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Cheifin out

Bob Glassley brings a 38-year legacy to the Mess-Around

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Photo credit: Brandon English
WE THE PEOPLE: Bob Glassley on stage with the reincarnated Cheifs.

In November of 1979, Bob Glassley and a few friends piled into his car for a road trip down the West Coast. It was a retired police cruiser from the Dorris California Police Department, an all-white Plymouth with a souped-up engine. At the time, Glassley sang for a young punk band from Portland called the Rubbers. They were on a mission that day, to make some alliances in the Los Angeles music scene, and to line up some shows for a touring caravan of Portland bands. “We set out for L.A., and the motor blew somewhere outside of Stockton,” Glassley says. “When we got back on the road we found out it was the day they were taping the Hollywood Christmas parade. All of the freeway exits were closed, so we just kept driving around the city, looking for an off-ramp.”

Eventually they made it into the city and crashed at the Holly-West in Hollywood. The space was a former MGM studio and office building on the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Western, housing everything from a porno studio and a church led by a gay preacher to rehearsal spaces where musicians lived, practiced and spent most of their time hanging out.

One day, Glassley was listening to a group making noise in a nearby room when a young man with bright blue hair — George Walker — poked his head around the doorway and asked if anyone played bass. “I said I did, although that was a serious stretch,” Glassley says. “I owned a cheap bass back in Portland, so I felt qualified.”

Walker was a gay black man in the late ’70s L.A. punk scene at a time when there were few out gay or black punk musicians.

The two became friends, and after sticking around and playing music for a few days, Glassley was invited to join the group and play bass alongside Walker on guitar with singer Jerry Koskie and drummer Kenneth “Rabit” Bragger. Soon they would come to be known as Cheifs.

Glassley returned to Portland to play the final shows the Rubbers had booked and was L.A.-bound soon after. The Rubbers’ Bruce Loose went on to sing and play bass with San Francisco’s legendary punk outfit, Flipper. Back in L.A., Glassley experienced a thrilling new beginning, building friendships with the now-legendary denizens of the local punk scene, including Darby Crash and Lorna Doom of the Germs, Keith Morris of Black Flag and the Circle Jerks, and Jack Grisham of T.S.O.L.

Image OLD SCHOOL: The original Cheifs lineup featuring guitarist George Walker (from left), singer Jerry Koskie, drummer Rabit and bass player Bob Glassley on stage, May 2, 1981, at Devonshire Downs in Northridge, CA.Vincent Ramirez Photography<!]}%-->He was thrust into a life bound by the live-fast, die-young ethos of late ’70s and early ’80s punk scene. But nearly 40 years after breaking up, the specter of Cheifs has returned, demanding the songs be heard again.

In their prime, Cheifs were a lauded act that bridged the gaps between West Coast punk and hardcore. They were a fixture of the Los Angeles scene but after scant few releases, the group has languished in obscurity.

From 1979 to 1982, Cheifs were a staple of the L.A. punk scene. Even though he hadn’t played in a band since they broke up, a chance meeting with a fan one night at the Masquerade proved the catalyst for Glassley to head up a new Atlanta-based incarnation of Cheifs.

Now 57 years old, Glassley lives near Woodstock, Georgia, where he works as a director of technology for Triton Digital. After watching social and political turmoil surge in recent years, the old familiar sting of unease that drove him to punk in the first place is stirring once again. With a new lineup together, Glassley is paying respect to Cheifs’ Hollywood legend while laying the groundwork for a new chapter in his musical career.

Despite the decades that have passed, the songs he played and wrote leading into the Reagan era remain as urgent and relevant as the day they were penned. “It’s unfortunate,” Glassley says. “Some of those songs are even more relevant now, in the face of everything the country — the world — is going through.”

By December of ’79, the group had settled on the name Cheifs. A friend of the band, Roger Rogerson, who played bass for the Circle Jerks, often playfully called out bossy people for being “the big chief,” or saying they were “chiefin’ out.” The band rolled with it.

Image THE VIEW FROM THE TOP: Rabit (left) wearing one of the shirts that gave Cheifs their name, George Walker, and Bob Glassley circa 1979.DL Jacobs<!]}%-->Around the same time, Glassley had an uncle die from Leukemia. He’d worked as a butcher and always wore plain white T-shirts. When he died, Glassley inherited those shirts. One afternoon he bought some red and black spray paint, went to his room at Holly-West, and made band shirts. When he showed them to the rest of the band, the reaction was a resounding, “Ah dude, you spelled it wrong! On every single one of them!”

But amid the punk era’s landscape adorned with logos like the Misfits’ skull and Black Flag’s bars, Cheifs presented a golden opportunity for branding. “I know how to spell,” Glassley laughs. “The i and the e came after c! … And ask anyone named Keith how they spell their name!”

Cheifs played regularly at venues such as Hong Kong Café and the Fleetwood, sharing stages with a who’s-who of Southern California punk legends: Black Flag, X, the Minutemen, Fear, Redd Kross, Descendents, Germs, T.S.O.L., Social Distortion and more. “The Gears, too, if I can add a band to that list,” says former Black Flag and Circle Jerks vocalist Keith Morris, who currently sings with the band Off! “The Gears and Cheifs were our party buddies. How many times did we all just crash on that floor where they practiced in the Holly-West building? Cheifs were easily one of the greatest bands around,” Morris adds. “When Holly-West Crisis finally came out it was such a great record.”

Cheifs’ sound occupied a strange but growing middle ground in the post-punk era, when the term hardcore didn’t yet denote a musical genre. Before Cheifs came along, groups like X, the Screamers and the Weirdos had stylized a Hollywood punk sound by infusing short, sharp blasts of rock ’n’ roll with outsider art leanings. The more aggressive sound of bands like Black Flag and the Adolescents had yet to fully reveal itself.

In Cheifs, Walker’s twisted hooks and bar chords taking shape in songs such as “Blues” and “(At The Beach At) Tower 18” were driven by a contentious snarl and fast, reflexive melodies. Rabit’s jittery drumming in “Knocked Out” was cut from a loud-fast and deceptively simple style on par with New York’s no wave scene. Koskie’s sneering voice was a conduit for disturbed visions of disenfranchisement, and Glassley gave direction to Cheifs’ buzz saw onslaught.

<img alt="KNOCKED OUT: The photo featured on the sleeve of Cheifs' " blues"="" b="" w="" “(at="" the="" beach="" at)="" tower="" 18”="" and="" "knocked="" out"="" 7-inch."="" src="http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/04/320w/CHEIFS01.58ffc8f47590a.jpg">KNOCKED OUT: The photo featured on the sleeve of Cheifs' "Blues" b/w “(At The Beach At) Tower 18” and "Knocked Out" 7-inch.DL Jacobs<!]}%-->One song that Glassley penned the music and lyrics for, “Eddie’s Revenge,” tells the true story of a journalist who was gunned down by police. “The LAPD at the time were neo-Nazis, I won’t mince words,” he says. “I read a story in the newspaper about this amateur writer who was shot while standing inside a phone booth, holding a typewriter. A cop felt threatened. There was even a witness,” he adds. “The song is from his perspective, wanting payback because justice wasn’t served.”

Glassley sings: “Armed with a typewriter you look very threatening/They know you’re a nut case so they’ll say anything/And don’t try to resist your life’s worth nothing.”

Other songs such as “Blues” confront the hardships of the world with thick skin. In “(At The Beach At) Tower 18,” Walker offers insight into the perils of a gay lifestyle in the Reagan era when he sings, “You think your sex action’s better than theirs/They’re doing a job you could never do/At the beach!”

“Knocked Out” celebrates the youthful abandon and persistence of throwing punk shows whether the cops liked it out not.

The Germs’ vexed singer Darby Crash was a friend of the band, who hung out at Holly-West. Glassley recalls an afternoon in 1980 when Cheifs’ manager Debbie Johnson announced she’d lined up studio time at Present Time Records in North Hollywood. Crash wanted to be there. “I recall him setting in the control room and making suggestions about sound and vocal tricks, like the doubling that Jerry used on most of the recordings,” Glassley says.

The songs they recorded — “Blues,” “(At The Beach At) Tower 18” and “Knocked Out” — were pressed on a 7-inch via Playgems. It was Cheifs’ only release while the group was active. Crash is credited as “Creative Consultant” on the sleeve. “That wall of sound on the guitar was likely his doing,” Glassley says. “He was there from beginning to end, providing input, effectively working as a producer. He was a good friend of the band,” Glassley adds. “His fans demanded him to be someone he wasn’t 24/7. They expected him to be on stage all the time. I think he really enjoyed chilling with everyone at Holly-West.”

Holly-West is hallowed ground in the annals of punk history. Redd Kross’ bass player, Steven McDonald, remembers the intimidating feel of the place when he was a kid. “I was only 12 years old back in the those days,” says McDonald. Redd Kross also plays the Mess-Around on Sat., April 29.

“Redd Kross recorded a project there, and we hung out with Cheifs and the Gears and everyone else," McDonald A. Everyone was friendly and accepting, but the place had this Bukowski vibe. It was a scary, old, decrepit building, but the community was really cool.”

Cheifs’ song “The Lonlies” appeared on the New Alliance/SST compilation titled Chunks that year. Later, “Riot Squad” (an adopted Rubbers song), “No Justice” and “Scrapped” appeared on an American Standard compilation titled Who Cares.

A half-dozen more songs were recorded, but personal differences caused Koskie and Rabit to leave the band. Glassley and Walker reconvened with vocalist Paul Brashier and drummer Gilbert Navarro, aka Jack Rivera, but they were together less than a year. By 1982, Cheifs were done. Glassley sold his bass and bought a computer, and has worked with technology ever since. He has made attempts to get the original lineup together for occasional one-off shows, even a surprise birthday party that Descendents’ drummer Bill Stevenson was throwing for singer Milo Aukerman. But neither Koskie nor Rabit have expressed any interest in playing with Cheifs again. The two have reunited to play shows with their pre-Cheifs band, the Simpletones. Neither Koskie nor Rabit were available for comment. Walker is presumed dead, although no death certificate has been produced yet. He was last seen hanging around Newport Beach in the early ’90s, but when Glassley went searching, word on the street was he had died.

Cheifs have since languished in obscurity, but the music refuses to disappear. A 1997 Flipside compilation titled Holly-West Crisis emerged as the definitive Cheifs document rounding up everything the group recorded. In 2000, Hate Records repackaged the songs for a European release, and Dr. Strange reissued Holly-West Crisis in 2004. The same year Spontaneous Combustion reissued Cheifs’ “Blues” b/w “(At The Beach At) Tower 18” and “Knocked Out” 7-inch.

In 1989, “Blues” appeared on the seminal Killed By Death Vol. 2 LP. What’s more, the Descendents often whip out a cover of “Knocked Out” during live shows.

Glassley moved to Georgia for work in 2000. His time with Cheifs had become a distant memory ever since. But that changed in July 2016 when Flag, a hardcore supergroup featuring singer Keith Morris, bass player Chuck Dukowski, drummer Bill Stevenson and vocalist/guitarist Dez Cadena — all Black Flag alumni — along with Descendents guitarist Stephen Egerton played the Masquerade. Glassley went backstage to say hello. While talking with Stevenson, Glassley felt a hand on his shoulder. A stranger asked: “Excuse me, did you say you were in the misspelled Cheifs?”

It was Scott Hedeen who owns Burnt Hickory Brewery in Kennesaw. The brewery is known for naming beers after punk bands, such as the Didjits Blood Orange IPA and Die Kreuzen Imperial Pumpkin Porter. Atlanta metalheads Order of the Owl even have a Chocolate Orange Stout in their name.

“Some of the seed money I used to start the brewery came from selling my punk record collection,” Hedeen says. “I sold a Cheifs single for $300, so I joked that he was a partial investor in the brewery.”

Hedeen and Glassley became friends. Hedeen hadn’t played guitar in a long time, but one night he sent Glassley a text. “I asked if he’d ever considered playing Cheifs’ music again,” Hedeen says. “I was in his ear. At the time he didn’t know the depths of where he had been, and the interest that’s out there for that era of music. It’s like you’ve seen a famous photograph from history countless times, and suddenly you realize that you see someone in the background. He was there.”

Image SCREAMING AGAIN: Cheifs current vocalist Brad Castlen.Mark Kocher<!]}%-->Glassley knew former Crisis Under Control singer and punk historian Brad Castlen would be interested. “When this started out last July, it was more for fun, but as people responded to the potential of the Cheifs’ music being played live again, I realized this was something more,” Glassley says. “Brad and Scott helped me see that. As I started posting lyrics on Facebook, it became clear there was still relevancy and many of the songs could have been written today and people related. That said, I was dead set against doing anything that would not live up to the original spirit and energy.”

They convened with a temporary drummer to play a Halloween party at Burnt Hickory. Hedeen made posters boasting a performance by “Holly-West Resurrection playing the songs of Cheifs.” Glassley was hit hard by seeing the name again. “He said, ‘You can’t do that!’” Hedeen says. “He didn’t want to dis the other members of the band, but I think we’ve convinced him now that they don’t care. Our intention is to make sure that Bob and the band get their just deserts.”

Image RESPECT: Cheifs guitarist George Walker circa 1979.DL Jacobs<!]}%-->When Hedeen takes the stage, he sticks a laminated photo of Walker on his guitar, adorned with the word “Respect” — Shepard Fairey style. “George was a trailblazer on so many levels,” Hedeen says. “Getting into his head and figuring out how these songs work is a major accomplishment for me. I had to decode this man’s web of how he did it. I had to reinvent myself.”

Drummer James Joyce (ex Noot d' Noot and Car Vs. Driver) knew Hedeen through the brewery and tried out for the gig. He'd also been friends with Castlen for nearly 25 years. After one practice, they looked at each other and said, “OK, we’re the Cheifs!” A Christmas party at Burnt Hickory was followed by a show at the Earl opening for Detroit proto-punk rockers Death. Then came a run of L.A.-area shows in March.

At first, wondering if they’d be accepted by the group’s hometown was nerve-wracking. “There were people who came out to the shows and said, ‘Wait, where’s Jerry?’” Glassley says. “I was worried about it at first, but the bottom line is, I tried to get him involved, but I found somebody else.”

Image BACKS AGAINST THE WALL: The new incarnation of Cheifs features Bob Glassley (from left), Scott Hedeen, Brad Castlen and James Joyce.Mark Kocher<!]}%-->Still, anxiety was high, especially for Castlen and Joyce, both of whom are of a younger generation than Glassley and Hedeen. Before their Saturday night show at Cafe NELA, they were sitting at the bar when Joyce noticed Keith Morris walk in. “Brad started losing it,” Joyce says. “He kept saying, ‘This is your fault! If it wasn’t for you being able to play these drum beats and tying everything together, I wouldn’t have to perform in front of Keith Morris, and have him judge me as the singer for Cheifs.’”

Morris, in his 2016 memoir, My Damage: The Story of A Punk Rock Survivor, writes that Cheifs were one of the few bands he thought of as the Circle Jerks’ competition. Now, he was there to see what the new group was all about.

“In the early days we were always friends — all of it was friendly until it was time to play shows,” Morris says. “That’s when some darkness crept up: ‘We’ve been playing longer, and we’ve played more shows than you. We’re from Hollywood, you’re from where you’re at, we draw more people, can you keep up with us?’ All of that kind of drama. But I always drank a few extra beers, got a little more fuzzy-headed and tried to keep the camaraderie at a social and friendly level.”

The Circle Jerks played their first show with Cheifs at a club in Redondo Beach called Kahuna’s Bearded Clam. “We pissed off everybody that night,” Morris says. “One of the songs we played was ‘Wasted’ and the guys from Black Flag wanted to firebomb our vehicles and run us out of town.”

The anxiety that Castlen felt, however, was over respect for the music. “There’s a lot of attitude in punk about where you come from,” Castlen says. “Crisis Under Control used to get that attitude from Atlanta punks because we didn’t live in Fulton County. ‘You can’t play punk or hardcore if you’re from Gwinnett County!’ So that’s just magnified. Here we are a bunch of guys from Georgia. How are we going to play these L.A. punk songs? I was worried people would have a problem with that and that we’re playing with just one original member.”

Afterward, Castlen thought, “If I don’t ask, it’s going bother me the rest of my life.” He approached Morris and asked, “What did you think?” Morris looked over his glasses and gave a thumbs up. “We did it justice?” Castlen asked. In the conversation Morris replied, “Oh, I woulda told you if you didn’t!”

Neither Koskie nor Rabit showed up for the L.A. shows. But other old friends were there: Don Bolles of the Germs was at the Cafe NELA show, and second Cheifs drummer Jack Rivera sat in for a performance of “Blues.” The night before, at a show in Anaheim, Brian Brannon of skate punk legends JFA and members of the Vandals were there offering praise.

Castlen recalls overhearing a conversation at a record store out there when their merch guy asked the record store clerk — an older guy — if he was going to the show. His response: “No. I don’t want to ruin it. I saw them back in the day.”

That kind of skepticism is understandable; plenty of people feel similarly about any bands who are resurrected with a new lineup. “But we’re busting our asses, making it sound as close to the original recordings as possible,” Castlen says. “I heard the criticism, but the legend of Cheifs means a lot to us, and we all felt like we had to prove ourselves.”

Kendall Behnke, who sang alongside Koskie and Rabit in the Simpletones, came out for the Friday night show. He showed up again the following night at Cafe NELA. According Castlen, Behnke called Koskie to get him out for the show. He didn’t come but asked how they were. Behnke’s reply: “I’m not going to lie to you … they killed it.”

Castlen says the band discussed what would happen if Koskie showed up. “I’d have no problem handing the mic over to him, if he wanted to sing,” he says. “But Bob’s in Woodstock, Georgia, so it would be hard to have a Cheifs reunion with two guys in California. I think he’s a great singer; I love the songs, and I have nothing bad to say about him. But I’m glad he doesn’t want to be involved, because here I am.”

Image FLASH TO BANG: Bob Glassley (from left) leads the Cheifs at Dipiazzas in Long Beach, March 2017.Albert Licano<!]}%-->While practicing for the L.A. run, the new lineup learned a few songs that the original Cheifs played but never recorded, including “Heart in Chains” and “1988,” both originally performed by the Rubbers. Both songs will appear on a split 7-inch with L.A. punk stalwarts the Gears via the Hermosa Beach label Hardline Entertainment.

“I love playing and didn’t realize how much I missed it,” Glassley says. “Even my wife, Vicki, has commented on how playing again affected me, in a good way. Add to that the relevancy of this music, these words at this time, and it makes sense. Given the situation our country and the world faces, I think there is a lot to say, and this is a familiar vehicle to make oneself heard. I fully expect us to be writing new songs in the months ahead, and we’ll see where that goes, but for me it feels like 1980 all over again — only worse.”

They’re recording at the Living Room in June. After recording those two songs, they’ll record the rest of the songs they’ve learned, if for no other reason than to have a document of this lineup’s time together. Whether what they record gets released remains to be seen. “If you’re a legendary band that can release a new album, people will buy it, like it was an original Descendents album,” Joyce says. “We’re not there, so we’re not trying to push out an entire album’s worth of material that somebody has to digest. It’ll be more like a song or two here and there.”

This approach takes the pressure off while fleshing out the strongest material a song or two at a time. But before Cheifs start writing new songs, their priority lies in taking the show on the road. Until now, the group has never played outside of L.A. and San Diego. But with the new lineup clicking in Atlanta, the group has its sights set on the East Coast.

After 35 years, excitement surrounding the group only underscores the strength of the songs. Giving the music a chance to be heard by a new generation, in an entirely new era, the new incarnation of Cheifs is already uncovering new meanings for these songs. For nearly 40 years, the road has been long and full of pitfalls. Like it was the day that Glassley and his friends piled into his converted cop car heading for Los Angeles, the future is unwritten. “I still have difficulty wrapping my head around it all. I have a split personality in this regard,” Glassley says. “On one hand, I’m coming to grips with the legacy side of it for the first time, and the other hand, I want to hit the road and play some fucking punk rock!”

Cheifs play 529 on Fri., April 28, 2017, as part of the Atlanta Mess-Around. $10. 3 p.m. with Watcher, Death Stuff and Mutual Jerk. 529, 529 Flat Shoals Ave. 404-228-6769. www.529atlanta.com.



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  string(68) "Despite lifting restrictions, music venues may still face extinction"
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  string(6643) "In June, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp declared that live music venues are allowed to reopen their stages for performances as of July 1. However, don’t expect the monthly music calendar to fill up anytime soon. Across the board, Atlanta’s live music promoters say that without a COVID-19 vaccine ready to go, or proof positive that the rate of infections is trending downward, most clubs aren’t comfortable inviting people to their shows. Most Atlanta music venue doors will remain shuttered for the time being.

“Sadly, we can’t really operate until we can operate safely with 100 plus people in the room, and [[[[[[knowing] that customers are comfortable coming out and eating in close quarters,” says Live Nation talent buyer and Eddie’s Attic promoter Andrew Hingley. “I also believe the vibe of the concert experience won’t translate that well with social distancing and musicians looking out to a small crowd of masks. I believe the energy for the customer and for the artists will be a disconnect from what people are used to,” he continues. “I believe Eddie’s Attic is looking at a mid-August to September time frame.”

But even if club owners do want to start booking shows, the number of bands and artists on the road is virtually nil for now and for the foreseeable future. OK Productions’ promoter Alex Weiss says, “It is crazy to open up venues, especially with the guidelines that Kemp has issued. With the way things work with the bands that I deal with, it will take more than a couple of weeks to set up a show, even if I wanted to, which I don’t.” He adds, “I definitely do not feel comfortable putting people at risk at this time. Most of the artists I deal with aren’t planning to tour now until 2021.”

In addition to the potential health risks of filling up rooms with concertgoers, Atlanta, and indeed the rest of the country are still reeling with daily protests being waged following the killing of George Floyd and now the June 12 police shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.

Face of Knives promoter Daniel DeSimone, who books the Bakery, explains that these larger issues at hand take precedence over the daily operations of booking a club. What’s more, the lease on the Bakery’s 825 Warner Street location expired on June 30, and it will not be renewed. The celebrated independent arts and music venue is moving on. Details remain to be determined. In the meantime, the Bakery’s staff and organizers are still operating out of their temporary New Square location above Underground Atlanta.

Still, DeSimone reiterates that it will be a while before they’re up and running again. “Although Kemp has legally permitted event spaces to program as of July 1, we don’t ethically feel like we can invite people to our space and potentially contribute to the inevitable second wave of COVID-19, putting artists, guests, and staff at risk,” he says. “We likely won’t be regularly programming again until there is a proven, widespread, and affordable vaccine for the virus, and (we) encourage other public spaces to consider these risks as well. “Furthermore,” DeSimone adds, “we consider ourselves community organizers first, and a music venue second — maybe third, fourth, or fifth, honestly — and believe it is our duty as organizers to focus all of our efforts on addressing the larger human rights crisis facing our nation and city.”

Sadly, the Vista Room has closed its doors permanently. In an emailed announcement, the club states: “As an independent we simply cannot sensibly sustain the massive overheard losses which will now run thru (sic) at least August (six months) and even then, judging by the surprising lack of attendance at Restaurants & Gyms (sic) the last three weeks, people will hesitate coming until Christmas.”

The press release goes on to state that The Vista Room did not fail — “... we were squashed by a bug! But we are all alive and moving on down new trails as the world deals with COVID-19.”

On the NIVA front ...

Born in March when the coronavirus pandemic first took hold, and currently boasting more than 2,000 members in all 50 U.S. states, the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) is still hard at work lobbying congress for a much-needed financial boost to keep the country’s music venues alive. Following a recent survey showing that 90 percent of the nation’s music venues will go out of business permanently if they can’t feasibly reopen soon, the organization is rallying behind the RESTART Act (S. 3814). If passed, the bipartisan act will modify the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to work for businesses that have lost all revenue amid the shelter-in-place orders. RESTART promises six months of payroll and operating expenses for music venues, and allows for more flexible use of government-sponsored loans with no minimum requirements for expense categories. RESTART expands availability for small businesses that work mostly with part-time employees, and extends the time frame for repayment and  PPP loan forgiveness. Stay tuned for more information as it becomes available.

In new releases news …    Creativity by any means necessary is the driving force behind Touch, a new six-song album from Child of Regulus, aka Quinn Mason. Touch was conceived, composed, and executed entirely by Mason using his smartphone equipped with GarageBand and iKaossilator software.

Over the last several years, Mason has made his presence felt most strongly amid Atlanta’s late-night jazz scene, fluttering and skronking on a saxophone with Konda, Kamaal Williams, Wolfpack ATL, QUAS, and the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra. Mason also curates Gallery 992’s Sunday-night improv sessions. Following shelter-in-place orders, Touch was born as a means to keep creating music while he was literally left to his own devices. Songs such as “Your Mind, Your Time,” Lo-Fi Lullaby,” and “No Quieres Fumar” eschew Mason’s more recognizable jazz modes while exploring electronic music, techno, jazz, and funk inflections.

Atlanta’s D-beat torchbearers Disable have a new 7-inch out, titled ... Slamming in the Depths of Hell. The record blasts six songs of hardcore punk fury with titles such as “Hellish Nightmare,” “False Flag,” and “Whistling Death” — anthems for our tumultuous times.

Chemical Illusion, the final offering from the late Rick Dang’s rock ‘n’ roll underdog outfit Dang Dang Dang, is now available on vinyl via Bandcamp. The album was originally released in June of 2018; Dang passed away in October 2019. —CL—"
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  string(6689) "In June, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp declared that live music venues are allowed to reopen their stages for performances as of July 1. However, don’t expect the monthly music calendar to fill up anytime soon. Across the board, Atlanta’s live music promoters say that without a COVID-19 vaccine ready to go, or proof positive that the rate of infections is trending downward, most clubs aren’t comfortable inviting people to their shows. Most Atlanta music venue doors will remain shuttered for the time being.

“Sadly, we can’t really operate until we can operate safely with 100 plus people in the room, and [[[[[[[[knowing] that customers are comfortable coming out and eating in close quarters,” says Live Nation talent buyer and Eddie’s Attic promoter Andrew Hingley. “I also believe the vibe of the concert experience won’t translate that well with social distancing and musicians looking out to a small crowd of masks. I believe the energy for the customer and for the artists will be a disconnect from what people are used to,” he continues. “I believe Eddie’s Attic is looking at a mid-August to September time frame.”

But even if club owners do want to start booking shows, the number of bands and artists on the road is virtually nil for now and for the foreseeable future. OK Productions’ promoter Alex Weiss says, “It is crazy to open up venues, especially with the guidelines that Kemp has issued. With the way things work with the bands that I deal with, it will take more than a couple of weeks to set up a show, even if I wanted to, which I don’t.” He adds, “I definitely do not feel comfortable putting people at risk at this time. Most of the artists I deal with aren’t planning to tour now until 2021.”

In addition to the potential health risks of filling up rooms with concertgoers, Atlanta, and indeed the rest of the country are still reeling with daily protests being waged following the killing of George Floyd and now the June 12 police shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.

Face of Knives promoter Daniel DeSimone, who books the Bakery, explains that these larger issues at hand take precedence over the daily operations of booking a club. What’s more, the lease on the Bakery’s 825 Warner Street location expired on June 30, and it will not be renewed. The celebrated independent arts and music venue is moving on. Details remain to be determined. In the meantime, the Bakery’s staff and organizers are still operating out of their temporary New Square location above Underground Atlanta.

Still, DeSimone reiterates that it will be a while before they’re up and running again. “Although Kemp has legally permitted event spaces to program as of July 1, we don’t ethically feel like we can invite people to our space and potentially contribute to the inevitable second wave of COVID-19, putting artists, guests, and staff at risk,” he says. “We likely won’t be regularly programming again until there is a proven, widespread, and affordable vaccine for the virus, and (we) encourage other public spaces to consider these risks as well. “Furthermore,” DeSimone adds, “we consider ourselves community organizers first, and a music venue second — maybe third, fourth, or fifth, honestly — and believe it is our duty as organizers to focus all of our efforts on addressing the larger human rights crisis facing our nation and city.”

Sadly, the Vista Room has closed its doors permanently. In an emailed announcement, the club states: “As an independent we simply cannot sensibly sustain the massive overheard losses which will now run thru (sic) at least August (six months) and even then, judging by the surprising lack of attendance at Restaurants & Gyms (sic) the last three weeks, people will hesitate coming until Christmas.”

The press release goes on to state that The Vista Room did not fail — “... we were squashed by a bug! But we are all alive and moving on down new trails as the world deals with COVID-19.”

__On the NIVA front ...__

Born in March when the coronavirus pandemic first took hold, and currently boasting more than 2,000 members in all 50 U.S. states, the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) is still hard at work lobbying congress for a much-needed financial boost to keep the country’s music venues alive. Following a recent survey showing that 90 percent of the nation’s music venues will go out of business permanently if they can’t feasibly reopen soon, the organization is rallying behind the RESTART Act (S. 3814). If passed, the bipartisan act will modify the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to work for businesses that have lost all revenue amid the shelter-in-place orders. RESTART promises six months of payroll and operating expenses for music venues, and allows for more flexible use of government-sponsored loans with no minimum requirements for expense categories. RESTART expands availability for small businesses that work mostly with part-time employees, and extends the time frame for repayment and  PPP loan forgiveness. Stay tuned for more information as it becomes available.

__In new releases news …__    Creativity by any means necessary is the driving force behind ''Touch'', a new six-song album from __Child of Regulus__, aka __Quinn Mason__. ''Touch'' was conceived, composed, and executed entirely by Mason using his smartphone equipped with GarageBand and iKaossilator software.

Over the last several years, Mason has made his presence felt most strongly amid Atlanta’s late-night jazz scene, fluttering and skronking on a saxophone with Konda, Kamaal Williams, Wolfpack ATL, QUAS, and the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra. Mason also curates Gallery 992’s Sunday-night improv sessions. Following shelter-in-place orders, ''Touch'' was born as a means to keep creating music while he was literally left to his own devices. Songs such as “Your Mind, Your Time,” Lo-Fi Lullaby,” and “No Quieres Fumar” eschew Mason’s more recognizable jazz modes while exploring electronic music, techno, jazz, and funk inflections.

Atlanta’s D-beat torchbearers __Disable__ have a new 7-inch out, titled ''... Slamming in the Depths of Hell''. The record blasts six songs of hardcore punk fury with titles such as “Hellish Nightmare,” “False Flag,” and “Whistling Death” — anthems for our tumultuous times.

''Chemical Illusion'', the final offering from the late Rick Dang’s rock ‘n’ roll underdog outfit Dang Dang Dang, is now available on vinyl via Bandcamp. The album was originally released in June of 2018; Dang passed away in October 2019. __—CL—__"
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  string(7244) " Child Of Regulus  2020-07-01T19:51:29+00:00 Child_of_Regulus.jpg    amn atlantamusicnews Despite lifting restrictions, music venues may still face extinction 31944  2020-06-30T15:55:00+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA lobbies for a RESTART jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford Chad Radford 2020-06-30T15:55:00+00:00  In June, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp declared that live music venues are allowed to reopen their stages for performances as of July 1. However, don’t expect the monthly music calendar to fill up anytime soon. Across the board, Atlanta’s live music promoters say that without a COVID-19 vaccine ready to go, or proof positive that the rate of infections is trending downward, most clubs aren’t comfortable inviting people to their shows. Most Atlanta music venue doors will remain shuttered for the time being.

“Sadly, we can’t really operate until we can operate safely with 100 plus people in the room, and [[[[[[knowing] that customers are comfortable coming out and eating in close quarters,” says Live Nation talent buyer and Eddie’s Attic promoter Andrew Hingley. “I also believe the vibe of the concert experience won’t translate that well with social distancing and musicians looking out to a small crowd of masks. I believe the energy for the customer and for the artists will be a disconnect from what people are used to,” he continues. “I believe Eddie’s Attic is looking at a mid-August to September time frame.”

But even if club owners do want to start booking shows, the number of bands and artists on the road is virtually nil for now and for the foreseeable future. OK Productions’ promoter Alex Weiss says, “It is crazy to open up venues, especially with the guidelines that Kemp has issued. With the way things work with the bands that I deal with, it will take more than a couple of weeks to set up a show, even if I wanted to, which I don’t.” He adds, “I definitely do not feel comfortable putting people at risk at this time. Most of the artists I deal with aren’t planning to tour now until 2021.”

In addition to the potential health risks of filling up rooms with concertgoers, Atlanta, and indeed the rest of the country are still reeling with daily protests being waged following the killing of George Floyd and now the June 12 police shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.

Face of Knives promoter Daniel DeSimone, who books the Bakery, explains that these larger issues at hand take precedence over the daily operations of booking a club. What’s more, the lease on the Bakery’s 825 Warner Street location expired on June 30, and it will not be renewed. The celebrated independent arts and music venue is moving on. Details remain to be determined. In the meantime, the Bakery’s staff and organizers are still operating out of their temporary New Square location above Underground Atlanta.

Still, DeSimone reiterates that it will be a while before they’re up and running again. “Although Kemp has legally permitted event spaces to program as of July 1, we don’t ethically feel like we can invite people to our space and potentially contribute to the inevitable second wave of COVID-19, putting artists, guests, and staff at risk,” he says. “We likely won’t be regularly programming again until there is a proven, widespread, and affordable vaccine for the virus, and (we) encourage other public spaces to consider these risks as well. “Furthermore,” DeSimone adds, “we consider ourselves community organizers first, and a music venue second — maybe third, fourth, or fifth, honestly — and believe it is our duty as organizers to focus all of our efforts on addressing the larger human rights crisis facing our nation and city.”

Sadly, the Vista Room has closed its doors permanently. In an emailed announcement, the club states: “As an independent we simply cannot sensibly sustain the massive overheard losses which will now run thru (sic) at least August (six months) and even then, judging by the surprising lack of attendance at Restaurants & Gyms (sic) the last three weeks, people will hesitate coming until Christmas.”

The press release goes on to state that The Vista Room did not fail — “... we were squashed by a bug! But we are all alive and moving on down new trails as the world deals with COVID-19.”

On the NIVA front ...

Born in March when the coronavirus pandemic first took hold, and currently boasting more than 2,000 members in all 50 U.S. states, the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) is still hard at work lobbying congress for a much-needed financial boost to keep the country’s music venues alive. Following a recent survey showing that 90 percent of the nation’s music venues will go out of business permanently if they can’t feasibly reopen soon, the organization is rallying behind the RESTART Act (S. 3814). If passed, the bipartisan act will modify the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to work for businesses that have lost all revenue amid the shelter-in-place orders. RESTART promises six months of payroll and operating expenses for music venues, and allows for more flexible use of government-sponsored loans with no minimum requirements for expense categories. RESTART expands availability for small businesses that work mostly with part-time employees, and extends the time frame for repayment and  PPP loan forgiveness. Stay tuned for more information as it becomes available.

In new releases news …    Creativity by any means necessary is the driving force behind Touch, a new six-song album from Child of Regulus, aka Quinn Mason. Touch was conceived, composed, and executed entirely by Mason using his smartphone equipped with GarageBand and iKaossilator software.

Over the last several years, Mason has made his presence felt most strongly amid Atlanta’s late-night jazz scene, fluttering and skronking on a saxophone with Konda, Kamaal Williams, Wolfpack ATL, QUAS, and the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra. Mason also curates Gallery 992’s Sunday-night improv sessions. Following shelter-in-place orders, Touch was born as a means to keep creating music while he was literally left to his own devices. Songs such as “Your Mind, Your Time,” Lo-Fi Lullaby,” and “No Quieres Fumar” eschew Mason’s more recognizable jazz modes while exploring electronic music, techno, jazz, and funk inflections.

Atlanta’s D-beat torchbearers Disable have a new 7-inch out, titled ... Slamming in the Depths of Hell. The record blasts six songs of hardcore punk fury with titles such as “Hellish Nightmare,” “False Flag,” and “Whistling Death” — anthems for our tumultuous times.

Chemical Illusion, the final offering from the late Rick Dang’s rock ‘n’ roll underdog outfit Dang Dang Dang, is now available on vinyl via Bandcamp. The album was originally released in June of 2018; Dang passed away in October 2019. —CL—    Courtesy Marquinn Mason CHILD OF REGULUS: While sheltered in place, saxophonist Quinn Mason crafted ‘Touch,’ an electronic album composed on his phone.  0,0,10    AMN atlantamusicnews                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA lobbies for a RESTART "
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Article

Tuesday June 30, 2020 11:55 am EDT
Despite lifting restrictions, music venues may still face extinction | more...
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  string(49) "ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: Music for guys who like music"
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  string(72) "New releases from Adam McIntyre, Mathis Hunter, Young Antiques, and more"
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  string(72) "New releases from Adam McIntyre, Mathis Hunter, Young Antiques, and more"
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  string(5305) "For most of us, after nearly three months of sheltering in place, the charm of quarantine time has worn off. But for Adam McIntyre of The Pinx, the downtime is proving to be quite an inspiration.

“I was a prolific writer as a teenager, and without my daily tasks of driving kids around and doing things I think I have to do but don’t, I go right back to what recharges and equally burns my energy, which is making music,” McIntyre says. “It’s all I want to do. So knowing that I was about to have a lot of time to create, I decided to get naked.”

McIntyre has created a trilogy of albums — a blues album, The Devil Got My Soul!; a more direct rock ‘n’ roll album, You’re Doing It Right; and a third, currently unreleased, album tentatively titled Quarantology III. McIntyre plans to change the name before it’s unleashed unto the public.

All three albums represent variations on a theme: McIntyre’s efforts to get comfortable without the “rock suit” he’s fashioned for himself while singing and playing guitar with the Pinx. “It’s a wonderful, beautiful suit if I do say so,” he adds. “But what if I wasn’t expected to do that? I took off the suit and made a blues record because that’s how I started. You’re Doing It Right is going even farther into removing identity. It’s running around wearing only purple paint. In space.”

Songs on McIntyre’s third record will largely be about becoming nobody, which he says is based on Ram Dass’s talks on ego vs. identity vs. the soul. “I’m looking to make a very fun record about losing yourself and seeing what is still left,” he says. “I guess it’s a trilogy of taking off your clothes, spiritually.”

To kick off this seemingly spontaneous series, in late March, McIntyre rolled out the first single from The Devil Got My Soul!, titled “Do The Damn Thing,” which features a blistering solo by Wayne Kramer of the MC5.

With all of this new material taking shape, McIntyre has also found time for a whole batch of Pinx songs as well. The group has a new EP tentatively scheduled for a July release, and four to five songs are coming together for the next full-length album as well. More details are coming soon.

Of course, McIntyre isn’t the only local rock dude to turn out a new record this spring. Chunklet Industries and Mathis Hunter’s self-run indie label Ley Lines have teamed up to release Hunter’s latest album, Mood Lighting.

Following a new single from the LP that previewed in April, “Clone It Off,” Mood Lighting emerges as a layered, inward journey that’s as sentimentally profound as it is psychedelic. Each number reflects on the ins and outs of reconnecting with one’s identity in the wake of a relationship coming to an end. For this outing, Hunter takes up guitar, bass, percussion, and various other musical duties, and is joined by a coterie of Atlanta all-stars including drummer Lee Corum, Rich Morris on keys, and Andy Morrison playing guitar and lap steel. 

Keep your eyes peeled for a new video for the album’s closing number “Don’t Be Long” to arrive in June.

In other Chunklet-related news, on June 5, the label is rolling out a handful of stellar new releases including a Honey Radar singles comp featuring liner notes by Byron Coley; a new single by Shark Toys, which includes a Desperate Bicycles cover on the B-side; and 7-inch singles by Atlanta acts Vangas, Reverends, and the almighty Purkinje Shift.

Another Risk Of The Heart is the latest release from longtime Atlanta songwriting hero Blake Rainey and the Young Antiques. Released via Southern Lovers Recording Co., Another Risk Of The Heart is pressed on gorgeous blue vinyl, and finds singer and guitarist Rainey flanked by bass player Blake Parris and new drummer John Speaks (Skirt, the Jody Grind), all reveling in new anthemic songs with titles such as “Euclid Creeper,” “I Think You’ll Never,” and “Goin’ Home” featuring vocals by Atlanta expat Kelly Hogan (Neko Case, the Decemberists, Rock*A*Teens, The Jody Grind).

Each song was recorded in Rainey’s home Southern Lovers Recording Studios, blending his signature blend of power pop hooks and storytelling with a rural Southern inflection and crystalline production. Chris Lopez ( Rock*A*Teens, Tenement Halls) and Tom Cheshire (West End Motel, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves) also make guest appearances throughout the album.

Grace Bellury’s indie rock outfit Karaoke has a new video out for the song “Lo Hi.” The song is set to appear on a forthcoming album, title TBD. The video, directed by DJ Barbie Corvette, is a single shot — no cuts — in which the group’s synth player Adrian Benedykt Świtoń dances and writhes around a glowing hotel room eating pizza, smoking cigarettes, and staring into the camera with fixed, bedroom eyes. Sultry. Absurd. Awesome. The “Lo Hi” video is the first in a series of five new videos in which all members of the group will get their individual screen time. Look for more coming very soon.

Last, but not least, on May 22, Brian Revels & the Heat Lightning released a brand-new album, Jasper County Blues. Check it out on Spotify. —CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com."
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  string(5454) "For most of us, after nearly three months of sheltering in place, the charm of quarantine time has worn off. But for __Adam McIntyre__ of __The Pinx__, the downtime is proving to be quite an inspiration.

“I was a prolific writer as a teenager, and without my daily tasks of driving kids around and doing things I think I have to do but don’t, I go right back to what recharges and equally burns my energy, which is making music,” McIntyre says. “It’s all I want to do. So knowing that I was about to have a lot of time to create, I decided to get naked.”

McIntyre has created a trilogy of albums — a blues album, ''The Devil Got My Soul!''; a more direct rock ‘n’ roll album, ''You’re Doing It Right''; and a third, currently unreleased, album tentatively titled ''Quarantology III''. McIntyre plans to change the name before it’s unleashed unto the public.

All three albums represent variations on a theme: McIntyre’s efforts to get comfortable without the “rock suit” he’s fashioned for himself while singing and playing guitar with the Pinx. “It’s a wonderful, beautiful suit if I do say so,” he adds. “But what if I wasn’t expected to do that? I took off the suit and made a blues record because that’s how I started. ''You’re Doing It Right'' is going even farther into removing identity. It’s running around wearing only purple paint. In space.”

Songs on McIntyre’s third record will largely be about becoming nobody, which he says is based on Ram Dass’s talks on ego vs. identity vs. the soul. “I’m looking to make a very fun record about losing yourself and seeing what is still left,” he says. “I guess it’s a trilogy of taking off your clothes, spiritually.”

To kick off this seemingly spontaneous series, in late March, McIntyre rolled out the first single from ''The Devil Got My Soul!'', titled “Do The Damn Thing,” which features a blistering solo by __Wayne Kramer__ of the MC5.

With all of this new material taking shape, McIntyre has also found time for a whole batch of Pinx songs as well. The group has a new EP tentatively scheduled for a July release, and four to five songs are coming together for the next full-length album as well. More details are coming soon.

Of course, McIntyre isn’t the only local rock dude to turn out a new record this spring. __Chunklet Industries__ and __Mathis Hunter__’s self-run indie label ''Ley Lines'' have teamed up to release Hunter’s latest album, ''Mood Lighting''.

Following a new single from the LP that previewed in April, “Clone It Off,” ''Mood Lighting'' emerges as a layered, inward journey that’s as sentimentally profound as it is psychedelic. Each number reflects on the ins and outs of reconnecting with one’s identity in the wake of a relationship coming to an end. For this outing, Hunter takes up guitar, bass, percussion, and various other musical duties, and is joined by a coterie of Atlanta all-stars including drummer __Lee Corum__, __Rich Morris__ on keys, and __Andy Morrison__ playing guitar and lap steel. 

Keep your eyes peeled for a new video for the album’s closing number “Don’t Be Long” to arrive in June.

In other Chunklet-related news, on June 5, the label is rolling out a handful of stellar new releases including a __Honey Radar__ singles comp featuring liner notes by __Byron Coley__; a new single by __Shark Toys__, which includes a Desperate Bicycles cover on the B-side; and 7-inch singles by Atlanta acts __Vangas__, __Reverends__, and the almighty __Purkinje Shift__.

''Another Risk Of The Heart'' is the latest release from longtime Atlanta songwriting hero __Blake Rainey__ and the __Young Antiques__. Released via __Southern Lovers Recording Co.__, ''Another Risk Of The Heart'' is pressed on gorgeous blue vinyl, and finds singer and guitarist Rainey flanked by bass player Blake Parris and new drummer John Speaks (Skirt, the Jody Grind), all reveling in new anthemic songs with titles such as “Euclid Creeper,” “I Think You’ll Never,” and “Goin’ Home” featuring vocals by Atlanta expat __Kelly Hogan__ (Neko Case, the Decemberists, Rock*A*Teens, The Jody Grind).

Each song was recorded in Rainey’s home Southern Lovers Recording Studios, blending his signature blend of power pop hooks and storytelling with a rural Southern inflection and crystalline production. __Chris Lopez__ ( Rock*A*Teens, Tenement Halls) and __Tom Cheshire__ (West End Motel, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves) also make guest appearances throughout the album.

__Grace Bellury__’s indie rock outfit __Karaoke__ has a new video out for the song “Lo Hi.” The song is set to appear on a forthcoming album, title TBD. The video, directed by __DJ Barbie Corvette__, is a single shot — no cuts — in which the group’s synth player __Adrian Benedykt Świtoń__ dances and writhes around a glowing hotel room eating pizza, smoking cigarettes, and staring into the camera with fixed, bedroom eyes. Sultry. Absurd. Awesome. The “Lo Hi” video is the first in a series of five new videos in which all members of the group will get their individual screen time. Look for more coming very soon.

Last, but not least, on May 22, __Brian Revels & the Heat Lightning__ released a brand-new album, ''Jasper County Blues''. Check it out on Spotify. __—CL—__

''Send local music news items to chad.radford@creativeloafing.com''."
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  string(5841) " Adam McIntyre Of The Pinx Web  2020-06-04T13:39:00+00:00 Adam_McIntyre_of_the_Pinx_web.jpg    amn atlmusicnews New releases from Adam McIntyre, Mathis Hunter, Young Antiques, and more 31431  2020-06-04T03:59:00+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: Music for guys who like music jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford Chad Radford 2020-06-04T03:59:00+00:00  For most of us, after nearly three months of sheltering in place, the charm of quarantine time has worn off. But for Adam McIntyre of The Pinx, the downtime is proving to be quite an inspiration.

“I was a prolific writer as a teenager, and without my daily tasks of driving kids around and doing things I think I have to do but don’t, I go right back to what recharges and equally burns my energy, which is making music,” McIntyre says. “It’s all I want to do. So knowing that I was about to have a lot of time to create, I decided to get naked.”

McIntyre has created a trilogy of albums — a blues album, The Devil Got My Soul!; a more direct rock ‘n’ roll album, You’re Doing It Right; and a third, currently unreleased, album tentatively titled Quarantology III. McIntyre plans to change the name before it’s unleashed unto the public.

All three albums represent variations on a theme: McIntyre’s efforts to get comfortable without the “rock suit” he’s fashioned for himself while singing and playing guitar with the Pinx. “It’s a wonderful, beautiful suit if I do say so,” he adds. “But what if I wasn’t expected to do that? I took off the suit and made a blues record because that’s how I started. You’re Doing It Right is going even farther into removing identity. It’s running around wearing only purple paint. In space.”

Songs on McIntyre’s third record will largely be about becoming nobody, which he says is based on Ram Dass’s talks on ego vs. identity vs. the soul. “I’m looking to make a very fun record about losing yourself and seeing what is still left,” he says. “I guess it’s a trilogy of taking off your clothes, spiritually.”

To kick off this seemingly spontaneous series, in late March, McIntyre rolled out the first single from The Devil Got My Soul!, titled “Do The Damn Thing,” which features a blistering solo by Wayne Kramer of the MC5.

With all of this new material taking shape, McIntyre has also found time for a whole batch of Pinx songs as well. The group has a new EP tentatively scheduled for a July release, and four to five songs are coming together for the next full-length album as well. More details are coming soon.

Of course, McIntyre isn’t the only local rock dude to turn out a new record this spring. Chunklet Industries and Mathis Hunter’s self-run indie label Ley Lines have teamed up to release Hunter’s latest album, Mood Lighting.

Following a new single from the LP that previewed in April, “Clone It Off,” Mood Lighting emerges as a layered, inward journey that’s as sentimentally profound as it is psychedelic. Each number reflects on the ins and outs of reconnecting with one’s identity in the wake of a relationship coming to an end. For this outing, Hunter takes up guitar, bass, percussion, and various other musical duties, and is joined by a coterie of Atlanta all-stars including drummer Lee Corum, Rich Morris on keys, and Andy Morrison playing guitar and lap steel. 

Keep your eyes peeled for a new video for the album’s closing number “Don’t Be Long” to arrive in June.

In other Chunklet-related news, on June 5, the label is rolling out a handful of stellar new releases including a Honey Radar singles comp featuring liner notes by Byron Coley; a new single by Shark Toys, which includes a Desperate Bicycles cover on the B-side; and 7-inch singles by Atlanta acts Vangas, Reverends, and the almighty Purkinje Shift.

Another Risk Of The Heart is the latest release from longtime Atlanta songwriting hero Blake Rainey and the Young Antiques. Released via Southern Lovers Recording Co., Another Risk Of The Heart is pressed on gorgeous blue vinyl, and finds singer and guitarist Rainey flanked by bass player Blake Parris and new drummer John Speaks (Skirt, the Jody Grind), all reveling in new anthemic songs with titles such as “Euclid Creeper,” “I Think You’ll Never,” and “Goin’ Home” featuring vocals by Atlanta expat Kelly Hogan (Neko Case, the Decemberists, Rock*A*Teens, The Jody Grind).

Each song was recorded in Rainey’s home Southern Lovers Recording Studios, blending his signature blend of power pop hooks and storytelling with a rural Southern inflection and crystalline production. Chris Lopez ( Rock*A*Teens, Tenement Halls) and Tom Cheshire (West End Motel, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves) also make guest appearances throughout the album.

Grace Bellury’s indie rock outfit Karaoke has a new video out for the song “Lo Hi.” The song is set to appear on a forthcoming album, title TBD. The video, directed by DJ Barbie Corvette, is a single shot — no cuts — in which the group’s synth player Adrian Benedykt Świtoń dances and writhes around a glowing hotel room eating pizza, smoking cigarettes, and staring into the camera with fixed, bedroom eyes. Sultry. Absurd. Awesome. The “Lo Hi” video is the first in a series of five new videos in which all members of the group will get their individual screen time. Look for more coming very soon.

Last, but not least, on May 22, Brian Revels & the Heat Lightning released a brand-new album, Jasper County Blues. Check it out on Spotify. —CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com.    Courtesy Adam McIntyre PURPLE HAZE: Adam McIntyre of the Pinx.  0,0,10    AMN atlmusicnews                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: Music for guys who like music "
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New releases from Adam McIntyre, Mathis Hunter, Young Antiques, and more | more...
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  string(82) "New music from DfTaLS, Misanthropic Aggression, Tears For the Dying, and Bad Moods"
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  string(6551) "The financial hardships wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic reach far and wide. Among the hardest-hit institutions across the country have been independent music venues.

Since Georgians began sheltering in place the second week of March, business for the city’s live music destinations has ground to a halt, and, aside from setting up GoFundMe accounts, revenue streams have remained shut off. A new coalition of venues and promoters, however, dubbed the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) has formed to lobby for, and to create a lifeline to support these indie music institutions, their staffs, artists, and their communities.

“Music venues were the first to close and will be the last to open,” said Dayna Frank, NIVA board member and owner of First Avenue in Minneapolis, in an April 20 press release. “It’s just brutal right now, and the future is predictable to no one. We can’t envision a world without these music venues, so we’ve created NIVA to fight for their ability to survive this shutdown, which we hear could go into 2021,” Frank goes on to say. “Our first order of business is to push to secure federal funding to preserve the ecosystem of live music venues and touring artists.”

One of the organization’s first acts was to petition Capitol Hill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, on April 22, with an open letter asking for assistance in ensuring the Small Business Paycheck Protection Program services the venues who need it most. The letter also asked for tax relief, including deferral of federal taxes for closed businesses, a forgiveness program, and for extensions on PPA loans until it’s safe for the concert industry to resume business. Continued federal support for unemployment insurance for employees of shuttered businesses, mortgage and rent forbearance, and the establishment of a grant-funded business recovery fund were also among the NIVA letter’s requests.

As of press time, more than 900 music venues in all 50 states have joined NIVA, including the 40 Watt in Athens, along with Atlanta promoters OK Productions and Rival Entertainment, as well as venues such as the Center Stage-Vinyl-The Loft complex, Smith’s Olde Bar, and The Masquerade.

“We joined NIVA because we believe there is strength in numbers,” says The Masquerade’s talent buyer Greg Green. “Instead of being just one of 800 small voices trying to be heard, we believe that the unified voice of all of these wonderful independent live music venues and promoters will carry a lot more weight regarding the issues facing our industry during this incredibly difficult time. Also, we think having the resource of all of the other members’ experience and knowledge available to us will be invaluable as we try to navigate ahead in the coming months and get back to presenting great concerts.”

There is no cost for venues to acquire NIVA membership.

In new-releases news, Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel is back with a new full-length album, titled Halocline. The music will be available to listen to via Bandcamp on May 16. In the meantime, check out the first single — the first time DfTaLS has even released a single — titled “Maelstrom.” It’s a six-and-a-half-minute improv set that projects something of an aquatic theme. The term “halocline” is what happens when two bodies of water are separated due to their different salinities. This first single is a full-bodied drift that finds theremin player Scott Burland and lap steel player Frank Schultz joined by Louisville, Kentucky-based vocalist Dane Waters.

Stream the song for free, or pay $1. There is also a preorder for the 16-track album up on Bandcamp as well. Every penny from their Bandcamp sales will be donated evenly to two charities: Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

There’s talk of a CD and possibly a vinyl release of Halocline coming out via Stickfigure Records in the near future, once the pandemic has receded and the world starts moving again. Until then, it’s a Bandcamp exclusive.

Schultz has also recently unveiled a new collaboration with composer, percussionist, and mad genius Klimchak, titled Six Feet Apart. For this project, Schultz rounded up a handful of improv pieces on the lap steel, and sent them off to a few folks to see if anyone was interested in expanding upon them. Klimchak was in, and composed his own sections to go along with Schultz’s improvisational pieces. The result is three pieces — “Off the Clock,” “Adrift and Lost,” and “Limping into Destiny” — 20 minutes of textured ambient droning bliss.

Six Feet Apart is available on Bandcamp now. Any and all proceeds will be donated to Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

In April, blackened death metal-punk trio Misanthropic Aggression rolled out a new 7-inch EP, titled Alcoholic Polyneuropathic Freaks in Hell. The three-song single is available now via Boris Records. National distribution via MVD begins in June.

Death rock and goth-punk trio Tears for the Dying recently unveiled the group’s second full-length, titled Memories. The album was engineered and produced by Tom Ashton of the March Violets, and recorded at Subvon Studio in Athens. This time around, singer, guitarist, and bass player Adria Schlenker, Debra Beat, and Candy Cancer shed the keyboard for most of the album’s tracks in favor of a raw, guitar-driven assault — all three members share guitar and bass duties here. Check out that smoldering cover of Christian Death’s “Spiritual Cramp”!

Bad Moods’ latest 7-inch, featuring a new version of “Super Collider” b/w “La France” and “Radiology” 7-inch has been making the rounds recently as well. Singer, guitar player, and songwriter Tim Haught and drummer Champ Hammett are formerly of Atlanta hardcore staples Foundation — Champ also played in Criminal Instinct. With Bad Moods they veer away from hardcore, taking a more straight-ahead approach to indie rock songwriting, with an emphasis on recording rather than playing live regularly. “The goal, in the beginning, was to sound kind of like the Lemonheads, or something like that,” Haught says. “In the end it comes across more like a power pop version of Leatherface.”

Keep an ear out for more Bad Moods recordings coming down the line soon. —­CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com."
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  string(6580) "The financial hardships wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic reach far and wide. Among the hardest-hit institutions across the country have been independent music venues.

Since Georgians began sheltering in place the second week of March, business for the city’s live music destinations has ground to a halt, and, aside from setting up GoFundMe accounts, revenue streams have remained shut off. A new coalition of venues and promoters, however, dubbed the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) has formed to lobby for, and to create a lifeline to support these indie music institutions, their staffs, artists, and their communities.

“Music venues were the first to close and will be the last to open,” said Dayna Frank, NIVA board member and owner of First Avenue in Minneapolis, in an April 20 press release. “It’s just brutal right now, and the future is predictable to no one. We can’t envision a world without these music venues, so we’ve created NIVA to fight for their ability to survive this shutdown, which we hear could go into 2021,” Frank goes on to say. “Our first order of business is to push to secure federal funding to preserve the ecosystem of live music venues and touring artists.”

One of the organization’s first acts was to petition Capitol Hill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, on April 22, with an open letter asking for assistance in ensuring the Small Business Paycheck Protection Program services the venues who need it most. The letter also asked for tax relief, including deferral of federal taxes for closed businesses, a forgiveness program, and for extensions on PPA loans until it’s safe for the concert industry to resume business. Continued federal support for unemployment insurance for employees of shuttered businesses, mortgage and rent forbearance, and the establishment of a grant-funded business recovery fund were also among the NIVA letter’s requests.

As of press time, more than 900 music venues in all 50 states have joined NIVA, including the 40 Watt in Athens, along with Atlanta promoters OK Productions and Rival Entertainment, as well as venues such as the Center Stage-Vinyl-The Loft complex, Smith’s Olde Bar, and The Masquerade.

“We joined NIVA because we believe there is strength in numbers,” says The Masquerade’s talent buyer Greg Green. “Instead of being just one of 800 small voices trying to be heard, we believe that the unified voice of all of these wonderful independent live music venues and promoters will carry a lot more weight regarding the issues facing our industry during this incredibly difficult time. Also, we think having the resource of all of the other members’ experience and knowledge available to us will be invaluable as we try to navigate ahead in the coming months and get back to presenting great concerts.”

There is no cost for venues to acquire NIVA membership.

In new-releases news, Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel is back with a new full-length album, titled ''Halocline''. The music will be available to listen to via Bandcamp on May 16. In the meantime, check out the first single — the first time DfTaLS has even released a single — titled “Maelstrom.” It’s a six-and-a-half-minute improv set that projects something of an aquatic theme. The term “halocline” is what happens when two bodies of water are separated due to their different salinities. This first single is a full-bodied drift that finds theremin player Scott Burland and lap steel player Frank Schultz joined by Louisville, Kentucky-based vocalist Dane Waters.

Stream the song for free, or pay $1. There is also a preorder for the 16-track album up on Bandcamp as well. Every penny from their Bandcamp sales will be donated evenly to two charities: Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

There’s talk of a CD and possibly a vinyl release of ''Halocline'' coming out via Stickfigure Records in the near future, once the pandemic has receded and the world starts moving again. Until then, it’s a Bandcamp exclusive.

Schultz has also recently unveiled a new collaboration with composer, percussionist, and mad genius Klimchak, titled ''Six Feet Apart''. For this project, Schultz rounded up a handful of improv pieces on the lap steel, and sent them off to a few folks to see if anyone was interested in expanding upon them. Klimchak was in, and composed his own sections to go along with Schultz’s improvisational pieces. The result is three pieces — “Off the Clock,” “Adrift and Lost,” and “Limping into Destiny” — 20 minutes of textured ambient droning bliss.

''Six Feet Apart'' is available on Bandcamp now. Any and all proceeds will be donated to Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

In April, blackened death metal-punk trio Misanthropic Aggression rolled out a new 7-inch EP, titled ''Alcoholic Polyneuropathic Freaks in Hell''. The three-song single is available now via Boris Records. National distribution via MVD begins in June.

Death rock and goth-punk trio Tears for the Dying recently unveiled the group’s second full-length, titled ''Memories''. The album was engineered and produced by Tom Ashton of the March Violets, and recorded at Subvon Studio in Athens. This time around, singer, guitarist, and bass player Adria Schlenker, Debra Beat, and Candy Cancer shed the keyboard for most of the album’s tracks in favor of a raw, guitar-driven assault — all three members share guitar and bass duties here. Check out that smoldering cover of Christian Death’s “Spiritual Cramp”!

Bad Moods’ latest 7-inch, featuring a new version of “Super Collider” b/w “La France” and “Radiology” 7-inch has been making the rounds recently as well. Singer, guitar player, and songwriter Tim Haught and drummer Champ Hammett are formerly of Atlanta hardcore staples Foundation — Champ also played in Criminal Instinct. With Bad Moods they veer away from hardcore, taking a more straight-ahead approach to indie rock songwriting, with an emphasis on recording rather than playing live regularly. “The goal, in the beginning, was to sound kind of like the Lemonheads, or something like that,” Haught says. “In the end it comes across more like a power pop version of Leatherface.”

Keep an ear out for more Bad Moods recordings coming down the line soon. __—­CL—__

''Send local music news items to chad.radford@creativeloafing.com.''"
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  string(7210) " Masquerade Credit Elena De Soto 1 2 Web  2020-05-11T20:22:29+00:00 Masquerade_Credit_Elena_de_Soto-1_2_web.jpg    amn New music from DfTaLS, Misanthropic Aggression, Tears For the Dying, and Bad Moods 31020  2020-05-01T04:13:00+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA fights to keep music venues alive jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford Chad Radford 2020-05-01T04:13:00+00:00  The financial hardships wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic reach far and wide. Among the hardest-hit institutions across the country have been independent music venues.

Since Georgians began sheltering in place the second week of March, business for the city’s live music destinations has ground to a halt, and, aside from setting up GoFundMe accounts, revenue streams have remained shut off. A new coalition of venues and promoters, however, dubbed the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) has formed to lobby for, and to create a lifeline to support these indie music institutions, their staffs, artists, and their communities.

“Music venues were the first to close and will be the last to open,” said Dayna Frank, NIVA board member and owner of First Avenue in Minneapolis, in an April 20 press release. “It’s just brutal right now, and the future is predictable to no one. We can’t envision a world without these music venues, so we’ve created NIVA to fight for their ability to survive this shutdown, which we hear could go into 2021,” Frank goes on to say. “Our first order of business is to push to secure federal funding to preserve the ecosystem of live music venues and touring artists.”

One of the organization’s first acts was to petition Capitol Hill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, on April 22, with an open letter asking for assistance in ensuring the Small Business Paycheck Protection Program services the venues who need it most. The letter also asked for tax relief, including deferral of federal taxes for closed businesses, a forgiveness program, and for extensions on PPA loans until it’s safe for the concert industry to resume business. Continued federal support for unemployment insurance for employees of shuttered businesses, mortgage and rent forbearance, and the establishment of a grant-funded business recovery fund were also among the NIVA letter’s requests.

As of press time, more than 900 music venues in all 50 states have joined NIVA, including the 40 Watt in Athens, along with Atlanta promoters OK Productions and Rival Entertainment, as well as venues such as the Center Stage-Vinyl-The Loft complex, Smith’s Olde Bar, and The Masquerade.

“We joined NIVA because we believe there is strength in numbers,” says The Masquerade’s talent buyer Greg Green. “Instead of being just one of 800 small voices trying to be heard, we believe that the unified voice of all of these wonderful independent live music venues and promoters will carry a lot more weight regarding the issues facing our industry during this incredibly difficult time. Also, we think having the resource of all of the other members’ experience and knowledge available to us will be invaluable as we try to navigate ahead in the coming months and get back to presenting great concerts.”

There is no cost for venues to acquire NIVA membership.

In new-releases news, Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel is back with a new full-length album, titled Halocline. The music will be available to listen to via Bandcamp on May 16. In the meantime, check out the first single — the first time DfTaLS has even released a single — titled “Maelstrom.” It’s a six-and-a-half-minute improv set that projects something of an aquatic theme. The term “halocline” is what happens when two bodies of water are separated due to their different salinities. This first single is a full-bodied drift that finds theremin player Scott Burland and lap steel player Frank Schultz joined by Louisville, Kentucky-based vocalist Dane Waters.

Stream the song for free, or pay $1. There is also a preorder for the 16-track album up on Bandcamp as well. Every penny from their Bandcamp sales will be donated evenly to two charities: Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

There’s talk of a CD and possibly a vinyl release of Halocline coming out via Stickfigure Records in the near future, once the pandemic has receded and the world starts moving again. Until then, it’s a Bandcamp exclusive.

Schultz has also recently unveiled a new collaboration with composer, percussionist, and mad genius Klimchak, titled Six Feet Apart. For this project, Schultz rounded up a handful of improv pieces on the lap steel, and sent them off to a few folks to see if anyone was interested in expanding upon them. Klimchak was in, and composed his own sections to go along with Schultz’s improvisational pieces. The result is three pieces — “Off the Clock,” “Adrift and Lost,” and “Limping into Destiny” — 20 minutes of textured ambient droning bliss.

Six Feet Apart is available on Bandcamp now. Any and all proceeds will be donated to Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

In April, blackened death metal-punk trio Misanthropic Aggression rolled out a new 7-inch EP, titled Alcoholic Polyneuropathic Freaks in Hell. The three-song single is available now via Boris Records. National distribution via MVD begins in June.

Death rock and goth-punk trio Tears for the Dying recently unveiled the group’s second full-length, titled Memories. The album was engineered and produced by Tom Ashton of the March Violets, and recorded at Subvon Studio in Athens. This time around, singer, guitarist, and bass player Adria Schlenker, Debra Beat, and Candy Cancer shed the keyboard for most of the album’s tracks in favor of a raw, guitar-driven assault — all three members share guitar and bass duties here. Check out that smoldering cover of Christian Death’s “Spiritual Cramp”!

Bad Moods’ latest 7-inch, featuring a new version of “Super Collider” b/w “La France” and “Radiology” 7-inch has been making the rounds recently as well. Singer, guitar player, and songwriter Tim Haught and drummer Champ Hammett are formerly of Atlanta hardcore staples Foundation — Champ also played in Criminal Instinct. With Bad Moods they veer away from hardcore, taking a more straight-ahead approach to indie rock songwriting, with an emphasis on recording rather than playing live regularly. “The goal, in the beginning, was to sound kind of like the Lemonheads, or something like that,” Haught says. “In the end it comes across more like a power pop version of Leatherface.”

Keep an ear out for more Bad Moods recordings coming down the line soon. —­CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com.    Elena DeSoto SOUND OF MUSIC: The Masquerade and more Atlanta music destinations and promoters join the National Independent Venue Association to lobby for support.  0,0,10    AMN                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA fights to keep music venues alive "
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Friday May 1, 2020 12:13 am EDT
New music from DfTaLS, Misanthropic Aggression, Tears For the Dying, and Bad Moods | more...
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  string(101) "Plus: The Star Bar will live again, new music from Nikki & the Phantom Callers, Picture One, and more"
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  string(8086) "For the Atlanta music scene, and everyone else around the planet, life is on pause, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold. Every music venue in town has suffered cancelations and closures en masse. The timing could not have been more inconvenient for The Star Community Bar, which closed its doors on January 1, 2020. Since then, the lauded Little 5 Points music venue and dive bar at 437 Moreland Avenue has remained in a holding pattern.

According to a March 13 feature story published by the Atlanta Business Chronicle in January, new owners Luke Lewis, Bruce McLeod, former Trackside Tavern and The Comet Pub & Lanes bartender Dan Meade, and longtime bartender at The Highlander, Christopher Jackson, have taken over business operations and signed a new lease with plans to get The Star Bar back up and running as soon as possible, with most of the previous staff back in place.

The plan has been to not change a thing for the storied music hangout, which has been a pillar of the local scene since 1991. Aside from giving the place a thorough cleaning and a new coat of paint, the stage, the photo booth, and the Elvis Vault will live on. Plans to reopen the Little Vinyl Lounge downstairs are still coming together. Aside from that, the mantra has been to reopen “sometime soon,” but as of press time, social distancing and self-quarantining are keeping everyone locked away at home. The Star Bar’s doors remain shuttered for the time being.

“A proper opening date has changed several times because of licensing issues with the city,” says the Star Bar’s music promoter Bryan Malone. “Everything appeared to be in the clear, and then this global pandemic began to take root. I was hoping to announce then that we’d be opening this coming weekend, but held off in light of news reports which seemed too ominous to ignore. If you had told me on January 2  that we’d still be waiting midway through March I would have thought it quite unlikely,” he adds. “But this virus threatens to delay not only that, but everything else — life in general. Indefinitely.”

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available.

In recent years, Tom Gray has been rocking stages around the world, singing and playing slide guitar with progressive blues outfit Delta Moon. After being sidelined in 2019 to deal with a stage four lung cancer diagnosis, Gray has a little more time on his hands than usual. Since February, he’s been involved in launching a campaign to reissue material that he recorded in the late ’70s and early ’80s with his new wave band the Brains. He’s even talking about offering up some unreleased material as well.

In March, Gray and the Swimming Pool Q’s singer and guitarist Jeff Calder went to Preserve South in Buford, Georgia, to bake the original master tapes for all of the Brains’ recordings to which Gray owns the rights. This includes the group’s 1978 debut 7-inch, featuring the song “Money Changes Everything,” later made famous by pop star Cyndi Lauper with her version as the opening number of her 1983 LP, She’s So Unusual. Gray and Calder are also working on the master tapes containing the Brains’ 1982 EP, Dancing Under Streetlights (Landslide Records), as well as some unreleased material. The group’s 1980 self-titled full-length and 1981’s Electronic Eden LPs were originally released by the now defunct Mercury Records. Those masters are currently owned by the Universal Music Group, but Gray and Calder hope to gain access to them soon. 

“Back in the CD era, several reissue labels were interested in the Brains albums, but Mercury was a stone wall,” says Gray. “Today we will be dealing with Universal. The plan, based on the advice of an LA attorney who knows today’s business, is to create enough online interest to show Universal that this would be worth their trouble.”

This reissue campaign will mark the first time these recordings by the Brains have been made available in any format other than the original, long out-of-print vinyl pressings. Stay tuned for more information, including release dates, as it becomes available over the coming weeks.

In new releases news, Picture One, the solo recording project of multi-instrumentalist and co-owner of the Deanwell Global Music label Thomas Barnwell unveiled his third full-length LP, titled Across the Depths of Seven Lakes. Over the last decade, Barnwell has played guitar on releases by local acts including the Orphins and Thy Mighty Contract, and in 2016, co-composed the score for director Adam Pinney’s film, The Arbalest. Barnwell has also reissued material by seminal proto-goth and darkwave acts including French post-punk group Asylum Party and Atlanta’s early ’80s synth-punk outfit the Modern Mannequins.

Picture One finds Barnwell delving into a more personal side of his mostly-instrumental songwriting. Across the Depths of Seven Lakes (out April 3), however, is the first Picture One release on which Barnwell shows off his voice and lyrics.

“I started singing on this record because I wanted to process a lot of what I have been going through over the last couple of years,” he says. “Trying to be more creative than I have been — I haven’t done lyrics in maybe 10 years. I just wanted that connection again. When you play stuff live, people really connect with vocals a lot,” he adds. “ And I wanted to make something that I would personally want to listen to multiple times.”

In other new releases news, 4-IZE recently dropped a new album, titled Look Into My IZE, which he describes as “the most hip-hop album of 2020.” The album features collaborations with a bevy of heavy-hitters including the late Sean Price, Rapper Big Pooh, Talib Kweli, Señor Kaos, J-Live, Shawnna, and the almighty Ludacris, the latter of whom tears it up on the song “Shit On Deez Niggaz.” Guest producers on the album include Floyd the Locsmif, Swizz Beatz, Illastrate, 9th Wonder, J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League, D.R.U.G.S. Beats, and Planet Asia.

“Music has always been an informal method of therapy, being noted as an excellent power to expel diseases, as well as a sovereign remedy against despair and melancholy,” 4IZE says in a press release. “For the listener as well as the artist.”

Under the direction of Sarajevo-born guitarist Eddie Beho, Sataraš Quartet has spent the last few years fleshing out a singular repertoire of Southern European jazz and folk music inflections, American blues, and improvisation. In April, the group unveiled its debut album, Errors and Omissions. The album’s arrival was also accompanied by a new two-song EP by the group’s rhythm section of Colin Bragg and Blake Helton, titled Mask Mania.

April 3 also marks the arrival of Nikki & the Phantom Callers’ debut album, titled Everybody’s Going to Hell (But You and Me). The album’s first proper single, “Fallen Angel,” is accompanied by a video directed by Video Rahim and Ashley Simpson, and premiered in March via Wide Open Country. The album finds the countrypolitan rockers reveling in a creative, upbeat blend of modern indie and timeless Southern rock influences in songs with titles such as “Howl With Me,” “Mamas Should Know,” and “They’ve Never Walked Through Shadows.”

“Your first album is always kind of like your first set list,” says singer and guitarist Nikki Speake. “You gather up what you have and see how it all fits together. Some of the songs were written 20 years ago, most were written and recorded within the last year. When I write songs, it’s sort of like a therapy session,” Speake adds. “I’m trying to get through what’s on my mind, and everyone in the group seems to be on the same musical wavelength. We don’t have to think about it much, and we’re just trying to have fun with it.”

For the time being, release shows are being postponed through April and May. Stay tuned for more announcements coming soon.

Send Atlanta music news tips to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com."
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  string(8231) "For the Atlanta music scene, and everyone else around the planet, life is on pause, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold. Every music venue in town has suffered cancelations and closures en masse. The timing could not have been more inconvenient for __The Star Community Bar__, which closed its doors on January 1, 2020. Since then, the lauded Little 5 Points music venue and dive bar at 437 Moreland Avenue has remained in a holding pattern.

According to a March 13 feature story published by the ''Atlanta Business Chronicle'' in January, new owners __Luke Lewis__, __Bruce McLeod__, former Trackside Tavern and The Comet Pub & Lanes bartender __Dan Meade__, and longtime bartender at __The Highlander, Christopher Jackson__, have taken over business operations and signed a new lease with plans to get The Star Bar back up and running as soon as possible, with most of the previous staff back in place.

The plan has been to not change a thing for the storied music hangout, which has been a pillar of the local scene since 1991. Aside from giving the place a thorough cleaning and a new coat of paint, the stage, the photo booth, and the Elvis Vault will live on. Plans to reopen the Little Vinyl Lounge downstairs are still coming together. Aside from that, the mantra has been to reopen “sometime soon,” but as of press time, social distancing and self-quarantining are keeping everyone locked away at home. The Star Bar’s doors remain shuttered for the time being.

“A proper opening date has changed several times because of licensing issues with the city,” says the Star Bar’s music promoter Bryan Malone. “Everything appeared to be in the clear, and then this global pandemic began to take root. I was hoping to announce then that we’d be opening this coming weekend, but held off in light of news reports which seemed too ominous to ignore. If you had told me on January 2  that we’d still be waiting midway through March I would have thought it quite unlikely,” he adds. “But this virus threatens to delay not only that, but everything else — life in general. Indefinitely.”

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available.

In recent years, Tom Gray has been rocking stages around the world, singing and playing slide guitar with progressive blues outfit Delta Moon. After being sidelined in 2019 to deal with a stage four lung cancer diagnosis, Gray has a little more time on his hands than usual. Since February, he’s been involved in launching a campaign to reissue material that he recorded in the late ’70s and early ’80s with his new wave band __the Brains__. He’s even talking about offering up some unreleased material as well.

In March, Gray and the Swimming Pool Q’s singer and guitarist Jeff Calder went to Preserve South in Buford, Georgia, to bake the original master tapes for all of the Brains’ recordings to which Gray owns the rights. This includes the group’s 1978 debut 7-inch, featuring the song “Money Changes Everything,” later made famous by pop star Cyndi Lauper with her version as the opening number of her 1983 LP, ''She’s So Unusual''. Gray and Calder are also working on the master tapes containing the Brains’ 1982 EP, ''Dancing Under Streetlights'' (Landslide Records), as well as some unreleased material. The group’s 1980 self-titled full-length and 1981’s ''Electronic Eden'' LPs were originally released by the now defunct Mercury Records. Those masters are currently owned by the Universal Music Group, but Gray and Calder hope to gain access to them soon. 

“Back in the CD era, several reissue labels were interested in the Brains albums, but Mercury was a stone wall,” says Gray. “Today we will be dealing with Universal. The plan, based on the advice of an LA attorney who knows today’s business, is to create enough online interest to show Universal that this would be worth their trouble.”

This reissue campaign will mark the first time these recordings by the Brains have been made available in any format other than the original, long out-of-print vinyl pressings. Stay tuned for more information, including release dates, as it becomes available over the coming weeks.

In new releases news, __Picture One__, the solo recording project of multi-instrumentalist and co-owner of the Deanwell Global Music label Thomas Barnwell unveiled his third full-length LP, titled ''Across the Depths of Seven Lakes''. Over the last decade, Barnwell has played guitar on releases by local acts including the Orphins and Thy Mighty Contract, and in 2016, co-composed the score for director Adam Pinney’s film, ''The Arbalest''. Barnwell has also reissued material by seminal proto-goth and darkwave acts including French post-punk group Asylum Party and Atlanta’s early ’80s synth-punk outfit the Modern Mannequins.

Picture One finds Barnwell delving into a more personal side of his mostly-instrumental songwriting. ''Across the Depths of Seven Lakes'' (out April 3), however, is the first Picture One release on which Barnwell shows off his voice and lyrics.

“I started singing on this record because I wanted to process a lot of what I have been going through over the last couple of years,” he says. “Trying to be more creative than I have been — I haven’t done lyrics in maybe 10 years. I just wanted that connection again. When you play stuff live, people really connect with vocals a lot,” he adds. “ And I wanted to make something that I would personally want to listen to multiple times.”

In other new releases news, __4-IZE__ recently dropped a new album, titled ''Look Into My IZE'', which he describes as “the most hip-hop album of 2020.” The album features collaborations with a bevy of heavy-hitters including the late __Sean Price__, __Rapper Big Pooh__, __Talib Kweli__, __Señor Kaos__, __J-Live__, __Shawnna__, and the almighty __Ludacris__, the latter of whom tears it up on the song “Shit On Deez Niggaz.” Guest producers on the album include __Floyd the Locsmif__, __Swizz Beatz__, __Illastrate__, __9th Wonder__, __J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League__, __D.R.U.G.S. Beats__, and __Planet Asia__.

“Music has always been an informal method of therapy, being noted as an excellent power to expel diseases, as well as a sovereign remedy against despair and melancholy,” 4IZE says in a press release. “For the listener as well as the artist.”

Under the direction of Sarajevo-born guitarist Eddie Beho, __Sataraš Quartet__ has spent the last few years fleshing out a singular repertoire of Southern European jazz and folk music inflections, American blues, and improvisation. In April, the group unveiled its debut album, ''Errors and Omissions''. The album’s arrival was also accompanied by a new two-song EP by the group’s rhythm section of Colin Bragg and Blake Helton, titled ''Mask Mania''.

April 3 also marks the arrival of __Nikki & the Phantom Callers__’ debut album, titled ''Everybody’s Going to Hell (But You and Me)''. The album’s first proper single, “Fallen Angel,” is accompanied by a video directed by Video Rahim and Ashley Simpson, and premiered in March via ''Wide Open Country''. The album finds the countrypolitan rockers reveling in a creative, upbeat blend of modern indie and timeless Southern rock influences in songs with titles such as “Howl With Me,” “Mamas Should Know,” and “They’ve Never Walked Through Shadows.”

“Your first album is always kind of like your first set list,” says singer and guitarist Nikki Speake. “You gather up what you have and see how it all fits together. Some of the songs were written 20 years ago, most were written and recorded within the last year. When I write songs, it’s sort of like a therapy session,” Speake adds. “I’m trying to get through what’s on my mind, and everyone in the group seems to be on the same musical wavelength. We don’t have to think about it much, and we’re just trying to have fun with it.”

For the time being, release shows are being postponed through April and May. Stay tuned for more announcements coming soon.

''Send Atlanta music news tips to chad.radford@creativeloafing.com.''"
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  string(8999) " Nikki & The Phantom Callers Photo By Jaysen Michael  2020-04-06T15:19:05+00:00 Nikki_&_the_Phantom_Callers_Photo_by_Jaysen_Michael.jpg    atlmn Plus: The Star Bar will live again, new music from Nikki & the Phantom Callers, Picture One, and more 30455  2020-04-06T15:17:04+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: The Brains redux jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford  2020-04-06T15:17:04+00:00  For the Atlanta music scene, and everyone else around the planet, life is on pause, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold. Every music venue in town has suffered cancelations and closures en masse. The timing could not have been more inconvenient for The Star Community Bar, which closed its doors on January 1, 2020. Since then, the lauded Little 5 Points music venue and dive bar at 437 Moreland Avenue has remained in a holding pattern.

According to a March 13 feature story published by the Atlanta Business Chronicle in January, new owners Luke Lewis, Bruce McLeod, former Trackside Tavern and The Comet Pub & Lanes bartender Dan Meade, and longtime bartender at The Highlander, Christopher Jackson, have taken over business operations and signed a new lease with plans to get The Star Bar back up and running as soon as possible, with most of the previous staff back in place.

The plan has been to not change a thing for the storied music hangout, which has been a pillar of the local scene since 1991. Aside from giving the place a thorough cleaning and a new coat of paint, the stage, the photo booth, and the Elvis Vault will live on. Plans to reopen the Little Vinyl Lounge downstairs are still coming together. Aside from that, the mantra has been to reopen “sometime soon,” but as of press time, social distancing and self-quarantining are keeping everyone locked away at home. The Star Bar’s doors remain shuttered for the time being.

“A proper opening date has changed several times because of licensing issues with the city,” says the Star Bar’s music promoter Bryan Malone. “Everything appeared to be in the clear, and then this global pandemic began to take root. I was hoping to announce then that we’d be opening this coming weekend, but held off in light of news reports which seemed too ominous to ignore. If you had told me on January 2  that we’d still be waiting midway through March I would have thought it quite unlikely,” he adds. “But this virus threatens to delay not only that, but everything else — life in general. Indefinitely.”

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available.

In recent years, Tom Gray has been rocking stages around the world, singing and playing slide guitar with progressive blues outfit Delta Moon. After being sidelined in 2019 to deal with a stage four lung cancer diagnosis, Gray has a little more time on his hands than usual. Since February, he’s been involved in launching a campaign to reissue material that he recorded in the late ’70s and early ’80s with his new wave band the Brains. He’s even talking about offering up some unreleased material as well.

In March, Gray and the Swimming Pool Q’s singer and guitarist Jeff Calder went to Preserve South in Buford, Georgia, to bake the original master tapes for all of the Brains’ recordings to which Gray owns the rights. This includes the group’s 1978 debut 7-inch, featuring the song “Money Changes Everything,” later made famous by pop star Cyndi Lauper with her version as the opening number of her 1983 LP, She’s So Unusual. Gray and Calder are also working on the master tapes containing the Brains’ 1982 EP, Dancing Under Streetlights (Landslide Records), as well as some unreleased material. The group’s 1980 self-titled full-length and 1981’s Electronic Eden LPs were originally released by the now defunct Mercury Records. Those masters are currently owned by the Universal Music Group, but Gray and Calder hope to gain access to them soon. 

“Back in the CD era, several reissue labels were interested in the Brains albums, but Mercury was a stone wall,” says Gray. “Today we will be dealing with Universal. The plan, based on the advice of an LA attorney who knows today’s business, is to create enough online interest to show Universal that this would be worth their trouble.”

This reissue campaign will mark the first time these recordings by the Brains have been made available in any format other than the original, long out-of-print vinyl pressings. Stay tuned for more information, including release dates, as it becomes available over the coming weeks.

In new releases news, Picture One, the solo recording project of multi-instrumentalist and co-owner of the Deanwell Global Music label Thomas Barnwell unveiled his third full-length LP, titled Across the Depths of Seven Lakes. Over the last decade, Barnwell has played guitar on releases by local acts including the Orphins and Thy Mighty Contract, and in 2016, co-composed the score for director Adam Pinney’s film, The Arbalest. Barnwell has also reissued material by seminal proto-goth and darkwave acts including French post-punk group Asylum Party and Atlanta’s early ’80s synth-punk outfit the Modern Mannequins.

Picture One finds Barnwell delving into a more personal side of his mostly-instrumental songwriting. Across the Depths of Seven Lakes (out April 3), however, is the first Picture One release on which Barnwell shows off his voice and lyrics.

“I started singing on this record because I wanted to process a lot of what I have been going through over the last couple of years,” he says. “Trying to be more creative than I have been — I haven’t done lyrics in maybe 10 years. I just wanted that connection again. When you play stuff live, people really connect with vocals a lot,” he adds. “ And I wanted to make something that I would personally want to listen to multiple times.”

In other new releases news, 4-IZE recently dropped a new album, titled Look Into My IZE, which he describes as “the most hip-hop album of 2020.” The album features collaborations with a bevy of heavy-hitters including the late Sean Price, Rapper Big Pooh, Talib Kweli, Señor Kaos, J-Live, Shawnna, and the almighty Ludacris, the latter of whom tears it up on the song “Shit On Deez Niggaz.” Guest producers on the album include Floyd the Locsmif, Swizz Beatz, Illastrate, 9th Wonder, J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League, D.R.U.G.S. Beats, and Planet Asia.

“Music has always been an informal method of therapy, being noted as an excellent power to expel diseases, as well as a sovereign remedy against despair and melancholy,” 4IZE says in a press release. “For the listener as well as the artist.”

Under the direction of Sarajevo-born guitarist Eddie Beho, Sataraš Quartet has spent the last few years fleshing out a singular repertoire of Southern European jazz and folk music inflections, American blues, and improvisation. In April, the group unveiled its debut album, Errors and Omissions. The album’s arrival was also accompanied by a new two-song EP by the group’s rhythm section of Colin Bragg and Blake Helton, titled Mask Mania.

April 3 also marks the arrival of Nikki & the Phantom Callers’ debut album, titled Everybody’s Going to Hell (But You and Me). The album’s first proper single, “Fallen Angel,” is accompanied by a video directed by Video Rahim and Ashley Simpson, and premiered in March via Wide Open Country. The album finds the countrypolitan rockers reveling in a creative, upbeat blend of modern indie and timeless Southern rock influences in songs with titles such as “Howl With Me,” “Mamas Should Know,” and “They’ve Never Walked Through Shadows.”

“Your first album is always kind of like your first set list,” says singer and guitarist Nikki Speake. “You gather up what you have and see how it all fits together. Some of the songs were written 20 years ago, most were written and recorded within the last year. When I write songs, it’s sort of like a therapy session,” Speake adds. “I’m trying to get through what’s on my mind, and everyone in the group seems to be on the same musical wavelength. We don’t have to think about it much, and we’re just trying to have fun with it.”

For the time being, release shows are being postponed through April and May. Stay tuned for more announcements coming soon.

Send Atlanta music news tips to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com.    Jaysen Michael SOUTHERN CHARM: Nikki & the Phantom Callers’ debut album, ‘Everybody’s Going To Hell (But You and Me),’ is out now.  0,0,10 luke.lewis@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470530 trackerid:9), bruce.mcleod@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470531 trackerid:9), dan.meade@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470532 trackerid:9), christopher.jackson@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470533 trackerid:9), The Brains (itemId:470535 trackerid:8)   ATLMN                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: The Brains redux "
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Plus: The Star Bar will live again, new music from Nikki & the Phantom Callers, Picture One, and more | more...
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Welcome to Creative Loafing’s weekend roundup podcast for March 13-15! Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford discuss their top picks for the weekend, including ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more! Tune in and turn out.

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Welcome to Creative Loafing’s weekend roundup podcast for March 13-15! Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford discuss their top picks for the weekend, including ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more! Tune in and turn out.

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  string(801) " Algiers1  2020-03-13T16:29:37+00:00 algiers1.jpg     ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more 30137  2020-03-13T16:15:19+00:00 PODCAST: Weekend roundup March 13-15 will.cardwell@gmail.com Will Cardwell Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford  2020-03-13T16:15:19+00:00  

Welcome to Creative Loafing’s weekend roundup podcast for March 13-15! Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford discuss their top picks for the weekend, including ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more! Tune in and turn out.

!!Friday, March 13
 

!!Saturday, March 14
 

!!Sunday, March 15
     CHRISTIAN HAGSTEDT INDUSTRIAL POP: Algiers plays 529 Saturday, March 14.  0,0,10                                 PODCAST: Weekend roundup March 13-15 "
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Friday March 13, 2020 12:15 pm EDT
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