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Weekend Arts Agenda: The Colors of Summer August 03 2012

Image

  • Courtesy 2 Rules Fine Art
  • Ava Werner, "Migration," 24x24, mixed media on panel



For the month of August, 2 Rules Fine Art is running The Colors of Summer, a mixed-media exhibit of summer-y pieces which capture a range of the city's seasonal shades. Oddly, they don't say anything about the heat. A reception opens tonight at 6 p.m.

After the jump, more hotspots around town.



More By This Writer

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  string(6483) "On a boiling night in August, two vampires prepared for battle in the parking lot of what used to be Grant Park Elementary, off Glenwood Avenue. One vampire, a snarling beast, stood tall across from the other, a "bastard" that could hug things to death. After an exchange of words, their battle began. One threw paper and the other, scissors.

??
This is what it's like watching the Atlanta Interactive Theatre play one of the Southeast's oldest live-action role-playing games, which in August celebrated its 22nd year.

??
On the second Saturday of each month, AIT takes over several rooms and hallways of an old school building, which is now the Arts Exchange. It has been based there for almost all of its life.

??
It is a hands-off, salon-style game based on the role-playing game, Vampire: The Masquerade. It's driven primarily by conversation and those rock-paper-scissors battles, called "chops." It has a heavy political bent, too, with the players as scheming and competing vampires of one sort or another.

??
The story is actually set in Atlanta, incorporating local landmarks, and gameplay builds the basics of role-playing (combat, questing, spells) into incredible intricacies. A typical session runs about six hours, past midnight, and involves clan council meetings, royalty, and secret plots.

??
Players vie for control, or for more power or experience, or whatever else they might desire. They can bring props and costumes — but no giant foam weapons.

??
AIT has a rich, weird history. (It briefly played at the Masquerade.) Several of its players have been involved for more than a decade, if not two. Unlike other LARPs, it has never "reset," wiping its own narrative clean.

??
"AIT is such a long-term game that it by itself has a reputation," says Mark Delgado, who started playing at the second game ever. "If you go to a different LARP and talk about AIT, you're going to find people that either talk bad about it, who don't like it, or who say, 'Oh, that's that game that's been going on forever.'"

??
That part made the months leading up to the August anniversary both novel and chaotic.

??
Last year, AIT decided to substantially rewrite its rules — a controversial decision made to make the game more accessible and appealing to new players and players of other LARPs. But the change, which involved protracted, deliberate internal planning and discussion, rubbed some players the wrong way.

??
Ash Lovins, one of the three storytellers who guide play and who suggested the rule change, says the old system privileged experienced players in the extreme.

??
"In the new system, a first-time player always has a chance to succeed no matter the situation," he says. "I heard many newer players comment on this while we were testing the new rules, saying such things as, 'Wow, I feel useful,' and, 'I finally feel like I contributed.'"

??
The new rules became effective in January 2015, following a player vote.

??
"Unfortunately, someone will always be displeased with a decision," Lovins says. "AIT did bring in newcomers, but we did lose some long-time players."

??
AIT has gone through "lean times" before, Delgado says. Attendance for the games in July, August, September, and October averaged 32 people (though the latter game drew 36 people, the highest of the four months). This creates what Delgado calls a "budget deficit," which can be filled by the money AIT has saved over the years. Monthly rent is about $360; and each player pays $8 each.

??
Attendance can be fluid anyway, dipping most in the heart of winter or summer, when the air in the building burns or freezes. (There's no central air.) Delgado says the single-biggest factor in a player's involvement is juggling their real-world obligations such as families and jobs, not how they feel about the game's changes.

??
Lovins says attendance has historically been much higher, and he says that AIT no longer has a near-monopoly on vampire LARPs in metro Atlanta. He remembers games in the '90s that drew 70 or more people. (In fact, there used to be five storytellers, but two recent vacancies weren't filled in order to preserve the player base.)

??
A player, or players, seems to be contributing a bit extra toward rent now, so their surplus is never too strained, Delgado says. He says whoever it is "is accepting an understanding that right now it's a bit lean, that they have done something potentially that they need to keep the game going until they can rev the attendance back up, rev the people back up." Because to AIT, the game is well worth saving.

??
Lovins and his storyteller colleagues say that the players guide the plot. He gave an example of a player who made the decision to rip the landing gear from a plane during its descent (and to later blame it on terrorists), during a quest at Hartsfield-Jackson. "People are unpredictable," he says.

??
"I still like AIT and I still have love for AIT, so I'm back to support it because I was told that their player base was not high enough to support the rent of this place," says Mark Mueller-Rougier, one longtime player who was put off by the rule change. He says it's "OK," but an ill fit with the game's history and setting.

??
Mueller-Rougier has been playing since 1997. He stopped when he had a child and returned in August, choosing a character designed specifically to stress test the ways in which this new game world might be broken. (His character, who would battle the beast in the parking lot, is married to an even more awesomely powered witch, played by his wife.)

??
At that August game, in fact, there were several returning players. Monthly attendance was predicted by some to break 40. It topped out at 33, but also included at least three relative newcomers.

??
As the night began, they all gathered together in the building's Paul Robeson Theatre, as they always do, adorned in top hats and canes and punk jackets. The prince wore a Nirvana T-shirt. Three men surrounded the prince as he gave his opening remarks. They were dressed all in black, and one wore a hooded robe. They were lurking. They were invisible. They were very, very deadly. The object of their hunt? A fourth player, who was a member of a shunned group with a hidden third eye. A fifth player, the beast who would battle Mueller-Rougier in the parking lot later that night, had arranged her death.

??
She never showed.

??Editor's note: This story was updated to correct a reference to Vampire: The Masquerade."
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??
This is what it's like watching the [http://www.atlantavampire.com/|Atlanta Interactive Theatre] play one of the Southeast's oldest live-action role-playing games, which in August celebrated its 22nd year.

??
On the second Saturday of each month, AIT takes over several rooms and hallways of an old school building, which is now the Arts Exchange. It has been based there for almost all of its life.

??
It is a hands-off, salon-style game based on the role-playing game, [http://www.white-wolf.com/|Vampire: The Masquerade]. It's driven primarily by conversation and those rock-paper-scissors battles, called "chops." It has a heavy political bent, too, with the players as scheming and competing vampires of one sort or another.

??
The story is actually set in Atlanta, incorporating local landmarks, and gameplay builds the basics of role-playing (combat, questing, spells) into incredible intricacies. A typical session runs about six hours, past midnight, and involves clan council meetings, royalty, and secret plots.

??
Players vie for control, or for more power or experience, or whatever else they might desire. They can bring props and costumes — but no giant foam weapons.

??
AIT has a rich, weird history. (It briefly played at the Masquerade.) Several of its players have been involved for more than a decade, if not two. Unlike other LARPs, it has never "reset," wiping its own narrative clean.

??
"AIT is such a long-term game that it by itself has a reputation," says Mark Delgado, who started playing at the second game ever. "If you go to a different LARP and talk about AIT, you're going to find people that either talk bad about it, who don't like it, or who say, 'Oh, that's that game that's been going on forever.'"

??
That part made the months leading up to the August anniversary both novel and chaotic.

??
Last year, AIT decided to substantially rewrite its rules — a controversial decision made to make the game more accessible and appealing to new players and players of other LARPs. But the change, which involved protracted, deliberate internal planning and discussion, rubbed some players the wrong way.

??
Ash Lovins, one of the three storytellers who guide play and who suggested the rule change, says the old system privileged experienced players in the extreme.

??
"In the new system, a first-time player always has a chance to succeed no matter the situation," he says. "I heard many newer players comment on this while we were testing the new rules, saying such things as, 'Wow, I feel useful,' and, 'I finally feel like I contributed.'"

??
The new rules became effective in January 2015, following a player vote.

??
"Unfortunately, someone will always be displeased with a decision," Lovins says. "AIT did bring in newcomers, but we did lose some long-time players."

??
AIT has gone through "lean times" before, Delgado says. Attendance for the games in July, August, September, and October averaged 32 people (though the latter game drew 36 people, the highest of the four months). This creates what Delgado calls a "budget deficit," which can be filled by the money AIT has saved over the years. Monthly rent is about $360; and each player pays $8 each.

??
Attendance can be fluid anyway, dipping most in the heart of winter or summer, when the air in the building burns or freezes. (There's no central air.) Delgado says the single-biggest factor in a player's involvement is juggling their real-world obligations such as families and jobs, not how they feel about the game's changes.

??
Lovins says attendance has historically been much higher, and he says that AIT no longer has a near-monopoly on vampire LARPs in metro Atlanta. He remembers games in the '90s that drew 70 or more people. (In fact, there used to be five storytellers, but two recent vacancies weren't filled in order to preserve the player base.)

??
A player, or players, seems to be contributing a bit extra toward rent now, so their surplus is never too strained, Delgado says. He says whoever it is "is accepting an understanding that right now it's a bit lean, that they have done something potentially that they need to keep the game going until they can rev the attendance back up, rev the people back up." Because to AIT, the game is well worth saving.

??
Lovins and his storyteller colleagues say that the players guide the plot. He gave an example of a player who made the decision to rip the landing gear from a plane during its descent (and to later blame it on terrorists), during a quest at Hartsfield-Jackson. "People are unpredictable," he says.

??
"I still like AIT and I still have love for AIT, so I'm back to support it because I was told that their player base was not high enough to support the rent of this place," says Mark Mueller-Rougier, one longtime player who was put off by the rule change. He says it's "OK," but an ill fit with the game's history and setting.

??
Mueller-Rougier has been playing since 1997. He stopped when he had a child and returned in August, choosing a character designed specifically to stress test the ways in which this new game world might be broken. (His character, who would battle the beast in the parking lot, is married to an even more awesomely powered witch, played by his wife.)

??
At that August game, in fact, there were several returning players. Monthly attendance was predicted by some to break 40. It topped out at 33, but also included at least three relative newcomers.

??
As the night began, they all gathered together in the building's Paul Robeson Theatre, as they always do, adorned in top hats and canes and punk jackets. The prince wore a Nirvana T-shirt. Three men surrounded the prince as he gave his opening remarks. They were dressed all in black, and one wore a hooded robe. They were lurking. They were invisible. They were very, very deadly. The object of their hunt? A fourth player, who was a member of a shunned group with a hidden third eye. A fifth player, the beast who would battle Mueller-Rougier in the parking lot later that night, had arranged her death.

??
She never showed.

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??
This is what it's like watching the Atlanta Interactive Theatre play one of the Southeast's oldest live-action role-playing games, which in August celebrated its 22nd year.

??
On the second Saturday of each month, AIT takes over several rooms and hallways of an old school building, which is now the Arts Exchange. It has been based there for almost all of its life.

??
It is a hands-off, salon-style game based on the role-playing game, Vampire: The Masquerade. It's driven primarily by conversation and those rock-paper-scissors battles, called "chops." It has a heavy political bent, too, with the players as scheming and competing vampires of one sort or another.

??
The story is actually set in Atlanta, incorporating local landmarks, and gameplay builds the basics of role-playing (combat, questing, spells) into incredible intricacies. A typical session runs about six hours, past midnight, and involves clan council meetings, royalty, and secret plots.

??
Players vie for control, or for more power or experience, or whatever else they might desire. They can bring props and costumes — but no giant foam weapons.

??
AIT has a rich, weird history. (It briefly played at the Masquerade.) Several of its players have been involved for more than a decade, if not two. Unlike other LARPs, it has never "reset," wiping its own narrative clean.

??
"AIT is such a long-term game that it by itself has a reputation," says Mark Delgado, who started playing at the second game ever. "If you go to a different LARP and talk about AIT, you're going to find people that either talk bad about it, who don't like it, or who say, 'Oh, that's that game that's been going on forever.'"

??
That part made the months leading up to the August anniversary both novel and chaotic.

??
Last year, AIT decided to substantially rewrite its rules — a controversial decision made to make the game more accessible and appealing to new players and players of other LARPs. But the change, which involved protracted, deliberate internal planning and discussion, rubbed some players the wrong way.

??
Ash Lovins, one of the three storytellers who guide play and who suggested the rule change, says the old system privileged experienced players in the extreme.

??
"In the new system, a first-time player always has a chance to succeed no matter the situation," he says. "I heard many newer players comment on this while we were testing the new rules, saying such things as, 'Wow, I feel useful,' and, 'I finally feel like I contributed.'"

??
The new rules became effective in January 2015, following a player vote.

??
"Unfortunately, someone will always be displeased with a decision," Lovins says. "AIT did bring in newcomers, but we did lose some long-time players."

??
AIT has gone through "lean times" before, Delgado says. Attendance for the games in July, August, September, and October averaged 32 people (though the latter game drew 36 people, the highest of the four months). This creates what Delgado calls a "budget deficit," which can be filled by the money AIT has saved over the years. Monthly rent is about $360; and each player pays $8 each.

??
Attendance can be fluid anyway, dipping most in the heart of winter or summer, when the air in the building burns or freezes. (There's no central air.) Delgado says the single-biggest factor in a player's involvement is juggling their real-world obligations such as families and jobs, not how they feel about the game's changes.

??
Lovins says attendance has historically been much higher, and he says that AIT no longer has a near-monopoly on vampire LARPs in metro Atlanta. He remembers games in the '90s that drew 70 or more people. (In fact, there used to be five storytellers, but two recent vacancies weren't filled in order to preserve the player base.)

??
A player, or players, seems to be contributing a bit extra toward rent now, so their surplus is never too strained, Delgado says. He says whoever it is "is accepting an understanding that right now it's a bit lean, that they have done something potentially that they need to keep the game going until they can rev the attendance back up, rev the people back up." Because to AIT, the game is well worth saving.

??
Lovins and his storyteller colleagues say that the players guide the plot. He gave an example of a player who made the decision to rip the landing gear from a plane during its descent (and to later blame it on terrorists), during a quest at Hartsfield-Jackson. "People are unpredictable," he says.

??
"I still like AIT and I still have love for AIT, so I'm back to support it because I was told that their player base was not high enough to support the rent of this place," says Mark Mueller-Rougier, one longtime player who was put off by the rule change. He says it's "OK," but an ill fit with the game's history and setting.

??
Mueller-Rougier has been playing since 1997. He stopped when he had a child and returned in August, choosing a character designed specifically to stress test the ways in which this new game world might be broken. (His character, who would battle the beast in the parking lot, is married to an even more awesomely powered witch, played by his wife.)

??
At that August game, in fact, there were several returning players. Monthly attendance was predicted by some to break 40. It topped out at 33, but also included at least three relative newcomers.

??
As the night began, they all gathered together in the building's Paul Robeson Theatre, as they always do, adorned in top hats and canes and punk jackets. The prince wore a Nirvana T-shirt. Three men surrounded the prince as he gave his opening remarks. They were dressed all in black, and one wore a hooded robe. They were lurking. They were invisible. They were very, very deadly. The object of their hunt? A fourth player, who was a member of a shunned group with a hidden third eye. A fifth player, the beast who would battle Mueller-Rougier in the parking lot later that night, had arranged her death.

??
She never showed.

??Editor's note: This story was updated to correct a reference to Vampire: The Masquerade.             13085414 15891702                          LARP'ing with vampires "
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Article

Thursday October 29, 2015 04:00 am EDT
Atlanta Interactive Theatre brings the underworld to Arts Exchange | more...
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  string(5365) "Allan Vella says almost everyone has a Fox Theatre story, what he calls the connection to the successful campaign to save the historic Midtown theater back from demolition in 1974. "When I came to Atlanta, everybody I ran into had a Fox story, everyone contributed, everyone had a family member who helped out," says Vella, the theatre's president and CEO.

In honor of that work, and the decades of restoration and cultural relevance it began, the Fox has announced a yearlong celebration — including the return of old friends (Lynyrd Skynyrd), new faces, and one block party. We recently spoke with Vella about the coming anniversary celebration, the Fox's long legacy, and its even longer history.

How did the Fox end up where it was in 1974?

Obviously the theater had its challenges stemming back to the day it opened. It opened on Christmas Day, 1929, two months after the stock market crash. And after 125 weeks of operation, the theater — which cost $3 million to build — was sold on the courthouse steps for $75,000. It was bought back by several members of the Shriners and they operated it and then obviously it kind of went on and people were moving out to the suburbs and there was the dawn of the multiplexes and television became very prominent in everyone's homes.

But the Fox Theatre has been part of the cultural core of Atlanta ... I think we've always been part of that and I'd like to also say that I think ourselves, along with the Woodruff Arts Center, have really been the bookends of Midtown.

Growing up, my mom would always tell me that my grandfather was involved with the campaign back in the '70s. It very much feels like a grassroots movement, people recognizing that the theater was worth saving.

Well you're right. I'll give you an example: I worked in Detroit and I was the general manger of the Fox Theatre there for a number of years and one family saved the theater and everyone was very appreciative. But when I came to Atlanta, everybody I ran into had a Fox story, everyone contributed, and everyone had a family member who helped out. So if it was students getting involved or sororities — and then there were kids who collected pennies at their school and contributed them and then there were some major anonymous donations that were very significant once they saw the groundswell.

Tell me about the highlights from this coming celebration.

Jeff Foxworthy was important to us because he was always a great supporter since he was in high school. Actually in his yearbook he wrote, "Save the Fox." He even said at our press conference, "If God says you only have one more show and then you're done, you're coming home," he said, "I want it to be at the Fox."

We wanted to do the block party because we thought, "Wouldn't it be fun to turn everything inside out?" We're really kind of an indoor venue. When my daughter was like 4 or 5 years old she told me, "We're not inside, daddy, we're outside" — because she saw all of the stars. We thought, "Let's turn the theater inside out."

Take me through the planning — how did Lynyrd Skynyrd return?

Back in 1976, Lynyrd Skynyrd helped come to our aid by having a series of concerts here that were recorded for the live album One More From the Road that took place here in the theater and Skynyrd made a financial contribution to the "Save the Fox" campaign. So we asked them if they would consider coming back and they were actually in the planning phases to celebrate the 40th anniversary of that album and they said, "Absolutely, we'd love to do that."

Are there any other highlights from the Fox's last few decades that you think of as real treasures from the theater's legacy?

I think hosting the Metropolitan Opera was one of the bigger moments for the theater throughout its history and I mean, that was obviously another generation, but folks that are on our board that were here at that time talk about how that was a citywide event and no one dared miss it. And the Metropolitan Opera loved coming to Atlanta and they were treated like royalty.

I also think the first time Phantom of the Opera came to Atlanta was a real watershed moment for us. It really put us on the Broadway touring map as well, and proved to North America that Atlanta was one of the leading Broadway touring maps in the country and we still remind everyone of that. We set the highest gross for a single week of touring Broadway ever, with Book of Mormon — and that was during an ice storm.

Do you remember what your reaction was, walking into the Fox for the first time?

It instantly moved me, in terms of how beautiful the restoration was. The stars on the ceiling were magnificent. When I first noticed the clouds were actually moving across the sky, I was shocked and then even more shocked to find out that that was 1929 technology that was still in the works. We call it "the grand sense of occasion." You're not just going to the local amphitheater or arena wearing shorts and a T-shirt in a cinder block building. So, immediately it kind of gets in your blood.

And then really the staff, I think, left the biggest impression on me, because the culture here amongst the staff was so good, that they treated the guests like they were walking into their home and then they guarded this theater like it was their home.

This interview has been edited and condensed."
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In honor of that work, and the decades of restoration and cultural relevance it began, the Fox has announced a yearlong celebration — including the return of old friends ([https://foxtheatre.org/lynyrd-skynyrds-renowned-musical-legacy-honored-one-night-concert-event-november-12th-2014-fox-theatre-atlanta/|Lynyrd Skynyrd]), new faces, and one block party. We recently spoke with Vella about the coming anniversary celebration, the Fox's long legacy, and its even longer history.

__How did the Fox end up where it was in 1974?__

Obviously the theater had its challenges stemming back to the day it opened. It opened on Christmas Day, 1929, two months after the stock market crash. And after 125 weeks of operation, the theater — which cost $3 million to build — was sold on the courthouse steps for $75,000. It was bought back by several members of the Shriners and they operated it and then obviously it kind of went on and people were moving out to the suburbs and there was the dawn of the multiplexes and television became very prominent in everyone's homes.

[But] the Fox Theatre has been part of the cultural core of Atlanta ... I think we've always been part of that and I'd like to also say that I think ourselves, along with the Woodruff Arts Center, have really been the bookends of Midtown.

__Growing up, my mom would always tell me that my grandfather was involved with the campaign back in the '70s. It very much feels like a grassroots movement, people recognizing that the theater was worth saving.__

Well you're right. I'll give you an example: I worked in Detroit and I was the general manger of the Fox Theatre [there] for a number of years and one family saved the theater and everyone was very appreciative. But when I came to Atlanta, everybody I ran into had a Fox story, everyone contributed, and everyone had a family member who helped out. So if it was students getting involved or sororities — and then there [were] kids who collected pennies at their school and contributed them and then there were some major anonymous donations that were very significant once they saw the groundswell.

__Tell me about the highlights from this coming celebration.__

Jeff Foxworthy was important to us because he was always a great supporter since he was in high school. Actually in his yearbook he wrote, "Save the Fox." He even said at our press conference, "If God says you only have one more show and then you're done, you're coming home," he said, "I want it to be at the Fox."

We wanted to do the block party because we thought, "Wouldn't it be fun to turn everything inside out?" We're really kind of an indoor venue. When my daughter was like 4 or 5 [years old] she told me, "We're not inside, daddy, we're outside" — because she saw all of the stars. We thought, "Let's turn the theater inside out."

__Take me through the planning — how did Lynyrd Skynyrd return?__

Back in 1976, Lynyrd Skynyrd helped come to our aid by having a series of concerts here that were recorded for the live album ''One More From the Road'' that took place here in the theater and Skynyrd made a financial contribution to the "Save the Fox" campaign. So we asked them if they would consider coming back and they were actually in the planning phases to celebrate the 40th anniversary of that album and they said, "Absolutely, we'd love to do that."

__Are there any other highlights from the Fox's last few decades that you think of as real treasures from the theater's legacy?__

I think hosting the Metropolitan Opera was one of the bigger moments for the theater throughout its history and I mean, that was obviously another generation, but folks that are on our board that were here at that time talk about how that was a citywide event and no one dared miss it. And the Metropolitan Opera loved coming to Atlanta and they were treated like royalty.

I also think the first time ''Phantom of the Opera'' came to Atlanta was a real watershed moment for us. It really put us on the Broadway touring map as well, and proved to North America that Atlanta was one of the leading Broadway touring maps in the country and we still remind everyone of that. We set the highest gross for a single week of touring Broadway ever, with ''Book of Mormon'' — and that was during an ice storm.

__Do you remember what your reaction was, walking into the Fox for the first time?__

It instantly moved me, in terms of how beautiful the restoration was. The stars on the ceiling were magnificent. When I first noticed the clouds were actually moving across the sky, I was shocked and then even more shocked to find out that that was 1929 technology that was still in the works. We call it "the grand sense of occasion." You're not just going to the local amphitheater or arena wearing shorts and a T-shirt in a cinder block building. So, immediately it kind of gets in your blood.

And then really the staff, I think, left the biggest impression on me, because the culture here amongst the staff was so good, that they treated the guests like they were walking into their home and then they guarded this theater like it was their home.

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  string(5663) "    Theater's CEO looks back on 40 years of history and community support   2015-01-15T09:00:00+00:00 Allan Vella talks 'Save the Fox' celebration   Adam Carlson 5430523 2015-01-15T09:00:00+00:00  Allan Vella says almost everyone has a Fox Theatre story, what he calls the connection to the successful campaign to save the historic Midtown theater back from demolition in 1974. "When I came to Atlanta, everybody I ran into had a Fox story, everyone contributed, everyone had a family member who helped out," says Vella, the theatre's president and CEO.

In honor of that work, and the decades of restoration and cultural relevance it began, the Fox has announced a yearlong celebration — including the return of old friends (Lynyrd Skynyrd), new faces, and one block party. We recently spoke with Vella about the coming anniversary celebration, the Fox's long legacy, and its even longer history.

How did the Fox end up where it was in 1974?

Obviously the theater had its challenges stemming back to the day it opened. It opened on Christmas Day, 1929, two months after the stock market crash. And after 125 weeks of operation, the theater — which cost $3 million to build — was sold on the courthouse steps for $75,000. It was bought back by several members of the Shriners and they operated it and then obviously it kind of went on and people were moving out to the suburbs and there was the dawn of the multiplexes and television became very prominent in everyone's homes.

But the Fox Theatre has been part of the cultural core of Atlanta ... I think we've always been part of that and I'd like to also say that I think ourselves, along with the Woodruff Arts Center, have really been the bookends of Midtown.

Growing up, my mom would always tell me that my grandfather was involved with the campaign back in the '70s. It very much feels like a grassroots movement, people recognizing that the theater was worth saving.

Well you're right. I'll give you an example: I worked in Detroit and I was the general manger of the Fox Theatre there for a number of years and one family saved the theater and everyone was very appreciative. But when I came to Atlanta, everybody I ran into had a Fox story, everyone contributed, and everyone had a family member who helped out. So if it was students getting involved or sororities — and then there were kids who collected pennies at their school and contributed them and then there were some major anonymous donations that were very significant once they saw the groundswell.

Tell me about the highlights from this coming celebration.

Jeff Foxworthy was important to us because he was always a great supporter since he was in high school. Actually in his yearbook he wrote, "Save the Fox." He even said at our press conference, "If God says you only have one more show and then you're done, you're coming home," he said, "I want it to be at the Fox."

We wanted to do the block party because we thought, "Wouldn't it be fun to turn everything inside out?" We're really kind of an indoor venue. When my daughter was like 4 or 5 years old she told me, "We're not inside, daddy, we're outside" — because she saw all of the stars. We thought, "Let's turn the theater inside out."

Take me through the planning — how did Lynyrd Skynyrd return?

Back in 1976, Lynyrd Skynyrd helped come to our aid by having a series of concerts here that were recorded for the live album One More From the Road that took place here in the theater and Skynyrd made a financial contribution to the "Save the Fox" campaign. So we asked them if they would consider coming back and they were actually in the planning phases to celebrate the 40th anniversary of that album and they said, "Absolutely, we'd love to do that."

Are there any other highlights from the Fox's last few decades that you think of as real treasures from the theater's legacy?

I think hosting the Metropolitan Opera was one of the bigger moments for the theater throughout its history and I mean, that was obviously another generation, but folks that are on our board that were here at that time talk about how that was a citywide event and no one dared miss it. And the Metropolitan Opera loved coming to Atlanta and they were treated like royalty.

I also think the first time Phantom of the Opera came to Atlanta was a real watershed moment for us. It really put us on the Broadway touring map as well, and proved to North America that Atlanta was one of the leading Broadway touring maps in the country and we still remind everyone of that. We set the highest gross for a single week of touring Broadway ever, with Book of Mormon — and that was during an ice storm.

Do you remember what your reaction was, walking into the Fox for the first time?

It instantly moved me, in terms of how beautiful the restoration was. The stars on the ceiling were magnificent. When I first noticed the clouds were actually moving across the sky, I was shocked and then even more shocked to find out that that was 1929 technology that was still in the works. We call it "the grand sense of occasion." You're not just going to the local amphitheater or arena wearing shorts and a T-shirt in a cinder block building. So, immediately it kind of gets in your blood.

And then really the staff, I think, left the biggest impression on me, because the culture here amongst the staff was so good, that they treated the guests like they were walking into their home and then they guarded this theater like it was their home.

This interview has been edited and condensed.             13081508 13194551                          Allan Vella talks 'Save the Fox' celebration "
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Thursday January 15, 2015 04:00 am EST
Theater's CEO looks back on 40 years of history and community support | more...
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*Paramount Pictures
*FOLLOW THE LEADERS: Andrew Young (from left, André Holland), Ralph Abernathy (Colman Domingo), Martin Luther King, Jr. (David Oyelowo), and James Orange (Omar Dorsey)


Last time most people saw Atlanta native Omar Dorsey, he was playing a homicidal "maniac" in Showtime's "Ray Donovan" — his words, not ours.

But Dorsey's next big screen role will be as the Rev. James Orange in the star-studded historical drama Selma, which shot in the Atlanta area this summer.

It's a role that Dorsey says he had to take, even more so given his violent small-screen role. "I think the film is going to be one of the most important movies of our generation, actually," he says.

Dorsey talks a lot about Selma's importance — and beauty, even in confronting some of the South's ugliest moments. Selma, written by Paul Webb and directed by Ava DuVernay, traces the 1965 voting rights marches across Alabama and follows many of the movement's central figures, both heroes and villains, including Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, Gov. George Wallace, and Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson.

Selma shot in Conyers, Covington, Marietta, and Downtown, among other locations. Its cast list positively glows, with Cuba Gooding Jr., Common, Wendell Pierce, Lorraine Toussaint, Tom Wilkinson, David Oyelowo, and more — and Oprah. "And the list could go on," Dorsey says. "You know man, this cast is one of the most beautiful things that that’s been a part of my life."

Dorsey describes Orange as one of the movement's benevolent figures. The pastor, who lived in Atlanta during the heart of the Civil Rights Movement in the '60s, was well known at the time for his commitment to a philosophy of non-violence.

At the same time, recreating one of the most important, and most violent, periods in Southern history — including “Bloody Sunday,” which included assaults by law enforcement on hundreds of marchers — was not something Dorsey, or his costars, took on lightly.

"This has been given to us, to tell the story, so that we have to tell it at its highest. ... We knew that we were standing on the shoulders of giants," he says.

That kind of legacy weighed on them. But it bonded them, too.

Before the last day of shooting, when they were to actually march into Montgomery, Dorsey says the cast gathered in a hotel screening room and watched a documentary about that same moment in history.

"We sat there, cried, prayed, laughed, it was just something that was so powerful, so majestic," Dorsey says. "It was something that I’ve never been a part of anything like that before. That’s why this is always going to be my family.""
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*[http://clatl.com/atlanta/ImageArchives?by=1289764|Paramount Pictures]
*FOLLOW THE LEADERS: Andrew Young (from left, André Holland), Ralph Abernathy (Colman Domingo), Martin Luther King, Jr. (David Oyelowo), and James Orange (Omar Dorsey)


Last time most people saw Atlanta native Omar Dorsey, he was playing a homicidal "maniac" in Showtime's "Ray Donovan" — his words, not ours.

But Dorsey's next big screen role will be as the [http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/22/us/22orange.html|Rev. James Orange] in the star-studded historical drama ''Selma'', which shot in the Atlanta area this summer.

It's a role that Dorsey says he had to take, even more so given his violent small-screen role. "I think [the film] is going to be one of the most important movies of our generation, actually," he says.

Dorsey talks a lot about ''Selma'''s importance — and beauty, even in confronting some of the South's ugliest moments. ''Selma'', written by Paul Webb and directed by Ava DuVernay, traces the 1965 voting rights marches across Alabama and follows many of the movement's central figures, both heroes and villains, including Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, Gov. George Wallace, and Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson.

''Selma ''shot in Conyers, Covington, Marietta, and Downtown, among other locations. Its cast list positively glows, with Cuba Gooding Jr., Common, Wendell Pierce, Lorraine Toussaint, Tom Wilkinson, David Oyelowo, and more — and Oprah. "And the list could go on," Dorsey says. "You know man, this cast is one of the most beautiful things that that’s been a part of my life."

Dorsey describes Orange as one of the movement's benevolent figures. The pastor, who lived in Atlanta during the heart of the Civil Rights Movement in the '60s, was well known at the time for his commitment to a philosophy of non-violence.

At the same time, recreating one of the most important, and most violent, periods in Southern history — including “[http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/eyewitness/html.php?section=2|Bloody Sunday],” which included assaults by law enforcement on hundreds of marchers — was not something Dorsey, or his costars, took on lightly.

"This has been given to us, to tell the story, so that we have to tell it at its highest. ... We knew that we were standing on the shoulders of giants," he says.

That kind of legacy weighed on them. But it bonded them, too.

Before the last day of shooting, when they were to actually march into Montgomery, Dorsey says the cast gathered in a hotel screening room and watched a documentary about that same moment in history.

"[We] sat there, cried, prayed, laughed, it was just something that was so powerful, so majestic," Dorsey says. "It was something that I’ve never been a part of anything like that before. That’s why this is always going to be my family.""
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*Paramount Pictures
*FOLLOW THE LEADERS: Andrew Young (from left, André Holland), Ralph Abernathy (Colman Domingo), Martin Luther King, Jr. (David Oyelowo), and James Orange (Omar Dorsey)


Last time most people saw Atlanta native Omar Dorsey, he was playing a homicidal "maniac" in Showtime's "Ray Donovan" — his words, not ours.

But Dorsey's next big screen role will be as the Rev. James Orange in the star-studded historical drama Selma, which shot in the Atlanta area this summer.

It's a role that Dorsey says he had to take, even more so given his violent small-screen role. "I think the film is going to be one of the most important movies of our generation, actually," he says.

Dorsey talks a lot about Selma's importance — and beauty, even in confronting some of the South's ugliest moments. Selma, written by Paul Webb and directed by Ava DuVernay, traces the 1965 voting rights marches across Alabama and follows many of the movement's central figures, both heroes and villains, including Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, Gov. George Wallace, and Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson.

Selma shot in Conyers, Covington, Marietta, and Downtown, among other locations. Its cast list positively glows, with Cuba Gooding Jr., Common, Wendell Pierce, Lorraine Toussaint, Tom Wilkinson, David Oyelowo, and more — and Oprah. "And the list could go on," Dorsey says. "You know man, this cast is one of the most beautiful things that that’s been a part of my life."

Dorsey describes Orange as one of the movement's benevolent figures. The pastor, who lived in Atlanta during the heart of the Civil Rights Movement in the '60s, was well known at the time for his commitment to a philosophy of non-violence.

At the same time, recreating one of the most important, and most violent, periods in Southern history — including “Bloody Sunday,” which included assaults by law enforcement on hundreds of marchers — was not something Dorsey, or his costars, took on lightly.

"This has been given to us, to tell the story, so that we have to tell it at its highest. ... We knew that we were standing on the shoulders of giants," he says.

That kind of legacy weighed on them. But it bonded them, too.

Before the last day of shooting, when they were to actually march into Montgomery, Dorsey says the cast gathered in a hotel screening room and watched a documentary about that same moment in history.

"We sat there, cried, prayed, laughed, it was just something that was so powerful, so majestic," Dorsey says. "It was something that I’ve never been a part of anything like that before. That’s why this is always going to be my family."             13081312 13016376                          Local 'Selma' star on 'one of the most important movies of our generation' "
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Article

Tuesday December 23, 2014 10:00 am EST

  • Paramount Pictures
  • FOLLOW THE LEADERS: Andrew Young (from left, André Holland), Ralph Abernathy (Colman Domingo), Martin Luther King, Jr. (David Oyelowo), and James Orange (Omar Dorsey)



Last time most people saw Atlanta native Omar Dorsey, he was playing a homicidal "maniac" in Showtime's "Ray Donovan" — his words, not ours.

But Dorsey's next big screen role will be as the Rev. James...

| more...
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*CHRIS MIHAL
*


Programming note: This is my last week on the ATLwood beat, y'all. It's been a wonderful 18 months; at this point, there are almost too many productions and their attendant celebrities to keep track of. I followed in the footsteps of the industrious, omnivorous Allison Keene. And now someone will follow me.

Filming Updates:
>> The Nice Guys has been filming at the Sandy Springs home of producer Dallas Austin, once occupied by Justin Bieber, per Jennifer Brett, and at Akers Mill near Cumberland Mall. Its base camp is reportedly at Galleria.

>> The 5th Wave, under the production name "Sheldrake," reportedly filmed around Emory and in Druid Hills.

>> "Constantine" reportedly filmed near Peachtree and Lanier in Brookhaven and at Oglethorpe University.

>> Ant-Man will be filming at Broad and Luckie Streets next week, starting Nov. 12, per a notice sent around the neighborhood. (Turns out, the film's Pym Industries is actually the archives building.)

>> USA's "Complications" has been filming on Marietta Street and in Douglasville and Kirkwood.

?      ?        jump?        
Sightings:
>> Chloë Grace Moretz, Nina Dobrev, and Slash join a long list of celebs (Jennifer Lawrence, T.I., and on and on) who like to get scared at Netherworld.

>> Lil Jon flew back in town ... to vote. Or, rather: “6AM FLIGHT TO ATL TO VOTE BECAUSE GA NEVA SENT MY BALLOT AFTER NUMEROUS CALLS!!!” he wrote.

>> Charles Barkley went to Flywheel in Midtown.

Deals:
>> Ludacris will not be in the next "Celebrity Apprentice," but former "Cosby" star Keshia Knight Pulliam and "Real Housewife" Kenya Moore will be.

Miscellany:
>> The Old Atlanta Prison Farm keeps showing up in movies. Here's why. 

>> Julie McGee — John Rocker's girlfriend — just quit "Survivor," weeks after Rocker was booted. “I was depleted in every facet,” she says.

Have any tips? Sightings? Encounters? Pictures? Filming news? We need 'em! Drop me a line: adamacarlson at gmail.com; or send me a tweet @acarlson91 (Don't forget to use the hashtag #ATLwood.)."
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*[http://clatl.com/atlanta/ImageArchives?by=3171068|CHRIS MIHAL]
*


''Programming note: This is my last week on the ATLwood beat, y'all. It's been a wonderful 18 months; at this point, there are almost ''too'' many productions and their attendant celebrities to keep track of. I followed in the footsteps of the industrious, omnivorous Allison Keene. And now someone will follow me.''

===Filming Updates:===
__>>__ ''The Nice Guys'' has been filming at the Sandy Springs home of producer Dallas Austin, once occupied by __Justin Bieber__, [http://buzz.blog.ajc.com/2014/11/04/photos-ryan-gosling-russell-crowe-filming-the-nice-guys-in-atlanta/|per Jennifer Brett], and [https://twitter.com/whisper_thunder/status/530025353247744000|at Akers Mill near Cumberland Mall]. Its base camp [https://twitter.com/AtlantaFilming/status/530064282965512192|is reportedly at Galleria].

__>>__ ''The 5th Wave'', under the production name "Sheldrake," reportedly [https://twitter.com/Peachyscoop/status/529024431478571008|filmed around Emory] and [https://twitter.com/AtlantaFilming/status/529051807348449283|in Druid Hills].

__>>__ "Constantine" reportedly filmed [https://twitter.com/Peachyscoop/status/529030677782888449|near Peachtree and Lanier in Brookhaven] and [https://twitter.com/nayna786/status/529770034210414592|at Oglethorpe University].

__>>__ ''Ant-Man'' will be filming at Broad and Luckie Streets next week, starting Nov. 12, [http://www.onlocationvacations.com/2014/11/03/find-out-where-you-can-see-ant-man-filming-in-downtown-atlanta-next-week/|per a notice sent around the neighborhood]. (Turns out, the film's Pym Industries [http://www.atlantamagazine.com/news-culture-articles/whats-been-filming-in-atlanta-5th-wave-ant-man-vacation-more/|is actually the archives building].)

__>>__ USA's "Complications" [http://www.atlantamagazine.com/news-culture-articles/whats-been-filming-in-atlanta-5th-wave-ant-man-vacation-more/|has been filming] on Marietta Street and in Douglasville and Kirkwood.

?      ?        [jump]?        
===Sightings:===
__>>____ Chloë Grace Moretz__, __Nina Dobrev__, and __Slash__ join a long list of celebs (__Jennifer Lawrence__, __T.I.__, and on and on) who [http://buzz.blog.ajc.com/2014/10/31/boo-scary-celebrity-sightings-at-netherworld/|like to get scared at Netherworld].

__>>__ __Lil Jon__ flew back in town ... to vote. Or, rather: “6AM FLIGHT TO ATL TO VOTE BECAUSE GA NEVA SENT MY BALLOT AFTER NUMEROUS CALLS!!!” [http://instagram.com/p/u-uRxxPj25/?modal=true|he wrote].

__>>__ __Charles Barkley__ went [https://twitter.com/Peachyscoop/status/530179606616096769|to Flywheel in Midtown].

===Deals:===
__>>__ __Ludacris__ will ''not'' be in the next "Celebrity Apprentice," but former "Cosby" star __Keshia Knight Pulliam__ and "Real Housewife" __Kenya Moore__ [http://radiotvtalk.blog.ajc.com/2014/11/04/confirmed-kenya-moore-keshia-knight-pulliam-on-celebrity-apprentice/|will be].

===Miscellany:===
__>>__ The Old Atlanta Prison Farm keeps showing up in movies. [http://buzz.blog.ajc.com/2014/10/31/old-atlanta-prison-farm-a-favorite-with-filmmakers/|Here's why]. 

__>>__ __Julie McGee__ — __John Rocker's__ girlfriend — just quit "Survivor," weeks after Rocker was booted. “I was depleted in every facet,” [http://radiotvtalk.blog.ajc.com/2014/11/06/survivor-recap-million-dollar-decision-season-29-episode-7/|she says].

''Have any tips? Sightings? Encounters? Pictures? Filming news? We need 'em! Drop me a line: adamacarlson@gmail.com; or send me a tweet [https://twitter.com/acarlson91|@acarlson91] (Don't forget to use the hashtag #ATLwood.).''"
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*CHRIS MIHAL
*


Programming note: This is my last week on the ATLwood beat, y'all. It's been a wonderful 18 months; at this point, there are almost too many productions and their attendant celebrities to keep track of. I followed in the footsteps of the industrious, omnivorous Allison Keene. And now someone will follow me.

Filming Updates:
>> The Nice Guys has been filming at the Sandy Springs home of producer Dallas Austin, once occupied by Justin Bieber, per Jennifer Brett, and at Akers Mill near Cumberland Mall. Its base camp is reportedly at Galleria.

>> The 5th Wave, under the production name "Sheldrake," reportedly filmed around Emory and in Druid Hills.

>> "Constantine" reportedly filmed near Peachtree and Lanier in Brookhaven and at Oglethorpe University.

>> Ant-Man will be filming at Broad and Luckie Streets next week, starting Nov. 12, per a notice sent around the neighborhood. (Turns out, the film's Pym Industries is actually the archives building.)

>> USA's "Complications" has been filming on Marietta Street and in Douglasville and Kirkwood.

?      ?        jump?        
Sightings:
>> Chloë Grace Moretz, Nina Dobrev, and Slash join a long list of celebs (Jennifer Lawrence, T.I., and on and on) who like to get scared at Netherworld.

>> Lil Jon flew back in town ... to vote. Or, rather: “6AM FLIGHT TO ATL TO VOTE BECAUSE GA NEVA SENT MY BALLOT AFTER NUMEROUS CALLS!!!” he wrote.

>> Charles Barkley went to Flywheel in Midtown.

Deals:
>> Ludacris will not be in the next "Celebrity Apprentice," but former "Cosby" star Keshia Knight Pulliam and "Real Housewife" Kenya Moore will be.

Miscellany:
>> The Old Atlanta Prison Farm keeps showing up in movies. Here's why. 

>> Julie McGee — John Rocker's girlfriend — just quit "Survivor," weeks after Rocker was booted. “I was depleted in every facet,” she says.

Have any tips? Sightings? Encounters? Pictures? Filming news? We need 'em! Drop me a line: adamacarlson at gmail.com; or send me a tweet @acarlson91 (Don't forget to use the hashtag #ATLwood.).             13080832 12667738                          ATLwood: What do Justin Bieber and Ryan Gosling have in common? "
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Article

Friday November 7, 2014 09:30 am EST

  • CHRIS MIHAL



Programming note: This is my last week on the ATLwood beat, y'all. It's been a wonderful 18 months; at this point, there are almost too many productions and their attendant celebrities to keep track of. I followed in the footsteps of the industrious, omnivorous Allison Keene. And now someone will follow me.

Filming Updates:
>> The Nice Guys has been filming at the Sandy...

| more...
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The Letters Festival is returning for its second year at the Goat Farm, with a kick-off on Thurs., at 7 p.m. (at BURNAWAY), and continuing through Sat., Nov. 8. Here's what we had to say about its debut in 2013: "The people who created the Letters Festival are very passionate about books and authors and readers. They are also a little terrified. Festivals require money and participants. First-time festivals require an extra infusion of good will and publicity." Looks like they got enough of both. (Buy tickets here.)

?      ?        jump?        
FRIDAY



Bill Lowe Gallery opens two exhibits on Friday night: Ed Nash's Transcience and Susannah Zucker's Avian — the former a collection of new two-dimensional works; the latter, lifesize (and sometimes lifelike) ceramic sculptures. With opening receptions from 6-9 p.m.

PSA: Sandler Hudson is turning 25 — with drinks, dancing, the like — and, simultaneously, will open Mario Petrirena's in the remembering with an opening reception from 7-9 p.m.

SATURDAY



Jane Garver will open a new solo exhibit, Floor Plans on Napkins, at MINT. Garver's work is "is a culmination of collaborative soundwalks" created at Iceland's Fljótstunga Residency earlier this year. According to the gallery, it's both a performance and a sound composition, incorporating "spoken visual imagery," and was created using two directional microphones (one for dialogue and one for sounds). The result aims to be both absorbing and meditative. With an opening reception from 8-11 p.m.

SUNDAY



On Sunday night, CL building neighbor C4 will host Autumn + Art, a mixer — plus conversation, plus snacks — benefiting its mission to connect local artists with local resources. From 4-6:30 p.m. at the Fuse Arts Center. RSVP here."
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[http://thelettersfestival.org/|The Letters Festival] is returning for its second year at the Goat Farm, with a kick-off on Thurs., at 7 p.m. (at BURNAWAY), and continuing through Sat., Nov. 8. [http://clatl.com/atlanta/the-letters-festival-turns-a-new-page-on-literary-events-in-atlanta/Content?oid=9700407|Here's what we had to say] about its debut in 2013: "The people who created the Letters Festival are very passionate about books and authors and readers. They are also a little terrified. Festivals require money and participants. First-time festivals require an extra infusion of good will and publicity." Looks like they got enough of both. (Buy tickets [http://www.brownpapertickets.com/profile/471907|here].)

?      ?        [jump]?        
__FRIDAY__

{img src="https://media2.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/weekend-arts-agenda-the-letters-festival/u/original/12644722/1414964157-waa.jpg"}

[http://www.lowegallery.com/|Bill Lowe Gallery] opens two exhibits on Friday night: Ed Nash's ''Transcience'' and Susannah Zucker's ''Avian'' — the former a collection of new two-dimensional works; the latter, lifesize (and sometimes life''like'') ceramic sculptures. With opening receptions from 6-9 p.m.

__PSA:__ [http://sandlerhudson.com/|Sandler Hudson] is turning 25 — with drinks, dancing, the like — and, simultaneously, will open Mario Petrirena's ''in the remembering'' with an opening reception from 7-9 p.m.

__SATURDAY__

{img src="https://media1.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/weekend-arts-agenda-the-letters-festival/u/original/12667695/1415216127-10404470_10152766685078290_3847272612979951261_n.jpg"}

Jane Garver will open a new solo exhibit, ''Floor Plans on Napkins'', at [http://mintatl.org/|MINT]. Garver's work is "is a culmination of collaborative soundwalks" created at Iceland's Fljótstunga Residency earlier this year. According to the gallery, it's both a performance and a sound composition, incorporating "spoken visual imagery," and was created using two directional microphones (one for dialogue and one for sounds). The result aims to be both absorbing and meditative. With an opening reception from 8-11 p.m.

__SUNDAY__

{img src="https://media1.fdncms.com/atlanta/imager/weekend-arts-agenda-the-letters-festival/u/original/12644726/1414964831-c4_fall14_revised-1.jpg"}

On Sunday night, ''CL ''building neighbor C4 will host ''Autumn + Art'', a mixer — plus conversation, plus snacks — benefiting its mission to connect local artists with local resources. From 4-6:30 p.m. at the Fuse Arts Center. RSVP [c4atlanta.org/RSVP|here]."
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  string(2027) "       2014-11-06T14:30:00+00:00 Weekend Arts Agenda: The Letters Festival November 06 2014   Adam Carlson 5430523 2014-11-06T14:30:00+00:00  

The Letters Festival is returning for its second year at the Goat Farm, with a kick-off on Thurs., at 7 p.m. (at BURNAWAY), and continuing through Sat., Nov. 8. Here's what we had to say about its debut in 2013: "The people who created the Letters Festival are very passionate about books and authors and readers. They are also a little terrified. Festivals require money and participants. First-time festivals require an extra infusion of good will and publicity." Looks like they got enough of both. (Buy tickets here.)

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FRIDAY



Bill Lowe Gallery opens two exhibits on Friday night: Ed Nash's Transcience and Susannah Zucker's Avian — the former a collection of new two-dimensional works; the latter, lifesize (and sometimes lifelike) ceramic sculptures. With opening receptions from 6-9 p.m.

PSA: Sandler Hudson is turning 25 — with drinks, dancing, the like — and, simultaneously, will open Mario Petrirena's in the remembering with an opening reception from 7-9 p.m.

SATURDAY



Jane Garver will open a new solo exhibit, Floor Plans on Napkins, at MINT. Garver's work is "is a culmination of collaborative soundwalks" created at Iceland's Fljótstunga Residency earlier this year. According to the gallery, it's both a performance and a sound composition, incorporating "spoken visual imagery," and was created using two directional microphones (one for dialogue and one for sounds). The result aims to be both absorbing and meditative. With an opening reception from 8-11 p.m.

SUNDAY



On Sunday night, CL building neighbor C4 will host Autumn + Art, a mixer — plus conversation, plus snacks — benefiting its mission to connect local artists with local resources. From 4-6:30 p.m. at the Fuse Arts Center. RSVP here.             13080772 12644504                          Weekend Arts Agenda: The Letters Festival November 06 2014 "
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Article

Thursday November 6, 2014 09:30 am EST



The Letters Festival is returning for its second year at the Goat Farm, with a kick-off on Thurs., at 7 p.m. (at BURNAWAY), and continuing through Sat., Nov. 8. Here's what we had to say about its debut in 2013: "The people who created the Letters Festival are very passionate about books and authors and readers. They are also a little terrified. Festivals require money and participants....

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[Admin link: Weekend Arts Agenda: The Colors of Summer August 03 2012]