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Talk of the Town - Sylvan hills March 14 2001

Homes in south Atlanta neighborhood are priced for first-time buyers

With its cozy brick bungalows and big porches, south Atlanta's Sylvan Hills neighborhood gains comparisons to a trendy area to the north, Virginia-Highland. But there is one big difference in the neighborhoods — price.

The 50- to 75-year-old homes in Sylvan Hills remain in good condition, making the neighborhood desirable for first-time homebuyers looking for a bargain. Just a few years ago, homes in the area sold for less than $100,000. As more buyers flocked to the intown neighborhood, prices increased to $120,000 to $150,000, according to realtors.

Real estate agent Jim Camp moved to Sylvan Hills in July 1999 from East Atlanta, anticipating that the neighborhood was about to go through a resurgence.

"At the time I moved over there, it was because the prices were so low," Camp says. "I saw it as an up-and-coming area."

Sylvan Hills is tucked between Sylvan Road on the east and Murphy Street on the west. The neighborhood extends from Lakewood Freeway north to Deckner Avenue. The neighborhood is nearly indistinguishable from the nearby Capitol View, where many home renovations are under way.

"Sylvan Hills didn't get run down like Capitol View," says Martha McCall, an agent with W.T. Adams & Co. Realtors.

While Sylvan Hills has been touted as one of the last low-priced neighborhoods within the perimeter, that's likely to change. McCall's company has new listings in the area for $150,000 and $169,000.

"Prices have already gone up some, but are still not out of reach to the average first-time home buyer," says Camp, who also works for W.T. Adams & Co.

Camp enjoys running in Sylvan Hills, which has wider streets and less traffic than his old neighborhood. Because of the wider streets and a strong neighborhood association, residents enjoy a sense of community rare among city dwellers.

Nearby Perkerson Park gives residents a place to play. The wooded 50-acre park includes an amphitheater, sports facilities and a big wheel course.

Camp enjoys a quick 10-minute drive to downtown. Although the neighborhood is near Lakewood Freeway, U.S. Highway 29, I-85 and I-75, he avoids traffic by driving on surface streets.??



More By This Writer

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"As clubs go out, these units are  attractive to other retailers," Massell says.

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Hothoods@ creativeloafing.com??


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"People are buying $2 million and $3 million houses, and it's not just the dotcom people," says Philip White, managing broker at Coldwell Banker Buckhead Brokers. "You have CEOs, heads of companies and entrepreneurs that have sold their companies, and many of them are trading up."

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''Hothoods@ creativeloafing.com''??


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With ground breaking for new houses, high-rises and commercial buildings across the area, Buckhead is busier than ever. New housing developments include the high-rise Phoenix condominiums on Peachtree and the Central Buckhead townhouse development at Piedmont and Roswell roads. Atlantans choose Buckhead not only for its status, but also for the convenience of its entertainment and retail businesses, as well as its proximity to downtown.

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Hothoods@ creativeloafing.com??


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Article

Wednesday April 18, 2001 12:04 am EDT
Poor economy, troubles in nightclub district haven't stopped Atlantans from buying pricey homes | more...
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  string(4044) "Throughout his 30-year career,  Dr. Andrew Sheldon has charted his own path. When his law school classmates took jobs with corporate law firms, Sheldon took a low-paying job in legal aid. After practicing and teaching law for several years, Sheldon started over again with a new career in psychotherapy. About 15 years ago, he combined the two, launching Sheldon Associates trial consulting firm.The Atlanta firm combines legal expertise and psychology to help lawyers with jury selection. Sheldon also helps people cope with the stress of the courtroom, and teaches stress-reduction techniques to high-powered lawyers.Early in his career, Sheldon established the Georgia Mountain Legal Aid Society and worked for the Atlanta Legal Aid Society. While on faculty at the Emory University School of Law, Sheldon started taking classes in psychology. He went on to earn a master's and doctorate in clinical psychology at Georgia State. He practiced psychotherapy for six years before starting the consulting firm.Why didn't you go to work at a traditional law firm?I graduated from law school at the University of Florida-Gainesville, but I had not really taken to law school. It was more fun to play the pinball machines. When I got out, a kind lawyer in Gainesville, Ga., hired me, and I got excited about legal aid, which was then called poverty law. I found there were a lot of issues the law could tackle, and you could feel good about the work you               were doing.What kind of legal aid work did you do?For a couple of years, we helped get divorces for people, and we worked in tenants' rights. We brought suits against DeKalb and Gwinnett counties for jail conditions. It grew out of the '70s when social activism was        important.What kind of cases have you worked on as a consultant?I've worked on a lot of reconciliation cases. One of the first cases we did, we worked for the state of Mississippi and helped pick the jury in the trial against Byron De La Beckwith for the murder of Medgar Evers. I also worked on the murder trial of Sam Bowers, a former Imperial Wizard of the KKK, for the state of Mississippi.How did you become interested in psychology?I was asked to teach at Emory Law School in the clinical program. I felt like I'd tried every stop I knew on this trip called law. I started taking courses in psychology at Emory.How did you come to combine the two disciplines?I practiced psychotherapy in a variety of settings, in clinics and in private practice. During that time, one side of my brain had the education in law, and the other side was in the softer side, psychology, and they started banging together. I tried to figure out what they looked like together. I really loved helping people solve problems. About that time a book came out, The Aquarian Conspiracy by Marilyn Ferguson, about all kinds of professions that were growing up because people were dissatisfied with the traditional forms. I wrote her and tossed some ideas around.How did you start your consulting firm?I decided to offer stress reduction to lawyers. There were a lot of mergers going on and it caused a lot of stress and upset in law firms. Then I got a call from a therapist who had a client that got sued. I developed a witness preparation model helping them understand what the legal system was about. They generally felt a lack of power. Then a lawyer called and asked me to help select a jury.What other work do you do?Research, focus groups, mock trials and community attitude surveys. My dad told me, 'You better find something you like to do, because you're going to be doing it a lot.'Do you like legal movies?My favorite legal movie is a comedy, My Cousin Vinny." There's a lot of room with law to make fun of it. I've read a lot of John Grisham's books. Each case is like its own small novel with its own story and its own characters.How much does this kind of legal work pay?Beginning trial consultants would probably make $40,000 to $60,000 a year. Senior trial consultants could make $90,000 to $200,000 a year.??


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  string(4364) "       2001-04-18T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Trial consultant combines law, psychotherapy for his work April 18 2001   Emily Graham 1223651 2001-04-18T04:04:00+00:00  Throughout his 30-year career,  Dr. Andrew Sheldon has charted his own path. When his law school classmates took jobs with corporate law firms, Sheldon took a low-paying job in legal aid. After practicing and teaching law for several years, Sheldon started over again with a new career in psychotherapy. About 15 years ago, he combined the two, launching Sheldon Associates trial consulting firm.The Atlanta firm combines legal expertise and psychology to help lawyers with jury selection. Sheldon also helps people cope with the stress of the courtroom, and teaches stress-reduction techniques to high-powered lawyers.Early in his career, Sheldon established the Georgia Mountain Legal Aid Society and worked for the Atlanta Legal Aid Society. While on faculty at the Emory University School of Law, Sheldon started taking classes in psychology. He went on to earn a master's and doctorate in clinical psychology at Georgia State. He practiced psychotherapy for six years before starting the consulting firm.Why didn't you go to work at a traditional law firm?I graduated from law school at the University of Florida-Gainesville, but I had not really taken to law school. It was more fun to play the pinball machines. When I got out, a kind lawyer in Gainesville, Ga., hired me, and I got excited about legal aid, which was then called poverty law. I found there were a lot of issues the law could tackle, and you could feel good about the work you               were doing.What kind of legal aid work did you do?For a couple of years, we helped get divorces for people, and we worked in tenants' rights. We brought suits against DeKalb and Gwinnett counties for jail conditions. It grew out of the '70s when social activism was        important.What kind of cases have you worked on as a consultant?I've worked on a lot of reconciliation cases. One of the first cases we did, we worked for the state of Mississippi and helped pick the jury in the trial against Byron De La Beckwith for the murder of Medgar Evers. I also worked on the murder trial of Sam Bowers, a former Imperial Wizard of the KKK, for the state of Mississippi.How did you become interested in psychology?I was asked to teach at Emory Law School in the clinical program. I felt like I'd tried every stop I knew on this trip called law. I started taking courses in psychology at Emory.How did you come to combine the two disciplines?I practiced psychotherapy in a variety of settings, in clinics and in private practice. During that time, one side of my brain had the education in law, and the other side was in the softer side, psychology, and they started banging together. I tried to figure out what they looked like together. I really loved helping people solve problems. About that time a book came out, The Aquarian Conspiracy by Marilyn Ferguson, about all kinds of professions that were growing up because people were dissatisfied with the traditional forms. I wrote her and tossed some ideas around.How did you start your consulting firm?I decided to offer stress reduction to lawyers. There were a lot of mergers going on and it caused a lot of stress and upset in law firms. Then I got a call from a therapist who had a client that got sued. I developed a witness preparation model helping them understand what the legal system was about. They generally felt a lack of power. Then a lawyer called and asked me to help select a jury.What other work do you do?Research, focus groups, mock trials and community attitude surveys. My dad told me, 'You better find something you like to do, because you're going to be doing it a lot.'Do you like legal movies?My favorite legal movie is a comedy, My Cousin Vinny." There's a lot of room with law to make fun of it. I've read a lot of John Grisham's books. Each case is like its own small novel with its own story and its own characters.How much does this kind of legal work pay?Beginning trial consultants would probably make $40,000 to $60,000 a year. Senior trial consultants could make $90,000 to $200,000 a year.??


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Article

Wednesday April 18, 2001 12:04 am EDT
Throughout his 30-year career, Dr. Andrew Sheldon has charted his own path. When his law school classmates took jobs with corporate law firms, Sheldon took a low-paying job in legal aid. After practicing and teaching law for several years, Sheldon started over again with a new career in psychotherapy. About 15 years ago, he combined the two, launching Sheldon Associates trial consulting... | more...
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  string(3949) "He's made small talk with Brad Pitt and worked on a music video for Atlanta's own Black Crowes, but don't ask location scout John Findley to show you his autograph collection. He doesn't have one.

The Atlanta photographer has worked as a location scout for movies, commercials and music videos for most of the past nine years. In addition to scouting sites in Georgia, Findley travels to the work. He spent three months in Los Angeles last summer working on Ben Affleck's latest movie Pearl Harbor, which is slated for release in May. A few years ago, he spent several months in Oklahoma small towns working on the film Twister.

The Atlanta native studied photography at the Atlanta College of Art, and planned a career in commercial photography. Although his father worked in the film industry, Findley says he got into it by chance. He worked for the Georgia Film Commission for two years and now is a freelance location scout.



How did you get your first job on a movie?

It was actually just an accident. A friend of mine was working on a movie nine years ago, and he got me a job that was a one-day thing. Pretty soon, it turned into two or three days, and then it turned into a month. The more people I met, the more my name got out there.

What does a location  scout do?

You get a script if it's a movie, or a storyboard if it's a commercial, and break down the different locations that are needed. You work with the director and the production designer on what kind of look they're going for. Then you look for various places, and knock on the door and see if people are interested, and take a few pictures back to the director and production designer. If they like a location, you secure it, do a contract and insurance, and work out what you'll pay to use it.

Is it hard to convince people to let you film on their property?

It depends. A lot of people are happy to have something done at their house. It's a extra money, and commercials don't take that long. But for movies, it's harder. There may be 50 or 60 people around and there's a lot more equipment.

What was the last job  you did?

I just finished a commercial for Skil Chainsaws on a farm up in Walker County. It's just beautiful up there.

How much of your work is in Georgia?

I'd say 95 percent of it. The movie industry has died down, but I'm doing a lot of commercials.

Do you ever meet the actors on location?

You will, but I don't go out of my way to meet anybody. I was working on this movie Kalifornia and had Brad Pitt just start talking to me. You're doing your job and they're doing their job, and that's what it boils down to.

How much does this  job pay?

For a commercial, they usually have budgeted $300 to $400 a day for a location scout. On movies, it's $200 to $300 a day. If you're working for six months and getting $1,200 a week, it's not bad, but you have a lot of time off where you're not working at all.

What skills or qualifications do you need for this kind of work?

It's just working hard, and getting your name out is the important thing. For a location scout, being a photographer helps, and also knowing the geography and the state. It's also working well with other people to know what the needs are for the whole production.

What did you do for the Georgia Film Commission?

I was a location liaison. Companies like Disney would send in a script, and I'd go through the files and send out photos. It's a big business. If you can get a good-sized movie, they can spend millions in your state.

Have you thought about moving to Hollywood?

I've thought about it. Last summer, when I worked out there I thought it would be intimidating, but it kind of grew on me. I like L.A., but I've lived here my whole life and I'd rather stay here.

What career goals do  you have?

My goals are just to enjoy it as long as I can. If something else comes along and I want to switch careers, then I'll do that.

Workedup@creativeloafing.com??


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The Atlanta photographer has worked as a location scout for movies, commercials and music videos for most of the past nine years. In addition to scouting sites in Georgia, Findley travels to the work. He spent three months in Los Angeles last summer working on Ben Affleck's latest movie ''Pearl Harbor'', which is slated for release in May. A few years ago, he spent several months in Oklahoma small towns working on the film ''Twister''.

The Atlanta native studied photography at the Atlanta College of Art, and planned a career in commercial photography. Although his father worked in the film industry, Findley says he got into it by chance. He worked for the Georgia Film Commission for two years and now is a freelance location scout.

____
____
__How did you get your first job on a movie?__

It was actually just an accident. A friend of mine was working on a movie nine years ago, and he got me a job that was a one-day thing. Pretty soon, it turned into two or three days, and then it turned into a month. The more people I met, the more my name got out there.

__What does a location  scout do?__

You get a script if it's a movie, or a storyboard if it's a commercial, and break down the different locations that are needed. You work with the director and the production designer on what kind of look they're going for. Then you look for various places, and knock on the door and see if people are interested, and take a few pictures back to the director and production designer. If they like a location, you secure it, do a contract and insurance, and work out what you'll pay to use it.

__Is it hard to convince people to let you film on their property?__

It depends. A lot of people are happy to have something done at their house. It's a extra money, and commercials don't take that long. But for movies, it's harder. There may be 50 or 60 people around and there's a lot more equipment.

__What was the last job  you did?__

I just finished a commercial for Skil Chainsaws on a farm up in Walker County. It's just beautiful up there.

__How much of your work is in Georgia?__

I'd say 95 percent of it. The movie industry has died down, but I'm doing a lot of commercials.

__Do you ever meet the actors on location?__

You will, but I don't go out of my way to meet anybody. I was working on this movie ''Kalifornia'' and had Brad Pitt just start talking to me. You're doing your job and they're doing their job, and that's what it boils down to.

__How much does this  job pay?__

For a commercial, they usually have budgeted $300 to $400 a day for a location scout. On movies, it's $200 to $300 a day. If you're working for six months and getting $1,200 a week, it's not bad, but you have a lot of time off where you're not working at all.

__What skills or qualifications do you need for this kind of work?__

It's just working hard, and getting your name out is the important thing. For a location scout, being a photographer helps, and also knowing the geography and the state. It's also working well with other people to know what the needs are for the whole production.

__What did you do for the Georgia Film Commission?__

I was a location liaison. Companies like Disney would send in a script, and I'd go through the files and send out photos. It's a big business. If you can get a good-sized movie, they can spend millions in your state.

__Have you thought about moving to Hollywood?__

I've thought about it. Last summer, when I worked out there I thought it would be intimidating, but it kind of grew on me. I like L.A., but I've lived here my whole life and I'd rather stay here.

__What career goals do  you have?__

My goals are just to enjoy it as long as I can. If something else comes along and I want to switch careers, then I'll do that.

''[mailto:Workedup@creativeloafing.com|Workedup@creativeloafing.com]''??


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  string(4255) "       2001-04-04T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Location scout spies sites for movies, commercials April 04 2001   Emily Graham 1223651 2001-04-04T04:04:00+00:00  He's made small talk with Brad Pitt and worked on a music video for Atlanta's own Black Crowes, but don't ask location scout John Findley to show you his autograph collection. He doesn't have one.

The Atlanta photographer has worked as a location scout for movies, commercials and music videos for most of the past nine years. In addition to scouting sites in Georgia, Findley travels to the work. He spent three months in Los Angeles last summer working on Ben Affleck's latest movie Pearl Harbor, which is slated for release in May. A few years ago, he spent several months in Oklahoma small towns working on the film Twister.

The Atlanta native studied photography at the Atlanta College of Art, and planned a career in commercial photography. Although his father worked in the film industry, Findley says he got into it by chance. He worked for the Georgia Film Commission for two years and now is a freelance location scout.



How did you get your first job on a movie?

It was actually just an accident. A friend of mine was working on a movie nine years ago, and he got me a job that was a one-day thing. Pretty soon, it turned into two or three days, and then it turned into a month. The more people I met, the more my name got out there.

What does a location  scout do?

You get a script if it's a movie, or a storyboard if it's a commercial, and break down the different locations that are needed. You work with the director and the production designer on what kind of look they're going for. Then you look for various places, and knock on the door and see if people are interested, and take a few pictures back to the director and production designer. If they like a location, you secure it, do a contract and insurance, and work out what you'll pay to use it.

Is it hard to convince people to let you film on their property?

It depends. A lot of people are happy to have something done at their house. It's a extra money, and commercials don't take that long. But for movies, it's harder. There may be 50 or 60 people around and there's a lot more equipment.

What was the last job  you did?

I just finished a commercial for Skil Chainsaws on a farm up in Walker County. It's just beautiful up there.

How much of your work is in Georgia?

I'd say 95 percent of it. The movie industry has died down, but I'm doing a lot of commercials.

Do you ever meet the actors on location?

You will, but I don't go out of my way to meet anybody. I was working on this movie Kalifornia and had Brad Pitt just start talking to me. You're doing your job and they're doing their job, and that's what it boils down to.

How much does this  job pay?

For a commercial, they usually have budgeted $300 to $400 a day for a location scout. On movies, it's $200 to $300 a day. If you're working for six months and getting $1,200 a week, it's not bad, but you have a lot of time off where you're not working at all.

What skills or qualifications do you need for this kind of work?

It's just working hard, and getting your name out is the important thing. For a location scout, being a photographer helps, and also knowing the geography and the state. It's also working well with other people to know what the needs are for the whole production.

What did you do for the Georgia Film Commission?

I was a location liaison. Companies like Disney would send in a script, and I'd go through the files and send out photos. It's a big business. If you can get a good-sized movie, they can spend millions in your state.

Have you thought about moving to Hollywood?

I've thought about it. Last summer, when I worked out there I thought it would be intimidating, but it kind of grew on me. I like L.A., but I've lived here my whole life and I'd rather stay here.

What career goals do  you have?

My goals are just to enjoy it as long as I can. If something else comes along and I want to switch careers, then I'll do that.

Workedup@creativeloafing.com??


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Article

Wednesday April 4, 2001 12:04 am EDT

He's made small talk with Brad Pitt and worked on a music video for Atlanta's own Black Crowes, but don't ask location scout John Findley to show you his autograph collection. He doesn't have one.

The Atlanta photographer has worked as a location scout for movies, commercials and music videos for most of the past nine years. In addition to scouting sites in Georgia, Findley travels to the...

| more...
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  string(2300) "Nestled between the popular neighborhoods of Kirkwood, Little Five Points and Candler Park, Edgewood has, for the most part, gone undiscovered. A wave of new residents and home renovations is causing Atlantans to take notice.

Like its neighbors, Edgewood is filled with Craftsman-style bungalows and Victorian homes, as well as a mix of brick and wood panel homes. Home sales in the area have ranged from about $100,000 to $150,000. New listings in the area quote prices of $130,000, $169,900 and $289,000.

Edgewood's greatest asset is its location. The neighborhood encompasses the area between Moreland Avenue and Kirkwood, and from I-20 to Candler Park.

"We're less than one mile from I-20, the shops of Virginia-Highland, Candler Park and Little Five Points, and we're very close to downtown," said resident Kristal Manning.

Manning and her partner bought a home in Edgewood two years ago after renting a house for years in Virginia-Highland. When they decided to move, they desired an intown location, but wanted a house in the $150,000 price range. Not only were homes in Edgewood more affordable than other intown neighborhoods, but the area also had an appealing mix of residents.

"We liked the demographics of the neighborhood," Manning said. "It's a good mix of white and black, straight and gay."

The area is seeing a surge in residential renovation as well as commercial development. Most notably, two developers are vying for the old Atlanta Gas Light building on Moreland Avenue. For now, Edgewood residents must drive to area shopping centers and restaurants, but it may not be long before such amenities are within walking distance, said ONE Vice President Garry Long.

"The development is not there yet, but it's coming," Long said. "The properties are here and the convenience factor makes it comparable to all these other neighborhoods."

With its lack of name recognition, Edgewood is often confused with nearby Kirkwood. The Organized Neighbors of Edgewood are working to gain notoriety. Edgewood flags fly from many porches, and the association has plans to install street sign toppers to mark their neighborhood, Long said.

"It's a hot little area that still is pretty unknown," Long said. "That will go a long way toward recognition."

Hothoods@creativeloafing.com??


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  string(2342) "Nestled between the popular neighborhoods of Kirkwood, Little Five Points and Candler Park, Edgewood has, for the most part, gone undiscovered. A wave of new residents and home renovations is causing Atlantans to take notice.

Like its neighbors, Edgewood is filled with Craftsman-style bungalows and Victorian homes, as well as a mix of brick and wood panel homes. Home sales in the area have ranged from about $100,000 to $150,000. New listings in the area quote prices of $130,000, $169,900 and $289,000.

Edgewood's greatest asset is its location. The neighborhood encompasses the area between Moreland Avenue and Kirkwood, and from I-20 to Candler Park.

"We're less than one mile from I-20, the shops of Virginia-Highland, Candler Park and Little Five Points, and we're very close to downtown," said resident Kristal Manning.

Manning and her partner bought a home in Edgewood two years ago after renting a house for years in Virginia-Highland. When they decided to move, they desired an intown location, but wanted a house in the $150,000 price range. Not only were homes in Edgewood more affordable than other intown neighborhoods, but the area also had an appealing mix of residents.

"We liked the demographics of the neighborhood," Manning said. "It's a good mix of white and black, straight and gay."

The area is seeing a surge in residential renovation as well as commercial development. Most notably, two developers are vying for the old Atlanta Gas Light building on Moreland Avenue. For now, Edgewood residents must drive to area shopping centers and restaurants, but it may not be long before such amenities are within walking distance, said ONE Vice President Garry Long.

"The development is not there yet, but it's coming," Long said. "The properties are here and the convenience factor makes it comparable to all these other neighborhoods."

With its lack of name recognition, Edgewood is often confused with nearby Kirkwood. The Organized Neighbors of Edgewood are working to gain notoriety. Edgewood flags fly from many porches, and the association has plans to install street sign toppers to mark their neighborhood, Long said.

"It's a hot little area that still is pretty unknown," Long said. "That will go a long way toward recognition."

''[mailto:Hothoods@creativeloafing.com|Hothoods@creativeloafing.com]''??


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  string(2584) "    Diverse residents take pride in virtually unknown neighborhood   2001-04-04T04:04:00+00:00 Talk of the Town - Edgewood April 04 2001   Emily Graham 1223651 2001-04-04T04:04:00+00:00  Nestled between the popular neighborhoods of Kirkwood, Little Five Points and Candler Park, Edgewood has, for the most part, gone undiscovered. A wave of new residents and home renovations is causing Atlantans to take notice.

Like its neighbors, Edgewood is filled with Craftsman-style bungalows and Victorian homes, as well as a mix of brick and wood panel homes. Home sales in the area have ranged from about $100,000 to $150,000. New listings in the area quote prices of $130,000, $169,900 and $289,000.

Edgewood's greatest asset is its location. The neighborhood encompasses the area between Moreland Avenue and Kirkwood, and from I-20 to Candler Park.

"We're less than one mile from I-20, the shops of Virginia-Highland, Candler Park and Little Five Points, and we're very close to downtown," said resident Kristal Manning.

Manning and her partner bought a home in Edgewood two years ago after renting a house for years in Virginia-Highland. When they decided to move, they desired an intown location, but wanted a house in the $150,000 price range. Not only were homes in Edgewood more affordable than other intown neighborhoods, but the area also had an appealing mix of residents.

"We liked the demographics of the neighborhood," Manning said. "It's a good mix of white and black, straight and gay."

The area is seeing a surge in residential renovation as well as commercial development. Most notably, two developers are vying for the old Atlanta Gas Light building on Moreland Avenue. For now, Edgewood residents must drive to area shopping centers and restaurants, but it may not be long before such amenities are within walking distance, said ONE Vice President Garry Long.

"The development is not there yet, but it's coming," Long said. "The properties are here and the convenience factor makes it comparable to all these other neighborhoods."

With its lack of name recognition, Edgewood is often confused with nearby Kirkwood. The Organized Neighbors of Edgewood are working to gain notoriety. Edgewood flags fly from many porches, and the association has plans to install street sign toppers to mark their neighborhood, Long said.

"It's a hot little area that still is pretty unknown," Long said. "That will go a long way toward recognition."

Hothoods@creativeloafing.com??


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Wednesday April 4, 2001 12:04 am EDT
Diverse residents take pride in virtually unknown neighborhood | more...
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  string(3970) "At over 6 feet tall, he's the biggest bird in town. Harry the Hawk keeps a busy schedule entertaining Atlanta basketball fans at home games, attending school assemblies to encourage children to read and making numerous other public appearances.Harry came on to the scene in 1986, when few professional sports teams had mascots. The same man has filled Harry's claw-shaped shoes for the last 15 years, perfecting his half-court shooting and stair-sledding skills.On a recent Saturday, Harry strutted his stuff in a St. Patrick's Day parade before heading to Philips Arena for a home game. The next day, Harry "flew" to an Atlanta Hawks Fan Jam at a local mall, where, without so much as a word, he brought cheers from basketball fans.Whether he's playing musical chairs with kids mid-court or pulling a prank on a referee, Harry's human alter ego guards his privacy. Although he's the most popular bird in town, few people recognize him without his red tights, big beak and tail feathers.What skills do you need to be a professional mascot?It's very physically demanding. I ride a unicycle, I juggle basketballs, I spin basketballs and shoot half-court shots. I made about 50 percent of my half-court shots this year.What about dancing?I don't really even have to be able to dance. I just have to be able to convince people I can dance.How did you come up with stair sledding?I took a snow sled and just started going down the concrete steps in the arena. It's just sort of a real stupid act, but sort of fun.How do people react to Harry?I'm very recognizable here in Atlanta. One of the most wonderful things about my job is the looks that people give you. When people look at a costume, they don't have any inhibitions. I see just huge smiles and great reactions, and I very seldom get any negative feedback at all.How do you communicate with fans without talking?Harry is very slapstick. It's very physical comedy. There's no vocal comedy at all. I communicate very well with people without having to speak. I've had people I've developed friendships with from 10, 11 years who have no clue when I walk up who I am. It's amazing what you can learn from somebody, just sitting down next to them and shaking their hand. They'll tell me their life story.What's it like to be such a recognizable figure?It's wonderful that I can put on the costume and be instantly recognized, yet I can take it off and people have no idea who I am. I have always tried to hide myself in the character because I want them to view Harry as a character and a personality. When you see Mickey Mouse, you don't think of the guy wearing the costume.How many appearances do you make outside of games?I probably do 200 to 300 outside of games a year, including appearances at carnivals, at parades, at schools. I do a program in kindergarten through fifth grade called 'Fast Break for Reading.' I've done over 2,000 school assemblies. We promote how important reading is. If they will read 14 books, then the Atlanta Hawks will give them two free tickets to a Hawks game.So this is a full-time gig?I'm putting in quite a few hours, 40 to 50 hours a week. If I'm not actually doing appearances, I'm en route to an appearance. I may have game operations meetings with the Hawks, or I'm talking to other mascots around the league about ideas and skits. I talk to several guys every day.I'm buddies with every mascot in the NBA. We meet two or three times a year and talk about different things that just are relevant to us. We help each other with ideas.How does this job pay?I'm under a contract that doesn't allow me to discuss it. I will say that I have four kids and I'm able to support my family. There are a lot of mascots in the NBA that make six figures. It's a lot of birdseed.What advice would you give aspiring mascots?If it's not something you have a passion for, don't do it.What goals do you have for your career?I don't have a lot of goals. My goal is just to have fun right now.??


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Wednesday March 28, 2001 12:04 am EST
At over 6 feet tall, he's the biggest bird in town. Harry the Hawk keeps a busy schedule entertaining Atlanta basketball fans at home games, attending school assemblies to encourage children to read and making numerous other public appearances.Harry came on to the scene in 1986, when few professional sports teams had mascots. The same man has filled Harry's claw-shaped shoes for the last 15... | more...
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