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Restaurant Review - Cue'd up

Raleigh's BBQ & Blues a saucy draw in Decatur



The sun is out, the humidity is down, the smog won't choke you and pollen has practically disappeared. It's safe to go out in Atlanta again, and there are fewer places so pleasant for walking around as the town square in Decatur. A real town square, with a courthouse and people and a bandstand.

And what is that delicious aroma? Barbecue.

Of the many charming and convenient restaurants lining the square, only Raleigh's BBQ & Blues lures passersby with the distinctive scent of burning hickory, making it impossible to think of anything other than sitting down immediately to a plate of pulled pork smothered with sauce.

Don't fret about what kind of sauce. Raleigh's is not here to fight the tomato-based, vinegar-based, sweet or hot sauce wars. They make all of them from scratch and transport them to the table in a six-pack carton.

You will need them. Despite the alluring aroma wafting from the advertised wood-burning pit, the meat is not permeated with that essential barbecue flavor. The meat — notably the large, meaty Righteous Rib rack ($11.50) — barely seems to have been touched by the slow-cooking process. Obviously a major drawback for a barbecue restaurant.

Yet there is so much to like about Raleigh's that it is worth taking the time to experiment with all the sauces, to discover which ones add the most to the chicken and pork, which is moist, meaty and fresh-tasting. And remember, that's pulled, not sliced or chopped.

Inside the long, narrow restaurant are high tables for two, some booths, a semi- circular bar and a couple of tables behind a low wood rail where the blues band will set up later.

It may be this dual restaurant/club personality that accounts for the unevenness of the kitchen, which produces both unusual and tasty things and mediocre, bland things. A trite, commercial essay on the back of the menu — "The Birth of Okefenokee BBQ and Blues" — sounds as though somebody has designs on franchising this concept. If so, the food will have to hit its marks more consistently than it does right now.

But the attitude of the staff could not be better. My experience has been that whatever you want to do, however you want to do it, is fine with them. Dinner at the bar? Sure. Food on the coffee table, the better to lounge on the sofa? Why not? A menu blurb invites you to order the water and coleslaw — both free — and enjoy the music "on the house," and I believe they mean it.

The free coleslaw could use more kick, but it's hard to quarrel with its creamy freshness. Better, though, to go with the even creamier Smokehouse Potato Salad ($1.75), with bits of country cured bacon. Gooey, cheesey Sweet Tomato Pie ($2.75 a slice) is in season through October, after which the requisite Georgia tomatoes and Vidalia onions will no longer be available.

Raleigh's does better with roasting and grilling, and nothing benefits more from these methods than the totally sublime Ok'fenokee Okry ($1.75), a small plate of whole okra. Bits of okra — along with lima beans, corn and diced potato — make Raleigh's Brunswick stew ($2 a mug, $3.75 a bowl) a notch above the usual conglomeration of leftovers.

World Famous Hicks Hot Tamales ($2 each, three for $5.50; they're small) seem out of place with the rest of the menu. They're hot all right, but lack the hearty mealiness of good tamales. And anyway, it should be illegal to go to a barbecue restaurant and not order barbecue.

Besides the simple pulled pork sandwich (buns are fresh-baked, $4.50), and pork plate ($8), there are salads — pork ($6.25) or chicken ($5.75) — and samplers: Hoochie Coochie Pork Combo ($8.75), a tamale, two ribs, Brunswick stew, potato salad and cornbread; the same lineup with pulled chicken is $8.50.

Desserts are the kind dear to a Southerner's heart: MoonPie ($1), hot buttered apples ($2) and blackberry ($2.50), cherry ($2.25) and peach ($2) cobblers, flaky crust and plenty of fruit under a mountain of vanilla ice cream.

foodanddrink@creativeloafing.com??



More By This Writer

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At this very minute, surely — since this brand-new restaurant is open nearly all the time — a Colombian family is producing an array of startlingly sophisticated dishes at moderate prices, thanks to inexpensive ingredients. This is white tablecloth dining on white vinyl, destination dining where the destination is ... Tucker?

Food lovers will recognize the address as the tiny space that was once the beloved Evelyn's Greek-Italian-American Cafe. The dining room's walls have been roughly sponged in a salmon-coral shade that unifies the seating arrangements: a few worn booths and small tables, and an inviting dark wood counter along one wall.

There's no liquor license at the moment, but one is welcome to bring one's own libation while the paperwork lags. Until then, Aires Latino's host will urge you to try one of their homemade juices (the blackberry is delicious) blended with water or milk.

The former is preferred before or with a meal; the latter tastes something like a milkshake. But both the unusual offering and its freshness set the stage for what's in store.

Enthusiastic menu descriptions pale in comparison to the real things. It is absolutely correct that ceviche de camaron ($8), for example, is shrimp "in an exquisite house special sauce." Neither tart like the traditional Caribbean ceviche nor ketchup-sweet like the Buford Highway Mexican versions, this one packs a mild tang that is crisp and elegant.

On no account should you miss one of the soups. The cup size is plenty if you're ordering something else, although one can hardly get enough of the thick, pure tomato or the lightly rich shrimp soup. A third changes daily, anything from vegetable to corn to a lovely chicken with vegetables and tiny noodles ($2.95 a cup or $3.50 a bowl).

The obvious care taken in balancing the soups' textures and flavors carries over to the more concentrated sauces. Flavors are strong, particularly the garlic, but everything is fresh and minimally cooked.

Only a handful of dishes are strictly Colombian; everything else among the seafood, pork, chicken and beef selections is Latin-influenced, except for the children's hamburger. But yes, there is the traditional bandeja paisa ($11.50), beef surrounded by or beneath pork rinds, fried eggs, rice, beans, avocado and sweet plantains.

And there is paella, made only on Friday and Saturday nights. The market price was a ridiculously low $10 when we ordered it the other night. And if you are wondering how that could possibly be, it's due to the lack of costly saffron. But surprisingly, the dish doesn't miss it. It seems impossible that the hearty, fluffy rice soaks in so much flavor from Spanish sausage, chicken, clams, shrimp and crab when only specks of each are present. It does, though.

Garlic lovers will appreciate the heady aroma and full flavor of filete de pescado al ajo ($13.95), grilled tilapia expertly sauteed and smothered in garlic sauce.

Mention you love garlic and you'll be treated to a small saucer of that sauce — or any other sauce you might like — along with the creamy pink sauce that normally accompanies papitas con salchicha ($4.95), a scrumptious potatoes and sausage appetizer that's light in spite of itself.

Plantains, beautifully fried, pop up alongside a lot of things. Blue corn tortillas burst with poblano pepper strips, red onions and white cheddar cheese ($4.95). The house salad ($6.75) is anything but usual: apples, grapes and raisins in a sweet and sour dressing on mixed greens.

Aires Latinos is not your run-of-the-mill chips and salsa and fajitas kind of place. Look instead for such interesting and tasty things as marinated chicken served with peaches and bacon pollo Caribeno ($13.95). Or the aromatic Caribbean-flavored beef dish ropa vieja ($9.50). Or the baked boneless chicken breast that glistens beneath parsley sauce, pechuguitas al perejil ($12.25).

Don't expect stellar service; the operation is simply too shorthanded at this point. Every time I've been, there have been only two cooks working deftly in the kitchen and one server working feverishly everywhere else. In other words, don't arrive expecting to be out in an hour. Your patience, however, will be amply rewarded.

amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com

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At this very minute, surely -- since this brand-new restaurant is open nearly all the time -- a Colombian family is producing an array of startlingly sophisticated dishes at moderate prices, thanks to inexpensive ingredients. This is white tablecloth dining on white vinyl, destination dining where the destination is ... Tucker?

Food lovers will recognize the address as the tiny space that was once the beloved Evelyn's Greek-Italian-American Cafe. The dining room's walls have been roughly sponged in a salmon-coral shade that unifies the seating arrangements: a few worn booths and small tables, and an inviting dark wood counter along one wall.

There's no liquor license at the moment, but one is welcome to bring one's own libation while the paperwork lags. Until then, Aires Latino's host will urge you to try one of their homemade juices (the blackberry is delicious) blended with water or milk.

The former is preferred before or with a meal; the latter tastes something like a milkshake. But both the unusual offering and its freshness set the stage for what's in store.

Enthusiastic menu descriptions pale in comparison to the real things. It is absolutely correct that ceviche de camaron ($8), for example, is shrimp "in an exquisite house special sauce." Neither tart like the traditional Caribbean ceviche nor ketchup-sweet like the Buford Highway Mexican versions, this one packs a mild tang that is crisp and elegant.

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The obvious care taken in balancing the soups' textures and flavors carries over to the more concentrated sauces. Flavors are strong, particularly the garlic, but everything is fresh and minimally cooked.

Only a handful of dishes are strictly Colombian; everything else among the seafood, pork, chicken and beef selections is Latin-influenced, except for the children's hamburger. But yes, there is the traditional bandeja paisa ($11.50), beef surrounded by or beneath pork rinds, fried eggs, rice, beans, avocado and sweet plantains.

And there is paella, made only on Friday and Saturday nights. The market price was a ridiculously low $10 when we ordered it the other night. And if you are wondering how that could possibly be, it's due to the lack of costly saffron. But surprisingly, the dish doesn't miss it. It seems impossible that the hearty, fluffy rice soaks in so much flavor from Spanish sausage, chicken, clams, shrimp and crab when only specks of each are present. It does, though.

Garlic lovers will appreciate the heady aroma and full flavor of filete de pescado al ajo ($13.95), grilled tilapia expertly sauteed and smothered in garlic sauce.

Mention you love garlic and you'll be treated to a small saucer of that sauce -- or any other sauce you might like -- along with the creamy pink sauce that normally accompanies papitas con salchicha ($4.95), a scrumptious potatoes and sausage appetizer that's light in spite of itself.

Plantains, beautifully fried, pop up alongside a lot of things. Blue corn tortillas burst with poblano pepper strips, red onions and white cheddar cheese ($4.95). The house salad ($6.75) is anything but usual: apples, grapes and raisins in a sweet and sour dressing on mixed greens.

Aires Latinos is not your run-of-the-mill chips and salsa and fajitas kind of place. Look instead for such interesting and tasty things as marinated chicken served with peaches and bacon pollo Caribeno ($13.95). Or the aromatic Caribbean-flavored beef dish ropa vieja ($9.50). Or the baked boneless chicken breast that glistens beneath parsley sauce, pechuguitas al perejil ($12.25).

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[mailto:amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com|amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com]
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At this very minute, surely — since this brand-new restaurant is open nearly all the time — a Colombian family is producing an array of startlingly sophisticated dishes at moderate prices, thanks to inexpensive ingredients. This is white tablecloth dining on white vinyl, destination dining where the destination is ... Tucker?

Food lovers will recognize the address as the tiny space that was once the beloved Evelyn's Greek-Italian-American Cafe. The dining room's walls have been roughly sponged in a salmon-coral shade that unifies the seating arrangements: a few worn booths and small tables, and an inviting dark wood counter along one wall.

There's no liquor license at the moment, but one is welcome to bring one's own libation while the paperwork lags. Until then, Aires Latino's host will urge you to try one of their homemade juices (the blackberry is delicious) blended with water or milk.

The former is preferred before or with a meal; the latter tastes something like a milkshake. But both the unusual offering and its freshness set the stage for what's in store.

Enthusiastic menu descriptions pale in comparison to the real things. It is absolutely correct that ceviche de camaron ($8), for example, is shrimp "in an exquisite house special sauce." Neither tart like the traditional Caribbean ceviche nor ketchup-sweet like the Buford Highway Mexican versions, this one packs a mild tang that is crisp and elegant.

On no account should you miss one of the soups. The cup size is plenty if you're ordering something else, although one can hardly get enough of the thick, pure tomato or the lightly rich shrimp soup. A third changes daily, anything from vegetable to corn to a lovely chicken with vegetables and tiny noodles ($2.95 a cup or $3.50 a bowl).

The obvious care taken in balancing the soups' textures and flavors carries over to the more concentrated sauces. Flavors are strong, particularly the garlic, but everything is fresh and minimally cooked.

Only a handful of dishes are strictly Colombian; everything else among the seafood, pork, chicken and beef selections is Latin-influenced, except for the children's hamburger. But yes, there is the traditional bandeja paisa ($11.50), beef surrounded by or beneath pork rinds, fried eggs, rice, beans, avocado and sweet plantains.

And there is paella, made only on Friday and Saturday nights. The market price was a ridiculously low $10 when we ordered it the other night. And if you are wondering how that could possibly be, it's due to the lack of costly saffron. But surprisingly, the dish doesn't miss it. It seems impossible that the hearty, fluffy rice soaks in so much flavor from Spanish sausage, chicken, clams, shrimp and crab when only specks of each are present. It does, though.

Garlic lovers will appreciate the heady aroma and full flavor of filete de pescado al ajo ($13.95), grilled tilapia expertly sauteed and smothered in garlic sauce.

Mention you love garlic and you'll be treated to a small saucer of that sauce — or any other sauce you might like — along with the creamy pink sauce that normally accompanies papitas con salchicha ($4.95), a scrumptious potatoes and sausage appetizer that's light in spite of itself.

Plantains, beautifully fried, pop up alongside a lot of things. Blue corn tortillas burst with poblano pepper strips, red onions and white cheddar cheese ($4.95). The house salad ($6.75) is anything but usual: apples, grapes and raisins in a sweet and sour dressing on mixed greens.

Aires Latinos is not your run-of-the-mill chips and salsa and fajitas kind of place. Look instead for such interesting and tasty things as marinated chicken served with peaches and bacon pollo Caribeno ($13.95). Or the aromatic Caribbean-flavored beef dish ropa vieja ($9.50). Or the baked boneless chicken breast that glistens beneath parsley sauce, pechuguitas al perejil ($12.25).

Don't expect stellar service; the operation is simply too shorthanded at this point. Every time I've been, there have been only two cooks working deftly in the kitchen and one server working feverishly everywhere else. In other words, don't arrive expecting to be out in an hour. Your patience, however, will be amply rewarded.

amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com

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Wednesday September 4, 2002 12:04 am EDT
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Article

Wednesday September 4, 2002 12:04 am EDT
Sky-high Latin flavor: The stars are aligned at Aires Latinos Aires Latinos is proof that gifted cooks are not the province solely of four- and five-star establishments.At this very minute, surely — since this brand-new restaurant is open nearly all the time — a Colombian family is producing an array of startlingly sophisticated dishes at moderate prices, thanks to inexpensive... | more...
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  string(43) "Restaurant Review - Under the Sycamore tree"
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  string(17) "Amy Jinkner-Lloyd"
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  string(43) "The Sycamore Grill has it made in the shade"
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  string(43) "The Sycamore Grill has it made in the shade"
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  string(4071) "The oldest building in the Village of Stone Mountain, a two-story stone and clapboard structure constructed in 1836, has been a post office, a Civil War hospital, numerous hotels and an abandoned wreck. It is our good fortune that today it is The Sycamore Grill, named in honor of the 153-year-old tree shading the verandah.
It is a very small building; one can scarcely imagine what it must have been like in any of its previous incarnations. But it is possible to glimpse the past in the main room where a transparent panel in one wall exposes part of the original  2-foot-thick wall, its bricks  fabricated of clay, mud, rock, horse hair and the local granite.

The interior is pleasingly  simple: wooden chairs painted dark green; rough-textured walls painted a muted color somewhere between mustard and cream; two or three fresh stems in small bud vases on each of the eight tables.

The crisp white tablecloths raise expectations, and with the exception of a few entrees inexplicably covered with cheese, these are more than satisfied. The ingredients are high quality, they are combined in interesting ways, and they are prepared with a high degree of skill.

One needn't wait for the entrees to  experience this. Even a salad will do. Something like the wilted spinach salad, for example, an enormous mound of fresh spinach, steamed to an exemplary consistency, bathed in an apple cider and brown sugar dressing and  incorporating toasted prosciutto, goat cheese, walnuts and grape tomatoes ($7). Sweet, salty, biting, crunchy — all these flavors and textures burst in the mouth simultaneously.

That's typical of the kitchen's style. Blue crab fritters shine under a lemon-dill cream sauce ($7); sweet potato french fries are tweaked by a blue cheese dipping sauce ($6); the fried green  tomatoes' tartness is mellowed by crumbled goat cheese and roasted red pepper sauce ($7); whole grain mustard-apricot sauce punches up a plate of coconut shrimp ($9). And these are only the appetizers.

They are large enough,  however, to serve as main courses, as are the lovely salads. No wisps of brown lettuce here. Beds of  hand-picked mixed greens cradle such diverse fillings as crisp sweet onion straws, grape  tomatoes, seedless cucumbers and sunflower seeds (the $5 house salad); blackberry  chicken salad with caramelized walnuts ($7);  or kabobs of beef tenderloin, sweet peppers, portabella mushrooms and grape tomatoes, which are topped with Danish blue cheese  and onion straws in a red wine peppercorn  vinaigrette ($12).

The kitchen's strength is grilling. Paired with the nuanced sauces or glazes — blackberry, orange, lemon-basil and roasted red pepper among them — beef, duck, lamb and pork loin rise to their fullest flavor.

My favorite is the luscious marinated  flank steak, grilled medium rare and  enhanced by a light, piquant red wine  peppercorn sauce ($15). But I would never  turn down the veal reduction and blue cheese crumbles on the unce filet mignon ($25)  or the pineapple-garlic glazed marinated pork loin rib chop on its bed of crispy sweet onion straws ($16).

Duck lovers, rejoice! For you, there is  roasted duck breast with a spicy blackberry sauce ($17). And an apple-mint glaze is a much more refreshing treatment for the 14-ounce New Zealand rack of lamb ($25) than the usual  herb crust.

While grilled meats are the highlights of The Sycamore Grill menu, they aren't the only option. The kitchen encrusts chicken breast with pecans, then adds a spicy orange sauce ($16); a whopping 10-ounce blackened chicken breast arrives at the table with Creole sauce, garlic andouille green beans and  succotash ($16). Only one entree features pasta — bowties tossed with shrimp, yellow and roma tomatoes, yellow corn, watercress, garlic, basil and parmesan cheese ($24). Grilled Georgia Mountain Trout and its toasted pecan-basil butter melt in the mouth ($18).

Many of the entrees — or a version of  them — are also available at lunch. On the  verandah, perhaps? amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com"
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  string(4106) "__The oldest building __in the Village of Stone Mountain, a two-story stone and clapboard structure constructed in 1836, has been a post office, a Civil War hospital, numerous hotels and an abandoned wreck. It is our good fortune that today it is __The Sycamore Grill__, named in honor of the 153-year-old tree shading the verandah.
It is a very small building; one can scarcely imagine what it must have been like in any of its previous incarnations. But it is possible to glimpse the past in the main room where a transparent panel in one wall exposes part of the original  2-foot-thick wall, its bricks  fabricated of clay, mud, rock, horse hair and the local granite.

The interior is pleasingly  simple: wooden chairs painted dark green; rough-textured walls painted a muted color somewhere between mustard and cream; two or three fresh stems in small bud vases on each of the eight tables.

The crisp white tablecloths raise expectations, and with the exception of a few entrees inexplicably covered with cheese, these are more than satisfied. The ingredients are high quality, they are combined in interesting ways, and they are prepared with a high degree of skill.

One needn't wait for the entrees to  experience this. Even a salad will do. Something like the wilted spinach salad, for example, an enormous mound of fresh spinach, steamed to an exemplary consistency, bathed in an apple cider and brown sugar dressing and  incorporating toasted prosciutto, goat cheese, walnuts and grape tomatoes ($7). Sweet, salty, biting, crunchy -- all these flavors and textures burst in the mouth simultaneously.

That's typical of the kitchen's style. Blue crab fritters shine under a lemon-dill cream sauce ($7); sweet potato french fries are tweaked by a blue cheese dipping sauce ($6); the fried green  tomatoes' tartness is mellowed by crumbled goat cheese and roasted red pepper sauce ($7); whole grain mustard-apricot sauce punches up a plate of coconut shrimp ($9). And these are only the appetizers.

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The kitchen's strength is grilling. Paired with the nuanced sauces or glazes -- blackberry, orange, lemon-basil and roasted red pepper among them -- beef, duck, lamb and pork loin rise to their fullest flavor.

My favorite is the luscious marinated  flank steak, grilled medium rare and  enhanced by a light, piquant red wine  peppercorn sauce ($15). But I would never  turn down the veal reduction and blue cheese crumbles on the 8-ounce filet mignon ($25)  or the pineapple-garlic glazed marinated pork loin rib chop on its bed of crispy sweet onion straws ($16).

Duck lovers, rejoice! For you, there is  roasted duck breast with a spicy blackberry sauce ($17). And an apple-mint glaze is a much more refreshing treatment for the 14-ounce New Zealand rack of lamb ($25) than the usual  herb crust.

While grilled meats are the highlights of The Sycamore Grill menu, they aren't the only option. The kitchen encrusts chicken breast with pecans, then adds a spicy orange sauce ($16); a whopping 10-ounce blackened chicken breast arrives at the table with Creole sauce, garlic andouille green beans and  succotash ($16). Only one entree features pasta -- bowties tossed with shrimp, yellow and roma tomatoes, yellow corn, watercress, garlic, basil and parmesan cheese ($24). Grilled Georgia Mountain Trout and its toasted pecan-basil butter melt in the mouth ($18).

Many of the entrees -- or a version of  them -- are also available at lunch. On the  verandah, perhaps? ____[mailto:amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com|amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com]____"
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It is a very small building; one can scarcely imagine what it must have been like in any of its previous incarnations. But it is possible to glimpse the past in the main room where a transparent panel in one wall exposes part of the original  2-foot-thick wall, its bricks  fabricated of clay, mud, rock, horse hair and the local granite.

The interior is pleasingly  simple: wooden chairs painted dark green; rough-textured walls painted a muted color somewhere between mustard and cream; two or three fresh stems in small bud vases on each of the eight tables.

The crisp white tablecloths raise expectations, and with the exception of a few entrees inexplicably covered with cheese, these are more than satisfied. The ingredients are high quality, they are combined in interesting ways, and they are prepared with a high degree of skill.

One needn't wait for the entrees to  experience this. Even a salad will do. Something like the wilted spinach salad, for example, an enormous mound of fresh spinach, steamed to an exemplary consistency, bathed in an apple cider and brown sugar dressing and  incorporating toasted prosciutto, goat cheese, walnuts and grape tomatoes ($7). Sweet, salty, biting, crunchy — all these flavors and textures burst in the mouth simultaneously.

That's typical of the kitchen's style. Blue crab fritters shine under a lemon-dill cream sauce ($7); sweet potato french fries are tweaked by a blue cheese dipping sauce ($6); the fried green  tomatoes' tartness is mellowed by crumbled goat cheese and roasted red pepper sauce ($7); whole grain mustard-apricot sauce punches up a plate of coconut shrimp ($9). And these are only the appetizers.

They are large enough,  however, to serve as main courses, as are the lovely salads. No wisps of brown lettuce here. Beds of  hand-picked mixed greens cradle such diverse fillings as crisp sweet onion straws, grape  tomatoes, seedless cucumbers and sunflower seeds (the $5 house salad); blackberry  chicken salad with caramelized walnuts ($7);  or kabobs of beef tenderloin, sweet peppers, portabella mushrooms and grape tomatoes, which are topped with Danish blue cheese  and onion straws in a red wine peppercorn  vinaigrette ($12).

The kitchen's strength is grilling. Paired with the nuanced sauces or glazes — blackberry, orange, lemon-basil and roasted red pepper among them — beef, duck, lamb and pork loin rise to their fullest flavor.

My favorite is the luscious marinated  flank steak, grilled medium rare and  enhanced by a light, piquant red wine  peppercorn sauce ($15). But I would never  turn down the veal reduction and blue cheese crumbles on the unce filet mignon ($25)  or the pineapple-garlic glazed marinated pork loin rib chop on its bed of crispy sweet onion straws ($16).

Duck lovers, rejoice! For you, there is  roasted duck breast with a spicy blackberry sauce ($17). And an apple-mint glaze is a much more refreshing treatment for the 14-ounce New Zealand rack of lamb ($25) than the usual  herb crust.

While grilled meats are the highlights of The Sycamore Grill menu, they aren't the only option. The kitchen encrusts chicken breast with pecans, then adds a spicy orange sauce ($16); a whopping 10-ounce blackened chicken breast arrives at the table with Creole sauce, garlic andouille green beans and  succotash ($16). Only one entree features pasta — bowties tossed with shrimp, yellow and roma tomatoes, yellow corn, watercress, garlic, basil and parmesan cheese ($24). Grilled Georgia Mountain Trout and its toasted pecan-basil butter melt in the mouth ($18).

Many of the entrees — or a version of  them — are also available at lunch. On the  verandah, perhaps? amy.jinknerlloyd@creativeloafing.com             13008997 1238094                          Restaurant Review - Under the Sycamore tree "
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Wednesday August 21, 2002 12:04 am EDT
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Wednesday August 21, 2002 12:04 am EDT
Under the Sycamore tree: The Sycamore Grill has it made in the shadeThe oldest building in the Village of Stone Mountain, a two-story stone and clapboard structure constructed in 1836, has been a post office, a Civil War hospital, numerous hotels and an abandoned wreck. It is our good fortune that today it is The Sycamore Grill, named in honor of the 153-year-old tree shading the verandah.It is... | more...
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[Admin link: Restaurant Review - Cue'd up]