Loading...
 

20 People to Watch - Rob Haze: The comedian

Comic goes from 'yo mamma' jokes to opening for Dave Chappelle

It's an unseasonably cold November evening at a lousy Old Fourth Ward sports bar where a handful of people, most of them comedians, are watching college football. The place feels oddly out of time, and early aught hits from the likes of Incubus and Dave Matthews Band blare overhead in agreement. There's going to be comedy here later, but the group of frat boys at the bar doesn't realize it yet. Nearby, two comics are discussing Hannibal Buress's recent sold-out show at Buckhead Theatre, and gossiping about local funny people. It's moments after they start praising Rob Haze that he walks through the door.

An Atlanta-born UGA grad, Haze lived in Orlando during his childhood before returning to the metro area. His jokes are delivered with an easygoing cadence, and they seamlessly range from the topical — gluten, Uber — to the absurd — basketball analogies connecting the audience to his material. He remembers his first brush with humor as a Snaps book his dad got him for Christmas. Think: "yo' mama" and other irreverent types of insult comedy. After that, it was Chris Rock's 1996 HBO special, "Bring the Pain."

"That was the first time where it was, 'Go to your room, we're going to watch comedy,'" he says, remembering his parents' orders. "Normally, it was like, 'There's guns and murder, go to your room.' This was the first time it was just a dude on a stage."

Haze kept a steady diet of Comedy Central, "Saturday Night Live," and Woody Allen movies. He goofed around with friends, but "was never cool enough to make the whole class laugh." He had comedic aspirations, but people didn't see his point of view. His sister told him that it was "the worst job you could have, making fun of people."

??
His weirdness and persistence has paid off. Haze is now five years into a blossoming career. After showcasing in Los Angeles at NBC talent search "Stand-Up for Diversity" in 2013, he signed with an agent and performed a couple of college tours. 2014 was Haze's first year doing it on his own.

"Students respond really well ... when they're there," Haze says. "Sometimes, they'll have me at lunch. No one knows a comedy show is happening, and they'll just have me in there. I'll feel like I'm heckling people eating."

Mostly, his sets go over well, though. He's a regular at Cloud IX, Star Bar, Laughing Skull Lounge, the Hangar, and Kat's Cafe. He opened for Dave Chappelle at the Tabernacle in 2013, and averages about seven performances a week. When he goes up at the lousy Old Fourth Ward sports bar, the room changes. The host says, "This next guy is going places." The frat boys in the back leave the football game for a few minutes. Haze easily gets twice as many laughs as any of the other comedians that night. 2015 seems poised to be a big year.

"Right now, I'm focused on stand-up, but I would like to act," Haze says. "I would like to write. I would like to have a book. I'd like to make a film that's an extension of the things I do on stage. I don't wanna rule out any of that."



More By This Writer

array(81) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(29) "First Draft with Cameron Alme"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-06-13T01:00:53+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-30T14:19:31+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2017-08-22T20:45:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(29) "First Draft with Cameron Alme"
  ["tracker_field_contentCreator"]=>
  string(28) "clint@thenetworkedplanet.com"
  ["tracker_field_contentCreator_text"]=>
  string(12) "Clint Bergst"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2017-08-22T20:45:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(39) "Content:_:First Draft with Cameron Alme"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(4843) "Before he made beer his career, Cameron Alme considered skateboarding and bass guitar. After "reluctantly" attending Georgia State University, he still didn't know what he wanted out of life, but did know he enjoyed hanging out in local brewery tasting rooms.

Born in Roswell and raised in Marietta, Alme says his family got "out of the East Cobb suburbia as much as they could, to give us some American diversity." Perhaps unsurprisingly, he developed a travel bug, visiting the flourishing beer scenes of San Diego, Denver, Asheville and more.

Eventually, after getting fired from a sales job he hated, Alme made his way to SweetWater, where he worked for three years, half of them as taproom manager. When an assistant brewing position opened up at Orpheus Brewing this past March, he jumped at it. "I'm told that I submitted my application within minutes after they made the position public," he says. He was promoted to brewer in two months.

Creative Loafing caught up with Alme to chat about favorite beers past and present, what he's thinking about the future, and how Sept. 1 is going to change just about everything for Georgia beer makers.

Describe your first beer.

The first beer I can clearly remember enjoying was Sam Adams' Old Fezziwig Ale during the Thanksgiving holidays at 17 years old. It was sweet, rich and incredibly flavorful, which was in stark contrast to what was typically in my family's fridge. Sampling the beers from their winter variety case with my family over that long weekend left an indelible mark on my craft brew consciousness.

When did you first start thinking about making beer your living?

I tried making use of my business degree with several sales jobs, but hated every moment of peddling products or services I wasn't passionate about. My utter lack of enthusiasm inevitably translated to poor performance and I was let go from my job at the time. In hindsight, it was the best thing that could have happened. I decided to get a part-time job while looking for full-time work and wound up pouring beer and giving tours at SweetWater. My intent was that it would be temporary, but I wound up home-brewing in order to better understand and explain the brewing process to tour guests. Before I knew it, beer was in my blood. The rest is history, as they say.

What did you learn at SweetWater?

Folks like Zak Schroerlucke, now marketing for Crosby Hop Farm, taught me about the brand, brewing and packaging, but evangelized beer in an infectious way. The old line about doing what you love and never working a day in your life felt significantly less d with him. I was home-brewing nearly every week on my days off and found myself increasingly fascinated with the production side. Working with the masses in the tasting room every week slowly felt routine, and it became clear that it was time for a new challenge, to move into the back of house. As my first gig in craft beer, working for the Southeast's largest brewery was a unique experience.

What attracted you to Orpheus?

I had a keen interest in what Jason Pellett was doing since day one. In a sea of hoppy pale ales, it was refreshingly daring to see a local brewery open with a flagship tart plum saison. They weren't afraid to push the boundaries here locally and take a gamble on Atlanta's readiness for sour beer. The experience I've had has completely validated my decision to join their team.

How excited are you about Sept. 1, the day direct sales begin for Georgia breweries?

We're all stoked to see the tasting room become a major revenue generator and generally less confusing for our patrons. I'm nervous to see how the changes are welcomed by the public. There's going to be some confusion until folks forget about the whole "tour and tasting" model Georgia has followed for decades. I've typically envied the experiences had at tasting rooms across the country and it's exciting to see what's in store for a city known for hospitality. For all the talk about craft beer saturation and exploding bubbles, there's a ton of local growth to be had.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

I've always been laid-back and enjoyed going with the flow. However, my experiences over the last several years have taught me the importance in being decisive and forward thinking. Perhaps I'll open a sustainable urban farm brewery with goats to manage spent grain and produce artisanal cheese. I've increasingly been fascinated by apiculture (beekeeping) and will explore that eventually. I enjoy having home-brewed beer on tap, and will continue that hobby. The craft beer landscape is continually evolving, and as much as we think we know its trajectory, it's impossible to predict. Contributing to Orpheus' continued growth is an honor, and already helping to bring my vision into finer detail."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4912) "Before he made beer his career, Cameron Alme considered skateboarding and bass guitar. After "reluctantly" attending Georgia State University, he still didn't know what he wanted out of life, but ''did'' know he enjoyed hanging out in local brewery tasting rooms.

Born in Roswell and raised in Marietta, Alme says his family got "out of the East Cobb suburbia as much as they could, to give us some American diversity." Perhaps unsurprisingly, he developed a travel bug, visiting the flourishing beer scenes of San Diego, Denver, Asheville and more.

Eventually, after getting fired from a sales job he hated, Alme made his way to SweetWater, where he worked for three years, half of them as taproom manager. When an assistant brewing position opened up at [http://www.orpheusbrewing.com/|Orpheus Brewing] this past March, he jumped at it. "I'm told that I submitted my application within minutes after they made [the position] public," he says. He was promoted to brewer in two months.

''Creative Loafing ''caught up with Alme to chat about favorite beers past and present, what he's thinking about the future, and how Sept. 1 is going to change just about everything for Georgia beer makers.

__Describe your first beer.__

The first beer I can clearly remember enjoying was Sam Adams' Old Fezziwig Ale during the Thanksgiving holidays at 17 years old. It was sweet, rich and incredibly flavorful, which was in stark contrast to what was typically in my family's fridge. Sampling the beers from their winter variety case with my family over that long weekend left an indelible mark on my craft brew consciousness.

__When did you first start thinking about making beer your living?__

I tried making use of my business degree with several sales jobs, but hated every moment of peddling products or services I wasn't passionate about. My utter lack of enthusiasm inevitably translated to poor performance and I was let go from my job at the time. In hindsight, it was the best thing that could have happened. I decided to get a part-time job while looking for full-time work and wound up pouring beer and giving tours at SweetWater. My intent was that it would be temporary, but I wound up home-brewing in order to better understand and explain the brewing process to tour guests. Before I knew it, beer was in my blood. The rest is history, as they say.

__What did you learn at SweetWater?__

Folks like Zak Schroerlucke, now marketing for Crosby Hop Farm, taught me about the brand, brewing and packaging, but evangelized beer in an infectious way. The old line about doing what you love and never working a day in your life felt significantly less d with him. I was home-brewing nearly every week on my days off and found myself increasingly fascinated with the production side. Working with the masses in the tasting room every week slowly felt routine, and it became clear that it was time for a new challenge, to move into the back of house. As my first gig in craft beer, working for the Southeast's largest brewery was a unique experience.

__What attracted you to Orpheus?__

I had a keen interest in what Jason [Pellett] was doing since day one. In a sea of hoppy pale ales, it was refreshingly daring to see a local brewery open with a flagship tart plum saison. They weren't afraid to push the boundaries here locally and take a gamble on Atlanta's readiness for sour beer. The experience I've had has completely validated my decision to join their team.

__How excited are you about Sept. 1, the day direct sales begin for Georgia breweries?__

We're all stoked to see the tasting room become a major revenue generator and generally less confusing for our patrons. I'm nervous to see how the changes are welcomed by the public. There's going to be some confusion until folks forget about the whole "tour and tasting" model Georgia has followed for decades. I've typically envied the experiences had at tasting rooms across the country and it's exciting to see what's in store for a city known for hospitality. For all the talk about craft beer saturation and exploding bubbles, there's a ton of local growth to be had.

__Where do you see yourself in five years?__

I've always been laid-back and enjoyed going with the flow. However, my experiences over the last several years have taught me the importance in being decisive and forward thinking. Perhaps I'll open a sustainable urban farm brewery with goats to manage spent grain and produce artisanal cheese. I've increasingly been fascinated by apiculture (beekeeping) and will explore that eventually. I enjoy having home-brewed beer on tap, and will continue that hobby. The craft beer landscape is continually evolving, and as much as we think we know its trajectory, it's impossible to predict. Contributing to Orpheus' continued growth is an honor, and already helping to bring my vision into finer detail."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-17T22:15:28+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-05-16T17:45:59+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_photos"]=>
  string(4) "5642"
  ["tracker_field_contentPhotoCredit"]=>
  string(11) "Joeff Davis"
  ["tracker_field_contentPhotoTitle"]=>
  string(64) "LOVE WHAT YOU DO: Cameron Alme at Orpheus Brewing in Morningside"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "706"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "706"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "20973265"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(4) "5642"
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(706)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(245)
    [2]=>
    int(706)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(245)
    [1]=>
    int(706)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(28) "clint@thenetworkedplanet.com"
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(26) "tiki.file.attach:file:5642"
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "tiki.file.attach"
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(18) "tiki.file.attach:1"
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "F"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(5) "First"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item266151"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "266151"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(5239) " Firsdraft1 1 02.599c5fb67a666  2018-05-16T17:45:14+00:00 Firsdraft1_1_02.599c5fb67a666.jpg      5642  2017-08-22T20:45:00+00:00 First Draft with Cameron Alme clint@thenetworkedplanet.com Clint Bergst Austin L. Ray  2017-08-22T20:45:00+00:00  Before he made beer his career, Cameron Alme considered skateboarding and bass guitar. After "reluctantly" attending Georgia State University, he still didn't know what he wanted out of life, but did know he enjoyed hanging out in local brewery tasting rooms.

Born in Roswell and raised in Marietta, Alme says his family got "out of the East Cobb suburbia as much as they could, to give us some American diversity." Perhaps unsurprisingly, he developed a travel bug, visiting the flourishing beer scenes of San Diego, Denver, Asheville and more.

Eventually, after getting fired from a sales job he hated, Alme made his way to SweetWater, where he worked for three years, half of them as taproom manager. When an assistant brewing position opened up at Orpheus Brewing this past March, he jumped at it. "I'm told that I submitted my application within minutes after they made the position public," he says. He was promoted to brewer in two months.

Creative Loafing caught up with Alme to chat about favorite beers past and present, what he's thinking about the future, and how Sept. 1 is going to change just about everything for Georgia beer makers.

Describe your first beer.

The first beer I can clearly remember enjoying was Sam Adams' Old Fezziwig Ale during the Thanksgiving holidays at 17 years old. It was sweet, rich and incredibly flavorful, which was in stark contrast to what was typically in my family's fridge. Sampling the beers from their winter variety case with my family over that long weekend left an indelible mark on my craft brew consciousness.

When did you first start thinking about making beer your living?

I tried making use of my business degree with several sales jobs, but hated every moment of peddling products or services I wasn't passionate about. My utter lack of enthusiasm inevitably translated to poor performance and I was let go from my job at the time. In hindsight, it was the best thing that could have happened. I decided to get a part-time job while looking for full-time work and wound up pouring beer and giving tours at SweetWater. My intent was that it would be temporary, but I wound up home-brewing in order to better understand and explain the brewing process to tour guests. Before I knew it, beer was in my blood. The rest is history, as they say.

What did you learn at SweetWater?

Folks like Zak Schroerlucke, now marketing for Crosby Hop Farm, taught me about the brand, brewing and packaging, but evangelized beer in an infectious way. The old line about doing what you love and never working a day in your life felt significantly less d with him. I was home-brewing nearly every week on my days off and found myself increasingly fascinated with the production side. Working with the masses in the tasting room every week slowly felt routine, and it became clear that it was time for a new challenge, to move into the back of house. As my first gig in craft beer, working for the Southeast's largest brewery was a unique experience.

What attracted you to Orpheus?

I had a keen interest in what Jason Pellett was doing since day one. In a sea of hoppy pale ales, it was refreshingly daring to see a local brewery open with a flagship tart plum saison. They weren't afraid to push the boundaries here locally and take a gamble on Atlanta's readiness for sour beer. The experience I've had has completely validated my decision to join their team.

How excited are you about Sept. 1, the day direct sales begin for Georgia breweries?

We're all stoked to see the tasting room become a major revenue generator and generally less confusing for our patrons. I'm nervous to see how the changes are welcomed by the public. There's going to be some confusion until folks forget about the whole "tour and tasting" model Georgia has followed for decades. I've typically envied the experiences had at tasting rooms across the country and it's exciting to see what's in store for a city known for hospitality. For all the talk about craft beer saturation and exploding bubbles, there's a ton of local growth to be had.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

I've always been laid-back and enjoyed going with the flow. However, my experiences over the last several years have taught me the importance in being decisive and forward thinking. Perhaps I'll open a sustainable urban farm brewery with goats to manage spent grain and produce artisanal cheese. I've increasingly been fascinated by apiculture (beekeeping) and will explore that eventually. I enjoy having home-brewed beer on tap, and will continue that hobby. The craft beer landscape is continually evolving, and as much as we think we know its trajectory, it's impossible to predict. Contributing to Orpheus' continued growth is an honor, and already helping to bring my vision into finer detail.    Joeff Davis LOVE WHAT YOU DO: Cameron Alme at Orpheus Brewing in Morningside        20973265                           First Draft with Cameron Alme "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(211) "First Draft with Cameron Alme"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(150) "Firsdraft1 1 02.599c5fb67a666

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(32) "No description provided"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Tuesday August 22, 2017 04:45 pm EDT

Before he made beer his career, Cameron Alme considered skateboarding and bass guitar. After "reluctantly" attending Georgia State University, he still didn't know what he wanted out of life, but did know he enjoyed hanging out in local brewery tasting rooms.

Born in Roswell and raised in Marietta, Alme says his family got "out of the East Cobb suburbia as much as they could, to give us some...

| more...
array(79) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(31) "First Draft with Lenox Mercedes"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2019-06-30T18:49:50+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-10T23:26:17+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "admin"
    [1]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2017-05-10T14:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(31) "First Draft with Lenox Mercedes"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(8) "13091951"
  ["tracker_field_description"]=>
  string(95) "The High Gravity Hip Hop founder seeks to bridge the divide between hip-hop and craft breweries"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(95) "The High Gravity Hip Hop founder seeks to bridge the divide between hip-hop and craft breweries"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2017-05-10T14:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(41) "Content:_:First Draft with Lenox Mercedes"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(4609) "%{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%225910bb5f39ab46fa13047321%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22320w%22 data-embed-align=%22left%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%      Before he started High Gravity Hip Hop in Atlanta, Lenox Mercedes enjoyed the hip-hop culture of New York City. Born and raised in Queens, he describes himself as bone of a select few Gen X-ers who was privileged enough to be born into and raised by hip-hopbs golden era. Ibve break-danced for money, done graffiti, and MCbd b the only thing I didnbt do was DJ.bMercedes says he enjoyed MCing the most; hebs been doing it since he was 10 years old, often competing in hip-hop and spoken word competitions. bI think thatbs why I am so comfortable on stage today,b he says.And comfortable he is. A week before his interview with Creative Loafing, Mercedes traveled to Washington, D.C., to speak on a panel at the Craft Brewers Conference with representatives from New Belgium Brewing and Brewery Vivant. The trio discussed how hip-hop and craft breweries are bridging cultural divides.    It was 2003 when Mercedes moved to Atlanta, and he discovered craft beer just a few years after that. Hebs paid the bills since working in higher education, artist and talent management, and project management. And then, of course, therebs HGHH, which he calls bthe first and only hip-hop beer festival in the world.b It was with all this in mind that CL picked his brain to find out what hebs digging these days and how craft beer and rap music can continue to collaborate going forward.Describe your first beer.My first taste of beer was a Budweiser. I was a kid; it was a sip. My mom loved it and would often cook with it. I have fond memories of weekends at the park, many Budweisers for the adults, and goat stew with a bsecretb ingredient.How did those first sips eventually lead you to your beer-inspired life today?That taste of beer at an early age made me aware of adult beverages. Growing up, I traveled to my motherbs homeland of Guayaquil, Ecuador many times. One of my older cousins became a chemical engineer and also held a masterbs in brewing. He went on to become a brewmaster for AmBev the biggest brewery in Latin America for many years. So that gave me some exposure even if I didnbt realize it at the time. I guess that led me to explore the adult beverage world a bit.I discovered craft beer in 2008 in Georgia. A friend put me onto the miracle nectar and I was hooked ever since. My first beers were Mendocinobs Eye of the Hawk, North Coastbs Old Rasputin, St. Bernardus, and Grain dbOrgebs Belzebuth.How did High Gravity Hip Hop get started, and how has it changed over the years?HGHH started because I wanted to build a better beer festival. It has grown into a complete lifestyle brand and is developing into the go-to agency for diversity marketing for the craft beer industry.Rock bands collaborate with breweries all the time. Why do you think there arenbt as many rap collaborations?I donbt know. The hip-hop collaborations I have seen are awesome. I was just at the latest one b Nappy Roots and Monday Night Brewing teamed up for a sweet hip-hop craft beer event at their brewery. Ibm looking forward to what breweries and the hip-hop community cook up. Therebs an unlimited ceiling in this area for both cultures. There is a true opportunity to bring people together during a time when the country needs it most.What else are you working on these days?                      We are working on launching the HGHH podcast bThe Audio Tasting,b where we bring craft beer and hip-hop pros together for a beer and a chat. We will be utilizing venues such as music studios, craft beer bars and breweries. We will also have a live studio audience for each show. Very excited about this project so keep your eye out for that.No value assignedUPCOMING BEER EVENTS:Three Taverns and Brouwers Verzet TakeoverWhen: Tues., May 16Where: Brick Store PubPrice: Depends how much you drink
                                         

To celebrate American Craft Beer Week, Brick Store will feature a lineup of standards and rarities from Three Taverns in Decatur and Brouwers Verzet in Belgium b the latter was started by Three Taverns brewmaster Joran Van Ginderachter.Brew at the ZooWhen: Sat., May 27Where: Zoo AtlantaPrice: $45-$100An evening at the zoo will include more than 70 different types of beer, wine, keeper talks and animal demos with some of the zoobs 1,000 nonhuman residents. Live music will come from local bands the Geeks, 8 Second Ride, RTW and Brad Jackson.B "
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4973) "%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="5910bb5f39ab46fa13047321" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="320w" data-embed-align="left" contenteditable="false" ]}%      Before he started High Gravity Hip Hop in Atlanta, Lenox Mercedes enjoyed the hip-hop culture of New York City. Born and raised in Queens, he describes himself as bone of a select few Gen X-ers who was privileged enough to be born into and raised by hip-hopbs golden era. Ibve break-danced for money, done graffiti, and MCbd b the only thing I didnbt do was DJ.bMercedes says he enjoyed MCing the most; hebs been doing it since he was 10 years old, often competing in hip-hop and spoken word competitions. bI think thatbs why I am so comfortable on stage today,b he says.And comfortable he is. A week before his interview with ''Creative Loafing'', Mercedes traveled to Washington, D.C., to speak on a panel at the Craft Brewers Conference with representatives from New Belgium Brewing and Brewery Vivant. The trio discussed how hip-hop and craft breweries are bridging cultural divides.    It was 2003 when Mercedes moved to Atlanta, and he discovered craft beer just a few years after that. Hebs paid the bills since working in higher education, artist and talent management, and project management. And then, of course, therebs HGHH, which he calls bthe first and only hip-hop beer festival in the world.b It was with all this in mind that ''CL'' picked his brain to find out what hebs digging these days and how craft beer and rap music can continue to collaborate going forward.__Describe your first beer.__My first taste of beer was a Budweiser. I was a kid; it was a sip. My mom loved it and would often cook with it. I have fond memories of weekends at the park, many Budweisers for the adults, and goat stew with a bsecretb ingredient.__How did those first sips eventually lead you to your beer-inspired life today?__That taste of beer at an early age made me aware of adult beverages. Growing up, I traveled to my motherbs homeland of Guayaquil, Ecuador many times. One of my older cousins became a chemical engineer and also held a masterbs in brewing. He went on to become a brewmaster for AmBev [the biggest brewery in Latin America] for many years. So that gave me some exposure even if I didnbt realize it at the time. I guess that led me to explore the adult beverage world a bit.I discovered craft beer in 2008 in Georgia. A friend put me onto the miracle nectar and I was hooked ever since. My first beers were [Mendocinobs] Eye of the Hawk, [North Coastbs] Old Rasputin, St. Bernardus, and [Grain dbOrgebs] Belzebuth.__How did High Gravity Hip Hop get started, and how has it changed over the years?__HGHH started because I wanted to build a better beer festival. It has grown into a complete lifestyle brand and is developing into the go-to agency for diversity marketing for the craft beer industry.__Rock bands collaborate with breweries all the time. Why do you think there arenbt as many rap collaborations?__I donbt know. The hip-hop collaborations I have seen are awesome. I was just at the latest one b Nappy Roots and Monday Night Brewing teamed up for a sweet hip-hop craft beer event at their brewery. Ibm looking forward to what breweries and the hip-hop community cook up. [Therebs an] unlimited ceiling in this area for both cultures. There is a true opportunity to bring people together during a time when the country needs it most.__What else are you working on these days?__                      We are working on launching the HGHH podcast bThe Audio Tasting,b where we bring craft beer and hip-hop pros together for a beer and a chat. We will be utilizing venues such as music studios, craft beer bars and breweries. We will also have a live studio audience for each show. Very excited about this project so keep your eye out for that.%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="5910bb5f35ab46dc22704533" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="640w" contenteditable="false" ]}%__===UPCOMING BEER EVENTS:===__[http://local.creativeloafing.com/event/brick-store-pub/three-taverns-and-brouwers-verzet-takeover|__Three Taverns and Brouwers Verzet Takeover__]__When: __Tues., May 16__Where: __Brick Store Pub__Price: __Depends how much you drink
                                         

To celebrate American Craft Beer Week, Brick Store will feature a lineup of standards and rarities from Three Taverns in Decatur and Brouwers Verzet in Belgium b the latter was started by Three Taverns brewmaster Joran Van Ginderachter.[http://local.creativeloafing.com/event/zoo-atlanta/brew-at-the-zoo.IcTHqL|__Brew at the Zoo__]__When: __Sat., May 27__Where:__ Zoo Atlanta__Price:__ $45-$100An evening at the zoo will include more than 70 different types of beer, wine, keeper talks and animal demos with some of the zoobs 1,000 nonhuman residents. Live music will come from local bands the Geeks, 8 Second Ride, RTW and Brad Jackson.B "
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-16T18:25:46+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-16T18:25:46+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "706"
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory_text"]=>
  string(3) "706"
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "20860590"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(84) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/05/food_firstdraft1_2_03.5910bb5c08cd6.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(706)
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    int(242)
    [1]=>
    int(245)
    [2]=>
    int(706)
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(245)
    [1]=>
    int(706)
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "F"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(5) "First"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item270766"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "270766"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(4977) "    The High Gravity Hip Hop founder seeks to bridge the divide between hip-hop and craft breweries   2017-05-10T14:00:00+00:00 First Draft with Lenox Mercedes   Austin L. Ray  2017-05-10T14:00:00+00:00  %{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%225910bb5f39ab46fa13047321%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22320w%22 data-embed-align=%22left%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%      Before he started High Gravity Hip Hop in Atlanta, Lenox Mercedes enjoyed the hip-hop culture of New York City. Born and raised in Queens, he describes himself as bone of a select few Gen X-ers who was privileged enough to be born into and raised by hip-hopbs golden era. Ibve break-danced for money, done graffiti, and MCbd b the only thing I didnbt do was DJ.bMercedes says he enjoyed MCing the most; hebs been doing it since he was 10 years old, often competing in hip-hop and spoken word competitions. bI think thatbs why I am so comfortable on stage today,b he says.And comfortable he is. A week before his interview with Creative Loafing, Mercedes traveled to Washington, D.C., to speak on a panel at the Craft Brewers Conference with representatives from New Belgium Brewing and Brewery Vivant. The trio discussed how hip-hop and craft breweries are bridging cultural divides.    It was 2003 when Mercedes moved to Atlanta, and he discovered craft beer just a few years after that. Hebs paid the bills since working in higher education, artist and talent management, and project management. And then, of course, therebs HGHH, which he calls bthe first and only hip-hop beer festival in the world.b It was with all this in mind that CL picked his brain to find out what hebs digging these days and how craft beer and rap music can continue to collaborate going forward.Describe your first beer.My first taste of beer was a Budweiser. I was a kid; it was a sip. My mom loved it and would often cook with it. I have fond memories of weekends at the park, many Budweisers for the adults, and goat stew with a bsecretb ingredient.How did those first sips eventually lead you to your beer-inspired life today?That taste of beer at an early age made me aware of adult beverages. Growing up, I traveled to my motherbs homeland of Guayaquil, Ecuador many times. One of my older cousins became a chemical engineer and also held a masterbs in brewing. He went on to become a brewmaster for AmBev the biggest brewery in Latin America for many years. So that gave me some exposure even if I didnbt realize it at the time. I guess that led me to explore the adult beverage world a bit.I discovered craft beer in 2008 in Georgia. A friend put me onto the miracle nectar and I was hooked ever since. My first beers were Mendocinobs Eye of the Hawk, North Coastbs Old Rasputin, St. Bernardus, and Grain dbOrgebs Belzebuth.How did High Gravity Hip Hop get started, and how has it changed over the years?HGHH started because I wanted to build a better beer festival. It has grown into a complete lifestyle brand and is developing into the go-to agency for diversity marketing for the craft beer industry.Rock bands collaborate with breweries all the time. Why do you think there arenbt as many rap collaborations?I donbt know. The hip-hop collaborations I have seen are awesome. I was just at the latest one b Nappy Roots and Monday Night Brewing teamed up for a sweet hip-hop craft beer event at their brewery. Ibm looking forward to what breweries and the hip-hop community cook up. Therebs an unlimited ceiling in this area for both cultures. There is a true opportunity to bring people together during a time when the country needs it most.What else are you working on these days?                      We are working on launching the HGHH podcast bThe Audio Tasting,b where we bring craft beer and hip-hop pros together for a beer and a chat. We will be utilizing venues such as music studios, craft beer bars and breweries. We will also have a live studio audience for each show. Very excited about this project so keep your eye out for that.No value assignedUPCOMING BEER EVENTS:Three Taverns and Brouwers Verzet TakeoverWhen: Tues., May 16Where: Brick Store PubPrice: Depends how much you drink
                                         

To celebrate American Craft Beer Week, Brick Store will feature a lineup of standards and rarities from Three Taverns in Decatur and Brouwers Verzet in Belgium b the latter was started by Three Taverns brewmaster Joran Van Ginderachter.Brew at the ZooWhen: Sat., May 27Where: Zoo AtlantaPrice: $45-$100An evening at the zoo will include more than 70 different types of beer, wine, keeper talks and animal demos with some of the zoobs 1,000 nonhuman residents. Live music will come from local bands the Geeks, 8 Second Ride, RTW and Brad Jackson.B              20860590         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/05/food_firstdraft1_2_03.5910bb5c08cd6.png                  First Draft with Lenox Mercedes "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(213) "First Draft with Lenox Mercedes"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(104) "The High Gravity Hip Hop founder seeks to bridge the divide between hip-hop and craft breweries"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(104) "The High Gravity Hip Hop founder seeks to bridge the divide between hip-hop and craft breweries"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Wednesday May 10, 2017 10:00 am EDT
The High Gravity Hip Hop founder seeks to bridge the divide between hip-hop and craft breweries | more...
array(78) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(30) "First Draft with Carey Charles"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-06-16T01:05:28+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-31T07:07:11+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2017-02-27T22:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(30) "First Draft with Carey Charles"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(8) "13091951"
  ["tracker_field_description"]=>
  string(91) "The Second Self beer peddler and industry jack-of-all-trades talks past, present and future"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(91) "The Second Self beer peddler and industry jack-of-all-trades talks past, present and future"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2017-02-27T22:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(40) "Content:_:First Draft with Carey Charles"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(4432) "%{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%2258af63e539ab4654774d61ee%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22640w%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%Carey Charles is about as involved in Georgia beer as one can be. For eight years now, he’s been a member of Atlanta’s oldest homebrew club, Covert Hops (including two years as treasurer). He’s worked on the retail side at Ale Yeah! and Hop City. He spent some time at Atlanta Beverage Company — or, as he puts it, “almost got eaten alive in the jungle of distribution.” Most recently, he completed his three-tier system hat trick, landing at Second Self Beer as official “beer peddler.” It’s a rare thing to see the industry from all sides like that, so Creative Loafing picked Charles’s brain a bit to find out what he’s learned and where he thinks the Peach State’s beer scene is heading next.Describe your first beer.It all started as a kid with a sip of my dad's Miller Lite, which I found disgusting at the time! That's probably why I didn't really start drinking until I was in college. Usually cheap stuff like Natty Light, Bud Light/Ice, etc. at weekend dorm room and house parties.You’re one of those rare beer industry unicorns that’s worked in all three tiers — manufacturing, retail, and distribution. What are a couple of your biggest takeaways seeing craft beer from all sides?I’ve seen Cantillon go from gathering dust on the shelves to a beer that some people might sell their child to get. I was able to have a very small hand in helping some great brewers get their breweries started. I've dropped kegs onto my hands. Loaded down a Ford Focus hatchback with six 15.5-gallon kegs and hoped I didn't have to make any sudden stops. I've had beer buyers turn and run when they see me coming with free beer for them to drink. But the main thing I learned is that all sides have to work together for the process to function. The relationship is very much like a family: you may not always like each other, but you always have to work together. The other thing I've learned is communication. I'm still not great at it, but communicating with everyone is key to getting the right product to the right people at the right time.  Second Self is settling into its third year as a brewery, which is when a lot of breweries really start finding their voice. What are you guys bringing to the table that no other breweries in the Peach State are?We literally bring food and beer to the table, and use a lot of culinary ingredients in our beers. A couple of examples are the fresh ginger, lemongrass, and galangal in our best-selling Thai Wheat, and the hand-foraged serviceberries in our Farmer's Fund Saison. Jason Santamaria, our dear co-leader, comes from a family restaurant background, had a catering company in college, and has family still in the restaurant business, which influences the flavors in our beers.A bill is currently working its way through the Georgia legislature that would allow breweries some limited direct sales. It’s a fight that’s been in the works for years, but if it makes it through, what’s the next change you’d like to see for breweries?I'm sure your readers would love for me to say “self distribution!" But, really, with the potential passage of SB85, I really don't know what's next. This bill will allow us to keep some money in the brewery to expand our offerings both onsite and out into the rest of the beer-drinking world. With this expanded access, we'll have to hire more tasting room staff. As y'all drink more of the beer, we'll have to hire more folks to make the beer and more people to get out and help sell the beer. All leading to me having a nice, cushy office job. So, I'm pretty happy with what's coming very soon.BEER EVENTSCinco de SiberiusWhen: Sun., March 5, 7 p.m.Where: Wrecking Bar BrewpubPrice: Depends how much you drinkOn the fifth of every month, Wrecking Bar taps its delicious Mexican Siberius Maximus, a Russian Imperial Stout barrel aged with peppers, cinnamon bark, cocoa nibs, and vanilla beans. The tastings have become the stuff of legend.Secret Stash BashWhen: Sat., March 11, 1-7 p.m.Where: Taco Mac PradoPrice: $40
                                   

Spread across two sessions on this Saturday afternoon, the Secret Stash Bash offers “rare beers from the secret collections of 24 breweries.” It’s one of the best beer festivals in Georgia."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4557) "%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="58af63e539ab4654774d61ee" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="640w" contenteditable="false" ]}%Carey Charles is about as involved in Georgia beer as one can be. For eight years now, he’s been a member of Atlanta’s oldest homebrew club, Covert Hops (including two years as treasurer). He’s worked on the retail side at Ale Yeah! and Hop City. He spent some time at Atlanta Beverage Company — or, as he puts it, “almost got eaten alive in the jungle of distribution.” Most recently, he completed his three-tier system hat trick, landing at Second Self Beer as official “beer peddler.” It’s a rare thing to see the industry from all sides like that, so ''Creative Loafing'' picked Charles’s brain a bit to find out what he’s learned and where he thinks the Peach State’s beer scene is heading next.__Describe your first beer.__It all started as a kid with a sip of my dad's Miller Lite, which I found disgusting at the time! That's probably why I didn't really start drinking until I was in college. Usually cheap stuff like Natty Light, Bud Light/Ice, etc. at weekend dorm room and house parties.__You’re one of those rare beer industry unicorns that’s worked in all three tiers — manufacturing, retail, and distribution. What are a couple of your biggest takeaways seeing craft beer from all sides?__I’ve seen Cantillon go from gathering dust on the shelves to a beer that some people might sell their child to get. I was able to have a very small hand in helping some great brewers get their breweries started. I've dropped kegs onto my hands. Loaded down a Ford Focus hatchback with six 15.5-gallon kegs and hoped I didn't have to make any sudden stops. I've had beer buyers turn and run when they see me coming with free beer for them to drink. But the main thing I learned is that all sides have to work together for the process to function. The relationship is very much like a family: you may not always like each other, but you always have to work together. The other thing I've learned is communication. I'm still not great at it, but communicating with everyone is key to getting the right product to the right people at the right time.  __Second Self is settling into its third year as a brewery, which is when a lot of breweries really start finding their voice. What are you guys bringing to the table that no other breweries in the Peach State are?__We literally bring food and beer to the table, and use a lot of culinary ingredients in our beers. A couple of examples are the fresh ginger, lemongrass, and galangal in our best-selling Thai Wheat, and the hand-foraged serviceberries in our Farmer's Fund Saison. Jason Santamaria, our dear co-leader, comes from a family restaurant background, had a catering company in college, and has family still in the restaurant business, which influences the flavors in our beers.__A bill is currently working its way through the Georgia legislature that would allow breweries some limited direct sales. It’s a fight that’s been in the works for years, but if it makes it through, what’s the next change you’d like to see for breweries?__I'm sure your readers would love for me to say “self distribution!" But, really, with the [potential] passage of SB85, I really don't know what's next. This bill will allow us to keep some money in the brewery to expand our offerings both onsite and out into the rest of the beer-drinking world. With this expanded access, we'll have to hire more tasting room staff. As y'all drink more of the beer, we'll have to hire more folks to make the beer and more people to get out and help sell the beer. All leading to me having a nice, cushy office job. So, I'm pretty happy with what's coming very soon.BEER EVENTS[http://www.wreckingbarbrewpub.com|__Cinco de Siberius__]__When:__ Sun., March 5, 7 p.m.__Where:__ Wrecking Bar Brewpub__Price:__ Depends how much you drinkOn the fifth of every month, Wrecking Bar taps its delicious Mexican Siberius Maximus, a Russian Imperial Stout barrel aged with peppers, cinnamon bark, cocoa nibs, and vanilla beans. The tastings have become the stuff of legend.[https://www.facebook.com/events/568388823358369/|__Secret Stash Bash__]__When:__ Sat., March 11, 1-7 p.m.__Where:__ Taco Mac Prado__Price:__ $40
                                   

Spread across two sessions on this Saturday afternoon, the Secret Stash Bash offers “rare beers from the secret collections of 24 breweries.” It’s one of the best beer festivals in Georgia."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-01T03:09:47+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-02T00:34:56+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "20853158"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(84) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/02/food_firstdraft1_1_45.58af63e243081.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "F"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(5) "First"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item268045"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "268045"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(4794) "    The Second Self beer peddler and industry jack-of-all-trades talks past, present and future   2017-02-27T22:00:00+00:00 First Draft with Carey Charles   Austin L. Ray  2017-02-27T22:00:00+00:00  %{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%2258af63e539ab4654774d61ee%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22640w%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%Carey Charles is about as involved in Georgia beer as one can be. For eight years now, he’s been a member of Atlanta’s oldest homebrew club, Covert Hops (including two years as treasurer). He’s worked on the retail side at Ale Yeah! and Hop City. He spent some time at Atlanta Beverage Company — or, as he puts it, “almost got eaten alive in the jungle of distribution.” Most recently, he completed his three-tier system hat trick, landing at Second Self Beer as official “beer peddler.” It’s a rare thing to see the industry from all sides like that, so Creative Loafing picked Charles’s brain a bit to find out what he’s learned and where he thinks the Peach State’s beer scene is heading next.Describe your first beer.It all started as a kid with a sip of my dad's Miller Lite, which I found disgusting at the time! That's probably why I didn't really start drinking until I was in college. Usually cheap stuff like Natty Light, Bud Light/Ice, etc. at weekend dorm room and house parties.You’re one of those rare beer industry unicorns that’s worked in all three tiers — manufacturing, retail, and distribution. What are a couple of your biggest takeaways seeing craft beer from all sides?I’ve seen Cantillon go from gathering dust on the shelves to a beer that some people might sell their child to get. I was able to have a very small hand in helping some great brewers get their breweries started. I've dropped kegs onto my hands. Loaded down a Ford Focus hatchback with six 15.5-gallon kegs and hoped I didn't have to make any sudden stops. I've had beer buyers turn and run when they see me coming with free beer for them to drink. But the main thing I learned is that all sides have to work together for the process to function. The relationship is very much like a family: you may not always like each other, but you always have to work together. The other thing I've learned is communication. I'm still not great at it, but communicating with everyone is key to getting the right product to the right people at the right time.  Second Self is settling into its third year as a brewery, which is when a lot of breweries really start finding their voice. What are you guys bringing to the table that no other breweries in the Peach State are?We literally bring food and beer to the table, and use a lot of culinary ingredients in our beers. A couple of examples are the fresh ginger, lemongrass, and galangal in our best-selling Thai Wheat, and the hand-foraged serviceberries in our Farmer's Fund Saison. Jason Santamaria, our dear co-leader, comes from a family restaurant background, had a catering company in college, and has family still in the restaurant business, which influences the flavors in our beers.A bill is currently working its way through the Georgia legislature that would allow breweries some limited direct sales. It’s a fight that’s been in the works for years, but if it makes it through, what’s the next change you’d like to see for breweries?I'm sure your readers would love for me to say “self distribution!" But, really, with the potential passage of SB85, I really don't know what's next. This bill will allow us to keep some money in the brewery to expand our offerings both onsite and out into the rest of the beer-drinking world. With this expanded access, we'll have to hire more tasting room staff. As y'all drink more of the beer, we'll have to hire more folks to make the beer and more people to get out and help sell the beer. All leading to me having a nice, cushy office job. So, I'm pretty happy with what's coming very soon.BEER EVENTSCinco de SiberiusWhen: Sun., March 5, 7 p.m.Where: Wrecking Bar BrewpubPrice: Depends how much you drinkOn the fifth of every month, Wrecking Bar taps its delicious Mexican Siberius Maximus, a Russian Imperial Stout barrel aged with peppers, cinnamon bark, cocoa nibs, and vanilla beans. The tastings have become the stuff of legend.Secret Stash BashWhen: Sat., March 11, 1-7 p.m.Where: Taco Mac PradoPrice: $40
                                   

Spread across two sessions on this Saturday afternoon, the Secret Stash Bash offers “rare beers from the secret collections of 24 breweries.” It’s one of the best beer festivals in Georgia.             20853158         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/02/food_firstdraft1_1_45.58af63e243081.png                  First Draft with Carey Charles "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(212) "First Draft with Carey Charles"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(100) "The Second Self beer peddler and industry jack-of-all-trades talks past, present and future"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(100) "The Second Self beer peddler and industry jack-of-all-trades talks past, present and future"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Monday February 27, 2017 05:00 pm EST
The Second Self beer peddler and industry jack-of-all-trades talks past, present and future | more...
array(78) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(31) "First Draft with Nathan Berrong"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-06-16T01:05:28+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-31T07:07:11+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2017-01-26T23:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(31) "First Draft with Nathan Berrong"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(8) "13091951"
  ["tracker_field_description"]=>
  string(100) "Three Taverns' brand cultivator talks turning points, drinking games, and putting sour beers in cans"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(100) "Three Taverns' brand cultivator talks turning points, drinking games, and putting sour beers in cans"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2017-01-26T23:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(41) "Content:_:First Draft with Nathan Berrong"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(4580) "%{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%22587fe0d439ab46db5f2a2c13%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22320w%22 data-embed-align=%22left%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%Before Nathan Berrong was helping direct the brand of one of Georgia’s most exciting breweries, he grew up in Conyers, studied communications and journalism at Liberty University, dabbled in music, and spent some time teaching English in Honduras.

“It wasn’t a great experience,” Berrong says of the latter over an Amulet IPA in Three Taverns Craft Brewery’s taproom in Decatur. “I barely knew Spanish and didn’t know anyone there. I felt like I was going insane.”When he returned Stateside, he handed off his resumé to Turner Broadcasting’s temp agency, ended up temping as a tour guide at CNN for a week, then got hired on full time. He’d spend 10 years with the organization, producing live shots in the field and eventually writing about beer for CNN’s food blog, Eatocracy.Along the way, he befriended Brick Store Pub co-founder Dave Blanchard, who would introduce him to a homebrewer named Brian Purcell. That homebrewer went on to open Three Taverns in Decatur and hire Berrong in 2013. Berrong quit after little more than a year with the company, but eventually found his way back. Creative Loafing sat down with the 36-year-old “brand cultivator” to talk drinking games, loving what you do, and putting sour beers in cans.Describe your first beer.I think it was a Miller Lite. In seventh or eighth grade, I was at a party with my sister, who was older, and her friends. She didn’t give it to me, but she knew what was going on. That was one of the first times. And then me and my friend John used to get into trouble with all kinds of substances in his basement. His parents had vermouth, and we had no idea what it was. He had found a drinking game and we poured equal parts Coke and vermouth into these big, 64-ounce QuikTrip cups. It was terrible. But we were both drinking it like, “This is really good!”What was your beer turning point before you started writing about it for CNN?Not long after I met my future wife, she bought me a subscription to BeerAdvocate. Going down that road of being nerdy, I started trading for beer online and doing that stuff. That’s when I realized I wanted it to be more than a hobby. Me and one of my friends started a blog, which is still online. It’s terrible. I’m not gonna tell you the name of it because you can still see it.It’s interesting that you worked for Three Taverns, left, and then came back. There were only four of us when we started. Four people starting a brewery of this size was a huge undertaking. I was bottling some days, taping up boxes, running around town doing sales, working in the tasting room at night, doing anything that needed to be done. I just got burnt out. So I applied for a job on a whim and got it. I was still in contact with the brewery, though. Brian would call me and ask me what I thought of things. When they lost a salesperson, I texted Joran Van Ginderarcter, Three Taverns’ head brewer mostly as a joke, saying that I almost applied for the job because I missed the brewery. He told me I should apply, but I told him I didn’t want to do sales. But then he asked me, “So, you’d be willing to come back?” And after that, Brian reached out, pitching a job to me.What changed in the time you were gone?From day one, I wanted us to do sours. But at the time, Brian wasn’t really into them himself. And right away, I wanted to do cans. This was in 2013. But again, Brian has more of an old-school approach where he thought Belgian beers should be in bottles. So sours and cans were things I wanted to do. They started doing sours a little after I left, and then, when Brian called me, he said, “Hey, we just ordered a canning line. You were right about sours, and I was wrong. You were right about cans, and I was wrong. I’m tired of being wrong about stuff. Would you wanna think about coming back to the brewery?”Atlanta Winter BeerfestWhen: Sat., Feb. 4, 1-6 p.m.Where: Atlantic StationPrice: $40-$55Atlanta Winter Beerfest's sixth annual event is taking over Atlantic Station with over 150 beers, wine, and cider. The ticket price includes entry, a souvenir cup, entertainment, and all the drinks you can drink.
One-Off Wednesday

When: Every Wednesday, 5-8 p.m.Where: Red Brick Brewing Co.Price: Tours start at $12
                                         

Each week on Wednesday, Red Brick brewers serve up a taproom-only selection."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4715) "%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="587fe0d439ab46db5f2a2c13" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="320w" data-embed-align="left" contenteditable="false" ]}%Before Nathan Berrong was helping direct the brand of one of Georgia’s most exciting breweries, he grew up in Conyers, studied communications and journalism at Liberty University, dabbled in music, and spent some time teaching English in Honduras.

“It wasn’t a great experience,” Berrong says of the latter over an Amulet IPA in Three Taverns Craft Brewery’s taproom in Decatur. “I barely knew Spanish and didn’t know anyone there. I felt like I was going insane.”When he returned Stateside, he handed off his resumé to Turner Broadcasting’s temp agency, ended up temping as a tour guide at CNN for a week, then got hired on full time. He’d spend 10 years with the organization, producing live shots in the field and eventually writing about beer for CNN’s food blog, Eatocracy.Along the way, he befriended Brick Store Pub co-founder Dave Blanchard, who would introduce him to a homebrewer named Brian Purcell. That homebrewer went on to open Three Taverns in Decatur and hire Berrong in 2013. Berrong quit after little more than a year with the company, but eventually found his way back. ''Creative Loafing ''sat down with the 36-year-old “brand cultivator” to talk drinking games, loving what you do, and putting sour beers in cans.__Describe your first beer.__I think it was a Miller Lite. In seventh or eighth grade, I was at a party with my sister, who was older, and her friends. She didn’t give it to me, but she knew what was going on. That was one of the first times. And then me and my friend John used to get into trouble with all kinds of substances in his basement. His parents had vermouth, and we had no idea what it was. He had found a drinking game and we poured equal parts Coke and vermouth into these big, 64-ounce QuikTrip cups. It was ''terrible''. But we were both drinking it like, “This is really good!”__What was your beer turning point before you started writing about it for CNN?__Not long after I met [my future wife], she bought me a subscription to ''BeerAdvocate''. Going down that road of being nerdy, I started trading for beer online and doing that stuff. That’s when I realized I wanted it to be more than a hobby. Me and one of my friends started [a blog], which is still online. It’s terrible. I’m not gonna tell you the name of it because you can still see it.__It’s interesting that you worked for Three Taverns, left, and then came back. __There were only four of us when we started. Four people starting a brewery of this size was a huge undertaking. I was bottling some days, taping up boxes, running around town doing sales, working in the tasting room at night, doing anything that needed to be done. I just got burnt out. So I applied for a job on a whim and got it. I was still in contact with the brewery, though. Brian would call me and ask me what I thought of things. When they lost a salesperson, I texted Joran [Van Ginderarcter, Three Taverns’ head brewer] ''mostly'' as a joke, saying that I almost applied for [the job] because I missed the brewery. He told me I should apply, but I told him I didn’t want to do sales. But then he asked me, “So, you’d be willing to come back?” And after that, Brian reached out, pitching a job to me.__What changed in the time you were gone?__From day one, I wanted us to do sours. But at the time, Brian wasn’t really into them himself. And right away, I wanted to do cans. This was in 2013. But again, Brian has more of an old-school approach where he thought Belgian beers should be in bottles. So sours and cans were things I wanted to do. They started doing sours a little after I left, and then, when Brian called me, he said, “Hey, we just ordered a canning line. You were right about sours, and I was wrong. You were right about cans, and I was wrong. I’m tired of being wrong about stuff. Would you wanna think about coming back to the brewery?”__[http://atlantawinterbeerfest.com/event-details/|Atlanta Winter Beerfest]____When:__ Sat., Feb. 4, 1-6 p.m.__Where:__ Atlantic Station__Price:__ $40-$55Atlanta Winter Beerfest's sixth annual event is taking over Atlantic Station with over 150 beers, wine, and cider. The ticket price includes entry, a souvenir cup, entertainment, and all the drinks you can drink.
__[http://www.redbrickbrewing.com|One-Off Wednesday]__

__When:__ Every Wednesday, 5-8 p.m.__Where:__ Red Brick Brewing Co.__Price:__ Tours start at $12
                                         

Each week on Wednesday, Red Brick brewers serve up a taproom-only selection."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-01T03:09:47+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-02T00:32:28+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "20848951"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(80) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/01/Firstdraft_1_1_40.588117dbc8951.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "F"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(5) "First"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item267843"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "267843"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(4949) "    Three Taverns' brand cultivator talks turning points, drinking games, and putting sour beers in cans   2017-01-26T23:00:00+00:00 First Draft with Nathan Berrong   Austin L. Ray  2017-01-26T23:00:00+00:00  %{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%22587fe0d439ab46db5f2a2c13%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22320w%22 data-embed-align=%22left%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%Before Nathan Berrong was helping direct the brand of one of Georgia’s most exciting breweries, he grew up in Conyers, studied communications and journalism at Liberty University, dabbled in music, and spent some time teaching English in Honduras.

“It wasn’t a great experience,” Berrong says of the latter over an Amulet IPA in Three Taverns Craft Brewery’s taproom in Decatur. “I barely knew Spanish and didn’t know anyone there. I felt like I was going insane.”When he returned Stateside, he handed off his resumé to Turner Broadcasting’s temp agency, ended up temping as a tour guide at CNN for a week, then got hired on full time. He’d spend 10 years with the organization, producing live shots in the field and eventually writing about beer for CNN’s food blog, Eatocracy.Along the way, he befriended Brick Store Pub co-founder Dave Blanchard, who would introduce him to a homebrewer named Brian Purcell. That homebrewer went on to open Three Taverns in Decatur and hire Berrong in 2013. Berrong quit after little more than a year with the company, but eventually found his way back. Creative Loafing sat down with the 36-year-old “brand cultivator” to talk drinking games, loving what you do, and putting sour beers in cans.Describe your first beer.I think it was a Miller Lite. In seventh or eighth grade, I was at a party with my sister, who was older, and her friends. She didn’t give it to me, but she knew what was going on. That was one of the first times. And then me and my friend John used to get into trouble with all kinds of substances in his basement. His parents had vermouth, and we had no idea what it was. He had found a drinking game and we poured equal parts Coke and vermouth into these big, 64-ounce QuikTrip cups. It was terrible. But we were both drinking it like, “This is really good!”What was your beer turning point before you started writing about it for CNN?Not long after I met my future wife, she bought me a subscription to BeerAdvocate. Going down that road of being nerdy, I started trading for beer online and doing that stuff. That’s when I realized I wanted it to be more than a hobby. Me and one of my friends started a blog, which is still online. It’s terrible. I’m not gonna tell you the name of it because you can still see it.It’s interesting that you worked for Three Taverns, left, and then came back. There were only four of us when we started. Four people starting a brewery of this size was a huge undertaking. I was bottling some days, taping up boxes, running around town doing sales, working in the tasting room at night, doing anything that needed to be done. I just got burnt out. So I applied for a job on a whim and got it. I was still in contact with the brewery, though. Brian would call me and ask me what I thought of things. When they lost a salesperson, I texted Joran Van Ginderarcter, Three Taverns’ head brewer mostly as a joke, saying that I almost applied for the job because I missed the brewery. He told me I should apply, but I told him I didn’t want to do sales. But then he asked me, “So, you’d be willing to come back?” And after that, Brian reached out, pitching a job to me.What changed in the time you were gone?From day one, I wanted us to do sours. But at the time, Brian wasn’t really into them himself. And right away, I wanted to do cans. This was in 2013. But again, Brian has more of an old-school approach where he thought Belgian beers should be in bottles. So sours and cans were things I wanted to do. They started doing sours a little after I left, and then, when Brian called me, he said, “Hey, we just ordered a canning line. You were right about sours, and I was wrong. You were right about cans, and I was wrong. I’m tired of being wrong about stuff. Would you wanna think about coming back to the brewery?”Atlanta Winter BeerfestWhen: Sat., Feb. 4, 1-6 p.m.Where: Atlantic StationPrice: $40-$55Atlanta Winter Beerfest's sixth annual event is taking over Atlantic Station with over 150 beers, wine, and cider. The ticket price includes entry, a souvenir cup, entertainment, and all the drinks you can drink.
One-Off Wednesday

When: Every Wednesday, 5-8 p.m.Where: Red Brick Brewing Co.Price: Tours start at $12
                                         

Each week on Wednesday, Red Brick brewers serve up a taproom-only selection.             20848951         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/01/Firstdraft_1_1_40.588117dbc8951.png                  First Draft with Nathan Berrong "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(213) "First Draft with Nathan Berrong"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(109) "Three Taverns' brand cultivator talks turning points, drinking games, and putting sour beers in cans"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(109) "Three Taverns' brand cultivator talks turning points, drinking games, and putting sour beers in cans"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Thursday January 26, 2017 06:00 pm EST
Three Taverns' brand cultivator talks turning points, drinking games, and putting sour beers in cans | more...
array(78) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(29) "First Draft with Dan Fontaine"
  ["modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-06-16T01:05:28+00:00"
  ["creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-01-31T07:07:11+00:00"
  ["contributors"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
  }
  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2016-11-30T21:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_status"]=>
  string(1) "o"
  ["tracker_id"]=>
  string(2) "11"
  ["view_permission"]=>
  string(13) "view_trackers"
  ["tracker_field_contentTitle"]=>
  string(29) "First Draft with Dan Fontaine"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline_exact"]=>
  string(13) "Austin L. Ray"
  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson"]=>
  string(8) "13091951"
  ["tracker_field_description"]=>
  string(102) "The Southeast's Guinness Brewery Ambassador talks dream jobs, podcasts, and the future of Georgia beer"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(102) "The Southeast's Guinness Brewery Ambassador talks dream jobs, podcasts, and the future of Georgia beer"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2016-11-30T21:00:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(39) "Content:_:First Draft with Dan Fontaine"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(4551) "%{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%22583b31686cdeea5b7d7cb4f4%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22640w%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%Dan Fontaine was born in Alabama, but Atlanta is where he came of age. After playing baseball and earning a bachelors in business management from Auburn, he moved to Atlanta and started doing stand-up comedy. Here, he fell in love with SweetWater 420 and the woman who would one day become his wife.“I love this city,” he says. “It’s where I really started to learn about myself. It’s hard to imagine being anywhere else.”Fontaine has bounced around jobs over the years, including a stint as promotions coordinator for The Onion in New York City. But as he started giving brewery tours (he co-ran the company Atlanta Beer Tours with a friend for a time), and doing a beer podcast (“BeerPop!”, which is currently on hiatus), and just generally obsessing over all things beer, he realized that he should be doing this stuff for a living. As it turns out, it was simple as checking Facebook, where he saw a job posting for a Guinness Brewery Ambassador. Today, just nine months into the gig, Fontaine focuses mostly on training and education at bars, restaurants, and with local distributors, and holds tasting events throughout the Southeast. Creative Loafing caught up with him to see how it’s going and what he hopes for the future of beer — the kind made in Ireland and Georgia.Describe your first beer.I don’t remember exactly but I have a vague memory of being a kid, say eight or nine, and sneaking a sip of a Miller Lite. I remember how cold it was, the lively carbonation, and how strange it tasted. Like a really weird soda. I kinda liked it. I don’t drink a lot of American light lagers these days but I really appreciate it when I do because that taste always brings me back to that memory. That’s one of the amazing things about beer, how aromas and tastes can really spark memories of times and flavors from your past.The tours, the podcasts — they all seem like stepping stones to making beer your life.Yeah, I was always doing something else completely unrelated but definitely had an interest in brewing, pub culture, and exploring new styles and brewing regions of the world. With Atlanta Beer Tours, my partner Aaron and I really just wanted to share Atlanta’s growing beer scene with other people. I’m no longer involved, but he’s doing a great job continuing that mission. Our podcast, “BeerPop!”, which is returning soon, was just an extension of our interest in beer. But yes, there was always that far-off goal of “working in beer.”How did the Guinness gig come about?I saw a link to the Guinness Brewery Ambassador position on Facebook and it seemed like a great fit. Two of the main requirements were someone who was passionate and knowledgeable about beer, and being comfortable speaking to large audiences. My background in beer tours and stand-up were a perfect foundation for this job. I’ve talked to thousands of people who really only know about Guinness Draught and are excited when they realize that we’re experimenting with different styles, updating old recipes, and bringing those beers to market.What do you hope for the future of Georgia beer?I hope we continue to see a rise in bootstrapped, mom-and-pop businesses that don’t worry so much about expansions or exit strategies. I would love for every neighborhood in the city to have a small brewery making great beer, or a 30-seat, nano-brewpub pouring world class brew with five menu items that blow people away, or a market that’s focused on beer and food pairings that can really push that niche forward. Anything that can be an asset to the community, be great at what they do, and educate beer lovers, that’s what I want to be a part of.BEER EVENTSCinco de SiberiusWhen: Mon., Dec. 5, 7 p.m.Where: Wrecking Bar Brewpub, 292 Moreland Ave. N.E.On the fifth of every month, Wrecking Bar taps its delicious Mexican Siberius Maximus, a Russian imperial stout barrel-aged with peppers, cinnamon bark, cocoa nibs, and vanilla beans. The tastings have become the stuff of local beer legend.Cherry Street Brewing’s 4th AnniversaryWhen: Sat., Dec. 10Where: Cherry Street Brewing Cooperative, 5817 S. Vickery St., Cumming
                                       

The Cumming brewpub will celebrate four years by debuting new beers all week, culminating in live music, t-shirt sales and to-go bottles on Saturday. Use it as an excuse to Uber OTP for once."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(4669) "%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="583b31686cdeea5b7d7cb4f4" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="640w" contenteditable="false" ]}%Dan Fontaine was born in Alabama, but Atlanta is where he came of age. After playing baseball and earning a bachelors in business management from Auburn, he moved to Atlanta and started doing stand-up comedy. Here, he fell in love with SweetWater 420 and the woman who would one day become his wife.“I love this city,” he says. “It’s where I really started to learn about myself. It’s hard to imagine being anywhere else.”Fontaine has bounced around jobs over the years, including a stint as promotions coordinator for ''The Onion'' in New York City. But as he started giving brewery tours (he co-ran the company Atlanta Beer Tours with a friend for a time), and doing a beer podcast (“BeerPop!”, which is currently on hiatus), and just generally obsessing over all things beer, he realized that he should be doing this stuff for a living. As it turns out, it was simple as checking Facebook, where he saw a job posting for a Guinness Brewery Ambassador. Today, just nine months into the gig, Fontaine focuses mostly on training and education at bars, restaurants, and with local distributors, and holds tasting events throughout the Southeast. ''Creative Loafing'' caught up with him to see how it’s going and what he hopes for the future of beer — the kind made in Ireland ''and'' Georgia.__Describe your first beer.__I don’t remember exactly but I have a vague memory of being a kid, say eight or nine, and sneaking a sip of a Miller Lite. I remember how cold it was, the lively carbonation, and how strange it tasted. Like a really weird soda. I kinda liked it. I don’t drink a lot of American light lagers these days but I really appreciate it when I do because that taste always brings me back to that memory. That’s one of the amazing things about beer, how aromas and tastes can really spark memories of times and flavors from your past.__The tours, the podcasts __—__ they all seem like stepping stones to making beer your life.__Yeah, I was always doing something else completely unrelated but definitely had an interest in brewing, pub culture, and exploring new styles and brewing regions of the world. With Atlanta Beer Tours, my partner Aaron and I really just wanted to share Atlanta’s growing beer scene with other people. I’m no longer involved, but he’s doing a great job continuing that mission. Our podcast, “BeerPop!”, which is returning soon, was just an extension of our interest in beer. But yes, there was always that far-off goal of “working in beer.”__How did the Guinness gig come about?__I saw a link to the Guinness Brewery Ambassador position on Facebook and it seemed like a great fit. Two of the main requirements were someone who was passionate and knowledgeable about beer, and being comfortable speaking to large audiences. My background in beer tours and stand-up were a perfect foundation for this job. I’ve talked to thousands of people who really only know about Guinness Draught and are excited when they realize that we’re experimenting with different styles, updating old recipes, and bringing those beers to market.__What do you hope for the future of Georgia beer?__I hope we continue to see a rise in bootstrapped, mom-and-pop businesses that don’t worry so much about expansions or exit strategies. I would love for every neighborhood in the city to have a small brewery making great beer, or a 30-seat, nano-brewpub pouring world class brew with five menu items that blow people away, or a market that’s focused on beer and food pairings that can really push that niche forward. Anything that can be an asset to the community, be great at what they do, and educate beer lovers, that’s what I want to be a part of.__BEER EVENTS____[http://www.wreckingbarbrewpub.com|Cinco de Siberius]____When:__ Mon., Dec. 5, 7 p.m.__Where:__ Wrecking Bar Brewpub, 292 Moreland Ave. N.E.On the fifth of every month, Wrecking Bar taps its delicious Mexican Siberius Maximus, a Russian imperial stout barrel-aged with peppers, cinnamon bark, cocoa nibs, and vanilla beans. The tastings have become the stuff of local beer legend.__[http://www.cherrystreetbrewing.com/|Cherry Street Brewing’s 4th Anniversary]____When:__ Sat., Dec. 10__Where:__ Cherry Street Brewing Cooperative, 5817 S. Vickery St., Cumming
                                       

The Cumming brewpub will celebrate four years by debuting new beers all week, culminating in live music, t-shirt sales and to-go bottles on Saturday. Use it as an excuse to Uber OTP for once."
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_creation_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-01T03:09:47+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_modification_date"]=>
  string(25) "2018-02-02T00:31:01+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentControlCategory"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_scene"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentNeighborhood"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelations_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedContent_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentRelatedWikiPages_multi"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(0) ""
  }
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEContentID"]=>
  string(8) "20844913"
  ["tracker_field_contentBASEAuthorID"]=>
  int(0)
  ["tracker_field_contentLegacyURL1"]=>
  string(80) "http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/11/Firstdraft_1_1_32.583b31660c5f5.png"
  ["tracker_field_section"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["language"]=>
  string(7) "unknown"
  ["attachments"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["deep_categories"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "orphan"
  }
  ["categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_28"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_177"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_209"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_163"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_171"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_153"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_242"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_564"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["deep_categories_under_1182"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["freetags"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["geo_located"]=>
  string(1) "n"
  ["allowed_groups"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "Admins"
    [1]=>
    string(9) "Anonymous"
  }
  ["allowed_users"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relations"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_objects"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_types"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["relation_count"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["title_initial"]=>
  string(1) "F"
  ["title_firstword"]=>
  string(5) "First"
  ["searchable"]=>
  string(1) "y"
  ["url"]=>
  string(10) "item267605"
  ["object_type"]=>
  string(11) "trackeritem"
  ["object_id"]=>
  string(6) "267605"
  ["contents"]=>
  string(4918) "    The Southeast's Guinness Brewery Ambassador talks dream jobs, podcasts, and the future of Georgia beer   2016-11-30T21:00:00+00:00 First Draft with Dan Fontaine   Austin L. Ray  2016-11-30T21:00:00+00:00  %{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%22583b31686cdeea5b7d7cb4f4%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22640w%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%Dan Fontaine was born in Alabama, but Atlanta is where he came of age. After playing baseball and earning a bachelors in business management from Auburn, he moved to Atlanta and started doing stand-up comedy. Here, he fell in love with SweetWater 420 and the woman who would one day become his wife.“I love this city,” he says. “It’s where I really started to learn about myself. It’s hard to imagine being anywhere else.”Fontaine has bounced around jobs over the years, including a stint as promotions coordinator for The Onion in New York City. But as he started giving brewery tours (he co-ran the company Atlanta Beer Tours with a friend for a time), and doing a beer podcast (“BeerPop!”, which is currently on hiatus), and just generally obsessing over all things beer, he realized that he should be doing this stuff for a living. As it turns out, it was simple as checking Facebook, where he saw a job posting for a Guinness Brewery Ambassador. Today, just nine months into the gig, Fontaine focuses mostly on training and education at bars, restaurants, and with local distributors, and holds tasting events throughout the Southeast. Creative Loafing caught up with him to see how it’s going and what he hopes for the future of beer — the kind made in Ireland and Georgia.Describe your first beer.I don’t remember exactly but I have a vague memory of being a kid, say eight or nine, and sneaking a sip of a Miller Lite. I remember how cold it was, the lively carbonation, and how strange it tasted. Like a really weird soda. I kinda liked it. I don’t drink a lot of American light lagers these days but I really appreciate it when I do because that taste always brings me back to that memory. That’s one of the amazing things about beer, how aromas and tastes can really spark memories of times and flavors from your past.The tours, the podcasts — they all seem like stepping stones to making beer your life.Yeah, I was always doing something else completely unrelated but definitely had an interest in brewing, pub culture, and exploring new styles and brewing regions of the world. With Atlanta Beer Tours, my partner Aaron and I really just wanted to share Atlanta’s growing beer scene with other people. I’m no longer involved, but he’s doing a great job continuing that mission. Our podcast, “BeerPop!”, which is returning soon, was just an extension of our interest in beer. But yes, there was always that far-off goal of “working in beer.”How did the Guinness gig come about?I saw a link to the Guinness Brewery Ambassador position on Facebook and it seemed like a great fit. Two of the main requirements were someone who was passionate and knowledgeable about beer, and being comfortable speaking to large audiences. My background in beer tours and stand-up were a perfect foundation for this job. I’ve talked to thousands of people who really only know about Guinness Draught and are excited when they realize that we’re experimenting with different styles, updating old recipes, and bringing those beers to market.What do you hope for the future of Georgia beer?I hope we continue to see a rise in bootstrapped, mom-and-pop businesses that don’t worry so much about expansions or exit strategies. I would love for every neighborhood in the city to have a small brewery making great beer, or a 30-seat, nano-brewpub pouring world class brew with five menu items that blow people away, or a market that’s focused on beer and food pairings that can really push that niche forward. Anything that can be an asset to the community, be great at what they do, and educate beer lovers, that’s what I want to be a part of.BEER EVENTSCinco de SiberiusWhen: Mon., Dec. 5, 7 p.m.Where: Wrecking Bar Brewpub, 292 Moreland Ave. N.E.On the fifth of every month, Wrecking Bar taps its delicious Mexican Siberius Maximus, a Russian imperial stout barrel-aged with peppers, cinnamon bark, cocoa nibs, and vanilla beans. The tastings have become the stuff of local beer legend.Cherry Street Brewing’s 4th AnniversaryWhen: Sat., Dec. 10Where: Cherry Street Brewing Cooperative, 5817 S. Vickery St., Cumming
                                       

The Cumming brewpub will celebrate four years by debuting new beers all week, culminating in live music, t-shirt sales and to-go bottles on Saturday. Use it as an excuse to Uber OTP for once.             20844913         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/11/Firstdraft_1_1_32.583b31660c5f5.png                  First Draft with Dan Fontaine "
  ["score"]=>
  float(0)
  ["_index"]=>
  string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main"
  ["objectlink"]=>
  string(211) "First Draft with Dan Fontaine"
  ["photos"]=>
  string(130) "Coming Soon

"
  ["desc"]=>
  string(111) "The Southeast's Guinness Brewery Ambassador talks dream jobs, podcasts, and the future of Georgia beer"
  ["eventDate"]=>
  string(111) "The Southeast's Guinness Brewery Ambassador talks dream jobs, podcasts, and the future of Georgia beer"
  ["noads"]=>
  string(10) "y"
}

Article

Wednesday November 30, 2016 04:00 pm EST
The Southeast's Guinness Brewery Ambassador talks dream jobs, podcasts, and the future of Georgia beer | more...
Search for more by Austin L. Ray

[Admin link: 20 People to Watch - Rob Haze: The comedian]