very anxious to talk about trends. Trends are just moments, and I don’t want stuff for the moment — I want to produce things that will live in your closet — a keepsake. Designers want a creative edge, so it’s important that the creative things that affect our society inspire me.

__What are some of those creative things? __
We’re all influenced by situations that are happening around us all over the world, but I don’t think that inspiration should follow a trend book, instead it should be inspired by life, music, movies, books, street fashion, and people. I love street fashion and I love seeing young people with such style and adding their own spin on things. It’s great if you have classic things because those things are what last, and those things are what have substance. I was just watching a documentary-type film about Brian Wilson from the Beach Boys, and it’s very exciting to watch. He was talking about ''Pet Sounds'', and if the younger generation could understand this man, I mean wow, he definitely struggled, but he stood by his vision. He put himself out there even though his vision was very different. Truly brilliant. I want my collections to be inspiring to others; I want them to send good vibrations. I want people to connect, because our life depends on those connections. 
____
__What are some Canadian trends you see in Atlanta, and vice versa? __
I think today fashion is global. From here to Canada, and to Europe, mostly because the web has made us able to become so in tune with everyone else and there’s hardly anything that we can’t search or find out about. I think the youth is straying away from regional trends, and they’re starting to focus on the world. 

__Would you say one place takes more risks than the other?__
It depends, because the States have such large markets, but I do find that the U.S. is more conservative because the population is so vast. There’s slightly more celebrity endorsements, which becomes a bigger part of the influence on U.S. fashion. It’s almost an obsession, and it’s a bit sad. Canadians are not as obsessed, because we don’t have the celebrity influence. It’s silly because what we see on the red carpets is not original, and they’re, for the most part, outfits pulled together by stylists — not the celebrities themselves. They don’t have personal styles — they have personal stylists. They’re mannequins. People will say, “The trend on the red carpet tonight is GREEN,” and I’m like well, I don’t care! Who cares? We don’t live on the red carpet, so why does it even matter what that trend it is? 

__Do you see Atlanta as a major player in the fashion game? __
Oh, yes. We have shows here, and I think Atlanta could be a market that creates a movement because of the diversity. The climate changes help as well. Each season exists, so that influences a transformation in fashion. For Canada, we mostly have winter and summer clothes. Atlanta is great because there’s an in-between. I believe in season-less clothing as well, so layering is important because Atlanta is so bipolar — one day it’s 90 degrees and the next day it’s rainy and chilly. 

__How do you go about encouraging women to develop their own style with your collections?__
I’m encouraging women to find things that are unique. We need collectibles. We consume too much stuff that leaves us thinking “Oh, why did I even bother?” So, I want to take the element of making great pieces that women love and is just the right thing to match their personalities. My collection is really to customize a person’s individuality, because I don’t like the cloning of the same message in a mall. And unfortunately, I feel like that’s what is happening in fashion today. I’m fortunate to have a specialty store like [Blue Dangles]. 

__What sort of advice would you give to young designers trying to defeat monotony in fashion?__
I’m different from designers, because I own my own business and I’m very involved in my business. I go into the shipping rooms and pack things, I want to be at retail stores to meet the potential customers and style them. 

I support the youth by offering scholarships for third year fashion students. The reason for that is because I want to nurture the future generations. The third year is very important because it’s where students get to the point where they need the extra push and reinforcement to keep moving forward. There are too many dropouts in the first two years, so by the third year you can see more accurately that the student is in it for the right reasons. I like the idea of younger designers producing their own designs rather than following a brand that has no personality and becoming a “ghost designer.” 

Put a spin on it and make it a habit. There is no formula for success — if you win some you lose some. People wont think everything you do is fabulous, and that’s okay. You either hit it at the right time, or you put it away and save it for later. A true act of creativity is never a waste of time — it’s just a matter of finding the right moment to release it. That’s what fashion should be today."
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  string(8016) "       2014-10-23T15:00:00+00:00 A conversation with designer Simon Chang   Natalie Fressell 11207532 2014-10-23T15:00:00+00:00  
*Nicholas Buck
*READY TO WEAR: Designer Simon Chang says, "I’m encouraging women to find things that are unique."


Canadian-born women's clothing designer, Simon Chang, made a stop in Atlanta recently, at the Blue Dangles boutique to launch his fall 2014 collection. Chang and shop owner, Tracey Freund collaborated for the in-store event in an effort to benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). During Chang’s visit, a percentage of sales were donated to LLS and the shop quickly turned into a makeshift catwalk for regular clientele. Freund, a fourth generation fashion retailer, has maintained a notable presence in the business with the help of her family’s internationally acclaimed women’s boutique, which has influenced and gained significant prominence in Montreal, Canada since 1953. 

Where Chang has found success is in the idea that style is conversation. “People are moving, and they’re moving fast," Chang says. "They will come up behind you and you better be ready to have something to say with fashion.” 

Chang and Freund have known each other since the latter was born, and while visiting Blue Dangles the internationally renowned designer took some time to talk about the problem with trends, Atlanta’s seasonal advantage in the fashion game, and encouraging the creative spirit.

?      ?        jump?        
What do you do differently from other designers?
Today’s fashion is very confusing for women, because they go to the mall or to a store and they get the same message, or they buy things that already exist, or things they already have. It’s very limited and boring. Even if they do try and reinvent something, it’s usually an idea or a style that is borrowed from a previous era, but it’s tweaked and modernized to remain fresh and young. This in itself makes it hard to be completely original. Shopping should be fun. Whether you shop vintage or seasonal designer collections, it’s important to give things a personal touch. Women today are so dynamic, and the age factor isn’t really there anymore — it’s no longer a reason to say no — so I say why not? It used to be that fashion was only produced for the youth. People always ask me what age I design for and I say "20 years to death!" Because I dress for generations; a mother could come in with her daughter, the mother could bring her mother, and yeah sometimes not everything works for everybody, but I certainly have that in mind.

How do you keep the creative juice flowing? 
It’s a commitment, and you have to stick by it. You have to love it, and you have to get your hands dirty. Everybody’s always very anxious to talk about trends. Trends are just moments, and I don’t want stuff for the moment — I want to produce things that will live in your closet — a keepsake. Designers want a creative edge, so it’s important that the creative things that affect our society inspire me.

What are some of those creative things? 
We’re all influenced by situations that are happening around us all over the world, but I don’t think that inspiration should follow a trend book, instead it should be inspired by life, music, movies, books, street fashion, and people. I love street fashion and I love seeing young people with such style and adding their own spin on things. It’s great if you have classic things because those things are what last, and those things are what have substance. I was just watching a documentary-type film about Brian Wilson from the Beach Boys, and it’s very exciting to watch. He was talking about Pet Sounds, and if the younger generation could understand this man, I mean wow, he definitely struggled, but he stood by his vision. He put himself out there even though his vision was very different. Truly brilliant. I want my collections to be inspiring to others; I want them to send good vibrations. I want people to connect, because our life depends on those connections. 

What are some Canadian trends you see in Atlanta, and vice versa? 
I think today fashion is global. From here to Canada, and to Europe, mostly because the web has made us able to become so in tune with everyone else and there’s hardly anything that we can’t search or find out about. I think the youth is straying away from regional trends, and they’re starting to focus on the world. 

Would you say one place takes more risks than the other?
It depends, because the States have such large markets, but I do find that the U.S. is more conservative because the population is so vast. There’s slightly more celebrity endorsements, which becomes a bigger part of the influence on U.S. fashion. It’s almost an obsession, and it’s a bit sad. Canadians are not as obsessed, because we don’t have the celebrity influence. It’s silly because what we see on the red carpets is not original, and they’re, for the most part, outfits pulled together by stylists — not the celebrities themselves. They don’t have personal styles — they have personal stylists. They’re mannequins. People will say, “The trend on the red carpet tonight is GREEN,” and I’m like well, I don’t care! Who cares? We don’t live on the red carpet, so why does it even matter what that trend it is? 

Do you see Atlanta as a major player in the fashion game? 
Oh, yes. We have shows here, and I think Atlanta could be a market that creates a movement because of the diversity. The climate changes help as well. Each season exists, so that influences a transformation in fashion. For Canada, we mostly have winter and summer clothes. Atlanta is great because there’s an in-between. I believe in season-less clothing as well, so layering is important because Atlanta is so bipolar — one day it’s 90 degrees and the next day it’s rainy and chilly. 

How do you go about encouraging women to develop their own style with your collections?
I’m encouraging women to find things that are unique. We need collectibles. We consume too much stuff that leaves us thinking “Oh, why did I even bother?” So, I want to take the element of making great pieces that women love and is just the right thing to match their personalities. My collection is really to customize a person’s individuality, because I don’t like the cloning of the same message in a mall. And unfortunately, I feel like that’s what is happening in fashion today. I’m fortunate to have a specialty store like Blue Dangles. 

What sort of advice would you give to young designers trying to defeat monotony in fashion?
I’m different from designers, because I own my own business and I’m very involved in my business. I go into the shipping rooms and pack things, I want to be at retail stores to meet the potential customers and style them. 

I support the youth by offering scholarships for third year fashion students. The reason for that is because I want to nurture the future generations. The third year is very important because it’s where students get to the point where they need the extra push and reinforcement to keep moving forward. There are too many dropouts in the first two years, so by the third year you can see more accurately that the student is in it for the right reasons. I like the idea of younger designers producing their own designs rather than following a brand that has no personality and becoming a “ghost designer.” 

Put a spin on it and make it a habit. There is no formula for success — if you win some you lose some. People wont think everything you do is fabulous, and that’s okay. You either hit it at the right time, or you put it away and save it for later. A true act of creativity is never a waste of time — it’s just a matter of finding the right moment to release it. That’s what fashion should be today.             13080612 12522506                          A conversation with designer Simon Chang "
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Article

Thursday October 23, 2014 11:00 am EDT

  • Nicholas Buck
  • READY TO WEAR: Designer Simon Chang says, "I’m encouraging women to find things that are unique."



Canadian-born women's clothing designer, Simon Chang, made a stop in Atlanta recently, at the Blue Dangles boutique to launch his fall 2014 collection. Chang and shop owner, Tracey Freund collaborated for the in-store event in an effort to benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society...

| more...
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The Kinks released their debut album, Kinks, on October 2, 1964, which consisted primarily of covers and altered songs. During a period where most of England’s iconic bands like the Yardbirds or the Rolling Stones were attracting a new fan base by way of America’s iconic bluesmen, the Kinks followed suit — but only at first. They blossomed after their first album topped the charts, and eventually took reign in the United Kingdom by reinventing the underground tone and revolutionizing the garage, Brit pop scene.

Mod revivalists and brothers, Ray and Dave Davies, conceptualized the group on the basis of breaking the boundaries of how “acceptable” pop bands were looking, sounding, and presenting themselves to the public. The Kinks didn’t attempt to disguise their English accents, sartorial style, or abide by social constructions, but they certainly developed a keen sense of stuffing their songs with hard-driving wit and gritty guitar distortions. 

For instance, the first single, “You Really Got Me,” features an iconic guitar riff fashioned after Dave Davies snipped the speaker cone of an amplifier. On the contrary, in the less aggressive track, “Just Can’t Go to Sleep,“ Ray Davies’ definitive songwriting embellishes the feeling most everyone can relate to — loneliness — but delivers it in a comfortable way that brands loneliness as a natural human instinct, rather than a sad, shameful emotion. 

The original UK tracks are listed individually below, or you can listen to the full album here. 

Side 1
"Beautiful Delilah" (Chuck Berry)
"So Mystifying"
"Just Can't Go to Sleep"
"Long Tall Shorty" (Herb Abramson, Don Covay) 
"I Took My Baby Home" 
"I'm a Lover Not a Fighter" (J. D. "Jay" Miller) 
"You Really Got Me" 

Side 2
"Cadillac" (Bo Diddley)
"Bald Headed Woman" (Shel Talmy)
"Revenge" (Ray Davies, Larry Page)
"Too Much Monkey Business" (Berry)
"I've Been Driving On Bald Mountain" (Talmy)
"Stop Your Sobbing" 
"Got Love If You Want It" (James Moore)

?      ?        jump?        
The Kinks first hit on Kinks was “You Really Got Me,” which reached number one on British charts. Later, the album was reissued as You Really Got Me as the album title in the U.S., with three title track omissions, and it ranked in at number seven. 

A proper celebration is in the works. The Kinks will reissued Muswell Hillbilles with several unreleased recordings Oct. 7. Also, an anniversary tour is being discussed, however Ray Davies seems the least optimistic. Read about the "50/50 chance" via Rolling Stone."
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The Kinks released their debut album, ''Kinks'', on October 2, 1964, which consisted primarily of covers and altered songs. During a period where most of England’s iconic bands like the Yardbirds or the Rolling Stones were attracting a new fan base by way of America’s iconic bluesmen, the Kinks followed suit — but only at first. They blossomed after their first album topped the charts, and eventually took reign in the United Kingdom by reinventing the underground tone and revolutionizing the garage, Brit pop scene.

Mod revivalists and brothers, Ray and Dave Davies, conceptualized the group on the basis of breaking the boundaries of how “acceptable” pop bands were looking, sounding, and presenting themselves to the public. The Kinks didn’t attempt to disguise their English accents, sartorial style, or abide by social constructions, but they certainly developed a keen sense of stuffing their songs with hard-driving wit and gritty guitar distortions. 

For instance, the first single, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTTsY-oz6Go|“You Really Got Me,”] features an iconic guitar riff fashioned after Dave Davies snipped the speaker cone of an amplifier. On the contrary, in the less aggressive track, [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hq8bc1HB2Fw|“Just Can’t Go to Sleep,“] Ray Davies’ definitive songwriting embellishes the feeling most everyone can relate to — loneliness — but delivers it in a comfortable way that brands loneliness as a natural human instinct, rather than a sad, shameful emotion. 

The original UK tracks are listed individually below, or you can listen to the full album [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfsL5p-zJ34|here]. 

__Side 1__
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJOV8t_beLg|"Beautiful Delilah"] (Chuck Berry)
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCm4by2ECGs|"So Mystifying"]
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1GqObeTYAY|"Just Can't Go to Sleep"]
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q6ml5U-WNY|"Long Tall Shorty"] (Herb Abramson, Don Covay) 
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cUI_2joS1I|"I Took My Baby Home" ]
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5D61MDy9FF4|"I'm a Lover Not a Fighter"] (J. D. "Jay" Miller) 
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7ffgqjcH40|"You Really Got Me"] 

__Side 2__
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lP_eky_R5fc|"Cadillac"] (Bo Diddley)
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHJhQgZS0BQ|"Bald Headed Woman" ](Shel Talmy)
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzq_ptXQ10w|"Revenge"] (Ray Davies, Larry Page)
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_70GzFj5zRE|"Too Much Monkey Business"] (Berry)
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMdPil_373s|"I've Been Driving On Bald Mountain"] (Talmy)
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRh5QGDNVcI|"Stop Your Sobbing" ]
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zt5_2Mfek5w|"Got Love If You Want It"] (James Moore)

?      ?        [jump]?        
The Kinks first hit on ''Kinks'' was “You Really Got Me,” which reached number one on British charts. Later, the album was reissued as ''You Really Got Me'' as the album title in the U.S., with three title track omissions, and it ranked in at number seven. 

A proper celebration is in the works. The Kinks will reissued ''Muswell Hillbilles'' with several unreleased recordings Oct. 7. Also, an anniversary tour is being discussed, however Ray Davies seems the least optimistic. Read about the [http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/dave-davies-kinks-reunion-ray-and-i-both-want-to-do-something-next-year-20140922|"50/50 chance" via ''Rolling Stone'']."
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The Kinks released their debut album, Kinks, on October 2, 1964, which consisted primarily of covers and altered songs. During a period where most of England’s iconic bands like the Yardbirds or the Rolling Stones were attracting a new fan base by way of America’s iconic bluesmen, the Kinks followed suit — but only at first. They blossomed after their first album topped the charts, and eventually took reign in the United Kingdom by reinventing the underground tone and revolutionizing the garage, Brit pop scene.

Mod revivalists and brothers, Ray and Dave Davies, conceptualized the group on the basis of breaking the boundaries of how “acceptable” pop bands were looking, sounding, and presenting themselves to the public. The Kinks didn’t attempt to disguise their English accents, sartorial style, or abide by social constructions, but they certainly developed a keen sense of stuffing their songs with hard-driving wit and gritty guitar distortions. 

For instance, the first single, “You Really Got Me,” features an iconic guitar riff fashioned after Dave Davies snipped the speaker cone of an amplifier. On the contrary, in the less aggressive track, “Just Can’t Go to Sleep,“ Ray Davies’ definitive songwriting embellishes the feeling most everyone can relate to — loneliness — but delivers it in a comfortable way that brands loneliness as a natural human instinct, rather than a sad, shameful emotion. 

The original UK tracks are listed individually below, or you can listen to the full album here. 

Side 1
"Beautiful Delilah" (Chuck Berry)
"So Mystifying"
"Just Can't Go to Sleep"
"Long Tall Shorty" (Herb Abramson, Don Covay) 
"I Took My Baby Home" 
"I'm a Lover Not a Fighter" (J. D. "Jay" Miller) 
"You Really Got Me" 

Side 2
"Cadillac" (Bo Diddley)
"Bald Headed Woman" (Shel Talmy)
"Revenge" (Ray Davies, Larry Page)
"Too Much Monkey Business" (Berry)
"I've Been Driving On Bald Mountain" (Talmy)
"Stop Your Sobbing" 
"Got Love If You Want It" (James Moore)

?      ?        jump?        
The Kinks first hit on Kinks was “You Really Got Me,” which reached number one on British charts. Later, the album was reissued as You Really Got Me as the album title in the U.S., with three title track omissions, and it ranked in at number seven. 

A proper celebration is in the works. The Kinks will reissued Muswell Hillbilles with several unreleased recordings Oct. 7. Also, an anniversary tour is being discussed, however Ray Davies seems the least optimistic. Read about the "50/50 chance" via Rolling Stone.             13080433 12387622        /mediaserver/atlanta/2015-17/1412620157-kinks.jpg                  The Kinks debut album celebrates 50 years "
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Wednesday October 8, 2014 01:53 pm EDT
The Kinks self-titled debut album turns 50 and the Davies' brothers are rumored to have a reunion tour. | more...
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*Natalie Fressell
*


I can’t think of a better way to embrace the autumn season and say goodbye to Atlanta's humidity than an end of summer playlist series finale featuring the calm, cool, and collected Jared Swilley of Black Lips.  While on the road promoting their album released earlier this summer, Underneath the Rainbow, Swilley jotted down his playlist for the last hurrah to summer 2014. He also reminisced about Dolly Parton tugging on his heart strings, suffering from the occasional tour high, and gives us a taste of some Jamaican reggae, forgotten favorites like the Banana Splits and the Murmaids, and early rock 'n' roll classics.  

What was the best thing you did this summer?
I went to see Dolly Parton in Berlin with King Khan and his family. She was amazing. We all dressed up real nice and cried during her set. It was beautiful.

What's on your summer playlist?
Trini Lopez: “If I Had a Hammer”
Chuck Berry: “Promised Land”
Toots and the Maytals: “54-46 Was My Number”
The Banana Splits: “I Enjoy Being a Boy (In Love With You)”
Zero Boys: “Stoned to Death”
The Murmaids: “Popsicles and Icicles” 
The Beach Boys: “Girl Don’t Tell Me”
James Brown: “Think”
The Phantom: “Whisper Your Love”
Buddy Holly: “Rock Around With Ollie Vee”
The Chills: “Heavenly Pop Hit”

?      ?        jump?        
How do your tastes in music differ from the other fellas in Black Lips?
It doesn’t really differ that much. I guess I like more pop stuff.

If you had to choose one profession other than being a musician, what would you want to be and why?
I’d want to be in a biker gang, or be a fighter pilot because they are both brave professions that are totally badass — much like my profession.

So, you'll be touring for pretty much the rest of the year promoting Underneath the Rainbow. Which place(s) are you looking forward to performing at the most?
We just played Moscow and that was pretty amazing. We’re going to South Africa soon and I’m stoked about that.

Is the song "I Don't Want to Go Home" about how some musicians get on a sort of high when they're on tour and don't want to go back to reality because they're out in the world living their dream? 
Yeah, it’s kinda difficult readjusting to civilian life when you get back. It takes a minute. Tour goes so fast and everything’s exciting, then you’re back home paying bills and watering your flowers. It’s just a big change, but I like both equally. Being home is very nice.

Pick one album to listen to for the rest of your life.
Captain Beefheart, Safe as Milk

If you could share the stage with one person from the past, who would it be?
Little Richard or Jerry Lee Lewis. It’s a tie.

What's the best part about being from Atlanta?
My awesome family lives there."
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*[http://clatl.com/atlanta/ImageArchives?by=11207532|Natalie Fressell]
*


I can’t think of a better way to embrace the autumn season and say goodbye to Atlanta's humidity than an end of summer playlist series finale featuring the calm, cool, and collected Jared Swilley of [http://black-lips.com/|Black Lips].  While on the road promoting their album released earlier this summer, ''[http://black-lips.com/tour-dates/|Underneath the Rainbow]'', Swilley jotted down his playlist for the last hurrah to summer 2014. He also reminisced about Dolly Parton tugging on his heart strings, suffering from the occasional tour high, and gives us a taste of some Jamaican reggae, forgotten favorites like the Banana Splits and the Murmaids, and early rock 'n' roll classics.  

__What was the best thing you did this summer?__
I went to see Dolly Parton in Berlin with King Khan and his family. She was amazing. We all dressed up real nice and cried during her set. It was beautiful.

__What's on your summer playlist?__
Trini Lopez: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJdLFRXAkzY|“If I Had a Hammer”]
Chuck Berry: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=litqE-UsIaM|“Promised Land”]
Toots and the Maytals: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sdXJiKsQrI|“54-46 Was My Number”]
The Banana Splits: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGpWExEVANY|“I Enjoy Being a Boy (In Love With You)”]
Zero Boys: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCHyydSSIs0|“Stoned to Death”]
The Murmaids: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jg3HNnNewXs|“Popsicles and Icicles”] 
The Beach Boys: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS94YK3pscs|“Girl Don’t Tell Me”]
James Brown: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vQ1MucCqKI|“Think”]
The Phantom: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4QLxpQ-0_k|“Whisper Your Love”]
Buddy Holly: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kby7MDBviHg|“Rock Around With Ollie Vee”]
The Chills: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvYihKlgzOg|“Heavenly Pop Hit”]

?      ?        [jump]?        
__How do your tastes in music differ from the other fellas in Black Lips?__
It doesn’t really differ that much. I guess I like more pop stuff.

__If you had to choose one profession other than being a musician, what would you want to be and why?__
I’d want to be in a biker gang, or be a fighter pilot because they are both brave professions that are totally badass — much like my profession.

__So, you'll be touring for pretty much the rest of the year promoting ''Underneath the Rainbow''. Which place(s) are you looking forward to performing at the most?__
We just played Moscow and that was pretty amazing. We’re going to South Africa soon and I’m stoked about that.

__Is the song "I Don't Want to Go Home" about how some musicians get on a sort of high when they're on tour and don't want to go back to reality because they're out in the world living their dream? __
Yeah, it’s kinda difficult readjusting to civilian life when you get back. It takes a minute. Tour goes so fast and everything’s exciting, then you’re back home paying bills and watering your flowers. It’s just a big change, but I like both equally. Being home is very nice.

__Pick one album to listen to for the rest of your life.__
Captain Beefheart, ''Safe as Milk''

__If you could share the stage with one person from the past, who would it be?__
Little Richard or Jerry Lee Lewis. It’s a tie.

__What's the best part about being from Atlanta?__
My awesome family lives there."
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  string(3512) "    The Black Lips' singer and bass player sends off the summer playlist series with Dolly Parton memories, biker gang dreams, and the Murmaids' 'Popsicles and Icicles.'   2014-09-19T17:39:00+00:00 Black Lips' Jared Swilley reveals his ultimate summer playlist   Natalie Fressell 11207532 2014-09-19T17:39:00+00:00  
*Natalie Fressell
*


I can’t think of a better way to embrace the autumn season and say goodbye to Atlanta's humidity than an end of summer playlist series finale featuring the calm, cool, and collected Jared Swilley of Black Lips.  While on the road promoting their album released earlier this summer, Underneath the Rainbow, Swilley jotted down his playlist for the last hurrah to summer 2014. He also reminisced about Dolly Parton tugging on his heart strings, suffering from the occasional tour high, and gives us a taste of some Jamaican reggae, forgotten favorites like the Banana Splits and the Murmaids, and early rock 'n' roll classics.  

What was the best thing you did this summer?
I went to see Dolly Parton in Berlin with King Khan and his family. She was amazing. We all dressed up real nice and cried during her set. It was beautiful.

What's on your summer playlist?
Trini Lopez: “If I Had a Hammer”
Chuck Berry: “Promised Land”
Toots and the Maytals: “54-46 Was My Number”
The Banana Splits: “I Enjoy Being a Boy (In Love With You)”
Zero Boys: “Stoned to Death”
The Murmaids: “Popsicles and Icicles” 
The Beach Boys: “Girl Don’t Tell Me”
James Brown: “Think”
The Phantom: “Whisper Your Love”
Buddy Holly: “Rock Around With Ollie Vee”
The Chills: “Heavenly Pop Hit”

?      ?        jump?        
How do your tastes in music differ from the other fellas in Black Lips?
It doesn’t really differ that much. I guess I like more pop stuff.

If you had to choose one profession other than being a musician, what would you want to be and why?
I’d want to be in a biker gang, or be a fighter pilot because they are both brave professions that are totally badass — much like my profession.

So, you'll be touring for pretty much the rest of the year promoting Underneath the Rainbow. Which place(s) are you looking forward to performing at the most?
We just played Moscow and that was pretty amazing. We’re going to South Africa soon and I’m stoked about that.

Is the song "I Don't Want to Go Home" about how some musicians get on a sort of high when they're on tour and don't want to go back to reality because they're out in the world living their dream? 
Yeah, it’s kinda difficult readjusting to civilian life when you get back. It takes a minute. Tour goes so fast and everything’s exciting, then you’re back home paying bills and watering your flowers. It’s just a big change, but I like both equally. Being home is very nice.

Pick one album to listen to for the rest of your life.
Captain Beefheart, Safe as Milk

If you could share the stage with one person from the past, who would it be?
Little Richard or Jerry Lee Lewis. It’s a tie.

What's the best part about being from Atlanta?
My awesome family lives there.             13080246 12248690        /mediaserver/atlanta/2015-17/1411051664-jared_swilley2.jpeg Natalie Fressell Black Lips peformance at Meltasia /mediaserver/atlanta/2015-17/1411051727-jared_swilley2.jpeg Natalie Fressell  /mediaserver/atlanta/2015-17/1411054225-screenshot_2014-09-18_11.20.22.png Natalie Fressell           Black Lips' Jared Swilley reveals his ultimate summer playlist "
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Article

Friday September 19, 2014 01:39 pm EDT
The Black Lips' singer and bass player sends off the summer playlist series with Dolly Parton memories, biker gang dreams, and the Murmaids' 'Popsicles and Icicles.' | more...
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