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First Look: MF Sushi

The Kinjo brothers bring the magic back to Atlanta

On the timeline of Atlanta sushi greats, MF Sushi was once the champ. Brothers Chris and Alex Kinjo first opened an intimate spot on Ponce de Leon Avenue in 2002, adding MF Buckhead — an ambitious sushi wonderland where the bill to experience chef Chris "Magic Fingers" Kinjo's edible art in the private omakase room ran $350 per person — in 2007. MF Buckhead was a sushi temple built for good times, ultimately mired by an economic bust that bankrupted the MF empire in 2011. The Kinjo brothers decamped to Houston, where they had family, to start from scratch. Meanwhile, Tomo, which opened in Buckhead that same year in similarly fancy digs, cemented its place in the city's sushi pantheon. In 2013, former MF executive chef Fuyuhiko Ito reappeared at new, glitzy Umi, proving the city's expanding appetite for upscale Japanese.

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Now, after years of regrouping and scouting, MF Sushi has returned. For their newest location, the Kinjo brothers set up shop along the increasingly foodie-friendly Beltline in the Inman Quarter development. The location is a bit awkward, down a side street, surrounded by apartments, but once you've walked through the black-as-coal charred wood exterior, concerns from the outside world fade away. Just like old times, you'll be greeted by the dapper visage of uber-stylish owner/manager Alex Kinjo, confirming that yes, MF is back, with its former panache and exquisite nigiri menu fully intact. Despite the return to form, however, MF still has work to do on the service side of things if it hopes to match crosstown rivals like Umi and Tomo.

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Inside, the new MF feels intimate and elegant. Despite having the acoustics and audio track of a W Hotel lobby — boom, boom, boom — the intermingling of orange and gold floral print fabrics, warm wood surfaces, and shimmering metallic chandeliers sets a serene scene. Behind the sushi bar, which runs the length of the narrow main room, half a dozen chefs slice immaculate fish and shape flawless grains of rice in studious silence.

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Since it was finally issued a liquor license in mid-July, the restaurant has added a nice selection of sake, as well as wine, beer, and cocktails to its repertoire. The extensive food menu includes many of MF's signature nigiri offerings, and covers all the categories you'd expect at an upscale sushi joint. There are seafood-centric salads, cooked and raw starters, rolls, robata-grilled vegetables, and mains like miso black cod.

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The hamachi nigiri comes simply presented: two torch-kissed slices of yellowtail over perfectly formed beds of rice, topped with thinly sliced lemon and drizzled with truffle soy sauce. MF trots out the truffle soy like it's going out of style, which, indeed, it did, about a decade ago. But damn that stuff is good. The chefs manage to keep its umami power in check, using it as a delicate accent in dishes like MF's heavenly spicy tuna avocado balls topped with truffle soy mousse.

????
The cooked appetizers are less elegant-looking than the nigiri. Both the steamed green mussels and the lobster tempura are, for example, topped with the same messy mélange of Japanese mayo, eel sauce, masago, and scallions. These are built for sensory overload, and offer some welcome drama and contrast to MF's more pristine, sashimi-centric dishes. I suggest alternating between raw and cooked courses during a meal here.

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Other dishes worth seeking out: the barely seared and pleasantly smoky A5 wagyu beef that literally melts in your mouth, the toro Osaka box style roll, and the robata-grilled miso eggplant served over smoking coals.

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A warning that may not need stating: MF, like all of the city's top sushi joints, is expensive. Given the quality of ingredients and the degree of skill to which they are prepared, expect to spend $100-plus per couple. And be sure to ask for prices on any specials. We enjoyed a lovely little plate of four small slices of kinmedai sashimi — a type of sea bream with gorgeous, blood orange-colored skin — but did not enjoy discovering the $32 price tag when the bill came.

??
It's early yet, but the restaurant's major flaw lies in the overall service experience. Despite Alex's presence walking the dining room and even bussing tables, the service felt out of synch with the elegant ambiance and excellent food. On one visit, we sat waiting more than half an hour between courses while nearby tables received dish after dish. Another time we experienced the opposite, receiving a pileup of plates that prevented us from enjoying the dishes to the fullest.

??
MF Sushi delivers near perfection on the plate (the overly sweet and sticky apricot sauce dousing our yuzu milk chocolate mousse dessert, notwithstanding). Like its peers Tomo and Umi, MF successfully and skillfully delivers plates of pristine purity alongside dishes of exuberant overload. I just hope the Kinjo brothers can find a way to make sure the entire experience measures up to the elegant setting and stellar nigiri.



More By This Writer

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  string(4634) "Nestled among the estates of Buckhead, there is a somewhat dilapidated old building topped by a wooden wagon wheel and the words, “Est. 1906.” The gas pumps outside and the bright red “Enjoy Coca-Cola” sign make clear that this is a convenience store, but it just feels so… out of place. After all, the neighborhood is among the wealthiest in town, lined with massive manicured lawns and houses hidden by thickets of trees, including older ranches that have somehow escaped the teardown tidal wave that has swept much of the area. There’s not another shop of any sort for miles around. The nearest home for sale, described by Sotheby’s as a “truly stunning European estate,” is listed at $9.88 million. Like I said, out of place. But this is the Mt. Paran Country Store, and it is a glorious anachronism.

If you arrive at the country store anywhere near lunchtime on a weekday, you’ll find the parking lot packed with landscaping, construction, and pool trucks, with a BMW or two thrown in, maybe a Rolls Royce. The benches and tables outside are filled with workers fortifying for the afternoon ahead. There may be a chicken or two prowling the pavement. Inside, the kitchen turns out a limited menu of affordable staples, mostly burgers and BBQ sandwiches, or biscuits if it’s morning. Sure, you can get any other typical convenience store pre-packaged fare – bags of pork rinds, tins of Vienna sausages, cups of instant ramen – but the burgers and biscuits are the draw. That said, the three microwaves ($0.25 charge for use) get plenty of action, especially from some of the Hispanic work crews who bring Tupperware dishes piled high with home-cooking that just needs a quick reheat. 

Pete Chevallier, or “Mr. Pete” as many of the regulars call him, has been running the country store for the past 15 years. He’s friendly and decidedly down to earth, putting in long days that start around 5:30 a.m. when he pops the first biscuits into the oven. “My minority partner,” Pete tells me, “he got the store in 2002 when the lease ran up on the other guy, and he called me – I was working at a Shell station over in Tucker – and asked if I wanted to be a partner and run the business. We’re now just into another five-year lease. Whether we extend that or not, I’ll be 68 years old. I don’t know what I’m going to do!” He chuckles at the thought. 

It’s hard to think of the country store continuing to exist without Mr. Pete, along with his wife, Jan, and a few longtime employees. Pete and Jan actually arrived a year or so after Lavern – the woman who works alongside them in the kitchen and takes credit for the store’s popular homemade chili. “The chili is her recipe,” Pete says. “The deviled eggs, the tuna fish: all hers.” He confides that Lavern likes to use a little bit of sugar in her cooking, and, sure enough, the chili, tuna salad, and deviled eggs all contain just enough sweetness to make you take note.  

Besides the sugar, the Mt. Paran Country Store is notable for what it does not have. There’s no hint that this is a million-dollar neighborhood. No fancy coffee. No micro-craft beer. There’s no upscale Angus beef in the burger, nor artisanal ham on the biscuits. None of the gimmickry, even, that your average QT employs to earn a higher dollar ring per customer. “We’ve thought about salads,” Pete says, “but we haven’t gotten around to it. We’re just not in the salad business.”

Pete does make exceptions on carrying specialty items when his regulars ask for them. He ticks off the ones that come to mind: “ZERO bars, 5th Avenue, that’s real old school. I still have TaB, and I may be the only person in Atlanta that sells single cans of TaB. You got some people who have been drinking TaB for years and just don’t want to switch. I would get assaulted if I didn’t have it.”

The store’s big volume, though, is soft drinks and sports drinks — anything that satisfies the thirst of the many workers who keep the homes of Buckhead up and running. “When it’s 90 degrees outside, a full fridge of Gatorade or Powerade will be empty by the time four o’clock rolls around.“

I ask Pete how he’s managed to keep the customers coming back over the past 15 years, without feeling the urge to change much of anything. “We’re just here to help people out whenever they need something,” he replies. Somehow, as incongruous as it may seem on first glance, the Mt. Paran Country Store is exactly what the neighborhood needs. 

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~~black:Pete Chevallier, or “Mr. Pete” as many of the regulars call him, has been running the country store for the past 15 years. He’s friendly and decidedly down to earth, putting in long days that start around 5:30 a.m. when he pops the first biscuits into the oven. “My minority partner,” Pete tells me, “he got the store in 2002 when the lease ran up on the other guy, and he called me – I was working at a Shell station over in Tucker – and asked if I wanted to be a partner and run the business. We’re now just into another five-year lease. Whether we extend that or not, I’ll be 68 years old. I don’t know what I’m going to do!” He chuckles at the thought. ~~

~~black:It’s hard to think of the country store continuing to exist without Mr. Pete, along with his wife, Jan, and a few longtime employees. Pete and Jan actually arrived a year or so after Lavern – the woman who works alongside them in the kitchen and takes credit for the store’s popular homemade chili. “The chili is her recipe,” Pete says. “The deviled eggs, the tuna fish: all hers.” He confides that Lavern likes to use a little bit of sugar in her cooking, and, sure enough, the chili, tuna salad, and deviled eggs all contain just enough sweetness to make you take note.  ~~

~~black:Besides the sugar, the Mt. Paran Country Store is notable for what it does ''not'' have. There’s no hint that this is a million-dollar neighborhood. No fancy coffee. No micro-craft beer. There’s no upscale Angus beef in the burger, nor artisanal ham on the biscuits. None of the gimmickry, even, that your average QT employs to earn a higher dollar ring per customer. “We’ve thought about salads,” Pete says, “but we haven’t gotten around to it. We’re just not in the salad business.”~~

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Pete Chevallier, or “Mr. Pete” as many of the regulars call him, has been running the country store for the past 15 years. He’s friendly and decidedly down to earth, putting in long days that start around 5:30 a.m. when he pops the first biscuits into the oven. “My minority partner,” Pete tells me, “he got the store in 2002 when the lease ran up on the other guy, and he called me – I was working at a Shell station over in Tucker – and asked if I wanted to be a partner and run the business. We’re now just into another five-year lease. Whether we extend that or not, I’ll be 68 years old. I don’t know what I’m going to do!” He chuckles at the thought. 

It’s hard to think of the country store continuing to exist without Mr. Pete, along with his wife, Jan, and a few longtime employees. Pete and Jan actually arrived a year or so after Lavern – the woman who works alongside them in the kitchen and takes credit for the store’s popular homemade chili. “The chili is her recipe,” Pete says. “The deviled eggs, the tuna fish: all hers.” He confides that Lavern likes to use a little bit of sugar in her cooking, and, sure enough, the chili, tuna salad, and deviled eggs all contain just enough sweetness to make you take note.  

Besides the sugar, the Mt. Paran Country Store is notable for what it does not have. There’s no hint that this is a million-dollar neighborhood. No fancy coffee. No micro-craft beer. There’s no upscale Angus beef in the burger, nor artisanal ham on the biscuits. None of the gimmickry, even, that your average QT employs to earn a higher dollar ring per customer. “We’ve thought about salads,” Pete says, “but we haven’t gotten around to it. We’re just not in the salad business.”

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The store’s big volume, though, is soft drinks and sports drinks — anything that satisfies the thirst of the many workers who keep the homes of Buckhead up and running. “When it’s 90 degrees outside, a full fridge of Gatorade or Powerade will be empty by the time four o’clock rolls around.“

I ask Pete how he’s managed to keep the customers coming back over the past 15 years, without feeling the urge to change much of anything. “We’re just here to help people out whenever they need something,” he replies. Somehow, as incongruous as it may seem on first glance, the Mt. Paran Country Store is exactly what the neighborhood needs. 

Mt. Paran Country Store. 4480 Northside Dr. N.W. 404-869-2992.    Photo Credit: Brad Kaplan BLAST FROM THE PAST: Pete Chevallier has been running the Mt. Paran Country Store for 15 years                                   The little country store that could "
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Monday February 19, 2018 04:59 pm EST
Gloriously anachronistic and free from all frills, Mt. Paran Country Store makes Buckhead work | more...
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Article

Wednesday January 3, 2018 06:00 pm EST
It's the Korean take-out shop you never knew you needed | more...
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  string(37) "Somm Talk with Eduardo Porto Carreiro"
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  string(7248) "Eduardo Porto Carreiro. It's a damn good name for a sommelier, isn't it? Exotic, complex with a touch of mystery? The man himself, like his actual title he was just promoted to beverage director for all Ford Fry Restaurants is more down to earth. After establishing a notable wine career in Los Angeles and New York, Porto Carreiro moved to Atlanta in March, along with his "very pregnant wife" who grew up in Morningside. She was thrilled to give their daughter, now five months old, the chance to be closer to Atlanta family. He was thrilled to find such a good fit with the Ford Fry group.

Porto Carreiro is not new to moving around. Born in Rio to a Brazilian father and Uruguayan mother, he was raised in Vienna, Austria, and then the suburbs of D.C. Half a year into his life in Atlanta, the somm reflects on the path that led him from L.A. to New York, then on to Georgia.

What was the spark for getting into wine?

I had always loved wine. My family always had wine on the dinner table, and I remember sneaking little sips from my parents' glasses as early as the age of six. After college, I was faced with a choice of sticking with what I had studied (applied economics and business management at Cornell University) or pursuing a passion. I decided to be a little adventurous. I had been an actor and a singer through high school and college and figured I might as well give it a go. I moved to Los Angeles to pursue that dream. One thing led to another and, as most young actors quickly find out, it's important to have a solid "survival job."

So I became a clerk at a great little wine store in Los Angeles called Greenblatt's. It was also a deli ... probably the only deli on Earth where you can eat a great Reuben while drinking a bottle of Chateau Petrus. But I quickly moved to the restaurant side of things on the opening team of chef Neal Fraser's Grace restaurant. I worked my way up from a food runner position to waiter, and then sommelier and wine director at a rather fast clip (I took over the wine program at 23) because of a confluence of circumstances and the kind trust that the owners placed in me.

You also worked in New York, with some top restaurateurs ...

I moved to New York in 2012 and joined the sommelier team at Bar Boulud and Boulud Sud. I was there for about a year until I moved to Daniel Boulud's DBGB to run the beverage program there for almost two years. I joined Danny Meyer's Union Square Hospitality Group to open Untitled with chef Michael Anthony in 2015.

How did that shape your path?

My time with Daniel Boulud, having arrived from Los Angeles, it was essentially going back to basics, and waking up and realizing I had spent 10 years studying my bum off and thinking I had learned something about wine only to realize I really didn't know much at all. It was like going from college to post grad, seeing the depth of knowledge that my colleagues had. All of the sommeliers at the Boulud restaurants had incredible palates, and I learned so much especially from Michael Madrigale, who ran the program at Boulud and Boulud Sud ... spending time with him on the floor, sensing and feeling how to interact with guests. It's pretty visceral, the wine culture there.

Each fork in the road for my career was decided by trusting my gut and ... surrounding myself with people from whom I could learn and who shared my passion. I moved to NYC because I had fallen in love with a girl who lived there. We ended up getting married and as we began to think about our next chapter, a move to Atlanta became more of a conversation because that's where she had grown up. We were expecting a baby and didn't want to raise the child in Brooklyn. When exploring the hospitality opportunities in Atlanta before the moves, my biggest concern had been finding like-minded folks who shared my goals and passions when it came to the guest experience. The team at Ford Fry Restaurants was completely aligned with my philosophy of hospitality.

Now in Atlanta, what are you trying to do with the wine menus you're working on?

At the end of the day, I want everybody who comes in to be drinking something delicious. The most important aspect of putting a wine list together for me is that all of the selections are of integrity and come from farmers and winemakers that have an honest connection to their vines. That mindfulness in winemaking translates to the glass in a very soulful way. Any new wine that I've added to the programs over these last few months has followed that line of thinking.

For the Optimist, we like to remind our guests that this is a coastal spot so there is respect for regions that are coastal. More importantly, though, it's about what tastes good with the food, what appeals to the guests, and understanding how the seasons change. I try to be extremely in tune with what the guest is feeling when they walk in for three or four straight months, there's a lot of heat and sweating, so I want to have ros̩s, bubblies, extremely crisp fun stuff, but that shifts when it gets cooler. Just last week we started getting in bolder, richer wines which pair well with what guests are feeling a sense of season. It goes back to the food and the markets.

We're also having so much fun with the Marcel list, trying to tap into the concept of being a French-inspired throwback, shifting wines you might find at a brasserie in Paris front and center. The focus is on the great regions of France, but including regions you might not think of immediately we have a whole page dedicated to the South of France, and we're probably the only restaurant in Georgia with four Bandol Rouge on the list and people are buying them every night. We still have great Napa Cabernet, but we also like showcasing a lot of northern Rhone, because the way Marcel prepares its steaks is like Syrah heaven - so Cornas, C̫te-R̫tie, producers that make beautiful wine but don't often get a lot of love. We have several selections of Saint-Joseph which I think are extraordinary values. For more medium-bodied wines, we're going straight to the Loire Valley with Cabernet Franc, even for folks who might be thinking about Napa Cab or Bordeaux, because those really hit the spot.

Outside of work, how has Atlanta been?

My wife and I have had a lot of fun exploring the farmers markets around town. We love to cook and have become regulars at the Grant Park and Freedom Farmers Markets. I think the croissant at Little Tart Bakeshop is one of the best this side of the Atlantic. Drinking beers at the Brick Store in Decatur has got to be one of my favorite things to do in Atlanta. Also, if I had my druthers, I'd be exploring Buford Highway every weekend. Frankly, I've only just scratched the surface of what the city has to offer ... lots of deliciousness around town!

I'm just really excited about the Atlanta scene. I never thought that I'd live anywhere but L.A. or New York, but in the last five or six years of visiting Atlanta with my wife ... my in-laws are the biggest fans of Atlanta and very quickly started pitching us. Every time I would visit, my father-in-law would try to show off the restaurants. I feel as if I've landed in a good place and the sky's the limit."
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  string(7274) "Eduardo Porto Carreiro. It's a damn good name for a sommelier, isn't it? Exotic, complex with a touch of mystery? The man himself, like his actual title he was just promoted to beverage director for all Ford Fry Restaurants is more down to earth. After establishing a notable wine career in Los Angeles and New York, Porto Carreiro moved to Atlanta in March, along with his "very pregnant wife" who grew up in Morningside. She was thrilled to give their daughter, now five months old, the chance to be closer to Atlanta family. He was thrilled to find such a good fit with the Ford Fry group.

Porto Carreiro is not new to moving around. Born in Rio to a Brazilian father and Uruguayan mother, he was raised in Vienna, Austria, and then the suburbs of D.C. Half a year into his life in Atlanta, the somm reflects on the path that led him from L.A. to New York, then on to Georgia.

__What was the spark for getting into wine?__

I had always loved wine. My family always had wine on the dinner table, and I remember sneaking little sips from my parents' glasses as early as the age of six. After college, I was faced with a choice of sticking with what I had studied (applied economics and business management at Cornell University) or pursuing a passion. I decided to be a little adventurous. I had been an actor and a singer through high school and college and figured I might as well give it a go. I moved to Los Angeles to pursue that dream. One thing led to another and, as most young actors quickly find out, it's important to have a solid "survival job."

[So I became] a clerk at a great little wine store in Los Angeles called Greenblatt's. It was also a deli ... probably the only deli on Earth where you can eat a great Reuben while drinking a bottle of Chateau Petrus. But I quickly moved to the restaurant side of things on the opening team of chef Neal Fraser's Grace restaurant. I worked my way up from a food runner position to waiter, and then sommelier and wine director at a rather fast clip (I took over the wine program at 23) because of a confluence of circumstances and the kind trust that the owners placed in me.

__You also worked in New York, with some top restaurateurs ...__

I moved to New York in 2012 and joined the sommelier team at Bar Boulud and Boulud Sud. I was there for about a year until I moved to [Daniel Boulud's] DBGB to run the beverage program there for almost two years. I joined Danny Meyer's Union Square Hospitality Group to open Untitled with chef Michael Anthony in 2015.

__How did that shape your path?__

My time with Daniel Boulud, having arrived from Los Angeles, it was essentially going back to basics, and waking up and realizing I had spent 10 years studying my bum off and thinking I had learned something about wine only to realize I really didn't know much at all. It was like going from college to post grad, seeing the depth of knowledge that my colleagues had. All of the sommeliers [at the Boulud restaurants] had incredible palates, and I learned so much especially from Michael Madrigale, who ran the program at Boulud and Boulud Sud ... spending time with him on the floor, sensing and feeling how to interact with guests. It's pretty visceral, the wine culture there.

Each fork in the road for my career was decided by trusting my gut and ... surrounding myself with people from whom I could learn and who shared my passion. I moved to NYC because I had fallen in love with a girl who lived there. We ended up getting married and as we began to think about our next chapter, a move to Atlanta became more of a conversation because that's where she had grown up. We were expecting a baby and didn't want to raise the child in Brooklyn. When exploring the hospitality opportunities in Atlanta before the moves, my biggest concern had been finding like-minded folks who shared my goals and passions when it came to the guest experience. The team at Ford Fry Restaurants was completely aligned with my philosophy of hospitality.

__Now in Atlanta, what are you trying to do with the wine menus you're working on?__

At the end of the day, I want everybody who comes in to be drinking something delicious. The most important aspect of putting a wine list together for me is that all of the selections are of integrity and come from farmers and winemakers that have an honest connection to their vines. That mindfulness in winemaking translates to the glass in a very soulful way. Any new wine that I've added to the programs over these last few months has followed that line of thinking.

For the Optimist, we like to remind our guests that this is a coastal spot so there is respect for regions that are coastal. More importantly, though, it's about what tastes good with the food, what appeals to the guests, and understanding how the seasons change. I try to be extremely in tune with what the guest is feeling when they walk in for three or four straight months, there's a lot of heat and sweating, so I want to have ros̩s, bubblies, extremely crisp fun stuff, but that shifts when it gets cooler. Just last week we started getting in bolder, richer wines which pair well with what guests are feeling a sense of season. It goes back to the food and the markets.

We're also having so much fun with the Marcel list, trying to tap into the concept of being a French-inspired throwback, shifting wines you might find at a brasserie in Paris front and center. The focus is on the great regions of France, but including regions you might not think of immediately we have a whole page dedicated to the South of France, and we're probably the only restaurant in Georgia with four Bandol Rouge on the list and people are buying them every night. We still have great Napa Cabernet, but we also like showcasing a lot of northern Rhone, because the way Marcel prepares its steaks is like Syrah heaven - so Cornas, C̫te-R̫tie, producers that make beautiful wine but don't often get a lot of love. We have several selections of Saint-Joseph which I think are extraordinary values. For more medium-bodied wines, we're going straight to the Loire Valley with Cabernet Franc, even for folks who might be thinking about Napa Cab or Bordeaux, because those really hit the spot.

__Outside of work, how has Atlanta been?__

My wife and I have had a lot of fun exploring the farmers markets around town. We love to cook and have become regulars at the Grant Park and Freedom Farmers Markets. I think the croissant at Little Tart Bakeshop is one of the best this side of the Atlantic. Drinking beers at the Brick Store in Decatur has got to be one of my favorite things to do in Atlanta. Also, if I had my druthers, I'd be exploring Buford Highway every weekend. Frankly, I've only just scratched the surface of what the city has to offer ... lots of deliciousness around town!

I'm just really excited about the Atlanta scene. I never thought that I'd live anywhere but L.A. or New York, but in the last five or six years of visiting Atlanta with my wife ... my in-laws are the biggest fans of Atlanta and very quickly started pitching us. Every time I would visit, my father-in-law would try to show off the restaurants. I feel as if I've landed in a good place and the sky's the limit."
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  string(7656) " Eduardo Porto Carreiro.5a26ba27753a6  2018-03-20T18:32:15+00:00 Eduardo_Porto_Carreiro.5a26ba27753a6.jpg      3781  2017-11-30T06:54:00+00:00 Somm Talk with Eduardo Porto Carreiro clint@thenetworkedplanet.com Clint Bergst Brad Kaplan  2017-11-30T06:54:00+00:00  Eduardo Porto Carreiro. It's a damn good name for a sommelier, isn't it? Exotic, complex with a touch of mystery? The man himself, like his actual title he was just promoted to beverage director for all Ford Fry Restaurants is more down to earth. After establishing a notable wine career in Los Angeles and New York, Porto Carreiro moved to Atlanta in March, along with his "very pregnant wife" who grew up in Morningside. She was thrilled to give their daughter, now five months old, the chance to be closer to Atlanta family. He was thrilled to find such a good fit with the Ford Fry group.

Porto Carreiro is not new to moving around. Born in Rio to a Brazilian father and Uruguayan mother, he was raised in Vienna, Austria, and then the suburbs of D.C. Half a year into his life in Atlanta, the somm reflects on the path that led him from L.A. to New York, then on to Georgia.

What was the spark for getting into wine?

I had always loved wine. My family always had wine on the dinner table, and I remember sneaking little sips from my parents' glasses as early as the age of six. After college, I was faced with a choice of sticking with what I had studied (applied economics and business management at Cornell University) or pursuing a passion. I decided to be a little adventurous. I had been an actor and a singer through high school and college and figured I might as well give it a go. I moved to Los Angeles to pursue that dream. One thing led to another and, as most young actors quickly find out, it's important to have a solid "survival job."

So I became a clerk at a great little wine store in Los Angeles called Greenblatt's. It was also a deli ... probably the only deli on Earth where you can eat a great Reuben while drinking a bottle of Chateau Petrus. But I quickly moved to the restaurant side of things on the opening team of chef Neal Fraser's Grace restaurant. I worked my way up from a food runner position to waiter, and then sommelier and wine director at a rather fast clip (I took over the wine program at 23) because of a confluence of circumstances and the kind trust that the owners placed in me.

You also worked in New York, with some top restaurateurs ...

I moved to New York in 2012 and joined the sommelier team at Bar Boulud and Boulud Sud. I was there for about a year until I moved to Daniel Boulud's DBGB to run the beverage program there for almost two years. I joined Danny Meyer's Union Square Hospitality Group to open Untitled with chef Michael Anthony in 2015.

How did that shape your path?

My time with Daniel Boulud, having arrived from Los Angeles, it was essentially going back to basics, and waking up and realizing I had spent 10 years studying my bum off and thinking I had learned something about wine only to realize I really didn't know much at all. It was like going from college to post grad, seeing the depth of knowledge that my colleagues had. All of the sommeliers at the Boulud restaurants had incredible palates, and I learned so much especially from Michael Madrigale, who ran the program at Boulud and Boulud Sud ... spending time with him on the floor, sensing and feeling how to interact with guests. It's pretty visceral, the wine culture there.

Each fork in the road for my career was decided by trusting my gut and ... surrounding myself with people from whom I could learn and who shared my passion. I moved to NYC because I had fallen in love with a girl who lived there. We ended up getting married and as we began to think about our next chapter, a move to Atlanta became more of a conversation because that's where she had grown up. We were expecting a baby and didn't want to raise the child in Brooklyn. When exploring the hospitality opportunities in Atlanta before the moves, my biggest concern had been finding like-minded folks who shared my goals and passions when it came to the guest experience. The team at Ford Fry Restaurants was completely aligned with my philosophy of hospitality.

Now in Atlanta, what are you trying to do with the wine menus you're working on?

At the end of the day, I want everybody who comes in to be drinking something delicious. The most important aspect of putting a wine list together for me is that all of the selections are of integrity and come from farmers and winemakers that have an honest connection to their vines. That mindfulness in winemaking translates to the glass in a very soulful way. Any new wine that I've added to the programs over these last few months has followed that line of thinking.

For the Optimist, we like to remind our guests that this is a coastal spot so there is respect for regions that are coastal. More importantly, though, it's about what tastes good with the food, what appeals to the guests, and understanding how the seasons change. I try to be extremely in tune with what the guest is feeling when they walk in for three or four straight months, there's a lot of heat and sweating, so I want to have ros̩s, bubblies, extremely crisp fun stuff, but that shifts when it gets cooler. Just last week we started getting in bolder, richer wines which pair well with what guests are feeling a sense of season. It goes back to the food and the markets.

We're also having so much fun with the Marcel list, trying to tap into the concept of being a French-inspired throwback, shifting wines you might find at a brasserie in Paris front and center. The focus is on the great regions of France, but including regions you might not think of immediately we have a whole page dedicated to the South of France, and we're probably the only restaurant in Georgia with four Bandol Rouge on the list and people are buying them every night. We still have great Napa Cabernet, but we also like showcasing a lot of northern Rhone, because the way Marcel prepares its steaks is like Syrah heaven - so Cornas, C̫te-R̫tie, producers that make beautiful wine but don't often get a lot of love. We have several selections of Saint-Joseph which I think are extraordinary values. For more medium-bodied wines, we're going straight to the Loire Valley with Cabernet Franc, even for folks who might be thinking about Napa Cab or Bordeaux, because those really hit the spot.

Outside of work, how has Atlanta been?

My wife and I have had a lot of fun exploring the farmers markets around town. We love to cook and have become regulars at the Grant Park and Freedom Farmers Markets. I think the croissant at Little Tart Bakeshop is one of the best this side of the Atlantic. Drinking beers at the Brick Store in Decatur has got to be one of my favorite things to do in Atlanta. Also, if I had my druthers, I'd be exploring Buford Highway every weekend. Frankly, I've only just scratched the surface of what the city has to offer ... lots of deliciousness around town!

I'm just really excited about the Atlanta scene. I never thought that I'd live anywhere but L.A. or New York, but in the last five or six years of visiting Atlanta with my wife ... my in-laws are the biggest fans of Atlanta and very quickly started pitching us. Every time I would visit, my father-in-law would try to show off the restaurants. I feel as if I've landed in a good place and the sky's the limit.    Joeff Davis MASTER OF WINE: Eduardo Porto Carreiro at Marcel        20984289                           Somm Talk with Eduardo Porto Carreiro "
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Thursday November 30, 2017 01:54 am EST
Eduardo Porto Carreiro. It's a damn good name for a sommelier, isn't it? Exotic, complex with a touch of mystery? The man himself, like his actual title he was just promoted to beverage director for all Ford Fry Restaurants is more down to earth. After establishing a notable wine career in Los Angeles and New York, Porto Carreiro moved to Atlanta in March, along with his "very pregnant wife"... | more...
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  string(2926) "Our family Thanksgiving meal was fabulous, but it wasn't the turkey or the cranberries or the dressing that really distinguished it from other meals it was the gravy. Gravy is the glue (forgive the unappetizing term) that brings the Thanksgiving meal together. It bridges the turkey to the dressing to the cranberries to the rolls. It magically works with just about everything. I could (almost) just drink it straight from the gravy boat (I do admit to having several straight shots of it while cooking). And it's something that I lamentably rarely eat the rest of the year, let alone cook at home. But why not?

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As for the time consuming part, it's true. To make a good gravy, there are several steps that, while fairly easy, take time and patience. There are variations on a good gravy recipe, of course, but the tack I took this year (and last) had three major stages first, heavily browning some turkey wings and legs in butter along with some mirepoix (that's French for carrots, celery and onion); second, deglazing with a bunch of stock (I admit to taking a shortcut here and using store-bought); and third, combining the rich stock and drippings from the cooked turkey with some fresh herbs and a quick roux (that's French for butter and flour whisked together I just realized there's a third possible reason not to make gravy it may involve usage of French words that end in X like roux and mirepoix!). The result though is well worth the time just thick enough to have body, rich and deep from the marriage of butter and turkey and high heat, packed with flavor thanks to the herbs. You could do it just as easy with chicken, and the time it takes to roast a chicken at home is perfect to accommodate the gravy making.

Our Thanksgiving gravy left me thinking that I need to make gravy, need to make sauces, more often. But gravy at dinner and classically influenced sauces in general seem relegated to the dustbin of history and stuffy steakhouses. Sauce is no longer the glue that holds together many a meal. I know it's a month or so early for New Year's resolutions, but this year, I resolve to bring back the glue, to make more sauces, more gravy, and... OK... more trips to the gym.

P.S. If ever there was a worthy name for a vessel, it is that of the "gravy boat." A boat of gravy. Fit for the high seas. I'd like to see a regatta of gravy boats and sushi boats racing towards victory. Oh buoy."
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P.S. If ever there was a worthy name for a vessel, it is that of the "gravy boat." A boat of gravy. Fit for the high seas. I'd like to see a regatta of gravy boats and sushi boats racing towards victory. Oh buoy."
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P.S. If ever there was a worthy name for a vessel, it is that of the "gravy boat." A boat of gravy. Fit for the high seas. I'd like to see a regatta of gravy boats and sushi boats racing towards victory. Oh buoy.    Brad Kaplan         20983285                           ENCORE: Good gravy "
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Friday November 17, 2017 06:49 pm EST
Our family Thanksgiving meal was fabulous, but it wasn't the turkey or the cranberries or the dressing that really distinguished it from other meals it was the gravy. Gravy is the glue (forgive the unappetizing term) that brings the Thanksgiving meal together. It bridges the turkey to the dressing to the cranberries to the rolls. It magically works with just about everything. I could (almost)... | more...
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  string(6024) "If there were an award for smiling-est bartender in town, Tiffanie Barriere, a.k.a the Drinking Coach, would surely be a finalist. Barriere may be best known for her long stint seven and a half years running the award-winning drinks program at One Flew South, the restaurant/bar that literally set the bar for airport awesomeness. But to Atlanta's tight-knit bartender community, Barriere is like a friendly beacon of knowledge, always willing to share, always happy to lend a hand.

Barriere's first bartending gig was at LongHorn Steakhouse, in the days when it still had a hometown Atlanta vibe. She credits her five years there with instilling the service mentality that guides her work today. But starting in 2008, One Flew South put Barriere's name on the map, alongside chef Duane Nutter and mentor barman Jerry Slater. There, she served travelers from around the world, and tempted Atlantans to get to the airport just a little earlier to squeeze in a visit to the bar.

After helping Nutter plan for a new restaurant called Southern National in Mobile, Alabama, Barriere has done what many professionals are doing these days: gone solo. At least for the time being, she calls herself a freelance bartender, doing pop-ups, working with chefs, and continuing to inspire other Atlanta bartenders. She just announced a series of events in partnership with chefs Jennifer Hill Booker and Deborah VanTrece titled the Cast Iron Chronicles, meant to celebrate the work of African-American women in the industry. The launch event takes place at VanTrece's Twisted Soul Cookhouse on Mon., Dec. 4, offering an evening of cocktails and conversation on the topic.

Creative Loafing sat down with Barriere to get the scoop on life in the freelance bartending world plus a recipe for one of her favorite cocktails, the 357.

Most folks associate a bartender with their bar. Tell us about the idea of a being of a freelance bartender.

Bartenders are personalities, knowledge, energy. I like to think guests love the bartender as much as the bar. So freelancing to me is like what chefs call pop-ups. It's a chance to share who you are as a bartender, to show your style, confidence, ambition, and camaraderie in other environments. It keeps it saucy. I just did an intimate dinner at Studio No. 7 dedicated to hip-hop, showcasing iconic lyrics in hip-hop that mention food. And I have a pop-up with chef Deborah VanTrece from Twisted Soul coming up.

Would you say you have a certain style or bring a certain philosophy to your cocktail making?

I share a fun fact with every cocktail I serve. It's not arrogant or pushy it's just one-liners on the spirit, mixer, or history. It opens up conversation and, in my eyes, makes the drink taste better when you know a little more.

How has your positive vibe affected the way you interact with people from behind a bar?

Connecting over a drink is where it's at! Dialogue, smiles, and compliments are free to give folks. That's not personality, that's kindness and essential when you encounter people. Putting the drink in their hand is the easy part.

Is there anything that's got you down these days?

The obvious political crap, poor rap lyrics, the Grady Curve traffic on 75 South, and slushie machine cocktails.

And up?

Music is exciting! Expression and opinions are all over the place, and music helps to articulate that. My Spotify is a beast and full of musical mood swings. I could listen to Jay-Z, 2 Chainz, J Dilla, and Erykah Badu all day, every day, no particular order. Weird, I know. Their vibes, lyrics, and messages keep a smile on me.

What was the first time you tasted a cocktail? 

Sipping my mom's drink as a kid, Crown Royal on ice! I had to be about 10.

First time you actually made a cocktail? 

The founder of LongHorn Steakhouse taught me how to make a proper Old Fashioned when I was bartending there. Sugar, bitters, and bourbon. I though it was the best thing ever! The sugar matched the Angostura perfectly and was a game changer to my palate. The balance was everything, and I made them every day for guests. It was a signature show-off drink.  

How does it feel now when you're in the airport? Do you still want to stop by the old stomping ground?

I left One Flew South in May of last year, and I miss the guests so much! You'd be surprised to know how many folks fly to work weekly. When I was there I sometimes took guests who missed their flights, or just wanted a night in Atlanta, to Clermont Lounge, concerts, dinner. A handful of my friends are regulars from One Flew South, and I've visited them in their cities and bars. Since I left, I've traveled a ton, but the flights have been really early or late, so I haven't had much of a chance to visit. I did stop in for the first time in late July. Some of the guests were still asking if I worked there. Bittersweet for sure.

What's your guilty pleasure drink? 

Ros̩ is my jam because I can consume it anytime all the time. The French do it right, but the Spanish do it fun! Cynar and Chartreuse are my guilty pleasures, also. I don't keep them in the house because I can't keep my hands off of it.

Favorite drink to relax with?

Relax at home anything neat. Relax out anything the bartender wants to give me. When the bartender is confident, I'm relaxed.

---
The 357

"I've been enjoying tequila a lot in the past few months. This one is inspired by my love for Negronis, swapping the Campari for Cynar, and tequila for the gin. Noni's on Edgewood does it right for me every time I'm there. They call it the Barriere in the computer, but I call it 357 because that's Noni's address, and I love the odd number combo  the ingredients involved are just as odd." - Tiffanie Barriere



Ingredients:

1 ounce Avion Silver tequila (or similar)

.5 ounce Cynar

.5 ounce sweet vermouth

Instructions:

Combine all ingredients in large mixing glass over ice and stir until cold. Pour over fresh ice and garnish with orange peel."
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  string(6710) "If there were an award for smiling-est bartender in town, Tiffanie Barriere, a.k.a [https://www.instagram.com/thedrinkingcoach/?hl=en|the Drinking Coach], would surely be a finalist. Barriere may be best known for her long stint seven and a half years running the award-winning drinks program at One Flew South, the restaurant/bar that literally set the bar for airport awesomeness. But to Atlanta's tight-knit bartender community, Barriere is like a friendly beacon of knowledge, always willing to share, always happy to lend a hand.

Barriere's first bartending gig was at LongHorn Steakhouse, in the days when it still had a hometown Atlanta vibe. She credits her five years there with instilling the service mentality that guides her work today. But starting in 2008, One Flew South put Barriere's name on the map, alongside chef Duane Nutter and mentor barman Jerry Slater. There, she served travelers from around the world, and tempted Atlantans to get to the airport just a little earlier to squeeze in a visit to the bar.

After helping Nutter plan for a new restaurant called Southern National in Mobile, Alabama, Barriere has done what many professionals are doing these days: gone solo. At least for the time being, she calls herself a freelance bartender, doing pop-ups, working with chefs, and continuing to inspire other Atlanta bartenders. She just announced a series of events in partnership with chefs Jennifer Hill Booker and Deborah VanTrece titled the Cast Iron Chronicles, meant to celebrate the work of African-American women in the industry. The launch event takes place at VanTrece's Twisted Soul Cookhouse on [https://www.culinarylocal.com/event/cocktails-cuisine-conversation/|Mon., Dec. 4], offering an evening of cocktails and conversation on the topic.

''Creative Loafing ''sat down with Barriere to get the scoop on life in the freelance bartending world plus a recipe for one of her favorite cocktails, the 357.

__Most folks associate a bartender with their bar. Tell us about the idea of a being of a freelance bartender.__

Bartenders are personalities, knowledge, energy. I like to think guests love the ''bartender'' [as much as the bar]. So freelancing to me is like what chefs call pop-ups. It's a chance to share who you are as a bartender, to show your style, confidence, ambition, and camaraderie in other environments. It keeps it saucy. I just did an intimate dinner at Studio No. 7 dedicated to hip-hop, showcasing iconic lyrics in hip-hop that mention food. And I have a pop-up with chef Deborah VanTrece from Twisted Soul coming up.

__Would you say you have a certain style or bring a certain philosophy to your cocktail making?__

I share a fun fact with every cocktail I serve. It's not arrogant or pushy it's just one-liners on the spirit, mixer, or history. It opens up conversation and, in my eyes, makes the drink taste better when you know a little more.

__How has your positive vibe affected the way you interact with people from behind a bar?__

Connecting over a drink is where it's at! Dialogue, smiles, and compliments are free to give folks. That's not personality, that's kindness and essential when you encounter people. Putting the drink in their hand is the easy part.

__Is there anything that's got you down these days?__

The obvious political crap, poor rap lyrics, the Grady Curve traffic on 75 South, and slushie machine cocktails.

__And up?__

Music is exciting! Expression and opinions are all over the place, and music helps to articulate that. My Spotify is a beast and full of musical mood swings. I could listen to Jay-Z, 2 Chainz, J Dilla, and Erykah Badu all day, every day, no particular order. Weird, I know. Their vibes, lyrics, and messages keep a smile on me.

__What was the first time you tasted a cocktail? __

Sipping my mom's drink as a kid, Crown Royal on ice! I had to be about 10.

__First time you actually made a cocktail? __

The founder of LongHorn Steakhouse taught me how to make a proper Old Fashioned when I was bartending there. Sugar, bitters, and bourbon. I though it was the best thing ever! The sugar matched the Angostura perfectly and was a game changer to my palate. The balance was everything, and I made them every day for guests. It was a signature show-off drink. __ __

__How does it feel now when you're in the airport? Do you still want to stop by the old stomping ground?__

I left One Flew South in May of last year, and I miss the guests ''so'' much! You'd be surprised to know how many folks fly to work weekly. [When I was there] I sometimes took guests who missed their flights, or just wanted a night in Atlanta, to Clermont Lounge, concerts, dinner. A handful of my friends are regulars from One Flew South, and I've visited them in their cities and bars. Since I left, I've traveled a ton, but the flights have been really early or late, so I haven't had much of a chance to visit. I did stop in for the first time in late July. Some of the guests were still asking if I worked there. Bittersweet for sure.

__What's your guilty pleasure drink? __

Ros̩ is my jam because I can consume it anytime ''all'' the time. The French do it right, but the Spanish do it fun! Cynar and Chartreuse are my guilty pleasures, also. I don't keep them in the house because I can't keep my hands off of it.

__Favorite drink to relax with?__

Relax at home ''anything'' neat. Relax out anything the bartender wants to give me. When the bartender is confident, I'm relaxed.

---
__===The 357===__

''"I've been enjoying tequila a lot in the past few months. This one is inspired by my love for Negronis, swapping the Campari for Cynar, and tequila for the gin. Noni's on Edgewood does it right for me every time I'm there. They call it the Barriere in the computer, but I call it 357 because that's Noni's address, and I love the odd number combo '''' the ingredients involved are just as odd." - Tiffanie Barriere''

{HTML()}MG4445SERVED WITH A SMILE: Barriere's 357 cocktail is a stiff mix of tequila, Cynar, and sweet vermouth.Lindsey Max{HTML}

===Ingredients:===

1 ounce Avion Silver tequila (or similar)

.5 ounce Cynar

.5 ounce sweet vermouth

===Instructions:===

Combine all ingredients in large mixing glass over ice and stir until cold. Pour over fresh ice and garnish with orange peel."
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  string(6436) " Perfect Pour MG 4437.5a09e654165de  2018-03-15T18:25:45+00:00 Perfect_Pour_MG_4437.5a09e654165de.jpg      3640  2017-11-13T23:31:00+00:00 Happy Hour with Tiffanie Barriere   Brad Kaplan  2017-11-13T23:31:00+00:00  If there were an award for smiling-est bartender in town, Tiffanie Barriere, a.k.a the Drinking Coach, would surely be a finalist. Barriere may be best known for her long stint seven and a half years running the award-winning drinks program at One Flew South, the restaurant/bar that literally set the bar for airport awesomeness. But to Atlanta's tight-knit bartender community, Barriere is like a friendly beacon of knowledge, always willing to share, always happy to lend a hand.

Barriere's first bartending gig was at LongHorn Steakhouse, in the days when it still had a hometown Atlanta vibe. She credits her five years there with instilling the service mentality that guides her work today. But starting in 2008, One Flew South put Barriere's name on the map, alongside chef Duane Nutter and mentor barman Jerry Slater. There, she served travelers from around the world, and tempted Atlantans to get to the airport just a little earlier to squeeze in a visit to the bar.

After helping Nutter plan for a new restaurant called Southern National in Mobile, Alabama, Barriere has done what many professionals are doing these days: gone solo. At least for the time being, she calls herself a freelance bartender, doing pop-ups, working with chefs, and continuing to inspire other Atlanta bartenders. She just announced a series of events in partnership with chefs Jennifer Hill Booker and Deborah VanTrece titled the Cast Iron Chronicles, meant to celebrate the work of African-American women in the industry. The launch event takes place at VanTrece's Twisted Soul Cookhouse on Mon., Dec. 4, offering an evening of cocktails and conversation on the topic.

Creative Loafing sat down with Barriere to get the scoop on life in the freelance bartending world plus a recipe for one of her favorite cocktails, the 357.

Most folks associate a bartender with their bar. Tell us about the idea of a being of a freelance bartender.

Bartenders are personalities, knowledge, energy. I like to think guests love the bartender as much as the bar. So freelancing to me is like what chefs call pop-ups. It's a chance to share who you are as a bartender, to show your style, confidence, ambition, and camaraderie in other environments. It keeps it saucy. I just did an intimate dinner at Studio No. 7 dedicated to hip-hop, showcasing iconic lyrics in hip-hop that mention food. And I have a pop-up with chef Deborah VanTrece from Twisted Soul coming up.

Would you say you have a certain style or bring a certain philosophy to your cocktail making?

I share a fun fact with every cocktail I serve. It's not arrogant or pushy it's just one-liners on the spirit, mixer, or history. It opens up conversation and, in my eyes, makes the drink taste better when you know a little more.

How has your positive vibe affected the way you interact with people from behind a bar?

Connecting over a drink is where it's at! Dialogue, smiles, and compliments are free to give folks. That's not personality, that's kindness and essential when you encounter people. Putting the drink in their hand is the easy part.

Is there anything that's got you down these days?

The obvious political crap, poor rap lyrics, the Grady Curve traffic on 75 South, and slushie machine cocktails.

And up?

Music is exciting! Expression and opinions are all over the place, and music helps to articulate that. My Spotify is a beast and full of musical mood swings. I could listen to Jay-Z, 2 Chainz, J Dilla, and Erykah Badu all day, every day, no particular order. Weird, I know. Their vibes, lyrics, and messages keep a smile on me.

What was the first time you tasted a cocktail? 

Sipping my mom's drink as a kid, Crown Royal on ice! I had to be about 10.

First time you actually made a cocktail? 

The founder of LongHorn Steakhouse taught me how to make a proper Old Fashioned when I was bartending there. Sugar, bitters, and bourbon. I though it was the best thing ever! The sugar matched the Angostura perfectly and was a game changer to my palate. The balance was everything, and I made them every day for guests. It was a signature show-off drink.  

How does it feel now when you're in the airport? Do you still want to stop by the old stomping ground?

I left One Flew South in May of last year, and I miss the guests so much! You'd be surprised to know how many folks fly to work weekly. When I was there I sometimes took guests who missed their flights, or just wanted a night in Atlanta, to Clermont Lounge, concerts, dinner. A handful of my friends are regulars from One Flew South, and I've visited them in their cities and bars. Since I left, I've traveled a ton, but the flights have been really early or late, so I haven't had much of a chance to visit. I did stop in for the first time in late July. Some of the guests were still asking if I worked there. Bittersweet for sure.

What's your guilty pleasure drink? 

Ros̩ is my jam because I can consume it anytime all the time. The French do it right, but the Spanish do it fun! Cynar and Chartreuse are my guilty pleasures, also. I don't keep them in the house because I can't keep my hands off of it.

Favorite drink to relax with?

Relax at home anything neat. Relax out anything the bartender wants to give me. When the bartender is confident, I'm relaxed.

---
The 357

"I've been enjoying tequila a lot in the past few months. This one is inspired by my love for Negronis, swapping the Campari for Cynar, and tequila for the gin. Noni's on Edgewood does it right for me every time I'm there. They call it the Barriere in the computer, but I call it 357 because that's Noni's address, and I love the odd number combo  the ingredients involved are just as odd." - Tiffanie Barriere



Ingredients:

1 ounce Avion Silver tequila (or similar)

.5 ounce Cynar

.5 ounce sweet vermouth

Instructions:

Combine all ingredients in large mixing glass over ice and stir until cold. Pour over fresh ice and garnish with orange peel.    Lindsey Max PERFECT POUR: Bartender Tiffanie Barriere makes one of her favorite cocktails, the 357, at Studio No. 7.        20982611                           Happy Hour with Tiffanie Barriere "
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Article

Monday November 13, 2017 06:31 pm EST
If there were an award for smiling-est bartender in town, Tiffanie Barriere, a.k.a the Drinking Coach, would surely be a finalist. Barriere may be best known for her long stint seven and a half years running the award-winning drinks program at One Flew South, the restaurant/bar that literally set the bar for airport awesomeness. But to Atlanta's tight-knit bartender community, Barriere is like... | more...
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