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Win tickets to see Liturgy!

The black metal band plays the Masquerade on Sun., April 5.



Brooklyn-based experimental black metal outfit Liturgy is playing a show at the Masquerade this Sun., April 5, and Crib Notes has one pair of tickets to give away. Be the first person to leave the correct answer to the following question in the comments section of this post and the tickets are yours.

What was the title of the treatise that frontman Hunter Hunt-Hendrix delivered at a symposium in 2009?

Go!

With Sannhet and Horse Lords. $12. 7 p.m. Sun., April 5. The Masquerade. 404-577-8178. www.masqueradeatlanta.com.



More By This Writer

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Article

Tuesday September 19, 2017 06:06 pm EDT
Atlanta's rock and soul disciples celebrate Stax Records 60th anniversary | more...
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  ["title"]=>
  string(41) "Art School Jocks are not a damn girl band"
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  string(62) "The bedroom pop outfit eclipses musical and gender stereotypes"
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  string(62) "The bedroom pop outfit eclipses musical and gender stereotypes"
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During a recent Art Schools Jocks show at 529, a conversation was overheard on the crowded outdoor patio: One concertgoer turned to a friend to ask if he'd heard the band's music before.

Art School Jocks play a blend of lo-fi pop and post-punk that's danceable and often politically-charged. The friend shrugged. "They're kind of like the Coathangers, right?" he said, referring to the Atlanta garage rock act.

Nope. The two acts don't have many musical qualities in common at all, except for one thing: they're all women.

Art School Jocks' warped pop caught the ears of Miami/San Francisco-based indie label Father/Daughter Records in March. Signing with the label placed them on a roster alongside left-of-pop artists like Diet Cig, Leapling, and Sports (as well as the recently excised PWR BTTM).

The group's members, Dianna Settles (guitar, vocals), Deborah Hudson (guitar, vocals), Camille Lindsley (bass, vocals) and Ali Bragg (drums, vocals), have played together since 2015, but received exponential hype in recent months. In March, their debut single "Just a Gwen" premiered on NPR's "All Songs Considered,?۝ garnering national attention leading up to the June 3 release of Art School Jocks' self-titled EP. Last year, NYLON magazine featured the band on a list of "5 Women-Fronted Punk Bands We're Obsessed With,?۝ and the much-hyped "Just a Gwen" was recently featured on a Spotify playlist titled "Badass Women.?۝

No value assignedSuch promotional pressure is both a blessing and a curse. In an industry that still trivializes women artists, it's too easy for an all-woman project to get stuck in simple "girl band" categories, even though the women within these categories differ wildly in style, aesthetic and experiences. Would Led Zeppelin be lumped into the same musical genre as the Beatles?

 These separate, women-only categories ostensibly fight a lack of representation, but isolating artists like Art School Jocks on the basis of gender assumes they wouldn't be able to stand out otherwise and can result in a disparity of critical response. This pigeonholing raises a few questions: Does Art School Jocks garner attention because it's a noteworthy and innovative band, or because it's an all-woman band? 

The band's members themselves question the hype they're receiving, but not because they think it's undeserved. 

Settles wonders if their gender plays a part in the attention, but laughs when recounting a conversation with a friend about the attention. "He started cracking up and said, 'I'm just thinking of how many friends in bands that I know that are all dudes who would never question the amount of hype that they were getting.'?۝

Mostly, they try not to worry about it. 

"As long as it doesn't keep us from what we're doing, I personally don't give a shit," Bragg says. 

Fair enough.

No value assigned

The band members have drastically far-flung musical backgrounds: Hudson strummed Pavement-inspired guitar in indie band Places to Hide; Lindsley raised hell in noise rock group Savant; and Settles, who also owns Hi-Lo Press, grew her activist voice in folk-punk outfit the Wild. This is the first project for Bragg, who grew up in Mexico and played in school drumlines from a young age. 

It's also the first time each band member has played with such a diverse mix of influences, and with only women. Hudson notes the differences from playing in a scene dominated by men.

"Previously, my creative voice was a little bit submissive because it felt like it had to be," Hudson says. "But playing music with these folks, I just feel super comfortable knowing that we have that particular intersection of experience.?۝

Settles agrees, explaining how each band members has more room to explore. "There's a lot of checking in with each other, airing suggestions," she says. "Allowing for those ideas to take place in the first place, and be given their own moment to reflect on it.?۝

That comfort and exploration culminates on the band's eponymous EP, a steady effort full of dissonant pop hooks over angular grooves. The catchy "Suffering Prom?۝ gives whiplash over the song's various tempo changes, oscillating between an upbeat post-punk rhythm and a drawling segment complete with slightly-sarcastic '60s girl-group "oohs" and "aahs." Social politics are central to their material as well: "Catdog" explores the tensions of social behavior, reflected in simultaneously rising and falling melodic lines, while the perplexing "Nina?۝ calls attention to the Black Lives Matter movement. But the members aren't just talk: Hudson recently helped organize a concert to raise awareness about Tent City, a now defunct protest camp near Turner Field concerned with housing rights issues and gentrification in the area. The band has raised that issue frequently at recent shows as well as on its social media pages.



Art School Jocks by Art School Jocks


"Just a Gwen" is perhaps Art School Jocks' most artistically successful track so far, with its addictive, purposefully monotonous melody that chronicles the regular checklist women follow to avoid violence and harassment. "Cover your legs up/Watch your drink/In fact just never let them buy you a drink," Settles drones, dispassionately. "Smile back and/Say you're sorry/You shouldn't be out this late alone." 

The song is deceptively simple. Guitars are heavy with distortion, echoing a twisted culture that places the onus on women to protect themselves by dressing less provocatively or not walking home alone  instead of changing the offenders or the culture itself. 

Settles drew inspiration from her daily life to write the lyrics. She used to work at a restaurant and remembers constantly asking male employees to walk outside with her to take out the trash or go to her car.

"These are just nightly reminders that stack up on being raised with those incessant 'safety tips,'" she says. "It's frustrating to realize how much of that is all put on the shoulders of the person that's likely to face some sort of attack, rather than on those who would perpetrate it.?۝

The song's title, a reference to No Doubt's 1995 pop anthem "Just a Girl," doubles down on the idea.

"That song is now 20 years old, somehow, and it's just  God, how long do we have to fucking say this shit?" Settles laughs mirthlessly.

In the 22 years since "Just a Girl" was released, critical responses to all-women groups seemingly haven't changed much either. Women artists like Art School Jocks are still too-often only being compared to each other. This promising group of musicians is already being unfairly shoved into "Badass Women" boxes, but their raw talent is what might take them to a wider audience  not just their genders.

The band members would rather focus on producing something that's true to their vision than on what does or doesn't happen with the hype machine.  

"As long as we feel that our voice is authentic, I think it doesn't matter what the response is," Lindsley says.

%{data-embed-type=%22image%22 data-embed-id=%225940476b39ab46663f8b457c%22 data-embed-element=%22span%22 data-embed-size=%22640w%22 contenteditable=%22false%22}%"
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During a recent [https://fatherdaughterrecords.bandcamp.com/album/art-school-jocks|Art Schools Jocks] show at 529, a conversation was overheard on the crowded outdoor patio: One concertgoer turned to a friend to ask if he'd heard the band's music before.

Art School Jocks play a blend of lo-fi pop and post-punk that's danceable and often politically-charged. The friend shrugged. "They're kind of like [http://www.creativeloafing.com/music/article/13086955/10-years-in-the-trenches-with-the-coathangers|the Coathangers], right?" he said, referring to the Atlanta garage rock act.

Nope. The two acts don't have many musical qualities in common at all, except for one thing: they're all women.

Art School Jocks' warped pop caught the ears of Miami/San Francisco-based indie label [http://www.fatherdaughterrecords.com/|Father/Daughter Records] in March. Signing with the label placed them on a roster alongside left-of-pop artists like Diet Cig, Leapling, and Sports (as well as the recently excised PWR BTTM).

The group's members, Dianna Settles (guitar, vocals), Deborah Hudson (guitar, vocals), Camille Lindsley (bass, vocals) and Ali Bragg (drums, vocals), have played together since 2015, but received exponential hype in recent months. In March, their debut single [http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2017/03/29/521774342/art-school-jocks-catchy-just-a-gwen-is-rolling-its-eyes-at-you|"Just a Gwen" premiered on NPR's "All Songs Considered,?۝] garnering national attention leading up to the June 3 release of Art School Jocks' self-titled EP. Last year, ''NYLON'' magazine featured the band on a list of [http://www.nylon.com/articles/female-fronted-punk-bands|"5 Women-Fronted Punk Bands We're Obsessed With,?۝] and the much-hyped "Just a Gwen" was recently featured on a Spotify playlist titled "Badass Women.?۝

%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="594047b235ab46e967a61306" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="320w" data-embed-align="right" contenteditable="false" ]}%Such promotional pressure is both a blessing and a curse. In an industry that still trivializes women artists, it's too easy for an all-woman project to get stuck in simple "girl band" categories, even though the women within these categories differ wildly in style, aesthetic and experiences. Would Led Zeppelin be lumped into the same musical genre as the Beatles?

 These separate, women-only categories ostensibly fight a lack of representation, but isolating artists like Art School Jocks on the basis of gender assumes they wouldn't be able to stand out otherwise and can result in a disparity of critical response. This pigeonholing raises a few questions: Does Art School Jocks garner attention because it's a noteworthy and innovative band, or because it's an all-woman band? 

The band's members themselves question the hype they're receiving, but not because they think it's undeserved. 

Settles wonders if their gender plays a part in the attention, but laughs when recounting a conversation with a friend about the attention. "He started cracking up and said, 'I'm just thinking of how many friends in bands that I know that are all dudes who would never question the amount of hype that they were getting.'?۝

Mostly, they try not to worry about it. 

"As long as it doesn't keep us from what we're doing, I personally don't give a shit," Bragg says. 

Fair enough.

%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="594047b235ab460265a6134d" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="640w" contenteditable="false" ]}%

The band members have drastically far-flung musical backgrounds: Hudson strummed Pavement-inspired guitar in indie band Places to Hide; Lindsley raised hell in noise rock group Savant; and Settles, who also owns [http://www.hilopress.com/|Hi-Lo Press], grew her activist voice in folk-punk outfit the Wild. This is the first project for Bragg, who grew up in Mexico and played in school drumlines from a young age. 

It's also the first time each band member has played with such a diverse mix of influences, and with only women. Hudson notes the differences from playing in a scene dominated by men.

"Previously, my creative voice was a little bit submissive because it felt like it had to be," Hudson says. "But playing music with these folks, I just feel super comfortable knowing that we have that particular intersection of experience.?۝

Settles agrees, explaining how each band members has more room to explore. "There's a lot of checking in with each other, airing suggestions," she says. "Allowing for those ideas to take place in the first place, and be given their own moment to reflect on it.?۝

That comfort and exploration culminates on the band's eponymous EP, a steady effort full of dissonant pop hooks over angular grooves. The catchy [https://fatherdaughterrecords.bandcamp.com/track/suffering-prom|"Suffering Prom?۝] gives whiplash over the song's various tempo changes, oscillating between an upbeat post-punk rhythm and a drawling segment complete with slightly-sarcastic '60s girl-group "oohs" and "aahs." Social politics are central to their material as well: "Catdog" explores the tensions of social behavior, reflected in simultaneously rising and falling melodic lines, while the perplexing [https://fatherdaughterrecords.bandcamp.com/track/nina|"Nina?۝] calls attention to the Black Lives Matter movement. But the members aren't just talk: Hudson recently helped organize a concert to raise awareness about Tent City, a now defunct protest camp near Turner Field concerned with housing rights issues and gentrification in the area. The band has raised that issue frequently at recent shows as well as on its social media pages.



[http://fatherdaughterrecords.bandcamp.com/album/art-school-jocks|Art School Jocks by Art School Jocks]


"Just a Gwen" is perhaps Art School Jocks' most artistically successful track so far, with its addictive, purposefully monotonous melody that chronicles the regular checklist women follow to avoid violence and harassment. "Cover your legs up/Watch your drink/In fact just never let them buy you a drink," Settles drones, dispassionately. "Smile back and/Say you're sorry/You shouldn't be out this late alone." 

The song is deceptively simple. Guitars are heavy with distortion, echoing a twisted culture that places the onus on women to protect themselves by dressing less provocatively or not walking home alone  instead of changing the offenders or the culture itself. 

Settles drew inspiration from her daily life to write the lyrics. She used to work at a restaurant and remembers constantly asking male employees to walk outside with her to take out the trash or go to her car.

"These are just nightly reminders that stack up on being raised with those incessant 'safety tips,'" she says. "It's frustrating to realize how much of that is all put on the shoulders of the person that's likely to face some sort of attack, rather than on those who would perpetrate it.?۝

The song's title, a reference to No Doubt's 1995 pop anthem "Just a Girl," doubles down on the idea.

"That song is now 20 years old, somehow, and it's just  God, how long do we have to fucking say this shit?" Settles laughs mirthlessly.

In the 22 years since "Just a Girl" was released, critical responses to all-women groups seemingly haven't changed much either. Women artists like Art School Jocks are still too-often only being compared to each other. This promising group of musicians is already being unfairly shoved into "Badass Women" boxes, but their raw talent is what might take them to a wider audience  not just their genders.

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"As long as we feel that [our voice is authentic], I think it doesn't matter what the response is," Lindsley says.

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During a recent Art Schools Jocks show at 529, a conversation was overheard on the crowded outdoor patio: One concertgoer turned to a friend to ask if he'd heard the band's music before.

Art School Jocks play a blend of lo-fi pop and post-punk that's danceable and often politically-charged. The friend shrugged. "They're kind of like the Coathangers, right?" he said, referring to the Atlanta garage rock act.

Nope. The two acts don't have many musical qualities in common at all, except for one thing: they're all women.

Art School Jocks' warped pop caught the ears of Miami/San Francisco-based indie label Father/Daughter Records in March. Signing with the label placed them on a roster alongside left-of-pop artists like Diet Cig, Leapling, and Sports (as well as the recently excised PWR BTTM).

The group's members, Dianna Settles (guitar, vocals), Deborah Hudson (guitar, vocals), Camille Lindsley (bass, vocals) and Ali Bragg (drums, vocals), have played together since 2015, but received exponential hype in recent months. In March, their debut single "Just a Gwen" premiered on NPR's "All Songs Considered,?۝ garnering national attention leading up to the June 3 release of Art School Jocks' self-titled EP. Last year, NYLON magazine featured the band on a list of "5 Women-Fronted Punk Bands We're Obsessed With,?۝ and the much-hyped "Just a Gwen" was recently featured on a Spotify playlist titled "Badass Women.?۝

No value assignedSuch promotional pressure is both a blessing and a curse. In an industry that still trivializes women artists, it's too easy for an all-woman project to get stuck in simple "girl band" categories, even though the women within these categories differ wildly in style, aesthetic and experiences. Would Led Zeppelin be lumped into the same musical genre as the Beatles?

 These separate, women-only categories ostensibly fight a lack of representation, but isolating artists like Art School Jocks on the basis of gender assumes they wouldn't be able to stand out otherwise and can result in a disparity of critical response. This pigeonholing raises a few questions: Does Art School Jocks garner attention because it's a noteworthy and innovative band, or because it's an all-woman band? 

The band's members themselves question the hype they're receiving, but not because they think it's undeserved. 

Settles wonders if their gender plays a part in the attention, but laughs when recounting a conversation with a friend about the attention. "He started cracking up and said, 'I'm just thinking of how many friends in bands that I know that are all dudes who would never question the amount of hype that they were getting.'?۝

Mostly, they try not to worry about it. 

"As long as it doesn't keep us from what we're doing, I personally don't give a shit," Bragg says. 

Fair enough.

No value assigned

The band members have drastically far-flung musical backgrounds: Hudson strummed Pavement-inspired guitar in indie band Places to Hide; Lindsley raised hell in noise rock group Savant; and Settles, who also owns Hi-Lo Press, grew her activist voice in folk-punk outfit the Wild. This is the first project for Bragg, who grew up in Mexico and played in school drumlines from a young age. 

It's also the first time each band member has played with such a diverse mix of influences, and with only women. Hudson notes the differences from playing in a scene dominated by men.

"Previously, my creative voice was a little bit submissive because it felt like it had to be," Hudson says. "But playing music with these folks, I just feel super comfortable knowing that we have that particular intersection of experience.?۝

Settles agrees, explaining how each band members has more room to explore. "There's a lot of checking in with each other, airing suggestions," she says. "Allowing for those ideas to take place in the first place, and be given their own moment to reflect on it.?۝

That comfort and exploration culminates on the band's eponymous EP, a steady effort full of dissonant pop hooks over angular grooves. The catchy "Suffering Prom?۝ gives whiplash over the song's various tempo changes, oscillating between an upbeat post-punk rhythm and a drawling segment complete with slightly-sarcastic '60s girl-group "oohs" and "aahs." Social politics are central to their material as well: "Catdog" explores the tensions of social behavior, reflected in simultaneously rising and falling melodic lines, while the perplexing "Nina?۝ calls attention to the Black Lives Matter movement. But the members aren't just talk: Hudson recently helped organize a concert to raise awareness about Tent City, a now defunct protest camp near Turner Field concerned with housing rights issues and gentrification in the area. The band has raised that issue frequently at recent shows as well as on its social media pages.



Art School Jocks by Art School Jocks


"Just a Gwen" is perhaps Art School Jocks' most artistically successful track so far, with its addictive, purposefully monotonous melody that chronicles the regular checklist women follow to avoid violence and harassment. "Cover your legs up/Watch your drink/In fact just never let them buy you a drink," Settles drones, dispassionately. "Smile back and/Say you're sorry/You shouldn't be out this late alone." 

The song is deceptively simple. Guitars are heavy with distortion, echoing a twisted culture that places the onus on women to protect themselves by dressing less provocatively or not walking home alone  instead of changing the offenders or the culture itself. 

Settles drew inspiration from her daily life to write the lyrics. She used to work at a restaurant and remembers constantly asking male employees to walk outside with her to take out the trash or go to her car.

"These are just nightly reminders that stack up on being raised with those incessant 'safety tips,'" she says. "It's frustrating to realize how much of that is all put on the shoulders of the person that's likely to face some sort of attack, rather than on those who would perpetrate it.?۝

The song's title, a reference to No Doubt's 1995 pop anthem "Just a Girl," doubles down on the idea.

"That song is now 20 years old, somehow, and it's just  God, how long do we have to fucking say this shit?" Settles laughs mirthlessly.

In the 22 years since "Just a Girl" was released, critical responses to all-women groups seemingly haven't changed much either. Women artists like Art School Jocks are still too-often only being compared to each other. This promising group of musicians is already being unfairly shoved into "Badass Women" boxes, but their raw talent is what might take them to a wider audience  not just their genders.

The band members would rather focus on producing something that's true to their vision than on what does or doesn't happen with the hype machine.  

"As long as we feel that our voice is authentic, I think it doesn't matter what the response is," Lindsley says.

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Saturday June 3, 2017 12:55 pm EDT
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It's one long day of music, games, contests and PBR at beloved neighborhood dive bar 97 Estoria's annual music festival. [https://www.facebook.com/events/1346280355461086/|Estoriafest] returns this year with a strong lineup of local acts, vendors, DJs and more that cater to its rowdy regulars (and new yuppie neighbors). Fuzzy alt-rock foursome Big Jesus, who released debut LP ''Oneiric'' last fall, headline a seven-band bill, with local notables such as psychedelic rock trio Midnight Larks and dance-able Dot.s. Beltline construction in the area is still underway, so walking or using alternative forms of transit are, as always, a good idea.

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Thursday June 1, 2017 05:11 pm EDT
Big Jesus, Midnight Larks, Dot.s and more headline Cabbagetown's annual day of music | more...
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Emma Rubenstein is a perfect party host. Even when it’s a really big party, with live bands and scores of people crammed into her house, that she and her roommates throw at least once a month. 



On a balmy February evening in southeast Atlanta, Rubenstein and her roommates clean countertops, replenish toilet paper, and start the popcorn machine in the spacious basement of their four-bedroom house. Arthur Cabral illuminates a movie projector next to the makeshift stage, where red-colored lights shine down, while Abigail Popwell sets up a machine on her bedroom windowsill that rains foamy bubbles over the fire pit in the backyard. 



“We want people to feel warm and welcome,” Popwell says. 



“This is my home,” Rubenstein adds. “I don’t want people to be uncomfortable.” 



The Casa Nova is one of the newer additions to Atlanta’s vibrant do-it-yourself musical landscape. These venues, usually run out of people’s houses, follow previous iterations, like the now-defunct Cleaners and Yellow House, that pop up to fill a void in Atlanta's music scene. 

 

"Trying to play the Earl, or even 529, here is hard if you don’t know a million people, or have all the connections, or haven't been in the scene for a long time,” Rubenstein says. She and Cabral are part of tropical rock act Sad Fish, and the house doubles as a rehearsal space for the roommates’ various musical projects. 



She notes that DIY sites like the Casa Nova can also attract more diverse lineups and audiences than more established venues, because there’s less financial pressure to reel in a certain demographic or to make money through alcohol sales. 



No value assigned“I think it’s just easier for them to not have to worry about giving voices to people that are marginalized because — I’m not saying they’re racist or homophobic or anything — but they’re trying to make money.” Rubenstein says, mentioning other groups like the independent Punk Black that highlights people of color in its lineups. “In general, DIY spaces know it’s harder for these bands traditionally to be booked at bigger venues."



There’s no entry fee for shows at the Casa Nova, except for cash donations at the door, and other than a couple of house-provided six-packs, it’s BYOB. That’s why a house show audience can range from teenagers to grey-flecked 30-somethings, and the lineups can push the boundaries of eclectic: one of its recent shows included a spoken-word rapper from New Orleans, experimental music from Switzerland, and a doom-metal band from Athens. 



Rubenstein, Popwell, Cabral and their fourth roommate, Lyle Baldes, met through Baldes' band Loudermilk & Moon. Rubenstein and Cabral used to throw shows together in their East Atlanta house, until noise complaints from new neighbors in the changing neighborhood threatened to shut it down. Their friend, performance artist and musician Daniel Scoggins, better known as Cousin Dan, recruited them to come fill a house next door to him.  



Their new house in Chosewood Park, located just off Cassanova St., is perfect for throwing shows, Cabral says, with a big yard, thick brick that better keeps noise inside, and a neighborhood where houses are further apart from each other. They’re still getting to know their neighbors, who are mostly families or other musicians. 



Cabral says they all just like hosting. Sometimes, they’ll make food for the guests. “We get worried that people will get hungry,” he says.



“We super Paula Deen-it,” Rubenstein adds. "I can’t help myself.” 



Rubenstein’s Southern hospitality comes from growing up in a Marietta house with her grandmother, a no-nonsense but funny woman who came from Depression-era North Carolina. Grandma Helen always expected the house to be in top shape, with refreshments for visitors at the ready.



Those lessons, and the small touches from all of the Casa Nova’s inhabitants, create warmth in the house that’s palpable at every event. Rubenstein hopes that the younger kids that come to her shows get inspired to do the same.

"I hope it’s creating a drive to keep Atlanta going, because it’s not going to be run by the same people forever," she says.

Peach Coven celebrates A Bloody One-Year Anniversary at the Casa Nova on Sun., March 12. $10 suggested donation. 8:30 p.m. Full moon ceremony and bonfire lead by Sarah Cavrak of Wild Moon Women. Fire dance by Caroline Croland. Musical performances by Femignome, Harlot Party, Casey Hood, Cuntry, Lauren Pararo, Lullahis with Gracie, and A Deer A Horse. Send a message for the address and directions."
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Emma Rubenstein is a perfect party host. Even when it’s a really big party, with live bands and scores of people crammed into her house, that she and her roommates throw at least once a month. 

____

On a balmy February evening in southeast Atlanta, Rubenstein and her roommates clean countertops, replenish toilet paper, and start the popcorn machine in the spacious basement of their four-bedroom house. Arthur Cabral illuminates a movie projector next to the makeshift stage, where red-colored lights shine down, while Abigail Popwell sets up a machine on her bedroom windowsill that rains foamy bubbles over the fire pit in the backyard. 

____

“We want people to feel warm and welcome,” Popwell says. 

____

“This is my home,” Rubenstein adds. “I don’t want people to be uncomfortable.” 

____

[https://www.facebook.com/diycasanova/|The Casa Nova] is one of the newer additions to Atlanta’s vibrant do-it-yourself musical landscape. These venues, usually run out of people’s houses, follow previous iterations, like the now-defunct Cleaners and Yellow House, that pop up to fill a void in Atlanta's music scene. 

 

"Trying to play the Earl, or even 529, here is hard if you don’t know a million people, or have all the connections, or haven't been in the scene for a long time,” Rubenstein says. She and Cabral are part of tropical rock act [https://godlessamericarecords.bandcamp.com/album/never-2-cool-2-dance|Sad Fish], and the house doubles as a rehearsal space for the roommates’ various musical projects. 

____

She notes that DIY sites like the Casa Nova can also attract more diverse lineups and audiences than more established venues, because there’s less financial pressure to reel in a certain demographic or to make money through alcohol sales. 

____

%{[ data-embed-type="image" data-embed-id="58bac3506cdeeab0071728e9" data-embed-element="span" data-embed-size="320w" data-embed-align="right" contenteditable="false" ]}%“I think it’s just easier for them to not have to worry about giving voices to people that are marginalized because — I’m not saying they’re racist or homophobic or anything — but they’re trying to make money.” Rubenstein says, mentioning other groups like the independent [http://www.punkblack.com/|Punk Black] that highlights people of color in its lineups. “In general, DIY spaces know it’s harder for these bands traditionally to be booked at bigger venues."

____

There’s no entry fee for shows at the Casa Nova, except for cash donations at the door, and other than a couple of house-provided six-packs, it’s BYOB. That’s why a house show audience can range from teenagers to grey-flecked 30-somethings, and the lineups can push the boundaries of eclectic: one of its recent shows included a spoken-word rapper from New Orleans, experimental music from Switzerland, and a doom-metal band from Athens. 

____

Rubenstein, Popwell, Cabral and their fourth roommate, Lyle Baldes, met through Baldes' band [https://loudermilkandmoon.bandcamp.com/|Loudermilk & Moon]. Rubenstein and Cabral used to throw shows together in their East Atlanta house, until noise complaints from new neighbors in the changing neighborhood threatened to shut it down. Their friend, performance artist and musician Daniel Scoggins, better known as Cousin Dan, recruited them to come fill a house next door to him.  

____

Their new house in Chosewood Park, located just off Cassanova St., is perfect for throwing shows, Cabral says, with a big yard, thick brick that better keeps noise inside, and a neighborhood where houses are further apart from each other. They’re still getting to know their neighbors, who are mostly families or other musicians. 

____

Cabral says they all just like hosting. Sometimes, they’ll make food for the guests. “We get worried that people will get hungry,” he says.

____

“We super Paula Deen-it,” Rubenstein adds. "I can’t help myself.” 

____

Rubenstein’s Southern hospitality comes from growing up in a Marietta house with her grandmother, a no-nonsense but funny woman who came from Depression-era North Carolina. Grandma Helen always expected the house to be in top shape, with refreshments for visitors at the ready.

____

Those lessons, and the small touches from all of the Casa Nova’s inhabitants, create warmth in the house that’s palpable at every event. Rubenstein hopes that the younger kids that come to her shows get inspired to do the same.

"I hope it’s creating a drive to keep Atlanta going, because it’s not going to be run by the same people forever," she says.

''[https://www.facebook.com/events/656034334599002/?active_tab=about|Peach Coven celebrates A Bloody One-Year Anniversary at the Casa Nova on Sun., March 12. $10 suggested donation. 8:30 p.m. Full moon ceremony and bonfire lead by Sarah Cavrak of Wild Moon Women. Fire dance by Caroline Croland. Musical performances by Femignome, Harlot Party, Casey Hood, Cuntry, Lauren Pararo, Lullahis with Gracie, and A Deer A Horse. Send a message for the address and directions.]''"
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Emma Rubenstein is a perfect party host. Even when it’s a really big party, with live bands and scores of people crammed into her house, that she and her roommates throw at least once a month. 



On a balmy February evening in southeast Atlanta, Rubenstein and her roommates clean countertops, replenish toilet paper, and start the popcorn machine in the spacious basement of their four-bedroom house. Arthur Cabral illuminates a movie projector next to the makeshift stage, where red-colored lights shine down, while Abigail Popwell sets up a machine on her bedroom windowsill that rains foamy bubbles over the fire pit in the backyard. 



“We want people to feel warm and welcome,” Popwell says. 



“This is my home,” Rubenstein adds. “I don’t want people to be uncomfortable.” 



The Casa Nova is one of the newer additions to Atlanta’s vibrant do-it-yourself musical landscape. These venues, usually run out of people’s houses, follow previous iterations, like the now-defunct Cleaners and Yellow House, that pop up to fill a void in Atlanta's music scene. 

 

"Trying to play the Earl, or even 529, here is hard if you don’t know a million people, or have all the connections, or haven't been in the scene for a long time,” Rubenstein says. She and Cabral are part of tropical rock act Sad Fish, and the house doubles as a rehearsal space for the roommates’ various musical projects. 



She notes that DIY sites like the Casa Nova can also attract more diverse lineups and audiences than more established venues, because there’s less financial pressure to reel in a certain demographic or to make money through alcohol sales. 



No value assigned“I think it’s just easier for them to not have to worry about giving voices to people that are marginalized because — I’m not saying they’re racist or homophobic or anything — but they’re trying to make money.” Rubenstein says, mentioning other groups like the independent Punk Black that highlights people of color in its lineups. “In general, DIY spaces know it’s harder for these bands traditionally to be booked at bigger venues."



There’s no entry fee for shows at the Casa Nova, except for cash donations at the door, and other than a couple of house-provided six-packs, it’s BYOB. That’s why a house show audience can range from teenagers to grey-flecked 30-somethings, and the lineups can push the boundaries of eclectic: one of its recent shows included a spoken-word rapper from New Orleans, experimental music from Switzerland, and a doom-metal band from Athens. 



Rubenstein, Popwell, Cabral and their fourth roommate, Lyle Baldes, met through Baldes' band Loudermilk & Moon. Rubenstein and Cabral used to throw shows together in their East Atlanta house, until noise complaints from new neighbors in the changing neighborhood threatened to shut it down. Their friend, performance artist and musician Daniel Scoggins, better known as Cousin Dan, recruited them to come fill a house next door to him.  



Their new house in Chosewood Park, located just off Cassanova St., is perfect for throwing shows, Cabral says, with a big yard, thick brick that better keeps noise inside, and a neighborhood where houses are further apart from each other. They’re still getting to know their neighbors, who are mostly families or other musicians. 



Cabral says they all just like hosting. Sometimes, they’ll make food for the guests. “We get worried that people will get hungry,” he says.



“We super Paula Deen-it,” Rubenstein adds. "I can’t help myself.” 



Rubenstein’s Southern hospitality comes from growing up in a Marietta house with her grandmother, a no-nonsense but funny woman who came from Depression-era North Carolina. Grandma Helen always expected the house to be in top shape, with refreshments for visitors at the ready.



Those lessons, and the small touches from all of the Casa Nova’s inhabitants, create warmth in the house that’s palpable at every event. Rubenstein hopes that the younger kids that come to her shows get inspired to do the same.

"I hope it’s creating a drive to keep Atlanta going, because it’s not going to be run by the same people forever," she says.

Peach Coven celebrates A Bloody One-Year Anniversary at the Casa Nova on Sun., March 12. $10 suggested donation. 8:30 p.m. Full moon ceremony and bonfire lead by Sarah Cavrak of Wild Moon Women. Fire dance by Caroline Croland. Musical performances by Femignome, Harlot Party, Casey Hood, Cuntry, Lauren Pararo, Lullahis with Gracie, and A Deer A Horse. Send a message for the address and directions.             20853999         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/03/DSC_0087.58c01103a4b10.png                  Love and music at the Casa Nova "
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Article

Wednesday March 8, 2017 02:43 pm EST
DIY space revels in Southern hospitality | more...
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  string(3275) "So, you're new in town. Maybe you're from Marietta or Manhattan or Mumbai. Your main associations with Atlanta are Coca-Cola and Future, and you don't know Peoplestown from Poncey-Highland. This isn't your city.

??
Maybe Atlanta is just a four-year stopping point on your road to other places. But the best advice I could give you is: While you're here, be an Atlantan.

??
As a freshman, you're already being bombarded by new experiences. There's the smelly roommate, the questionable dining hall food, and, of course, the frat party down the street. It might seem like there's so much going on that you hardly have time to think about being in a city.

??
But those four or five years go by in a blur and, suddenly, you're walking across the podium, off to new horizons. That's what happened to me after graduating in May. I'm from Norcross, barely 20 minutes away from Atlanta city limits. But aside from high school visits to Downtown attractions and sneaked trips to Little Five Points, I didn't really have a link with the city before college. When I went to college, I didn't feel like I fit in with much of campus, so I looked outside the bubble, discovering new people and places around town. I grew my own roots here. After graduating, I didn't want to leave — not yet, anyway.

??
So, while you're taking advantage of the resources in your classroom (who knows when you'll have the time to learn a language again?), make sure to learn outside of it. Maybe your history class is a little dry. Walk around Old Fourth Ward, where the Civil Rights Movement lived and breathed, instead.

??
Try different clubs around campus, but also make time to work, intern, or volunteer at a local business. Organizations such as WonderRoot, the Goat Farm, and Atlanta Film Festival come to mind. That's where you'll meet and interact with others outside of college, people who can teach you lessons just as important as those from your professors. For journalists, getting out into the world is in the job description. The people I spoke to for stories and co-workers I met during jobs showed me so much more than staying in my dorm room ever could.

??
Pay attention to local politics and issues. Yes, MARTA has its weaknesses. We know. And let's not even get started on the Atlanta Streetcar. But don't just roll your eyes and move on. Change your voter registration and make a difference in the next election, and look up local transit (and other) advocacy groups and see how you can help. There are a lot of college students in Atlanta, and your vote can count as much as people who have lived here all their lives.

??
Don't just party at the fun and familiar college bars in your university's 'hood. Go somewhere completely out of your comfort zone, whether that's a jazz bar (can't go wrong with Churchill Downs), hardcore punk show (Drunken Unicorn and the Masquerade are sure bets), or contemporary art gallery opening (see: Mammal Gallery and Low Museum of Contemporary Culture, both started by college kids).

??
If you're a present, active inhabitant in this city, you'll find there's plenty to love here. Who knows? You might just stick around after you graduate.

??
— Sonam Vashi, Researcher for The Row at CNN, CL Contributing Writer, and 2013 CL music intern"
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??
Maybe Atlanta is just a four-year stopping point on your road to other places. But the best advice I could give you is: While you're here, be an Atlantan.

??
As a freshman, you're already being bombarded by new experiences. There's the smelly roommate, the questionable dining hall food, and, of course, the frat party down the street. It might seem like there's so much going on that you hardly have time to think about being in a city.

??
But those four or five years go by in a blur and, suddenly, you're walking across the podium, off to new horizons. That's what happened to me after graduating in May. I'm from Norcross, barely 20 minutes away from Atlanta city limits. But aside from high school visits to Downtown attractions and sneaked trips to Little Five Points, I didn't really have a link with the city before college. When I went to college, I didn't feel like I fit in with much of campus, so I looked outside the bubble, discovering new people and places around town. I grew my own roots here. After graduating, I didn't want to leave — not yet, anyway.

??
So, while you're taking advantage of the resources in your classroom (who knows when you'll have the time to learn a language again?), make sure to learn outside of it. Maybe your history class is a little dry. Walk around Old Fourth Ward, where the Civil Rights Movement lived and breathed, instead.

??
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??
Pay attention to local politics and issues. Yes, MARTA has its weaknesses. We know. And let's not even get started on the Atlanta Streetcar. But don't just roll your eyes and move on. Change your voter registration and make a difference in the next election, and look up local transit (and other) [http://www.cfpt.org/get-involved|advocacy groups] and see how you can help. There are a lot of college students in Atlanta, and your vote can count as much as people who have lived here all their lives.

??
Don't just party at the fun and familiar college bars in your university's 'hood. Go somewhere completely out of your comfort zone, whether that's a [http://clatl.com/atlanta/Content?oid=13969629&guide=city|jazz bar] (can't go wrong with Churchill Downs), [http://clatl.com/atlanta/Content?oid=11898688&guide=city|hardcore punk show] (Drunken Unicorn and the Masquerade are sure bets), or contemporary art gallery opening (see: Mammal Gallery and Low Museum of Contemporary Culture, both started by college kids).

??
If you're a present, active inhabitant in this city, you'll find there's plenty to love here. Who knows? You might just stick around after you graduate.

??
— Sonam Vashi, Researcher for The Row at CNN, __''CL''__ Contributing Writer, and 2013 __''CL''__ music intern"
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  string(3529) "    Go to college in Atlanta; come out an Atlantan   2015-08-06T12:00:00+00:00 College Guide - College Guide 2015   Sonam Vashi 8770492 2015-08-06T12:00:00+00:00  So, you're new in town. Maybe you're from Marietta or Manhattan or Mumbai. Your main associations with Atlanta are Coca-Cola and Future, and you don't know Peoplestown from Poncey-Highland. This isn't your city.

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Maybe Atlanta is just a four-year stopping point on your road to other places. But the best advice I could give you is: While you're here, be an Atlantan.

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As a freshman, you're already being bombarded by new experiences. There's the smelly roommate, the questionable dining hall food, and, of course, the frat party down the street. It might seem like there's so much going on that you hardly have time to think about being in a city.

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But those four or five years go by in a blur and, suddenly, you're walking across the podium, off to new horizons. That's what happened to me after graduating in May. I'm from Norcross, barely 20 minutes away from Atlanta city limits. But aside from high school visits to Downtown attractions and sneaked trips to Little Five Points, I didn't really have a link with the city before college. When I went to college, I didn't feel like I fit in with much of campus, so I looked outside the bubble, discovering new people and places around town. I grew my own roots here. After graduating, I didn't want to leave — not yet, anyway.

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So, while you're taking advantage of the resources in your classroom (who knows when you'll have the time to learn a language again?), make sure to learn outside of it. Maybe your history class is a little dry. Walk around Old Fourth Ward, where the Civil Rights Movement lived and breathed, instead.

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Try different clubs around campus, but also make time to work, intern, or volunteer at a local business. Organizations such as WonderRoot, the Goat Farm, and Atlanta Film Festival come to mind. That's where you'll meet and interact with others outside of college, people who can teach you lessons just as important as those from your professors. For journalists, getting out into the world is in the job description. The people I spoke to for stories and co-workers I met during jobs showed me so much more than staying in my dorm room ever could.

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Pay attention to local politics and issues. Yes, MARTA has its weaknesses. We know. And let's not even get started on the Atlanta Streetcar. But don't just roll your eyes and move on. Change your voter registration and make a difference in the next election, and look up local transit (and other) advocacy groups and see how you can help. There are a lot of college students in Atlanta, and your vote can count as much as people who have lived here all their lives.

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Don't just party at the fun and familiar college bars in your university's 'hood. Go somewhere completely out of your comfort zone, whether that's a jazz bar (can't go wrong with Churchill Downs), hardcore punk show (Drunken Unicorn and the Masquerade are sure bets), or contemporary art gallery opening (see: Mammal Gallery and Low Museum of Contemporary Culture, both started by college kids).

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If you're a present, active inhabitant in this city, you'll find there's plenty to love here. Who knows? You might just stick around after you graduate.

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— Sonam Vashi, Researcher for The Row at CNN, CL Contributing Writer, and 2013 CL music intern             13084267 15028536                          College Guide - College Guide 2015 "
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Thursday August 6, 2015 08:00 am EDT
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