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NEW ATLANTA MUSIC: Mayer & Mayer offer up lush acoustic pop on 'Listen Up Baby'

Brother and sister duo return with new track

SkybigM&Msquarecropped 2
Photo credit: Mick Mayer
BIG SKY: Mick and Elle Mayer.
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More By This Writer

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  string(11025) "BIG THIEF, PALEHOUND — Variety Playhouse, Thurs. Nov. 7.  Based out of Brooklyn, New York, this indie, folk influenced powerhouse quartet first arrived on the scene with their debut album, Masterpiece, which was lauded by audiences and critics alike. With frontwoman, Adrianne Lenker, an accomplished musician in her own right, known for her tender and personal vocals, the band produces lyrically courageous songs that focus on intimate struggles and relationships. This time around, they are promoting the release of their two new sister albums, U.F.O.F. and Two Hands, both released in 2019 and touted as two of the best of the year. $21-$39. 7 p.m. — Leah Schwartz

ALLISON MOORER, KYLE TIBBS JONES — Eddie’s Attic, Fri. Nov. 8. Living a life that mirrors a gothic country song, Moorer has seen some serious ups and downs, and her singing talent has always been her sanctuary. She recently received her MFA in creative writing and has just released Blood: A Memoir, one of the most powerful and soul-baring stories you will ever find. Moorer’s dark family tragedy finally comes out front and center, and she has written an album’s worth of songs about the event and how it impacted both her and her sister Shelby Lynne. The show features a moderated discussion of the book, and an acoustic performance of the songs. Bring hankies. $23-$92. 7 p.m. — James Kelly

LIZARDMEN, BACKYARD BIRDS, CAROLINE & THE RAMBLERS — Star Bar, Sat. Nov. 9. It’s been a while since the original Lizardmen were all in town at the same time, and they are taking advantage of the serendipity to host a big 25 anniversary bash. Decked out in full mod regalia, the Lizardmen were one of the most popular bands to perform at the Star Bar in their heyday — and we’re betting they haven’t lost a step. Filling out the great bill are fellow retro Brit rockers the Backyard Birds and rockabilly twangers Caroline & the Ramblers. NO SMOKING SHOW!!! $10. 9 p.m. — JK

THIS WILL DESTROY YOU, CHRISTOPHER TIGNOR — Masquerade (Hell), Sun. Nov. 10. Are there some themes and motifs that are better communicated without words? Instrumental rock band This Will Destroy You thinks so, and not just because Jeremy Galindo’s vocals can be so bad they’re laughable. The band got their start in San Marcos, Texas, in 2004 and decided on their signature, voiceless direction after a playback comparison of their first recorded track with and without vocals. The latter just felt right. Their music has found a wider audience in the last 15 years, particularly as accompaniment to documentaries, movies, and art installations. Each song brings to mind themes of destiny, nature, and — particularly on their newest records New Others part one and two — emotional turmoil. Join them for a night of introspection on these themes, with guitar riffs that aim at your heart and drums that beat at your soul. $15. 7 p.m. — Narah Landress

THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS, LADY LAMB — Buckhead Theatre, Tues. Nov. 12.It’s November of 2019, which means we’re about 20 percent of the way through the 21st century. And the best rock band of said century so far is The New Pornographers, the Canadian power-pop collective led by songwriter extraordinaire Carl Newman. The group released its debut album — a sugar rush of controlled chaos called Mass Romantic —- in 2000, and they’ve spent the 19 years since building one of the best catalogs of catchy pop-rock music ever. The most recent entry is this year’s In the Morse Code of Brake Lights, which juxtaposes the inescapable anxiety of our times with upbeat arrangements, memorable melodies, gorgeous vocal harmonies, and an unstoppable army of warmly glowing synthesizers. $35-$45. 8 p.m. — Ben Salmon

CRUMB, DIVINO NIÑO, SHORMEY — Terminal West, Thurs. Nov. 14. Crumb’s languid, jazz-infused psych-rock is not concerned with gravity. Rather, the Brooklyn-based quartet’s music hangs like a haze, colored with woozy synth passages and singer Lila Ramani’s signature dry, yet ethereal delivery. The effect is hypnotic and casts a spell; it comes as no surprise that the group named their debut album Jinx. Crumb’s debut follows two critically-acclaimed EPs — 2016’s Crumb and 2017’s Locket — with which the band molded their magnetic sound. Jinx finds the band exploring the sound they’ve created, doubling down on the introspective qualities of their music and covering new dynamics in their quest to not be discarded as just another psych group. 18+. $18. 8 p.m. — Jake Van Valkenburg

BLACK MIDI, FAT TONY — The Earl, Sat. Nov. 16. The unclassifiable racket of Black Midi’s debut Schlagenheim gives insight as to what the eye of a hurricane might sound like. From the bull-in-a-china-shop opener “953” to the mutant groove of “Ducter,” the band unleashes sheets of noise, skronky guitar riffs, and truly odd vocals that draw together post-punk, math rock, post-hardcore, and free jazz tumult under one umbrella. Since their emergence in the U.K. underground music scene last year, the young quartet has experienced a meteoric rise in hype, some critics even calling them the “best band in London nobody knows about” and the “weirdest buzz band today.” Put simply, Black Midi is fearless. What they are spearheading might just save modern guitar music. 21+. SOLD OUT. 9 p.m. — JVV

THE FLATLANDERS — City Winery, Tues. Nov. 19. If there are three finer fellows in Texas, I would love to meet them. Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and Butch Hancock form a trinity of excellence in both songwriting and performance. They have been playing since the ’60s, touring together and separately for years, and define the singer/songwriter genre with top quality tunes. Like a fine wine, they seem to only get better with age. An evening with the three of them together is a real treat, filled with humor, craftsmanship, and a sense of pure pleasure only the best of friends can share. $35-$45. 8 p.m. — JK

THE MENZINGERS, TIGERS JAW, CULTURE ABUSE — Masquerade (Heaven), Tues. Nov. 19.The last full-length album from The Menzingers — 2017’s After the Party — is one of the great “Oh no, I’ve grown up. Now what?” records in recent memory. On their follow-up, the Philly rockers get to work answering that question. Hello Exile kicks off with a highly relatable song called “America (You’re Freaking Me Out)” and then continues with 11 tracks of deeply earnest verses and skyscraping choruses about love, loss, heartbreak, new horizons, good old days, unclaimed baggage, and desperate hope for better times ahead. The Menzingers are masters of arena-ready anthems for the middle class. Fans of Bruce Springsteen take note! $20. 7 p.m. — BS

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF — Variety Playhouse, Tues. Nov. 19. While prog rock sometimes (well, a lot of times) gets dissed as overblown theatrical noodling, there is a strong following of folks who still love it. From the first notes of King Crimson’s seminal debut to The Pineapple Thief’s newest album ( Hold Our Fire, Nov. 15), runs a thread of concise musicianship, esoteric and fantastical lyricism, and a complete suspension of reality. The Pineapple Thief is a bit more melodic and diverse than most current bands in the genre, and with virtually no pretentiousness. Well, maybe a little. $25-$49. 8 p.m. — JK

BROCKHAMPTON, SLOWTHAI, 100 GECS — Coca Cola Roxy, Wed. Nov. 20. They call themselves the “world’s greatest boy band,” but last year, BROCKHAMPTON almost fell apart. Following the forced departure of their best rapper, Ameer Vann, who was accused of sexual misconduct, the rap collective took a hiatus to regroup and recenter. In August, the group returned with GINGER, a densely emotional effort that finds the band navigating loss, betrayal, and discovering new ways to rejoice. It’s definitely a recovery album, but still with the same anxious and boisterous swagger paired with beats BROCKHAMPTON’s known for. $43-$75+. 8 p.m. — JVV

PIGFACE — Masquerade (Hell), Fri. Nov. 22. Industrial rock supergroup Pigface formed in 1990 after Ministry’s The Mind is a Terrible Thing to Taste tour, when drummer Martin Atkins decided they should continue to  expand on what Al Jourgensen only hinted at. The revolving door of musicians collaborated with other industrial rockers like Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails, who co-wrote and sang “Suck,” a Pigface underground hit. Known to put on performances just as electrifying as their sound, Pigface might include up to 10 musicians on the stage at a time. They are also known to bring up audience members during their encore sets. $29.50. 8 p.m. — LS

OF MONTREAL AT OVER/UNDER MUSIC FEST — Monday Night Brewing Garage, Sat. Nov. 23. — Nudity, a white horse, shimmying and shaking, disco lights — anything is possible with an Of Montreal show, so draw a ticket out of the hat to see what you get! This indie rock band from Athens, GA with a penchant for disco flare, funky vocal enunciation, and distortion are also known for progressive song subjects, particularly concerning sex and gender roles. Some examples include “Paranoiac Intervals/Body Dysmorphia” and “Sophie Calle Private Game/Every Person Is a Pussy and Every Pussy Is a Star!” from their newest record White is Relic/Irrealis Mood. They are taking this record and its messages across the U.S. this fall, with dynamic and engaging performances that will leave you sweaty, enamored, and free. $40-$85. 4 p.m. — NL

SUGAR CANDY MOUNTAIN, KIBI JAMES, PINKEST — Drunken Unicorn, Sat. Nov. 23. Let your body sway and your mind wander as Sugar Candy Mountain creates psychedelic sounds. A neo-psych pop group from Oakland, CA, that formed in 2010, with the rise of psychedelic riffs into the mainstream, the group has only moved further in this unhinged direction. Their newest single, “My Clown,” dials up the psychedelia to the max, with heavy reverb and delays on the vocals, the introduction of bongos, and a disjointed song structure that stumbles endearingly along before finding itself complete and in harmony by the final lines. Expect a night of vocals like lullabies and instrumentals like stimulants — the crossfading you don’t have to light up for. $10-$12. 9 p.m. — NL

THREE WOMEN AND THE TRUTH, WITH JAIMEE HARRIS AND BARRY WALSH — City Winery, Sat. Nov. 30. And the truth will be delivered from three fine songwriters performing together. Eliza Gilkyson has a clear perspective of the human condition, yet delivers her message with a palatable wit and charm. Gretchen Peters is a member of the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, with multiple hits — intelligent, thoughtful hits — written for many great artists. Americana artist Mary Gauthier is never the dark horse in this accomplished trio, and her recent album of songs (Rifles & Rosary Beads, 2018) co-written with military veterans is simply astounding in its depth. $22-$32. 8 p.m.— JK
 

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  string(11239) "__BIG THIEF, PALEHOUND — Variety Playhouse, Thurs. Nov. 7. __ Based out of Brooklyn, New York, this indie, folk influenced powerhouse quartet first arrived on the scene with their debut album, Masterpiece, which was lauded by audiences and critics alike. With frontwoman, Adrianne Lenker, an accomplished musician in her own right, known for her tender and personal vocals, the band produces lyrically courageous songs that focus on intimate struggles and relationships. This time around, they are promoting the release of their two new sister albums, U.F.O.F. and Two Hands, both released in 2019 and touted as two of the best of the year. $21-$39. 7 p.m. — Leah Schwartz

__ALLISON MOORER, KYLE TIBBS JONES — Eddie’s Attic, Fri. Nov. 8.__ Living a life that mirrors a gothic country song, Moorer has seen some serious ups and downs, and her singing talent has always been her sanctuary. She recently received her MFA in creative writing and has just released ''Blood: A Memoir'', one of the most powerful and soul-baring stories you will ever find. Moorer’s dark family tragedy finally comes out front and center, and she has written an album’s worth of songs about the event and how it impacted both her and her sister Shelby Lynne. The show features a moderated discussion of the book, and an acoustic performance of the songs. Bring hankies. $23-$92. 7 p.m. — James Kelly

__LIZARDMEN, BACKYARD BIRDS, CAROLINE & THE RAMBLERS — Star Bar, Sat. Nov. 9.__ It’s been a while since the original Lizardmen were all in town at the same time, and they are taking advantage of the serendipity to host a big 25{SUP()}th{SUP} anniversary bash. Decked out in full mod regalia, the Lizardmen were one of the most popular bands to perform at the Star Bar in their heyday — and we’re betting they haven’t lost a step. Filling out the great bill are fellow retro Brit rockers the Backyard Birds and rockabilly twangers Caroline & the Ramblers. NO SMOKING SHOW!!! $10. 9 p.m. — JK

__THIS WILL DESTROY YOU, CHRISTOPHER TIGNOR — Masquerade (Hell), Sun. Nov. 10.__ Are there some themes and motifs that are better communicated without words? Instrumental rock band This Will Destroy You thinks so, and not just because Jeremy Galindo’s vocals can be so bad they’re laughable. The band got their start in San Marcos, Texas, in 2004 and decided on their signature, voiceless direction after a playback comparison of their first recorded track with and without vocals. The latter just felt right. Their music has found a wider audience in the last 15 years, particularly as accompaniment to documentaries, movies, and art installations. Each song brings to mind themes of destiny, nature, and — particularly on their newest records ''New Others'' part one and two — emotional turmoil. Join them for a night of introspection on these themes, with guitar riffs that aim at your heart and drums that beat at your soul. $15. 7 p.m. — Narah Landress

__THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS, LADY LAMB — Buckhead Theatre, Tues. Nov. 12.__It’s November of 2019, which means we’re about 20 percent of the way through the 21st century. And the best rock band of said century so far is The New Pornographers, the Canadian power-pop collective led by songwriter extraordinaire Carl Newman. The group released its debut album — a sugar rush of controlled chaos called ''Mass Romantic'' —- in 2000, and they’ve spent the 19 years since building one of the best catalogs of catchy pop-rock music ever. The most recent entry is this year’s ''In the Morse Code of Brake Lights'', which juxtaposes the inescapable anxiety of our times with upbeat arrangements, memorable melodies, gorgeous vocal harmonies, and an unstoppable army of warmly glowing synthesizers. $35-$45. 8 p.m. — Ben Salmon

__CRUMB, DIVINO NIÑO, SHORMEY — Terminal West, Thurs. Nov. 14.__ Crumb’s languid, jazz-infused psych-rock is not concerned with gravity. Rather, the Brooklyn-based quartet’s music hangs like a haze, colored with woozy synth passages and singer Lila Ramani’s signature dry, yet ethereal delivery. The effect is hypnotic and casts a spell; it comes as no surprise that the group named their debut album ''Jinx''. Crumb’s debut follows two critically-acclaimed EPs — 2016’s ''Crumb'' and 2017’s ''Locket'' — with which the band molded their magnetic sound. ''Jinx'' finds the band exploring the sound they’ve created, doubling down on the introspective qualities of their music and covering new dynamics in their quest to not be discarded as just another psych group. 18+. $18. 8 p.m. — Jake Van Valkenburg

__BLACK MIDI, FAT TONY — The Earl, Sat. Nov. 16.__ The unclassifiable racket of Black Midi’s debut ''Schlagenheim'' gives insight as to what the eye of a hurricane might sound like. From the bull-in-a-china-shop opener “953” to the mutant groove of “Ducter,” the band unleashes sheets of noise, skronky guitar riffs, and truly odd vocals that draw together post-punk, math rock, post-hardcore, and free jazz tumult under one umbrella. Since their emergence in the U.K. underground music scene last year, the young quartet has experienced a meteoric rise in hype, some critics even calling them the “best band in London nobody knows about” and the “weirdest buzz band today.” Put simply, Black Midi is fearless. What they are spearheading might just save modern guitar music. 21+. SOLD OUT. 9 p.m. — JVV

__THE FLATLANDERS — City Winery, Tues. Nov. 19.__ If there are three finer fellows in Texas, I would love to meet them. Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and Butch Hancock form a trinity of excellence in both songwriting and performance. They have been playing since the ’60s, touring together and separately for years, and define the singer/songwriter genre with top quality tunes. Like a fine wine, they seem to only get better with age. An evening with the three of them together is a real treat, filled with humor, craftsmanship, and a sense of pure pleasure only the best of friends can share. $35-$45. 8 p.m. — JK

__THE MENZINGERS, TIGERS JAW, CULTURE ABUSE — Masquerade (Heaven), Tues. Nov. 19.__The last full-length album from The Menzingers — 2017’s ''After the Party'' — is one of the great “Oh no, I’ve grown up. Now what?” records in recent memory. On their follow-up, the Philly rockers get to work answering that question. ''Hello Exile'' kicks off with a highly relatable song called “America (You’re Freaking Me Out)” and then continues with 11 tracks of deeply earnest verses and skyscraping choruses about love, loss, heartbreak, new horizons, good old days, unclaimed baggage, and desperate hope for better times ahead. The Menzingers are masters of arena-ready anthems for the middle class. Fans of Bruce Springsteen take note! $20. 7 p.m. — BS

__THE PINEAPPLE THIEF — Variety Playhouse, Tues. Nov. 19.__ While prog rock sometimes (well, a lot of times) gets dissed as overblown theatrical noodling, there is a strong following of folks who still love it. From the first notes of King Crimson’s seminal debut to The Pineapple Thief’s newest album ('' Hold Our Fire'', Nov. 15), runs a thread of concise musicianship, esoteric and fantastical lyricism, and a complete suspension of reality. The Pineapple Thief is a bit more melodic and diverse than most current bands in the genre, and with virtually no pretentiousness. Well, maybe a little. $25-$49. 8 p.m. — JK

__BROCKHAMPTON, SLOWTHAI, 100 GECS — Coca Cola Roxy, Wed. Nov. 20.__ They call themselves the “world’s greatest boy band,” but last year, BROCKHAMPTON almost fell apart. Following the forced departure of their best rapper, Ameer Vann, who was accused of sexual misconduct, the rap collective took a hiatus to regroup and recenter. In August, the group returned with ''GINGER'', a densely emotional effort that finds the band navigating loss, betrayal, and discovering new ways to rejoice. It’s definitely a recovery album, but still with the same anxious and boisterous swagger paired with beats BROCKHAMPTON’s known for. $43-$75+. 8 p.m. — JVV

__PIGFACE — Masquerade (Hell), Fri. Nov. 22.__ Industrial rock supergroup Pigface formed in 1990 after Ministry’s ''The Mind is a Terrible Thing to Taste'' tour, when drummer Martin Atkins decided they should continue to  expand on what Al Jourgensen only hinted at. The revolving door of musicians collaborated with other industrial rockers like Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails, who co-wrote and sang “Suck,” a Pigface underground hit. Known to put on performances just as electrifying as their sound, Pigface might include up to 10 musicians on the stage at a time. They are also known to bring up audience members during their encore sets. $29.50. 8 p.m. — LS

__OF MONTREAL AT OVER/UNDER MUSIC FEST — Monday Night Brewing Garage, Sat. Nov. 23.__ — Nudity, a white horse, shimmying and shaking, disco lights — anything is possible with an Of Montreal show, so draw a ticket out of the hat to see what you get! This indie rock band from Athens, GA with a penchant for disco flare, funky vocal enunciation, and distortion are also known for progressive song subjects, particularly concerning sex and gender roles. Some examples include “Paranoiac Intervals/Body Dysmorphia” and “Sophie Calle Private Game/Every Person Is a Pussy and Every Pussy Is a Star!” from their newest record ''White is Relic/Irrealis Mood''. They are taking this record and its messages across the U.S. this fall, with dynamic and engaging performances that will leave you sweaty, enamored, and free. $40-$85. 4 p.m. — NL

__SUGAR CANDY MOUNTAIN, KIBI JAMES, PINKEST — Drunken Unicorn, Sat. Nov. 23. __Let your body sway and your mind wander as Sugar Candy Mountain creates psychedelic sounds. A neo-psych pop group from Oakland, CA, that formed in 2010, with the rise of psychedelic riffs into the mainstream, the group has only moved further in this unhinged direction. Their newest single, “My Clown,” dials up the psychedelia to the max, with heavy reverb and delays on the vocals, the introduction of bongos, and a disjointed song structure that stumbles endearingly along before finding itself complete and in harmony by the final lines. Expect a night of vocals like lullabies and instrumentals like stimulants — the crossfading you don’t have to light up for. ''$10-$12. 9 p.m.'' — NL

__THREE WOMEN AND THE TRUTH, WITH JAIMEE HARRIS AND BARRY WALSH — City Winery, Sat. Nov. 30.__ And the truth will be delivered from three fine songwriters performing together. Eliza Gilkyson has a clear perspective of the human condition, yet delivers her message with a palatable wit and charm. Gretchen Peters is a member of the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, with multiple hits — intelligent, thoughtful hits — written for many great artists. Americana artist Mary Gauthier is never the dark horse in this accomplished trio, and her recent album of songs (''Rifles & Rosary Beads'', 2018) co-written with military veterans is simply astounding in its depth. $22-$32. 8 p.m.— JK
 

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  string(11503) " Black Midi  2019-11-13T20:33:04+00:00 black midi.jpg    musicmenu A selection of what to see in Atlanta this month 25941  2019-11-13T17:20:27+00:00 MUSIC MENU: Live in concert tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris James Kelly, Narah Landress, Ben Salmon, Leah Schwartz, and Jake Van Valkenburg  2019-11-13T17:20:27+00:00  BIG THIEF, PALEHOUND — Variety Playhouse, Thurs. Nov. 7.  Based out of Brooklyn, New York, this indie, folk influenced powerhouse quartet first arrived on the scene with their debut album, Masterpiece, which was lauded by audiences and critics alike. With frontwoman, Adrianne Lenker, an accomplished musician in her own right, known for her tender and personal vocals, the band produces lyrically courageous songs that focus on intimate struggles and relationships. This time around, they are promoting the release of their two new sister albums, U.F.O.F. and Two Hands, both released in 2019 and touted as two of the best of the year. $21-$39. 7 p.m. — Leah Schwartz

ALLISON MOORER, KYLE TIBBS JONES — Eddie’s Attic, Fri. Nov. 8. Living a life that mirrors a gothic country song, Moorer has seen some serious ups and downs, and her singing talent has always been her sanctuary. She recently received her MFA in creative writing and has just released Blood: A Memoir, one of the most powerful and soul-baring stories you will ever find. Moorer’s dark family tragedy finally comes out front and center, and she has written an album’s worth of songs about the event and how it impacted both her and her sister Shelby Lynne. The show features a moderated discussion of the book, and an acoustic performance of the songs. Bring hankies. $23-$92. 7 p.m. — James Kelly

LIZARDMEN, BACKYARD BIRDS, CAROLINE & THE RAMBLERS — Star Bar, Sat. Nov. 9. It’s been a while since the original Lizardmen were all in town at the same time, and they are taking advantage of the serendipity to host a big 25 anniversary bash. Decked out in full mod regalia, the Lizardmen were one of the most popular bands to perform at the Star Bar in their heyday — and we’re betting they haven’t lost a step. Filling out the great bill are fellow retro Brit rockers the Backyard Birds and rockabilly twangers Caroline & the Ramblers. NO SMOKING SHOW!!! $10. 9 p.m. — JK

THIS WILL DESTROY YOU, CHRISTOPHER TIGNOR — Masquerade (Hell), Sun. Nov. 10. Are there some themes and motifs that are better communicated without words? Instrumental rock band This Will Destroy You thinks so, and not just because Jeremy Galindo’s vocals can be so bad they’re laughable. The band got their start in San Marcos, Texas, in 2004 and decided on their signature, voiceless direction after a playback comparison of their first recorded track with and without vocals. The latter just felt right. Their music has found a wider audience in the last 15 years, particularly as accompaniment to documentaries, movies, and art installations. Each song brings to mind themes of destiny, nature, and — particularly on their newest records New Others part one and two — emotional turmoil. Join them for a night of introspection on these themes, with guitar riffs that aim at your heart and drums that beat at your soul. $15. 7 p.m. — Narah Landress

THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS, LADY LAMB — Buckhead Theatre, Tues. Nov. 12.It’s November of 2019, which means we’re about 20 percent of the way through the 21st century. And the best rock band of said century so far is The New Pornographers, the Canadian power-pop collective led by songwriter extraordinaire Carl Newman. The group released its debut album — a sugar rush of controlled chaos called Mass Romantic —- in 2000, and they’ve spent the 19 years since building one of the best catalogs of catchy pop-rock music ever. The most recent entry is this year’s In the Morse Code of Brake Lights, which juxtaposes the inescapable anxiety of our times with upbeat arrangements, memorable melodies, gorgeous vocal harmonies, and an unstoppable army of warmly glowing synthesizers. $35-$45. 8 p.m. — Ben Salmon

CRUMB, DIVINO NIÑO, SHORMEY — Terminal West, Thurs. Nov. 14. Crumb’s languid, jazz-infused psych-rock is not concerned with gravity. Rather, the Brooklyn-based quartet’s music hangs like a haze, colored with woozy synth passages and singer Lila Ramani’s signature dry, yet ethereal delivery. The effect is hypnotic and casts a spell; it comes as no surprise that the group named their debut album Jinx. Crumb’s debut follows two critically-acclaimed EPs — 2016’s Crumb and 2017’s Locket — with which the band molded their magnetic sound. Jinx finds the band exploring the sound they’ve created, doubling down on the introspective qualities of their music and covering new dynamics in their quest to not be discarded as just another psych group. 18+. $18. 8 p.m. — Jake Van Valkenburg

BLACK MIDI, FAT TONY — The Earl, Sat. Nov. 16. The unclassifiable racket of Black Midi’s debut Schlagenheim gives insight as to what the eye of a hurricane might sound like. From the bull-in-a-china-shop opener “953” to the mutant groove of “Ducter,” the band unleashes sheets of noise, skronky guitar riffs, and truly odd vocals that draw together post-punk, math rock, post-hardcore, and free jazz tumult under one umbrella. Since their emergence in the U.K. underground music scene last year, the young quartet has experienced a meteoric rise in hype, some critics even calling them the “best band in London nobody knows about” and the “weirdest buzz band today.” Put simply, Black Midi is fearless. What they are spearheading might just save modern guitar music. 21+. SOLD OUT. 9 p.m. — JVV

THE FLATLANDERS — City Winery, Tues. Nov. 19. If there are three finer fellows in Texas, I would love to meet them. Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and Butch Hancock form a trinity of excellence in both songwriting and performance. They have been playing since the ’60s, touring together and separately for years, and define the singer/songwriter genre with top quality tunes. Like a fine wine, they seem to only get better with age. An evening with the three of them together is a real treat, filled with humor, craftsmanship, and a sense of pure pleasure only the best of friends can share. $35-$45. 8 p.m. — JK

THE MENZINGERS, TIGERS JAW, CULTURE ABUSE — Masquerade (Heaven), Tues. Nov. 19.The last full-length album from The Menzingers — 2017’s After the Party — is one of the great “Oh no, I’ve grown up. Now what?” records in recent memory. On their follow-up, the Philly rockers get to work answering that question. Hello Exile kicks off with a highly relatable song called “America (You’re Freaking Me Out)” and then continues with 11 tracks of deeply earnest verses and skyscraping choruses about love, loss, heartbreak, new horizons, good old days, unclaimed baggage, and desperate hope for better times ahead. The Menzingers are masters of arena-ready anthems for the middle class. Fans of Bruce Springsteen take note! $20. 7 p.m. — BS

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF — Variety Playhouse, Tues. Nov. 19. While prog rock sometimes (well, a lot of times) gets dissed as overblown theatrical noodling, there is a strong following of folks who still love it. From the first notes of King Crimson’s seminal debut to The Pineapple Thief’s newest album ( Hold Our Fire, Nov. 15), runs a thread of concise musicianship, esoteric and fantastical lyricism, and a complete suspension of reality. The Pineapple Thief is a bit more melodic and diverse than most current bands in the genre, and with virtually no pretentiousness. Well, maybe a little. $25-$49. 8 p.m. — JK

BROCKHAMPTON, SLOWTHAI, 100 GECS — Coca Cola Roxy, Wed. Nov. 20. They call themselves the “world’s greatest boy band,” but last year, BROCKHAMPTON almost fell apart. Following the forced departure of their best rapper, Ameer Vann, who was accused of sexual misconduct, the rap collective took a hiatus to regroup and recenter. In August, the group returned with GINGER, a densely emotional effort that finds the band navigating loss, betrayal, and discovering new ways to rejoice. It’s definitely a recovery album, but still with the same anxious and boisterous swagger paired with beats BROCKHAMPTON’s known for. $43-$75+. 8 p.m. — JVV

PIGFACE — Masquerade (Hell), Fri. Nov. 22. Industrial rock supergroup Pigface formed in 1990 after Ministry’s The Mind is a Terrible Thing to Taste tour, when drummer Martin Atkins decided they should continue to  expand on what Al Jourgensen only hinted at. The revolving door of musicians collaborated with other industrial rockers like Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails, who co-wrote and sang “Suck,” a Pigface underground hit. Known to put on performances just as electrifying as their sound, Pigface might include up to 10 musicians on the stage at a time. They are also known to bring up audience members during their encore sets. $29.50. 8 p.m. — LS

OF MONTREAL AT OVER/UNDER MUSIC FEST — Monday Night Brewing Garage, Sat. Nov. 23. — Nudity, a white horse, shimmying and shaking, disco lights — anything is possible with an Of Montreal show, so draw a ticket out of the hat to see what you get! This indie rock band from Athens, GA with a penchant for disco flare, funky vocal enunciation, and distortion are also known for progressive song subjects, particularly concerning sex and gender roles. Some examples include “Paranoiac Intervals/Body Dysmorphia” and “Sophie Calle Private Game/Every Person Is a Pussy and Every Pussy Is a Star!” from their newest record White is Relic/Irrealis Mood. They are taking this record and its messages across the U.S. this fall, with dynamic and engaging performances that will leave you sweaty, enamored, and free. $40-$85. 4 p.m. — NL

SUGAR CANDY MOUNTAIN, KIBI JAMES, PINKEST — Drunken Unicorn, Sat. Nov. 23. Let your body sway and your mind wander as Sugar Candy Mountain creates psychedelic sounds. A neo-psych pop group from Oakland, CA, that formed in 2010, with the rise of psychedelic riffs into the mainstream, the group has only moved further in this unhinged direction. Their newest single, “My Clown,” dials up the psychedelia to the max, with heavy reverb and delays on the vocals, the introduction of bongos, and a disjointed song structure that stumbles endearingly along before finding itself complete and in harmony by the final lines. Expect a night of vocals like lullabies and instrumentals like stimulants — the crossfading you don’t have to light up for. $10-$12. 9 p.m. — NL

THREE WOMEN AND THE TRUTH, WITH JAIMEE HARRIS AND BARRY WALSH — City Winery, Sat. Nov. 30. And the truth will be delivered from three fine songwriters performing together. Eliza Gilkyson has a clear perspective of the human condition, yet delivers her message with a palatable wit and charm. Gretchen Peters is a member of the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, with multiple hits — intelligent, thoughtful hits — written for many great artists. Americana artist Mary Gauthier is never the dark horse in this accomplished trio, and her recent album of songs (Rifles & Rosary Beads, 2018) co-written with military veterans is simply astounding in its depth. $22-$32. 8 p.m.— JK
 

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Wednesday November 13, 2019 12:20 pm EST
A selection of what to see in Atlanta this month | more...
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  string(71) "‘Atlanta Millionaires Club’ blends intimacy, Americana, and R&B"
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  string(5172) "Faye Webster is hitting her stride. When Creative Loafing caught up with her in 2017, the then 17-year-old singer and songwriter was capturing attention around the city, playing songs from her self-titled sophomore outing via Awful Records. The lone folkie in a crowd of left-field hip-hop rhymesmiths and producers, Webster stood apart by crafting a sophisticated blend of Americana and R&B bound by a wry and plainspoken lyrical approach.

Webster is 21 years old now. After garnering a hard-earned national following through extensive touring, she’s back with her most intimate and fully realized album to date, titled Atlanta Millionaires Club, out May 24 via Secretly Canadian.

“I’ve never been that kind of person who can write about somebody else’s experience or a movie I might’ve seen,” Webster says. “I’ve always felt like it needs to come from me and not someone else.”

Introducing herself to the local scene in 2013 with the bluegrass fare of her debut, Run and Tell, Webster built her foundation on the country and folk roots that she grew up with. It wasn’t until joining Awful Records’ roster in 2017, where she joined the ranks of one of the most innovative underground hip-hop collectives Atlanta has seen in recent history, that Webster began finding her voice. Helmed by label mastermind Father, Awful Records made a name for itself by developing psychedelic trap and launching the career of artists such as ABRA, Danger Incorporated, and Playboi Carti.

Webster notes that despite her outsider role, being accepted by Awful proved the eclectic, boundary-pushing nature of the label. Awful Records became a stepping stone for Webster, giving her the courage to take more risks with her sound, and to venture beyond typical genre definitions.

“There’s a kind of beauty in not having to classify my art,” Webster says. “I’m able to make it and let people think whatever they want to think.”

It’s that same attitude that Webster leans into with Atlanta Millionaires Club. Armed with a newfound confidence and time spent honing her craft, she isn’t afraid to open up and let people into whatever she’s going through. Take the album’s opener, “Room Temperature,” in which she laments, “Looks like I’ve been crying again, over the same thing,” accented by Athens mainstay Matt “Pistol” Stoessel’s tear-stained pedal-steel work. His melodies ebb and flow, offering a tongue-in-cheek nostalgia and swooning theatrics during the record’s most lonesome moments.

The songs on the record were written over a two-year period as Webster settled into new stages of her life, leaving school in Nashville and moving into a place of her own in Atlanta, and the music reflects her feelings of existing out of time and place. Songs like “Kingston” and “Right Side of My Neck” function as mementos — souvenirs from a darker emotional place conjured through the solemn strums of her guitar and whispery vocal delivery.

Once Webster had arranged the bones of the songs, she recorded the album in chunks with Drew Vandenberg at Athens’ Chase Park Transduction studio. Webster took her time with the songwriting and recording process, adding new sonic elements and explorations as needed.

“I didn’t want to write another album that was textbook Faye Webster,” she says. “I wanted to give people something new.”

Though Webster’s usual indie-folk style harkens back to her self-titled release, the new record introduces forays into classic Southern R&B as well as some jazz-inflected balladry. This new dynamic is most present on “Jonny,” the centerpiece of the record and one of the most heartbreaking songs Webster has written. Here, she crafts a jazzy, country-soul ballad that lifts her mournful voice into cinematic territory. Full of brass and string flourishes, spine-tingling moments, and theatrics, it’s a love song in spite of itself.

Before launching into the chorus, Webster displays her wry sense of humor when she sings, “I want to find a man with an old name just like me / And get over how my dog is my best friend / And he doesn’t even know what my name is.”

All joking aside, it’s one of the most direct moments on the record, demonstrating a certain vulnerability that’s uncharted for the Atlanta native.

“I probably would’ve been too scared to say the things on my new record in my previous work,” Webster says, “but that’s just something that comes with time.”

From start to finish, Atlanta Millionaires Club is a carefully curated statement of artistic intent. Crafted in the thick of isolation and heartbreak, the album sees Webster emerging with confident control of who she wants to be and the music that she wants to make. She’s no longer trapped behind whatever labels are placed on her; rather, she’s looking forward. Whatever comes next for the songwriter is up to chance, but what’s for certain is that it will be entirely on her own terms.

Faye Webster plays the Earl on Sat., June 29, With Jenny O. $10-$12. 8 p.m. 488 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-522-3950. www.badearl.com.

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Webster is 21 years old now. After garnering a hard-earned national following through extensive touring, she’s back with her most intimate and fully realized album to date, titled ''Atlanta Millionaires Club'', out May 24 via Secretly Canadian.

“I’ve never been that kind of person who can write about somebody else’s experience or a movie I might’ve seen,” Webster says. “I’ve always felt like it needs to come from me and not someone else.”

Introducing herself to the local scene in 2013 with the bluegrass fare of her debut, ''Run and Tell'', Webster built her foundation on the country and folk roots that she grew up with. It wasn’t until joining Awful Records’ roster in 2017, where she joined the ranks of one of the most innovative underground hip-hop collectives Atlanta has seen in recent history, that Webster began finding her voice. Helmed by label mastermind Father, Awful Records made a name for itself by developing psychedelic trap and launching the career of artists such as ABRA, Danger Incorporated, and Playboi Carti.

Webster notes that despite her outsider role, being accepted by Awful proved the eclectic, boundary-pushing nature of the label. Awful Records became a stepping stone for Webster, giving her the courage to take more risks with her sound, and to venture beyond typical genre definitions.

“There’s a kind of beauty in not having to classify my art,” Webster says. “I’m able to make it and let people think whatever they want to think.”

It’s that same attitude that Webster leans into with ''Atlanta Millionaires Club''. Armed with a newfound confidence and time spent honing her craft, she isn’t afraid to open up and let people into whatever she’s going through. Take the album’s opener, “Room Temperature,” in which she laments, “Looks like I’ve been crying again, over the same thing,” accented by Athens mainstay Matt “Pistol” Stoessel’s tear-stained pedal-steel work. His melodies ebb and flow, offering a tongue-in-cheek nostalgia and swooning theatrics during the record’s most lonesome moments.

The songs on the record were written over a two-year period as Webster settled into new stages of her life, leaving school in Nashville and moving into a place of her own in Atlanta, and the music reflects her feelings of existing out of time and place. Songs like “Kingston” and “Right Side of My Neck” function as mementos — souvenirs from a darker emotional place conjured through the solemn strums of her guitar and whispery vocal delivery.

Once Webster had arranged the bones of the songs, she recorded the album in chunks with Drew Vandenberg at Athens’ Chase Park Transduction studio. Webster took her time with the songwriting and recording process, adding new sonic elements and explorations as needed.

“I didn’t want to write another album that was textbook Faye Webster,” she says. “I wanted to give people something new.”

Though Webster’s usual indie-folk style harkens back to her self-titled release, the new record introduces forays into classic Southern R&B as well as some jazz-inflected balladry. This new dynamic is most present on “Jonny,” the centerpiece of the record and one of the most heartbreaking songs Webster has written. Here, she crafts a jazzy, country-soul ballad that lifts her mournful voice into cinematic territory. Full of brass and string flourishes, spine-tingling moments, and theatrics, it’s a love song in spite of itself.

Before launching into the chorus, Webster displays her wry sense of humor when she sings, “I want to find a man with an old name just like me / And get over how my dog is my best friend / And he doesn’t even know what my name is.”

All joking aside, it’s one of the most direct moments on the record, demonstrating a certain vulnerability that’s uncharted for the Atlanta native.

“I probably would’ve been too scared to say the things on my new record in my previous work,” Webster says, “but that’s just something that comes with time.”

From start to finish, ''Atlanta Millionaires Club'' is a carefully curated statement of artistic intent. Crafted in the thick of isolation and heartbreak, the album sees Webster emerging with confident control of who she wants to be and the music that she wants to make. She’s no longer trapped behind whatever labels are placed on her; rather, she’s looking forward. Whatever comes next for the songwriter is up to chance, but what’s for certain is that it will be entirely on her own terms.

''[http://www.badearl.com/events/5112/Faye-Webster|Faye Webster plays the Earl on Sat., June 29, With Jenny O. $10-$12. 8 p.m. 488 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-522-3950. www.badearl.com.]''

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  string(5691) " Music FayeWebster1 1 11  2019-05-24T17:11:23+00:00 Music_FayeWebster1-1_11.jpg     ‘Atlanta Millionaires Club’ blends intimacy, Americana, and R&B 17953  2019-05-24T17:06:28+00:00 Faye Webster returns on her own terms will.cardwell@gmail.com Will Cardwell Jake Van Valkenburg  2019-05-24T17:06:28+00:00  Faye Webster is hitting her stride. When Creative Loafing caught up with her in 2017, the then 17-year-old singer and songwriter was capturing attention around the city, playing songs from her self-titled sophomore outing via Awful Records. The lone folkie in a crowd of left-field hip-hop rhymesmiths and producers, Webster stood apart by crafting a sophisticated blend of Americana and R&B bound by a wry and plainspoken lyrical approach.

Webster is 21 years old now. After garnering a hard-earned national following through extensive touring, she’s back with her most intimate and fully realized album to date, titled Atlanta Millionaires Club, out May 24 via Secretly Canadian.

“I’ve never been that kind of person who can write about somebody else’s experience or a movie I might’ve seen,” Webster says. “I’ve always felt like it needs to come from me and not someone else.”

Introducing herself to the local scene in 2013 with the bluegrass fare of her debut, Run and Tell, Webster built her foundation on the country and folk roots that she grew up with. It wasn’t until joining Awful Records’ roster in 2017, where she joined the ranks of one of the most innovative underground hip-hop collectives Atlanta has seen in recent history, that Webster began finding her voice. Helmed by label mastermind Father, Awful Records made a name for itself by developing psychedelic trap and launching the career of artists such as ABRA, Danger Incorporated, and Playboi Carti.

Webster notes that despite her outsider role, being accepted by Awful proved the eclectic, boundary-pushing nature of the label. Awful Records became a stepping stone for Webster, giving her the courage to take more risks with her sound, and to venture beyond typical genre definitions.

“There’s a kind of beauty in not having to classify my art,” Webster says. “I’m able to make it and let people think whatever they want to think.”

It’s that same attitude that Webster leans into with Atlanta Millionaires Club. Armed with a newfound confidence and time spent honing her craft, she isn’t afraid to open up and let people into whatever she’s going through. Take the album’s opener, “Room Temperature,” in which she laments, “Looks like I’ve been crying again, over the same thing,” accented by Athens mainstay Matt “Pistol” Stoessel’s tear-stained pedal-steel work. His melodies ebb and flow, offering a tongue-in-cheek nostalgia and swooning theatrics during the record’s most lonesome moments.

The songs on the record were written over a two-year period as Webster settled into new stages of her life, leaving school in Nashville and moving into a place of her own in Atlanta, and the music reflects her feelings of existing out of time and place. Songs like “Kingston” and “Right Side of My Neck” function as mementos — souvenirs from a darker emotional place conjured through the solemn strums of her guitar and whispery vocal delivery.

Once Webster had arranged the bones of the songs, she recorded the album in chunks with Drew Vandenberg at Athens’ Chase Park Transduction studio. Webster took her time with the songwriting and recording process, adding new sonic elements and explorations as needed.

“I didn’t want to write another album that was textbook Faye Webster,” she says. “I wanted to give people something new.”

Though Webster’s usual indie-folk style harkens back to her self-titled release, the new record introduces forays into classic Southern R&B as well as some jazz-inflected balladry. This new dynamic is most present on “Jonny,” the centerpiece of the record and one of the most heartbreaking songs Webster has written. Here, she crafts a jazzy, country-soul ballad that lifts her mournful voice into cinematic territory. Full of brass and string flourishes, spine-tingling moments, and theatrics, it’s a love song in spite of itself.

Before launching into the chorus, Webster displays her wry sense of humor when she sings, “I want to find a man with an old name just like me / And get over how my dog is my best friend / And he doesn’t even know what my name is.”

All joking aside, it’s one of the most direct moments on the record, demonstrating a certain vulnerability that’s uncharted for the Atlanta native.

“I probably would’ve been too scared to say the things on my new record in my previous work,” Webster says, “but that’s just something that comes with time.”

From start to finish, Atlanta Millionaires Club is a carefully curated statement of artistic intent. Crafted in the thick of isolation and heartbreak, the album sees Webster emerging with confident control of who she wants to be and the music that she wants to make. She’s no longer trapped behind whatever labels are placed on her; rather, she’s looking forward. Whatever comes next for the songwriter is up to chance, but what’s for certain is that it will be entirely on her own terms.

Faye Webster plays the Earl on Sat., June 29, With Jenny O. $10-$12. 8 p.m. 488 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-522-3950. www.badearl.com.

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Friday May 24, 2019 01:06 pm EDT
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Thursday January 10, 2019 11:46 am EST
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  string(1317) " SeeDo Music2 1 17  2018-12-16T18:40:43+00:00 SeeDo_Music2-1_17.jpg     Two outlier artists explore the far reaches of ghostly music Dec. 17 11958  2018-12-16T18:32:17+00:00 Lonnie Holley and Mary Lattimore play the Bakery chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford  Jake Van Valkenburg Jake Van Valkenburg 2018-12-16T18:32:17+00:00  Transcendence and discord find their crossroads within the music of Lonnie Holley and Mary Lattimore. Holley has held a long, fruitful career in visual art and music by finding meaning in time-worn and discarded found objects. MITH, his latest album, is a meditation on the current state of American social and political affairs expressed through dark hues of noise and poignant stream-of-consciousness folk musings. Lattimore is an acclaimed harpist out of Los Angeles who has worked with everyone from Thurston Moore to Jarvis Cocker. Conjuring both the ethereal and the pastoral, Lattimore’s virtuosity pushes the musical envelope with humbling precision.

$12. 8 p.m. Mon., Dec. 17. The Bakery, 825 Warner St. S.W. www.thebakeryatlanta.com.



     Jackie Lee Young HARP IN THE SOUTH: Mary Lattimore (pictured above) joins Lonnie Holley for an evening of ethereal and pastoral music.                                   Lonnie Holley and Mary Lattimore play the Bakery "
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Sunday December 16, 2018 01:32 pm EST
Two outlier artists explore the far reaches of ghostly music Dec. 17 | more...
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  string(4524) "Yukons’ singer and guitarist José Joaquin Izaguirre, drummer Danielle Dollar, and bass player Han Lenkey write urgent, evocative songs that are sung in both Spanish and English. Each number is set to infectious concoctions of guitar-heavy garage punk, culminating in what the group calls ‘Latinx expression rock.’ In March, the group released a cassette EP, South of the Equator. Songs such as “Nueva,” “Pa’Lante,” and “Toolbox (the way she thinks)” are bound by a DIY sensibility. Energetic live performances reinvigorate the age-old ideal that a band can play a vital role in improving its surroundings. For much of the last year, the group has been on the road, touring the East Coast, and carving out a definitive place in Atlanta’s young post-punk scene. While working on new music, all three members took a few minutes from their busy schedule to talk about the year gone by and what the future holds in store.



How has this year been for you all? Stressful? Fun?Danielle Dollar: All the shows were super fun. I don’t feel stressed when it comes to getting together — it’s more like, ‘Okay, let’s do this.’

José Joaquín Izaguirre: The only stressful things are things we do other than being a band, like life, family, school, and work. Life has other things that make it stressful. Music is fun.

How did your first East Coast tour go?
DD: It definitely gave us an appreciation for Atlanta. It’s a cool community here; not just music, but art too. It made us reflect on what we have here, and it pushed us to do more.

Han Lenkey: We usually know how we’re going to be received here because we’ve played enough to know the kind of reception we get. But to have other people responding to our music in different places … It’s interesting to see the reaction of the crowd depending on the time and place. We needed that.

How have you seen Atlanta change?
JJI: There are more artists making music in Spanish. That’s just a fact. There are bands like Elevator Chat and Kibi James making music in Spanish. If there’s anything I would hope to change, it’s the amount of diversity in the music scene. There should be more music sung in other languages. Things are always changing though. Venues close, new venues open up. That changes everything, in a way.

What are you doing differently with the new recording?
DD: Our musicality is stretching, and it's going in a lot more directions on the new album. South of the Equator was like one giant statement saying, “Hey we’re Yukons! This is us.” Now we’re getting to be like, “Hey we’re Yukons, we also get sad sometimes.” It’s almost gonna be like every song is a different vibe or feeling, but they all coexist with each other.

JJI: We're still curating. But there are hints of psychedelia and garage rock. There are some sounds inspired by the Venezuelan Tonada folk music as well.

What was your intention with South of the Equator and how did you approach the new album differently?
JJI: We were introducing ourselves to people, especially locally. With the new one, it feels like we’re still introducing ourselves. I think we’re always going to be introducing ourselves.

The intention with the new one is to be more specific and cover a wider range of things without going crazy. … There are different songs and different genres, but we’re also not going to be recording with someone else. It’s going to make us more efficient, but it’ll be a learning experience between the three of us.

You’ve previously mentioned that you wanted to be more transparent and intimate with the new album. Can you elaborate?
JJI: We think of it as intimate because we have so much time to make it on our own. All that time makes us have this desire to fill in as many gaps about ourselves as possible. From social-political frustrations, to ecstatic love, to depression and nihilism, to apologies and concessions. I think if I'm expressing social frustrations and dissatisfactions with the people around me and the world I live in, I have to also look within myself and expose truths, and recognize that in many ways I'm also part of the problem. Just gotta be transparent — for the sake of the music and for my own sake.

Any hopes for the new year?
DD: Play more cool shows. Hope our country gets its shit together.

JJI: We’re planning to play some shows in Mexico — we hope that happens in 2019.

HL: Can’t stop, won’t stop, don’t know how to stop."
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~~#000000:__How has this year been for you all? Stressful? Fun?__Danielle Dollar:~~ All the shows were super fun. I don’t feel stressed when it comes to getting together — it’s more like, ‘Okay, let’s do this.’

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~~#000000:__How did your first East Coast tour go?__~~
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~~#000000:__How have you seen Atlanta change?__~~
~~#000000:JJI:~~ There are more artists making music in Spanish. That’s just a fact. There are bands like Elevator Chat and Kibi James making music in Spanish. If there’s anything I would hope to change, it’s the amount of diversity in the music scene. There should be more music sung in other languages. Things are always changing though. Venues close, new venues open up. That changes everything, in a way.

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~~#000000:__What was your intention with ''South of the Equator'' and how did you approach the new album differently?__~~
~~#000000:JJI:~~ We were introducing ourselves to people, especially locally. With the new one, it feels like we’re still introducing ourselves. I think we’re always going to be introducing ourselves.

The intention with the new one is to be more specific and cover a wider range of things without going crazy. … There are different songs and different genres, but we’re also not going to be recording with someone else. It’s going to make us more efficient, but it’ll be a learning experience between the three of us.

~~#000000:__You’ve previously mentioned that you wanted to be more transparent and intimate with the new album. Can you elaborate?__~~
~~#000000:JJI:~~ We think of it as intimate because we have so much time to make it on our own. All that time makes us have this desire to fill in as many gaps about ourselves as possible. From social-political frustrations, to ecstatic love, to depression and nihilism, to apologies and concessions. I think if I'm expressing social frustrations and dissatisfactions with the people around me and the world I live in, I have to also look within myself and expose truths, and recognize that in many ways I'm also part of the problem. Just gotta be transparent — for the sake of the music and for my own sake.

~~#000000:__Any hopes for the new year?__~~
~~#000000:DD:~~ Play more cool shows. Hope our country gets its shit together.

~~#000000:JJI:~~ We’re planning to play some shows in Mexico — we hope that happens in 2019.

~~#000000:HL:~~ Can’t stop, won’t stop, don’t know how to stop."
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  string(5030) " Music Yukons2 1 17  2018-12-12T20:48:30+00:00 Music_Yukons2-1_17.jpg     The ‘Latinx expression rock’ trio talks new music and a new year 11887  2018-12-12T22:55:00+00:00 Yukons look to the future chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford  Jake Van Valkenburg Jake Van Valkenburg 2018-12-12T22:55:00+00:00  Yukons’ singer and guitarist José Joaquin Izaguirre, drummer Danielle Dollar, and bass player Han Lenkey write urgent, evocative songs that are sung in both Spanish and English. Each number is set to infectious concoctions of guitar-heavy garage punk, culminating in what the group calls ‘Latinx expression rock.’ In March, the group released a cassette EP, South of the Equator. Songs such as “Nueva,” “Pa’Lante,” and “Toolbox (the way she thinks)” are bound by a DIY sensibility. Energetic live performances reinvigorate the age-old ideal that a band can play a vital role in improving its surroundings. For much of the last year, the group has been on the road, touring the East Coast, and carving out a definitive place in Atlanta’s young post-punk scene. While working on new music, all three members took a few minutes from their busy schedule to talk about the year gone by and what the future holds in store.



How has this year been for you all? Stressful? Fun?Danielle Dollar: All the shows were super fun. I don’t feel stressed when it comes to getting together — it’s more like, ‘Okay, let’s do this.’

José Joaquín Izaguirre: The only stressful things are things we do other than being a band, like life, family, school, and work. Life has other things that make it stressful. Music is fun.

How did your first East Coast tour go?
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How have you seen Atlanta change?
JJI: There are more artists making music in Spanish. That’s just a fact. There are bands like Elevator Chat and Kibi James making music in Spanish. If there’s anything I would hope to change, it’s the amount of diversity in the music scene. There should be more music sung in other languages. Things are always changing though. Venues close, new venues open up. That changes everything, in a way.

What are you doing differently with the new recording?
DD: Our musicality is stretching, and it's going in a lot more directions on the new album. South of the Equator was like one giant statement saying, “Hey we’re Yukons! This is us.” Now we’re getting to be like, “Hey we’re Yukons, we also get sad sometimes.” It’s almost gonna be like every song is a different vibe or feeling, but they all coexist with each other.

JJI: We're still curating. But there are hints of psychedelia and garage rock. There are some sounds inspired by the Venezuelan Tonada folk music as well.

What was your intention with South of the Equator and how did you approach the new album differently?
JJI: We were introducing ourselves to people, especially locally. With the new one, it feels like we’re still introducing ourselves. I think we’re always going to be introducing ourselves.

The intention with the new one is to be more specific and cover a wider range of things without going crazy. … There are different songs and different genres, but we’re also not going to be recording with someone else. It’s going to make us more efficient, but it’ll be a learning experience between the three of us.

You’ve previously mentioned that you wanted to be more transparent and intimate with the new album. Can you elaborate?
JJI: We think of it as intimate because we have so much time to make it on our own. All that time makes us have this desire to fill in as many gaps about ourselves as possible. From social-political frustrations, to ecstatic love, to depression and nihilism, to apologies and concessions. I think if I'm expressing social frustrations and dissatisfactions with the people around me and the world I live in, I have to also look within myself and expose truths, and recognize that in many ways I'm also part of the problem. Just gotta be transparent — for the sake of the music and for my own sake.

Any hopes for the new year?
DD: Play more cool shows. Hope our country gets its shit together.

JJI: We’re planning to play some shows in Mexico — we hope that happens in 2019.

HL: Can’t stop, won’t stop, don’t know how to stop.    Miranda James Corless SOUTH OF THE EQUATOR: Yukons are José Joaquín Izaguirre (from left), Danielle Dollar, and Han Lenkey.                                   Yukons look to the future "
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Wednesday December 12, 2018 05:55 pm EST
The ‘Latinx expression rock’ trio talks new music and a new year | more...
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