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Punch Brothers play the Tabernacle July 14

Brooklyn's progressive bluegrass quintet plays songs from 'All Ashore' and more

Punch Brothers Cassandra Jenkins
Photo credit: Photo by Cassandra Jenkins
PUNCH BROTHERS

The Brooklyn-based progressive bluegrass quintet Punch Brothers’ instrumentation — mandolin, violin, banjo, guitar, and stand-up bass — is distinctly bluegrass, but their songwriting structures and musical arrangements are reminiscent of a classical chamber group. Punch Brothers’ warm vocal harmonies and darkly-humored, narrative lyrics give their otherwise heady music an approachable human touch. The group's latest album, All Ashore, due out July 20 via Nonesuch, is a nine-song reflection on the tense reality of commitment in a time of unrest. The record is meant to be listened to in its entirety, and the band is in the midst of an international tour performing it live start-to-finish.

$25-$32. 7 p.m. (doors). Sat., July 14. The Tabernacle. 152 Luckie St. 404-659-9022. www.tabernacleatl.com.



More By This Writer

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Article

Thursday August 9, 2018 03:32 pm EDT
Latinx fest takes over the Sound Table, Variety Playhouse, and Terminal West Aug. 10-12 | more...
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Adding up the release of 2016’s critically acclaimed My Piece of Land (BMG), extensive touring with husband Jason Isbell’s 400 Unit, and the birth of the couples’ daughter in 2015, Shires has endured a whirlwind few years. With To The Sunset (Silver Knife Records), Shires finds strength in these experiences. The record is also a stylistic shift away from the vulnerable observations that define much of Shires’ previous work, positioning her as an unapologetically energetic woman tackling change head-on.

“A lot of things in making this record were different for me,” Shires says. “I made the last one when I was pregnant, and then had my daughter three weeks later. Growing as a human is a thing that happens, but I also had to completely change the process of how I naturally write.”

“Leave it Alone,” the record’s first single, throws listeners into Shires’ new world feet first. The song leaves behind the simpler days of raw vocals and a solo acoustic guitar, immersing fans in a swirling dream-pop fantasy, complete with playfully doubled harmonies and twinkly synth embellishments. 

“Eve’s Daughter,” the follow-up single, delivers an infectious jolt to the system. With a title that hints at original sin, the song speaks to aggressive self-reclamation, with growling, bluesy guitars and unaffected vocals. 

The process behind the record was an experiment born out of necessity. With a young child in the house, Shires learned how to be flexible and patient with herself. Sitting at her desk poring over new ideas became less viable as the home environment grew more chaotic. Instead, Shires packed up her journals, instruments, and paper shredder, and relocated to a quiet, isolated closet in her home. Even in her small corner, her pages were still within the grasp of her innocently eager-to-help daughter. The final result was a closet with journal-like pieces of paper blanketing the wall.

“That was a really difficult thing to do, to learn how to accept my process and the fact that it takes me a while to say the things I want to say,” Shires says. “It looked pretty much like a 13-year-old girl’s journal just so I could focus and revisit. In doing that, I had to build a thicker skin and more confidence in the work that I was doing. That’s why the record is how it is.”

Even with the self-imposed isolation that went into her latest effort, Shires’ marriage to Isbell has certainly fed some of her musical growth in the same way that it has fed his. Isbell can be heard throughout the record on both bass and guitar, and the two have shared many a long conversation about song structure, lyrical sentiment, and Beatlesque guitar tones. 

Their union is a public one, and fans could easily draw conclusions about the couple based on their confessional lyrics. Shires has always written about the things that affect her, whatever they may be. However, she says, this record has given her the opportunity to forgo the melancholy of her earlier work. Instead, the tracks offer a gust of fresh energy, letting her sweetly rebellious spirit shine through.

Shires’ newfound confidence has inspired her to take control over more than just her music. Her visual presentation for To The Sunset is notably different from her previous aesthetic choices. This time around, she leans toward high fashion and shimmering colors. “Visuals are a crazy thing for me, kind of like synesthesia — like seeing sound or hearing color,” Shires says. “I was trying to make the colors match what I was doing sonically. It has been hard for me to describe what I want to get visually, so I figured I might as well just do it myself!”

As such, Shires has positioned herself as a force with which to be reckoned, within country music and beyond. What to expect from this most recent release? Shires has an answer: “All rock ’n’ roll. No golf.”

With Cory Branan. $25-$35. 7 p.m. (doors). Fri., Aug. 10. Variety Playhouse, 1099 Euclid Ave N.E. 404-524-7354. www.variety-playhouse.com."
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Adding up the release of 2016’s critically acclaimed ''My Piece of Land'' (BMG), extensive touring with husband Jason Isbell’s 400 Unit, and the birth of the couples’ daughter in 2015, Shires has endured a whirlwind few years. With ''To The Sunset'' (Silver Knife Records), Shires finds strength in these experiences. The record is also a stylistic shift away from the vulnerable observations that define much of Shires’ previous work, positioning her as an unapologetically energetic woman tackling change head-on.

“A lot of things in making this record were different for me,” Shires says. “I made the last one when I was pregnant, and then had my daughter three weeks later. Growing as a human is a thing that happens, but I also had to completely change the process of how I naturally write.”

“Leave it Alone,” the record’s first single, throws listeners into Shires’ new world feet first. The song leaves behind the simpler days of raw vocals and a solo acoustic guitar, immersing fans in a swirling dream-pop fantasy, complete with playfully doubled harmonies and twinkly synth embellishments. 

“Eve’s Daughter,” the follow-up single, delivers an infectious jolt to the system. With a title that hints at original sin, the song speaks to aggressive self-reclamation, with growling, bluesy guitars and unaffected vocals. 

The process behind the record was an experiment born out of necessity. With a young child in the house, Shires learned how to be flexible and patient with herself. Sitting at her desk poring over new ideas became less viable as the home environment grew more chaotic. Instead, Shires packed up her journals, instruments, and paper shredder, and relocated to a quiet, isolated closet in her home. Even in her small corner, her pages were still within the grasp of her innocently eager-to-help daughter. The final result was a closet with journal-like pieces of paper blanketing the wall.

“That was a really difficult thing to do, to learn how to accept my process and the fact that it takes me a while to say the things I want to say,” Shires says. “It looked pretty much like a 13-year-old girl’s journal just so I could focus and revisit. In doing that, I had to build a thicker skin and more confidence in the work that I was doing. That’s why the record is how it is.”

Even with the self-imposed isolation that went into her latest effort, Shires’ marriage to Isbell has certainly fed some of her musical growth in the same way that it has fed his. Isbell can be heard throughout the record on both bass and guitar, and the two have shared many a long conversation about song structure, lyrical sentiment, and Beatlesque guitar tones. 

Their union is a public one, and fans could easily draw conclusions about the couple based on their confessional lyrics. Shires has always written about the things that affect her, whatever they may be. However, she says, this record has given her the opportunity to forgo the melancholy of her earlier work. Instead, the tracks offer a gust of fresh energy, letting her sweetly rebellious spirit shine through.

Shires’ newfound confidence has inspired her to take control over more than just her music. Her visual presentation for ''To The Sunset'' is notably different from her previous aesthetic choices. This time around, she leans toward high fashion and shimmering colors. “Visuals are a crazy thing for me, kind of like synesthesia — like seeing sound or hearing color,” Shires says. “I was trying to make the colors match what I was doing sonically. It has been hard for me to describe what I want to get visually, so I figured I might as well just do it myself!”

As such, Shires has positioned herself as a force with which to be reckoned, within country music and beyond. What to expect from this most recent release? Shires has an answer: “All rock ’n’ roll. No golf.”

''[http://www.variety-playhouse.com/event/amanda-shires/|With Cory Branan. $25-$35. 7 p.m. (doors). Fri., Aug. 10. Variety Playhouse, 1099 Euclid Ave N.E. 404-524-7354. www.variety-playhouse.com.]''"
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  string(5009) " Music Shires3 1 13  2018-08-07T15:45:08+00:00 Music_Shires3-1_13.jpg     The Southern songwriter pivots with confidence and grace 7995  2018-08-09T04:02:00+00:00 Amanda Shires takes a bold step chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Annika Von Grey  2018-08-09T04:02:00+00:00  Life imitates art. Or does art imitate life? The directional flow of mimicry is difficult to pinpoint, but it’s clear that art exposes internal worlds. Close observance of creativity can provide a gentle understanding of an artist’s reality, following the twists and turns that accompany their life. Singer and violin player Amanda Shires’ latest album, To The Sunset (Silver Knife Records), offers an intimate look at how life and art intersect, guiding her deeper into her songwriting path.

Adding up the release of 2016’s critically acclaimed My Piece of Land (BMG), extensive touring with husband Jason Isbell’s 400 Unit, and the birth of the couples’ daughter in 2015, Shires has endured a whirlwind few years. With To The Sunset (Silver Knife Records), Shires finds strength in these experiences. The record is also a stylistic shift away from the vulnerable observations that define much of Shires’ previous work, positioning her as an unapologetically energetic woman tackling change head-on.

“A lot of things in making this record were different for me,” Shires says. “I made the last one when I was pregnant, and then had my daughter three weeks later. Growing as a human is a thing that happens, but I also had to completely change the process of how I naturally write.”

“Leave it Alone,” the record’s first single, throws listeners into Shires’ new world feet first. The song leaves behind the simpler days of raw vocals and a solo acoustic guitar, immersing fans in a swirling dream-pop fantasy, complete with playfully doubled harmonies and twinkly synth embellishments. 

“Eve’s Daughter,” the follow-up single, delivers an infectious jolt to the system. With a title that hints at original sin, the song speaks to aggressive self-reclamation, with growling, bluesy guitars and unaffected vocals. 

The process behind the record was an experiment born out of necessity. With a young child in the house, Shires learned how to be flexible and patient with herself. Sitting at her desk poring over new ideas became less viable as the home environment grew more chaotic. Instead, Shires packed up her journals, instruments, and paper shredder, and relocated to a quiet, isolated closet in her home. Even in her small corner, her pages were still within the grasp of her innocently eager-to-help daughter. The final result was a closet with journal-like pieces of paper blanketing the wall.

“That was a really difficult thing to do, to learn how to accept my process and the fact that it takes me a while to say the things I want to say,” Shires says. “It looked pretty much like a 13-year-old girl’s journal just so I could focus and revisit. In doing that, I had to build a thicker skin and more confidence in the work that I was doing. That’s why the record is how it is.”

Even with the self-imposed isolation that went into her latest effort, Shires’ marriage to Isbell has certainly fed some of her musical growth in the same way that it has fed his. Isbell can be heard throughout the record on both bass and guitar, and the two have shared many a long conversation about song structure, lyrical sentiment, and Beatlesque guitar tones. 

Their union is a public one, and fans could easily draw conclusions about the couple based on their confessional lyrics. Shires has always written about the things that affect her, whatever they may be. However, she says, this record has given her the opportunity to forgo the melancholy of her earlier work. Instead, the tracks offer a gust of fresh energy, letting her sweetly rebellious spirit shine through.

Shires’ newfound confidence has inspired her to take control over more than just her music. Her visual presentation for To The Sunset is notably different from her previous aesthetic choices. This time around, she leans toward high fashion and shimmering colors. “Visuals are a crazy thing for me, kind of like synesthesia — like seeing sound or hearing color,” Shires says. “I was trying to make the colors match what I was doing sonically. It has been hard for me to describe what I want to get visually, so I figured I might as well just do it myself!”

As such, Shires has positioned herself as a force with which to be reckoned, within country music and beyond. What to expect from this most recent release? Shires has an answer: “All rock ’n’ roll. No golf.”

With Cory Branan. $25-$35. 7 p.m. (doors). Fri., Aug. 10. Variety Playhouse, 1099 Euclid Ave N.E. 404-524-7354. www.variety-playhouse.com.    Elizaveta Porodina TO THE SUNSET: Amanda Shires makes moves with amplified energy.                                   Amanda Shires takes a bold step "
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Thursday August 9, 2018 12:02 am EDT
The Southern songwriter pivots with confidence and grace | more...
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“Penmanship” is the latest offering from the longstanding Atlanta by-way-of-Jacksonville Florida pairing of hip-hop renaissance men Dillon Vaughan Maurer and Batsauce. Their latest album together,  On Their Way, arrived in April via Full Plate, but they don’t land on stage together all too often these days. Dillon resides on the Southwest side of Atlanta. Batsauce spends half of his time in Southeast Asia — the other half of his time is spent in Berlin. Plans, however, are in the works for a September album release party. Stay tuned for more details regarding that magnanimous affair coming soon.

In the meantime, “Penmanship,” featuring Count Bass D is a laidback stroll through a night in the life on the East Atlanta Village strip. It’s also a smooth intro to the albums odyssey of characters including Sadat X, Greg Nice, Paten Locke, Qwazaar, Willie Evans Jr., and the almighty Supa Dave West. Just press play.



Tim Kohler’s debut solo album, Thank You For Sharing, is out August 10 via Bear Kids Recordings. Over the years, Kohler has played with Hello Ocho and Kid Stuff, and his latest single, titled “Don’t,” paves the way for a bright, synth-laden future.

“Don’t,” the second single taken from Thank You For Sharing, is pure ’70s pop, laced with gentle arpeggiations, elegant orchestral arrangements, and a bouncy bass line played by the record’s producer, Fantasy Guys’ Mitchell Hardage. The song teeters on the edge of a disco aesthetic, but the slickness of production and the depth of the chosen synth sounds allow the track to maintain relevance and contemporary sonic cred.

The sheer peppiness of “Don’t” makes it somewhat difficult to connect with Kohler’s slightly disenchanted lyrics. But a close listen to lyrics such as “Don’t look now/I’m busy working on a new disaster/Aren’t you proud/These chemicals don’t make a true reaction” reveal vulnerability hidden beneath the layers of synthesizers. Thank You For Sharing was born during a period of transition spanning five years, and the record functions as an exposé on Kohler’s struggles with change, growth, and the chaos of life’s twists and turns. 

The album features contributions from Pony League and Book Club’s Gus Fernandez on drums, Patrick Russert on pedal steel guitar, percussionist Chris Childs, Indie Killed the Pop Star’s Jennifer Zuiff, Waller’s Tiffany Blaylock, and various members of Atlanta’s contemporary classical scene.

Quirky, funky, and full of shimmering sincerity, “Don’t” is a perfect track to usher in the dog days of summer.

Kohler celebrates a release party for Thank You For Sharing with Small Reactions and Big Baby at Aisle 5 on Thurs., Aug. 9. $10-$12. 9 p.m.
https://www.aisle5atl.com/event/1724994-tim-kohler-atlanta/


 
Former Ether Seeds guitarist Stephen Seals teams up with Skid Row drummer Rob Hammersmith and James Hall & the Steady Wicked guitarist Bruce Butkovich to form Thunderbolt Hydraulic. “Karma to Burn,” the band’s debut single, is a tip of the hat to old school ‘80s metal heroes while offering a dose a heavy rock in a modern context. Seals provides vocals here, and his growling voice is a bit disarming with its impressive flexibility. A simple chord progression with consistently overdriven guitar tones, and a fairly traditional arrangement allows focus to rest on the lyrics and vocal performance.  

The track’s lyrics are aggressive, vindictive, and sexually charged all at once. “Hate me, hate me, honey/ I’m going to shatter you/ Hate me, hate me, honey/ There’s nothing you can do,” sings Seals, his voice shaking with spite.

The middle of the song is dominated by a fuzzy, soaring guitar solo which lasts for nearly 40 seconds offering a perfectly timed break from the chorus. 
 
The writing process for the group’s forthcoming EP, The Best of Intentions (out Sept. 14), began in 2015, and the solidification process of the band’s lineup opened Seals’ creative floodgates. Hammersmith nearly missed the window of opportunity due to a clogged email inbox, and continues to tour with Skid Row while making time for Thunderbolt Hydraulic ’s full-time recording and rehearsing schedule.



Hexotica, the musical pairing of Penny Transmission and the Hot Place’s Lisa King, takes shape in the form of haunted witch music in a pool of swirling water. There’s a hint of melancholia here, and more than a few eerily sweeping sounds make themselves known throughout the clouds of static and delay. The duo has released a digital 12-inch which includes two tracks, “Lunar Sea” and “Obscurum Per Obsucrius,” both of which were recorded and mixed by Tim DeLaney at Electron Gardens Studio."
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“Penmanship” is the latest offering from the longstanding Atlanta by-way-of-Jacksonville Florida pairing of hip-hop renaissance men Dillon Vaughan Maurer and Batsauce. Their latest album together,  ''On Their Way'', arrived in April via Full Plate, but they don’t land on stage together all too often these days. Dillon resides on the Southwest side of Atlanta. Batsauce spends half of his time in Southeast Asia — the other half of his time is spent in Berlin. Plans, however, are in the works for a September album release party. Stay tuned for more details regarding that magnanimous affair coming soon.

In the meantime, “Penmanship,” featuring Count Bass D is a laidback stroll through a night in the life on the East Atlanta Village strip. It’s also a smooth intro to the albums odyssey of characters including Sadat X, Greg Nice, Paten Locke, Qwazaar, Willie Evans Jr., and the almighty Supa Dave West. Just press play.

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Tim Kohler’s debut solo album, ''Thank You For Sharing'', is out August 10 via Bear Kids Recordings. Over the years, Kohler has played with Hello Ocho and Kid Stuff, and his latest single, titled “Don’t,” paves the way for a bright, synth-laden future.

“Don’t,” the second single taken from ''Thank You For Sharing'', is pure ’70s pop, laced with gentle arpeggiations, elegant orchestral arrangements, and a bouncy bass line played by the record’s producer, Fantasy Guys’ Mitchell Hardage. The song teeters on the edge of a disco aesthetic, but the slickness of production and the depth of the chosen synth sounds allow the track to maintain relevance and contemporary sonic cred.

The sheer peppiness of “Don’t” makes it somewhat difficult to connect with Kohler’s slightly disenchanted lyrics. But a close listen to lyrics such as “Don’t look now/I’m busy working on a new disaster/Aren’t you proud/These chemicals don’t make a true reaction” reveal vulnerability hidden beneath the layers of synthesizers. ''Thank You For Sharing'' was born during a period of transition spanning five years, and the record functions as an exposé on Kohler’s struggles with change, growth, and the chaos of life’s twists and turns. 

The album features contributions from Pony League and Book Club’s Gus Fernandez on drums, Patrick Russert on pedal steel guitar, percussionist Chris Childs, Indie Killed the Pop Star’s Jennifer Zuiff, Waller’s Tiffany Blaylock, and various members of Atlanta’s contemporary classical scene.

Quirky, funky, and full of shimmering sincerity, “Don’t” is a perfect track to usher in the dog days of summer.

''Kohler celebrates a release party for ''Thank You For Sharing'' with Small Reactions and Big Baby at Aisle 5 on Thurs., Aug. 9. $10-$12. 9 p.m.''
https://www.aisle5atl.com/event/1724994-tim-kohler-atlanta/

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Former Ether Seeds guitarist Stephen Seals teams up with Skid Row drummer Rob Hammersmith and James Hall & the Steady Wicked guitarist Bruce Butkovich to form Thunderbolt Hydraulic. “Karma to Burn,” the band’s debut single, is a tip of the hat to old school ‘80s metal heroes while offering a dose a heavy rock in a modern context. Seals provides vocals here, and his growling voice is a bit disarming with its impressive flexibility. A simple chord progression with consistently overdriven guitar tones, and a fairly traditional arrangement allows focus to rest on the lyrics and vocal performance.  

The track’s lyrics are aggressive, vindictive, and sexually charged all at once. “Hate me, hate me, honey/ I’m going to shatter you/ Hate me, hate me, honey/ There’s nothing you can do,” sings Seals, his voice shaking with spite.

The middle of the song is dominated by a fuzzy, soaring guitar solo which lasts for nearly 40 seconds offering a perfectly timed break from the chorus. 
 
The writing process for the group’s forthcoming EP, ''The Best of Intentions'' (out Sept. 14), began in 2015, and the solidification process of the band’s lineup opened Seals’ creative floodgates. Hammersmith nearly missed the window of opportunity due to a clogged email inbox, and continues to tour with Skid Row while making time for Thunderbolt Hydraulic ’s full-time recording and rehearsing schedule.

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Hexotica, the musical pairing of Penny Transmission and the Hot Place’s Lisa King, takes shape in the form of haunted witch music in a pool of swirling water. There’s a hint of melancholia here, and more than a few eerily sweeping sounds make themselves known throughout the clouds of static and delay. The duo has released a digital 12-inch which includes two tracks, “Lunar Sea” and “Obscurum Per Obsucrius,” both of which were recorded and mixed by Tim DeLaney at Electron Gardens Studio."
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“Penmanship” is the latest offering from the longstanding Atlanta by-way-of-Jacksonville Florida pairing of hip-hop renaissance men Dillon Vaughan Maurer and Batsauce. Their latest album together,  On Their Way, arrived in April via Full Plate, but they don’t land on stage together all too often these days. Dillon resides on the Southwest side of Atlanta. Batsauce spends half of his time in Southeast Asia — the other half of his time is spent in Berlin. Plans, however, are in the works for a September album release party. Stay tuned for more details regarding that magnanimous affair coming soon.

In the meantime, “Penmanship,” featuring Count Bass D is a laidback stroll through a night in the life on the East Atlanta Village strip. It’s also a smooth intro to the albums odyssey of characters including Sadat X, Greg Nice, Paten Locke, Qwazaar, Willie Evans Jr., and the almighty Supa Dave West. Just press play.



Tim Kohler’s debut solo album, Thank You For Sharing, is out August 10 via Bear Kids Recordings. Over the years, Kohler has played with Hello Ocho and Kid Stuff, and his latest single, titled “Don’t,” paves the way for a bright, synth-laden future.

“Don’t,” the second single taken from Thank You For Sharing, is pure ’70s pop, laced with gentle arpeggiations, elegant orchestral arrangements, and a bouncy bass line played by the record’s producer, Fantasy Guys’ Mitchell Hardage. The song teeters on the edge of a disco aesthetic, but the slickness of production and the depth of the chosen synth sounds allow the track to maintain relevance and contemporary sonic cred.

The sheer peppiness of “Don’t” makes it somewhat difficult to connect with Kohler’s slightly disenchanted lyrics. But a close listen to lyrics such as “Don’t look now/I’m busy working on a new disaster/Aren’t you proud/These chemicals don’t make a true reaction” reveal vulnerability hidden beneath the layers of synthesizers. Thank You For Sharing was born during a period of transition spanning five years, and the record functions as an exposé on Kohler’s struggles with change, growth, and the chaos of life’s twists and turns. 

The album features contributions from Pony League and Book Club’s Gus Fernandez on drums, Patrick Russert on pedal steel guitar, percussionist Chris Childs, Indie Killed the Pop Star’s Jennifer Zuiff, Waller’s Tiffany Blaylock, and various members of Atlanta’s contemporary classical scene.

Quirky, funky, and full of shimmering sincerity, “Don’t” is a perfect track to usher in the dog days of summer.

Kohler celebrates a release party for Thank You For Sharing with Small Reactions and Big Baby at Aisle 5 on Thurs., Aug. 9. $10-$12. 9 p.m.
https://www.aisle5atl.com/event/1724994-tim-kohler-atlanta/


 
Former Ether Seeds guitarist Stephen Seals teams up with Skid Row drummer Rob Hammersmith and James Hall & the Steady Wicked guitarist Bruce Butkovich to form Thunderbolt Hydraulic. “Karma to Burn,” the band’s debut single, is a tip of the hat to old school ‘80s metal heroes while offering a dose a heavy rock in a modern context. Seals provides vocals here, and his growling voice is a bit disarming with its impressive flexibility. A simple chord progression with consistently overdriven guitar tones, and a fairly traditional arrangement allows focus to rest on the lyrics and vocal performance.  

The track’s lyrics are aggressive, vindictive, and sexually charged all at once. “Hate me, hate me, honey/ I’m going to shatter you/ Hate me, hate me, honey/ There’s nothing you can do,” sings Seals, his voice shaking with spite.

The middle of the song is dominated by a fuzzy, soaring guitar solo which lasts for nearly 40 seconds offering a perfectly timed break from the chorus. 
 
The writing process for the group’s forthcoming EP, The Best of Intentions (out Sept. 14), began in 2015, and the solidification process of the band’s lineup opened Seals’ creative floodgates. Hammersmith nearly missed the window of opportunity due to a clogged email inbox, and continues to tour with Skid Row while making time for Thunderbolt Hydraulic ’s full-time recording and rehearsing schedule.



Hexotica, the musical pairing of Penny Transmission and the Hot Place’s Lisa King, takes shape in the form of haunted witch music in a pool of swirling water. There’s a hint of melancholia here, and more than a few eerily sweeping sounds make themselves known throughout the clouds of static and delay. The duo has released a digital 12-inch which includes two tracks, “Lunar Sea” and “Obscurum Per Obsucrius,” both of which were recorded and mixed by Tim DeLaney at Electron Gardens Studio.    Chad Hess BOURBON ON THE ROCKS: Dillon (left) and Batsauce.                                   NEW MUSIC MONDAY: Dillon & Batsauce, Tim Kohler, Hexotica, and Thunderbolt Hydraulic "
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For a band with a name that implies stillness, Landing’s world feels like a sci-fi parallel universe. Since 2001, the group has crafted an impressive discography featuring 12 full-length albums, each one dripping in delay, breath, and twinkly threads of pulsing melody. The group’s music orbits just beyond of the realm of the traditional songwriting, and this year’s Bells In New Towns (El Paraiso Records), was recorded with the help of Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr, Sonic Youth, Parquet Courts, Pixies). The album showcases a renewed focus on songwriting and vocals that transcend their textural role in the mix. Bells In New Towns is still a fuzzy, lo-fi, and ambient psychedelic dream, maintaining Landing’s reputation as a band that makes listeners feel like they have intercepted an important moment of extraterrestrial communication.

With Gardener and Anticipation. Donations at the door. Wed., Aug. 8. 6 p.m. 529, 529 Flat Shoals Ave SE. 404-228-6769. www.529atlanta.com."
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''[http://529atlanta.com/calendar/5891/|With Gardener and Anticipation. Donations at the door. Wed., Aug. 8. 6 p.m. 529, 529 Flat Shoals Ave SE. 404-228-6769. www.529atlanta.com.]''"
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For a band with a name that implies stillness, Landing’s world feels like a sci-fi parallel universe. Since 2001, the group has crafted an impressive discography featuring 12 full-length albums, each one dripping in delay, breath, and twinkly threads of pulsing melody. The group’s music orbits just beyond of the realm of the traditional songwriting, and this year’s Bells In New Towns (El Paraiso Records), was recorded with the help of Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr, Sonic Youth, Parquet Courts, Pixies). The album showcases a renewed focus on songwriting and vocals that transcend their textural role in the mix. Bells In New Towns is still a fuzzy, lo-fi, and ambient psychedelic dream, maintaining Landing’s reputation as a band that makes listeners feel like they have intercepted an important moment of extraterrestrial communication.

With Gardener and Anticipation. Donations at the door. Wed., Aug. 8. 6 p.m. 529, 529 Flat Shoals Ave SE. 404-228-6769. www.529atlanta.com.    JP Chirdon READY FOR TAKEOFF: Landing plays 529 August 8.                                   SEE & DO: Landing plays 529 on Aug. 8 "
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Monday August 6, 2018 03:00 am EDT

 

For a band with a name that implies stillness, Landing’s world feels like a sci-fi parallel universe. Since 2001, the group has crafted an impressive discography featuring 12 full-length albums, each one dripping in delay, breath, and twinkly threads of pulsing melody. The group’s music orbits just beyond of the realm of the traditional songwriting, and this year’s Bells In New Towns (El...

| more...
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Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled “Keep Me Up,” which arrived July 27.

“Blue” presented a textured, full-bodied sound. Adelaide, along with Christopher Alan Yates (banjo and vocal harmonies), Trish Land (percussion), and Gabbie Watts (upright bass), crafted a colorful blend of Americana and folk. The group lingered on the video, seeking perfection. At last, the polished product was set free and arrived in April. 

Now, Adelaide reveals a different side of herself that transcends her goals of perfection and pushes for authenticity with ”Keep Me Up.” Both the songwriting and production take a raw turn without sacrificing the sound quality as Adelaide treks on as a soloist.

“Keep Me Up” is about seeing or thinking about someone you already did all of the work of getting over emotionally,” Adelaide says. “How you don't want them to make you happy or sad because it would rip your heart back open. It's about working hard to stay neutral when someone really has the ability to get under your skin.”

One month after the song's June release, Adelaide also released the video, which continued the push for realism. Filmed and edited by Nina Dolgin (WonderRoot), listeners are guided down a trail of nostalgia. The video was shot at the Goat Farm, and acts as a diary focusing on relationships. But the term relationship holds an extended meaning — from human connections to an intimacy with the city of Atlanta itself. 

“It’s kind of a love letter to the city,” she says. “I wanted it to be really simple and cozy.”
As a multifaceted artist, Adelaide’s tangible art takes refuge in her music and vice versa. Although songwriting and painting have different creative processes, she combines them by incorporating a visual element during live shows. 

“Both art and music inform one another, especially when it comes to performance,” she says. “I try to channel the energy that I want to present to the listeners. A lot of times I see that as color and it makes me think of painting and flow. The feeling of creation.”

Whether Adelaide treks on as a solo artist, collaborative musician, or painter, she’s sure to enthrall audiences with a kaleidoscope of talents that pull on multiple sensory channels. — Lauren Leathers



Bad Spell’s most recent release, a track titled “Don’t Go Out Tonight,” offers a healthy dose of fuzzed up, grimy psychedelia. Throughout the song, which was produced by Bad Spell and Ed Rawls of Living Room Studios, singer Bryan Malone’s scratchy vocals warn an unidentified compadre that the outside winds are picking up and carrying ominous tidings. Dealing with the topics of paranoia and loneliness, the song is both gloomy and grinding, maintaining momentum via drum crashes, organ pads courtesy of guest musician Spencer Garn, and a lengthy and commendable guitar solo that rips through the middle. “Don’t Go Out Tonight” will appear on an upcoming album of the same name, and the track is accompanied by an appropriately trippy and scuffed up music video, directed by Bad Spell’s own Bryan Malone. The band plays the Star Bar on Sat., Aug. 25, with Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, the Woggles, and DJ Vikki V.— Annika Von Grey



Illiterates’ latst single “Horton Heats A Who,” produced by Matt McCalvin (Gringo Star, Zoners, St. Pe), is theatrical, fun, and a little bit twisted. The song is fairly sparse, hanging on to the pace created by stuttering drums and singer Steve Albertson’s stream-of-consciousness vocal ranting. Sporadic and fairly manic guitar wails and punk laced gang vocals echo throughout the track, adding some aesthetic depth. A few key harmonized guitar moments bump up the complexity of the song, showcasing Illiterates as a group with some meaningful talent to go along with their spunk. The song will appear on the band’s upcoming debut LP Makeout Mountain and positions them as an up-and-coming act to watch.— AVG"
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~~#000000:__Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled “Keep Me Up,” which arrived July 27.__~~

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~~#000000:__“Keep Me Up” is about seeing or thinking about someone you already did all of the work of getting over emotionally,” Adelaide says. “How you don't want them to make you happy or sad because it would rip your heart back open. It's about working hard to stay neutral when someone really has the ability to get under your skin.”__~~

~~#000000:__One month after the song's June release, Adelaide also released the video, which continued the push for realism. Filmed and edited by Nina Dolgin (WonderRoot), listeners are guided down a trail of nostalgia. The video was shot at the Goat Farm, and acts as a diary focusing on relationships. But the term relationship holds an extended meaning — from human connections to an intimacy with the city of Atlanta itself. __~~

~~#000000:__“It’s kind of a love letter to the city,” she says. “I wanted it to be really simple and cozy.”__~~
~~#000000:__As a multifaceted artist, Adelaide’s tangible art takes refuge in her music and vice versa. Although songwriting and painting have different creative processes, she combines them by incorporating a visual element during live shows. __~~

~~#000000:__“Both art and music inform one another, especially when it comes to performance,” she says. “I try to channel the energy that I want to present to the listeners. A lot of times I see that as color and it makes me think of painting and flow. The feeling of creation.”__~~

~~#000000:__Whether Adelaide treks on as a solo artist, collaborative musician, or painter, she’s sure to enthrall audiences with a kaleidoscope of talents that pull on multiple sensory channels. ____— Lauren Leathers__~~

~~#000000:{youtube movie="cv0-adpntLg" width="640" height="395" quality="high" allowFullScreen="y"}~~

~~#000000:__Bad Spell’s most recent release, a track titled “Don’t Go Out Tonight,” offers a healthy dose of fuzzed up, grimy psychedelia. Throughout the song, which was produced by Bad Spell and Ed Rawls of Living Room Studios, singer Bryan Malone’s scratchy vocals warn an unidentified compadre that the outside winds are picking up and carrying ominous tidings. Dealing with the topics of paranoia and loneliness, the song is both gloomy and grinding, maintaining momentum via drum crashes, organ pads courtesy of guest musician Spencer Garn, and a lengthy and commendable guitar solo that rips through the middle. “Don’t Go Out Tonight” will appear on an upcoming album of the same name, and the track is accompanied by an appropriately trippy and scuffed up music video, directed by Bad Spell’s own Bryan Malone. The band plays the Star Bar on Sat., Aug. 25, with Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, the Woggles, and DJ Vikki V.____— Annika Von Grey__~~

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~~#000000:__Illiterates’ latst single “Horton Heats A Who,” produced by Matt McCalvin (Gringo Star, Zoners, St. Pe), is theatrical, fun, and a little bit twisted. The song is fairly sparse, hanging on to the pace created by stuttering drums and singer Steve Albertson’s stream-of-consciousness vocal ranting. Sporadic and fairly manic guitar wails and punk laced gang vocals echo throughout the track, adding some aesthetic depth. A few key harmonized guitar moments bump up the complexity of the song, showcasing Illiterates as a group with some meaningful talent to go along with their spunk. The song will appear on the band’s upcoming debut LP ''Makeout Mountain'' and positions them as an up-and-coming act to watch.____— AVG__~~"
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  string(4991) " Screen Shot 2018 07 30 At 3.04.08 PM  2018-07-30T19:04:21+00:00 Screen Shot 2018-07-30 at 3.04.08 PM.png      7771  2018-07-31T03:58:00+00:00 NEW MUSIC MONDAY: Adelaide, Bad Spell, and Illiterates laureneleathers@gmail.com Lauren Leathers Lauren Leathers and Annika Von Grey  2018-07-31T03:58:00+00:00  
Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled “Keep Me Up,” which arrived July 27.

“Blue” presented a textured, full-bodied sound. Adelaide, along with Christopher Alan Yates (banjo and vocal harmonies), Trish Land (percussion), and Gabbie Watts (upright bass), crafted a colorful blend of Americana and folk. The group lingered on the video, seeking perfection. At last, the polished product was set free and arrived in April. 

Now, Adelaide reveals a different side of herself that transcends her goals of perfection and pushes for authenticity with ”Keep Me Up.” Both the songwriting and production take a raw turn without sacrificing the sound quality as Adelaide treks on as a soloist.

“Keep Me Up” is about seeing or thinking about someone you already did all of the work of getting over emotionally,” Adelaide says. “How you don't want them to make you happy or sad because it would rip your heart back open. It's about working hard to stay neutral when someone really has the ability to get under your skin.”

One month after the song's June release, Adelaide also released the video, which continued the push for realism. Filmed and edited by Nina Dolgin (WonderRoot), listeners are guided down a trail of nostalgia. The video was shot at the Goat Farm, and acts as a diary focusing on relationships. But the term relationship holds an extended meaning — from human connections to an intimacy with the city of Atlanta itself. 

“It’s kind of a love letter to the city,” she says. “I wanted it to be really simple and cozy.”
As a multifaceted artist, Adelaide’s tangible art takes refuge in her music and vice versa. Although songwriting and painting have different creative processes, she combines them by incorporating a visual element during live shows. 

“Both art and music inform one another, especially when it comes to performance,” she says. “I try to channel the energy that I want to present to the listeners. A lot of times I see that as color and it makes me think of painting and flow. The feeling of creation.”

Whether Adelaide treks on as a solo artist, collaborative musician, or painter, she’s sure to enthrall audiences with a kaleidoscope of talents that pull on multiple sensory channels. — Lauren Leathers



Bad Spell’s most recent release, a track titled “Don’t Go Out Tonight,” offers a healthy dose of fuzzed up, grimy psychedelia. Throughout the song, which was produced by Bad Spell and Ed Rawls of Living Room Studios, singer Bryan Malone’s scratchy vocals warn an unidentified compadre that the outside winds are picking up and carrying ominous tidings. Dealing with the topics of paranoia and loneliness, the song is both gloomy and grinding, maintaining momentum via drum crashes, organ pads courtesy of guest musician Spencer Garn, and a lengthy and commendable guitar solo that rips through the middle. “Don’t Go Out Tonight” will appear on an upcoming album of the same name, and the track is accompanied by an appropriately trippy and scuffed up music video, directed by Bad Spell’s own Bryan Malone. The band plays the Star Bar on Sat., Aug. 25, with Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, the Woggles, and DJ Vikki V.— Annika Von Grey



Illiterates’ latst single “Horton Heats A Who,” produced by Matt McCalvin (Gringo Star, Zoners, St. Pe), is theatrical, fun, and a little bit twisted. The song is fairly sparse, hanging on to the pace created by stuttering drums and singer Steve Albertson’s stream-of-consciousness vocal ranting. Sporadic and fairly manic guitar wails and punk laced gang vocals echo throughout the track, adding some aesthetic depth. A few key harmonized guitar moments bump up the complexity of the song, showcasing Illiterates as a group with some meaningful talent to go along with their spunk. The song will appear on the band’s upcoming debut LP Makeout Mountain and positions them as an up-and-coming act to watch.— AVG    Mario Fernando for James Jewels SEEING COLORS: “I try to channel the energy that I want to present to the listeners. A lot of times I see that as color and it makes me think of painting and flow. The feeling of creation.” - Adelaide                                    NEW MUSIC MONDAY: Adelaide, Bad Spell, and Illiterates "
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Article

Monday July 30, 2018 11:58 pm EDT


Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled...

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