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The Residents: In the eye of the beholder

How avant-garde rock icon the Residents changed pop music, and singer Molly Harvey's life, forever

ResidentsAtGGBridge1979
Photo credit: Poor Know Graphics
THE EYES HAVE IT: The Residents in San Francisco in the late ’70s.

In the winter of 1993, Molly Harvey was lost. She was 21 years old, and shortly after graduating from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond with a BFA in Theatre, had landed on the streets of San Francisco. She came not in pursuit of an acting gig, but to be with her father, who was dying of cancer. When he died just a few months later, she had nowhere to go. Homeless and couch-surfing, she took a job at the first place she saw a help-wanted sign, a café in the South of Market Street district called Elsie's. "It wasn't a cool San Francisco coffee hangout, either," Harvey says. Elsie's was a dive in what was then a derelict warehouse district before the dot-com boom transformed the area into luxury lofts and live/work condos. "The place was owned by a cop who had hair plugs," Harvey says. "The coffee was terrible and we were still serving it in Styrofoam cups. I was stuck there at a time when my life had no direction, and I had no idea how I was going to move on."

But within the first few hours of her first waitressing shift, a chance meeting at the cash register changed her life forever. An unassuming, middle-aged man came in to buy a latte and when he went to pay, Harvey noticed a small but colorful medical painting of an eyeball on his wallet. For reasons that she still cannot fully explain, she blurted out the question, "Oh! Are you a fan of the Residents?"

She was vaguely familiar with the mythologized avant-garde performance art band, mostly because she'd heard friends talking about the group in high school. But all she really knew about the Residents was the group's iconic image: four faceless, genderless beings with oversized eyeballs for heads, dressed in tuxedos and top hats. The customer hesitated, then he replied, "Well, yeah ... kind of."

He didn't let on at first, but she soon learned he was Residents co-manager Homer Flynn. Since 1976, Flynn and his Cryptic Corporation partner Hardy Fox have split duties managing the Residents and overseeing the affairs of the group's long-standing independent label, Ralph Records. Their warehouse-size office space was just three doors down from Elsie's on Folsom Street. Being in such close proximity to each other in an otherwise desolate part of town, Harvey and Flynn were bound to see a lot more of each other.

Although they had no way of knowing it at the time, their fateful exchange marked the beginning of a long-lasting friendship that would lead to Harvey joining the Residents. For more than a decade, she toured the world singing with the group and serving as a creative catalyst during a crucial chapter of the band's ongoing evolution.

Since the group's formation in 1972, the Residents have remained an anonymous enigma, an icon in American music's freaky fringes, where performance art, punk, new wave, and the avant-garde collide with unbridled creativity and experimentation. The group's surreal musical theatrics and twisted narratives have generated nearly 80 albums, all of which wreak havoc on the senses. They bear such curious titles as The Third Reich 'N Roll, God in Three Persons, Eskimo, and Demons Dance Alone. In the early days, the group's primitive anti-rock 'n' roll clatter synthesized the influences of everyone from John Cage to Sun Ra, while deconstructing such '60s pop standards as "Land of a Thousand Dances" and "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag." The Residents challenged the notions of what noise is, and what pop music could be. Along the way, the group's fiercely self-reliant tactics laid the foundation for everything from the world of homespun record labels to the flood of self-conceived and -produced music videos that flood the Internet today. Across the board, DIY music owes a debt to the Residents' early efforts to create a fun-house-mirror view of the world — a protocol that continues to evolve in the face of social media as the group embarks on its 40th anniversary Wonder Of Weird Tour.

According to legend, the group's members originally hailed from Shreveport, La., and they adopted the name "The Residents" in 1971 after a reel-to-reel demo tape they'd sent to Warner Bros. agent Hal Halverstadt (best known for signing Captain Beefheart) was mailed back with a rejection letter made out to "the Residents." By neglecting to include a name with their return address, a mysterious legacy was born.

Undeterred by Warner Bros.' rejection, the group took matters into its own hands and launched Ralph Records to release its debut single, a double 7-inch set titled "Santa Dog." As Fox explains, starting an independent label was not about taking a stance in defiance of the record industry as much as it was an act of self-preservation. "Founding Ralph Records was the result of necessity," Fox says. "Truthfully, most people hated the Residents, still do."

[page]


The men (or possibly women) behind the Residents have successfully kept their identities concealed for decades, and do not grant interviews. Their dedicated anonymity created a mania. Perhaps "The Simpsons" creator Matt Groening said it best when he penned a bio for the group's now-defunct W.E.I.R.D. fan club circa 1979: "There is no true story of The Residents. You should know that right off. The secrets of The Residents will never be revealed by anyone but The Residents themselves, and so far they aren't saying much."

When it comes to talking with the press, Fox and Flynn serve as the voices of the Residents, their plainspoken approach giving rise to even more speculation and mystery.

"The Residents are actually fairly normal people, and they wanted to maintain some separation between their public lives and their private lives," Flynn says. When he speaks, there is no denying that his languid, Cajun drawl bears an uncanny resemblance to the voice that can be heard singing, screaming, growling, and warbling throughout so many of the Residents' records. Yet he maintains that he is not a member of the group. "I have connections to the band prior to 1976, when Cryptic took over, but it was all fairly informal. My area of expertise is graphics," Flynn says. "I've done all or most all of the Residents' album covers and promo materials and that sort of stuff. I consulted with the Residents on a few things before we started the more formal relationship."

As punk and new wave become dominant cultural influences in the late '70s, the public became curious about the Residents. "Most of the time the market is controlled by market forces, but every once in a while the gate swings open and a lot of crazy people get to come to the party for a while," Flynn says. "That's what the punk and new wave era was; the music business had become stagnant, and all a the sudden there was a lot of new life and energy in music."

Over the years, the group has continually embraced new technologies. When music video became a viable format for pop music, the Residents were among the first to add visual accompaniments to songs. The group gained some notoriety via the USA Network's late-night variety show "Night Flight," circa 1981. During its weekly Friday- and Saturday-night broadcasts, videos for Residents numbers such as "Hello Skinny," the "One Minute Movies" — minute-long films meant to be watched repeatedly — or the stark black-and-white, Eraserhead-esque "Third Reich 'N Roll" music video were regular features.

After Cryptic took over Ralph in 1976, it upped the stakes. Other groups besides the Residents, ranging from terse art-punks MX-80 Sound and Tuxedomoon to the bombastic synth-pop of Swiss group Yello to warped guitarist and singer Philip Lithman, aka Snakefinger, were all part of the Ralph roster. The Residents even cowrote and produced the first two Snakefinger records, Chewing Hides the Sound (1979) and Greener Postures (1980). Snakefinger went on to become a regular sideman with the Residents until he died of a heart attack in the summer of 1987.

Cryptic's mission to expand the label's scope by signing what were ostensibly more commercially viable groups created a financial footing that allowed the Residents unhindered creative freedom.

Ironically, even though the other acts it had signed were superficially more accessible, none of them came close to selling as many records as the Residents. "Much of this had to do with the mythology and the image the group had created," Flynn says. "By working together, the Residents and Cryptic had created a more seductive image for the group, and audiences latched onto it."

When Harvey and Flynn struck up their friendship, the Residents were continuing to experiment with then-cutting-edge CD-ROM technology. The group was busy piecing together what would become 1995's Gingerbread Man. Flynn had mentioned to her that Cryptic was busy organizing everything for the Residents. One day, during his regular stop at Elsie's, Harvey was feeling a bit wired after drinking too much coffee. She was just trying to stay sane on a slow day at work when she put a set of fake buckteeth into her mouth and began talking in a Southern accent. "That was my go-to for nearly everything at the time," she says. "I said to Homer, 'Can't you give me a job or something? I can do voices.'"

She was partially joking, and even delivered the question in a way that would ease the blow of rejection. But he paused for a moment and then responded, "Maybe. ... Can you do an old woman's voice?"

Her reply: "Of course I can do an old woman's voice!"

Flynn consulted with the Residents about using Harvey for the project. She was brought into the studio to read for the part — a monologue for a song about an elderly woman who wants to be loved, but will never recognize that her manipulative ways contribute to her sense of agony. Just who was present during the recording session, or if Flynn was even there, Harvey won't say. "Because I was stupid enough to be there and not really grasp who I was with, I was able to read the part quickly and not be nervous," she says. "They liked that I worked fast, and once it was done, it was done. They recorded me and nothing much happened after that, not for a while."

[page]


In time, she also befriended another regular customer at the coffee shop, a woman named Sarah McLennan who was a managing partner at Ralph. McLennan enlisted Harvey to work filling the label's mail orders, which became a full-time job. If Harvey was only vaguely familiar with the Residents' music up to that point, she now had a universe of the group's records and CDs at her fingertips.

She immediately immersed herself in the music. "As soon as I had access to it, I was into it," she says. "We listened to a lot of the music in the office, and I became familiar with the whole Ralph Records catalogue," she adds, running though a list of her favorites. Renaldo & the Loaf's 1983 LP Title in Limbo and Snakefinger's cover of Kraftwerk's "The Model" from his Chewing Hides the Sound LP still resonate with her. When it comes to the Residents, she was always drawn to the group's 1988 album, God in Three Persons, mostly because of its powerful storytelling elements.

Eventually, the part that Harvey had casually gone in to read for the song "The Old Woman" appeared on Gingerbread Man. When she heard it, she was elated, but still in shock that she had been accepted by and even become a part of the group. "Our aesthetics just worked — everything about it was symbiotic," Harvey says. "My weirdness and their weirdness complemented each other."

The Residents brought Harvey to Köln, Germany, for a one-off performance in August 1997 titled "Disfigured Night (The Saga of Silly Billy)." Because her character was a mute, her only vocal part during the entire show was to hum a bit of USA for Africa's charity song "We are the World." That performance was the extent of her experience singing on stage. At a restaurant after the show, however, one of the Residents pulled her aside to explain that the Fillmore in San Francisco had contacted them to play five nights, leading up to a midnight show on Halloween. Not only was she going to be on stage with the group, she was going to sing. "I was like, 'What? ... What? Um, OK ...'" she says. "And then there I was on stage in front of 2,000 people at the Fillmore ... singing for the Residents. No pressure!"

She survived the shows, which to her felt very much like trial-by-fire. Afterward, she found that she had earned a place among the group's ranks. It also meant it was time to make a decision. When the show was over, according to Harvey, one of the Residents said, "Do you want to keep your identity, or do you want to be anonymous?"

Her decision wasn't difficult: She stuck with Molly Harvey. "I never really felt like I was one of the Residents, but also, while working at the Ralph office, fans would call every day to talk about the music and whatnot, and they all knew me as Molly," she explains. "I already had a rapport with a lot of the Residents' fans, so I kept it at that."

Over the next decade, Harvey lent her voice to several Residents albums, including Bad Day on the Midway, Wormwood: Curious Stories from the Bible, and what is perhaps the group's most poignant album yet, Demons Dance Alone. Since she started appearing with the band more than 15 years ago, the Residents seem to have discovered that a little subtlety goes a long way. The music remains as bizarre and challenging as ever, but the more melodic arrangements of albums such as Demons Dance Alone reveal new layers of emotional depth. Whether that has anything to do with an added female presence, or if it was just the Residents maturing as artists, is anyone's guess.

In 2005, the group released Animal Lover, Harvey's final studio recording with the Residents. That same year she embarked on a trek to Australia to sing for the Way We Were Tour, which became her last major outing with the group. Since 2003, Harvey has called Atlanta home, and although her initial plan was to keep working with the Residents, the distance and time apart have resulted in a gradual, but natural parting of ways. She is a mother now, and in a new chapter of her life. The Residents have carried on as well. This year marks the Residents' 40th anniversary, and just as it always has done, the group is continuing to experiment with changing technology, social media in particular.

[page]


Since the rise of the Internet, the concept of anonymity, at least from the Residents' perspective, has been abused. But rather than lament the technological dilemma, the group has adapted its façade to fit the times. When the Residents appeared on stage during their 2010-11 Talking Light Tour, something had clearly changed. There wasn't a single one of the group's trademark eyeballs present, and its members, now stripped down to three, had outed themselves as Randy, Bob, and Chuck. They were three costumed characters presented as though you should already know them — or at least Randy. Bob and Chuck flanked Randy on either side of the stage, lingering in the shadows, hunched over keyboards and guitars and dressed in matching insect-like costumes. The stage set was an invitation into Randy's living room, where, dressed in his bathrobe, he was comfortable enough to share a series of ghost stories with the audience. He masqueraded around the stage, acting as though the veil of anonymity had been lifted. In its place, the group had switched gears to welcome the aesthetics of complete familiarity, albeit in a manner just as convoluted as anything else the group had ever done.

Fox insists that the Residents have never been any more anonymous than anyone else who performs with a stage name. "Names reveal nothing about a person, and very few show folks use their real name, anyway," Fox says. "We live in a world of Lady Gagas and Bob Dylans, and people in show business surgically remodel their face on a whim. The whole anonymous fascination is much more of a thing to the outside world."

It's a valid point: Everyone from indie rock icon Bonnie "Prince" Billy to Miley Cyrus as Hannah Montana disguises his or her identity to varying degrees. But what sets the Residents apart, even as Randy, Bob, and Chuck, is a fundamental void. It is human nature to ascribe value to facial recognition and familiarity. Regardless of how contrived that sense of recognition may be, it is a core element of celebrity culture, pop music, and social media. Most performers give you a face and a name behind the act. It's in defying this formula that the Residents have given themselves a face-lift while staying true to the group's original mission.

But creating Randy, Bob, and Chuck personalizes the Residents, adding a new and modern layer to their presentation. "In all honesty, they had been trying to get away from the eyeball and top hat thing for years, but for one reason or another they would have to re-create it for promotion or for some other reason because it was so successful," Flynn says. "But underneath that, they had been chomping at the bit for change."

Fox is more cynical with his take on the transformation. "If I say that one of the Residents is Charles Bobuck, you would say, 'Never heard of him,'" Fox says. "It really means nothing, so in time you can't be a person. No one is interested in such boredom as a 'Bobuck.' The Residents are stuck being the Residents or being nobody at all."

Still, Charles "Chuck" Bobuck is on Facebook, and he regularly posts bits of fiction and observations via his Codgers on the Moon blog, stating outright that he is the "primary composer and arranger for the Residents." Likewise, Randy Rose appears in an infomercial advertising the Residents' limited edition (just 10) Ultimate Box Set, which is actually a refrigerator packed with all of the group's major releases and an original eyeball mask that sells for the low price of $100,000.

Randy also has a Tumblr, called Maurice and Me, where he mixes Residents history lessons with answering questions from fans. He also uses his Tumblr as an outlet for ruminating on obtuse topics such as his sexual exploits, his 11 failed marriages, and his cat Maurice — whom he's claimed as his life partner. Fabricated or not, it's an impressive, Residents-style take on social media, riffing on the absurdly juicy details that drive celebrity culture. It's also the same playful sense of humor that was on display 40 years ago when the group defaced the cover of Meet the Beatles for its own debut, Meet the Residents, and identified its members as Paul McCrawfish, John Crawfish, George Crawfish, and Ringo Starfish.

Just as the members of the Residents have found a new direction while redefining the group, Harvey's life has taken on a new direction. She's now raising her son, Flynn, and working as a substitute teacher. Life has carried her far away from the derelict SoMa streets of the early '90s, where she first made the acquaintance of Homer Flynn and, through him, the Residents. These days she takes the stage with them any time the group passes through town to play a show, and she's still interested in doing voice work; always keeping an ear to the ground.

Ironically, it's when reflecting on the years and her experiences with the Residents a decade later that she realizes it was only by becoming a part of the group's twisted worldview that she was able to find the direction in life that she needed. "I was at such a transitional point in my life when I met them, and the experiences that I carry with me from the years I spent with them are how I learned to be a normal person in society. That's where I found the balance of being able to make something crazy, but still be a happy, healthy person — to be normal and have a family," she says. "For me, meeting the Residents was an absolute lifesaver."

 



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  string(6643) "In June, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp declared that live music venues are allowed to reopen their stages for performances as of July 1. However, don’t expect the monthly music calendar to fill up anytime soon. Across the board, Atlanta’s live music promoters say that without a COVID-19 vaccine ready to go, or proof positive that the rate of infections is trending downward, most clubs aren’t comfortable inviting people to their shows. Most Atlanta music venue doors will remain shuttered for the time being.

“Sadly, we can’t really operate until we can operate safely with 100 plus people in the room, and [[[[[[knowing] that customers are comfortable coming out and eating in close quarters,” says Live Nation talent buyer and Eddie’s Attic promoter Andrew Hingley. “I also believe the vibe of the concert experience won’t translate that well with social distancing and musicians looking out to a small crowd of masks. I believe the energy for the customer and for the artists will be a disconnect from what people are used to,” he continues. “I believe Eddie’s Attic is looking at a mid-August to September time frame.”

But even if club owners do want to start booking shows, the number of bands and artists on the road is virtually nil for now and for the foreseeable future. OK Productions’ promoter Alex Weiss says, “It is crazy to open up venues, especially with the guidelines that Kemp has issued. With the way things work with the bands that I deal with, it will take more than a couple of weeks to set up a show, even if I wanted to, which I don’t.” He adds, “I definitely do not feel comfortable putting people at risk at this time. Most of the artists I deal with aren’t planning to tour now until 2021.”

In addition to the potential health risks of filling up rooms with concertgoers, Atlanta, and indeed the rest of the country are still reeling with daily protests being waged following the killing of George Floyd and now the June 12 police shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.

Face of Knives promoter Daniel DeSimone, who books the Bakery, explains that these larger issues at hand take precedence over the daily operations of booking a club. What’s more, the lease on the Bakery’s 825 Warner Street location expired on June 30, and it will not be renewed. The celebrated independent arts and music venue is moving on. Details remain to be determined. In the meantime, the Bakery’s staff and organizers are still operating out of their temporary New Square location above Underground Atlanta.

Still, DeSimone reiterates that it will be a while before they’re up and running again. “Although Kemp has legally permitted event spaces to program as of July 1, we don’t ethically feel like we can invite people to our space and potentially contribute to the inevitable second wave of COVID-19, putting artists, guests, and staff at risk,” he says. “We likely won’t be regularly programming again until there is a proven, widespread, and affordable vaccine for the virus, and (we) encourage other public spaces to consider these risks as well. “Furthermore,” DeSimone adds, “we consider ourselves community organizers first, and a music venue second — maybe third, fourth, or fifth, honestly — and believe it is our duty as organizers to focus all of our efforts on addressing the larger human rights crisis facing our nation and city.”

Sadly, the Vista Room has closed its doors permanently. In an emailed announcement, the club states: “As an independent we simply cannot sensibly sustain the massive overheard losses which will now run thru (sic) at least August (six months) and even then, judging by the surprising lack of attendance at Restaurants & Gyms (sic) the last three weeks, people will hesitate coming until Christmas.”

The press release goes on to state that The Vista Room did not fail — “... we were squashed by a bug! But we are all alive and moving on down new trails as the world deals with COVID-19.”

On the NIVA front ...

Born in March when the coronavirus pandemic first took hold, and currently boasting more than 2,000 members in all 50 U.S. states, the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) is still hard at work lobbying congress for a much-needed financial boost to keep the country’s music venues alive. Following a recent survey showing that 90 percent of the nation’s music venues will go out of business permanently if they can’t feasibly reopen soon, the organization is rallying behind the RESTART Act (S. 3814). If passed, the bipartisan act will modify the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to work for businesses that have lost all revenue amid the shelter-in-place orders. RESTART promises six months of payroll and operating expenses for music venues, and allows for more flexible use of government-sponsored loans with no minimum requirements for expense categories. RESTART expands availability for small businesses that work mostly with part-time employees, and extends the time frame for repayment and  PPP loan forgiveness. Stay tuned for more information as it becomes available.

In new releases news …    Creativity by any means necessary is the driving force behind Touch, a new six-song album from Child of Regulus, aka Quinn Mason. Touch was conceived, composed, and executed entirely by Mason using his smartphone equipped with GarageBand and iKaossilator software.

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Atlanta’s D-beat torchbearers Disable have a new 7-inch out, titled ... Slamming in the Depths of Hell. The record blasts six songs of hardcore punk fury with titles such as “Hellish Nightmare,” “False Flag,” and “Whistling Death” — anthems for our tumultuous times.

Chemical Illusion, the final offering from the late Rick Dang’s rock ‘n’ roll underdog outfit Dang Dang Dang, is now available on vinyl via Bandcamp. The album was originally released in June of 2018; Dang passed away in October 2019. —CL—"
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  string(6689) "In June, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp declared that live music venues are allowed to reopen their stages for performances as of July 1. However, don’t expect the monthly music calendar to fill up anytime soon. Across the board, Atlanta’s live music promoters say that without a COVID-19 vaccine ready to go, or proof positive that the rate of infections is trending downward, most clubs aren’t comfortable inviting people to their shows. Most Atlanta music venue doors will remain shuttered for the time being.

“Sadly, we can’t really operate until we can operate safely with 100 plus people in the room, and [[[[[[[[knowing] that customers are comfortable coming out and eating in close quarters,” says Live Nation talent buyer and Eddie’s Attic promoter Andrew Hingley. “I also believe the vibe of the concert experience won’t translate that well with social distancing and musicians looking out to a small crowd of masks. I believe the energy for the customer and for the artists will be a disconnect from what people are used to,” he continues. “I believe Eddie’s Attic is looking at a mid-August to September time frame.”

But even if club owners do want to start booking shows, the number of bands and artists on the road is virtually nil for now and for the foreseeable future. OK Productions’ promoter Alex Weiss says, “It is crazy to open up venues, especially with the guidelines that Kemp has issued. With the way things work with the bands that I deal with, it will take more than a couple of weeks to set up a show, even if I wanted to, which I don’t.” He adds, “I definitely do not feel comfortable putting people at risk at this time. Most of the artists I deal with aren’t planning to tour now until 2021.”

In addition to the potential health risks of filling up rooms with concertgoers, Atlanta, and indeed the rest of the country are still reeling with daily protests being waged following the killing of George Floyd and now the June 12 police shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.

Face of Knives promoter Daniel DeSimone, who books the Bakery, explains that these larger issues at hand take precedence over the daily operations of booking a club. What’s more, the lease on the Bakery’s 825 Warner Street location expired on June 30, and it will not be renewed. The celebrated independent arts and music venue is moving on. Details remain to be determined. In the meantime, the Bakery’s staff and organizers are still operating out of their temporary New Square location above Underground Atlanta.

Still, DeSimone reiterates that it will be a while before they’re up and running again. “Although Kemp has legally permitted event spaces to program as of July 1, we don’t ethically feel like we can invite people to our space and potentially contribute to the inevitable second wave of COVID-19, putting artists, guests, and staff at risk,” he says. “We likely won’t be regularly programming again until there is a proven, widespread, and affordable vaccine for the virus, and (we) encourage other public spaces to consider these risks as well. “Furthermore,” DeSimone adds, “we consider ourselves community organizers first, and a music venue second — maybe third, fourth, or fifth, honestly — and believe it is our duty as organizers to focus all of our efforts on addressing the larger human rights crisis facing our nation and city.”

Sadly, the Vista Room has closed its doors permanently. In an emailed announcement, the club states: “As an independent we simply cannot sensibly sustain the massive overheard losses which will now run thru (sic) at least August (six months) and even then, judging by the surprising lack of attendance at Restaurants & Gyms (sic) the last three weeks, people will hesitate coming until Christmas.”

The press release goes on to state that The Vista Room did not fail — “... we were squashed by a bug! But we are all alive and moving on down new trails as the world deals with COVID-19.”

__On the NIVA front ...__

Born in March when the coronavirus pandemic first took hold, and currently boasting more than 2,000 members in all 50 U.S. states, the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) is still hard at work lobbying congress for a much-needed financial boost to keep the country’s music venues alive. Following a recent survey showing that 90 percent of the nation’s music venues will go out of business permanently if they can’t feasibly reopen soon, the organization is rallying behind the RESTART Act (S. 3814). If passed, the bipartisan act will modify the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to work for businesses that have lost all revenue amid the shelter-in-place orders. RESTART promises six months of payroll and operating expenses for music venues, and allows for more flexible use of government-sponsored loans with no minimum requirements for expense categories. RESTART expands availability for small businesses that work mostly with part-time employees, and extends the time frame for repayment and  PPP loan forgiveness. Stay tuned for more information as it becomes available.

__In new releases news …__    Creativity by any means necessary is the driving force behind ''Touch'', a new six-song album from __Child of Regulus__, aka __Quinn Mason__. ''Touch'' was conceived, composed, and executed entirely by Mason using his smartphone equipped with GarageBand and iKaossilator software.

Over the last several years, Mason has made his presence felt most strongly amid Atlanta’s late-night jazz scene, fluttering and skronking on a saxophone with Konda, Kamaal Williams, Wolfpack ATL, QUAS, and the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra. Mason also curates Gallery 992’s Sunday-night improv sessions. Following shelter-in-place orders, ''Touch'' was born as a means to keep creating music while he was literally left to his own devices. Songs such as “Your Mind, Your Time,” Lo-Fi Lullaby,” and “No Quieres Fumar” eschew Mason’s more recognizable jazz modes while exploring electronic music, techno, jazz, and funk inflections.

Atlanta’s D-beat torchbearers __Disable__ have a new 7-inch out, titled ''... Slamming in the Depths of Hell''. The record blasts six songs of hardcore punk fury with titles such as “Hellish Nightmare,” “False Flag,” and “Whistling Death” — anthems for our tumultuous times.

''Chemical Illusion'', the final offering from the late Rick Dang’s rock ‘n’ roll underdog outfit Dang Dang Dang, is now available on vinyl via Bandcamp. The album was originally released in June of 2018; Dang passed away in October 2019. __—CL—__"
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  string(7244) " Child Of Regulus  2020-07-01T19:51:29+00:00 Child_of_Regulus.jpg    amn atlantamusicnews Despite lifting restrictions, music venues may still face extinction 31944  2020-06-30T15:55:00+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA lobbies for a RESTART jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford Chad Radford 2020-06-30T15:55:00+00:00  In June, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp declared that live music venues are allowed to reopen their stages for performances as of July 1. However, don’t expect the monthly music calendar to fill up anytime soon. Across the board, Atlanta’s live music promoters say that without a COVID-19 vaccine ready to go, or proof positive that the rate of infections is trending downward, most clubs aren’t comfortable inviting people to their shows. Most Atlanta music venue doors will remain shuttered for the time being.

“Sadly, we can’t really operate until we can operate safely with 100 plus people in the room, and [[[[[[knowing] that customers are comfortable coming out and eating in close quarters,” says Live Nation talent buyer and Eddie’s Attic promoter Andrew Hingley. “I also believe the vibe of the concert experience won’t translate that well with social distancing and musicians looking out to a small crowd of masks. I believe the energy for the customer and for the artists will be a disconnect from what people are used to,” he continues. “I believe Eddie’s Attic is looking at a mid-August to September time frame.”

But even if club owners do want to start booking shows, the number of bands and artists on the road is virtually nil for now and for the foreseeable future. OK Productions’ promoter Alex Weiss says, “It is crazy to open up venues, especially with the guidelines that Kemp has issued. With the way things work with the bands that I deal with, it will take more than a couple of weeks to set up a show, even if I wanted to, which I don’t.” He adds, “I definitely do not feel comfortable putting people at risk at this time. Most of the artists I deal with aren’t planning to tour now until 2021.”

In addition to the potential health risks of filling up rooms with concertgoers, Atlanta, and indeed the rest of the country are still reeling with daily protests being waged following the killing of George Floyd and now the June 12 police shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.

Face of Knives promoter Daniel DeSimone, who books the Bakery, explains that these larger issues at hand take precedence over the daily operations of booking a club. What’s more, the lease on the Bakery’s 825 Warner Street location expired on June 30, and it will not be renewed. The celebrated independent arts and music venue is moving on. Details remain to be determined. In the meantime, the Bakery’s staff and organizers are still operating out of their temporary New Square location above Underground Atlanta.

Still, DeSimone reiterates that it will be a while before they’re up and running again. “Although Kemp has legally permitted event spaces to program as of July 1, we don’t ethically feel like we can invite people to our space and potentially contribute to the inevitable second wave of COVID-19, putting artists, guests, and staff at risk,” he says. “We likely won’t be regularly programming again until there is a proven, widespread, and affordable vaccine for the virus, and (we) encourage other public spaces to consider these risks as well. “Furthermore,” DeSimone adds, “we consider ourselves community organizers first, and a music venue second — maybe third, fourth, or fifth, honestly — and believe it is our duty as organizers to focus all of our efforts on addressing the larger human rights crisis facing our nation and city.”

Sadly, the Vista Room has closed its doors permanently. In an emailed announcement, the club states: “As an independent we simply cannot sensibly sustain the massive overheard losses which will now run thru (sic) at least August (six months) and even then, judging by the surprising lack of attendance at Restaurants & Gyms (sic) the last three weeks, people will hesitate coming until Christmas.”

The press release goes on to state that The Vista Room did not fail — “... we were squashed by a bug! But we are all alive and moving on down new trails as the world deals with COVID-19.”

On the NIVA front ...

Born in March when the coronavirus pandemic first took hold, and currently boasting more than 2,000 members in all 50 U.S. states, the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) is still hard at work lobbying congress for a much-needed financial boost to keep the country’s music venues alive. Following a recent survey showing that 90 percent of the nation’s music venues will go out of business permanently if they can’t feasibly reopen soon, the organization is rallying behind the RESTART Act (S. 3814). If passed, the bipartisan act will modify the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to work for businesses that have lost all revenue amid the shelter-in-place orders. RESTART promises six months of payroll and operating expenses for music venues, and allows for more flexible use of government-sponsored loans with no minimum requirements for expense categories. RESTART expands availability for small businesses that work mostly with part-time employees, and extends the time frame for repayment and  PPP loan forgiveness. Stay tuned for more information as it becomes available.

In new releases news …    Creativity by any means necessary is the driving force behind Touch, a new six-song album from Child of Regulus, aka Quinn Mason. Touch was conceived, composed, and executed entirely by Mason using his smartphone equipped with GarageBand and iKaossilator software.

Over the last several years, Mason has made his presence felt most strongly amid Atlanta’s late-night jazz scene, fluttering and skronking on a saxophone with Konda, Kamaal Williams, Wolfpack ATL, QUAS, and the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra. Mason also curates Gallery 992’s Sunday-night improv sessions. Following shelter-in-place orders, Touch was born as a means to keep creating music while he was literally left to his own devices. Songs such as “Your Mind, Your Time,” Lo-Fi Lullaby,” and “No Quieres Fumar” eschew Mason’s more recognizable jazz modes while exploring electronic music, techno, jazz, and funk inflections.

Atlanta’s D-beat torchbearers Disable have a new 7-inch out, titled ... Slamming in the Depths of Hell. The record blasts six songs of hardcore punk fury with titles such as “Hellish Nightmare,” “False Flag,” and “Whistling Death” — anthems for our tumultuous times.

Chemical Illusion, the final offering from the late Rick Dang’s rock ‘n’ roll underdog outfit Dang Dang Dang, is now available on vinyl via Bandcamp. The album was originally released in June of 2018; Dang passed away in October 2019. —CL—    Courtesy Marquinn Mason CHILD OF REGULUS: While sheltered in place, saxophonist Quinn Mason crafted ‘Touch,’ an electronic album composed on his phone.  0,0,10    AMN atlantamusicnews                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA lobbies for a RESTART "
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Tuesday June 30, 2020 11:55 am EDT
Despite lifting restrictions, music venues may still face extinction | more...
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  string(72) "New releases from Adam McIntyre, Mathis Hunter, Young Antiques, and more"
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  string(5305) "For most of us, after nearly three months of sheltering in place, the charm of quarantine time has worn off. But for Adam McIntyre of The Pinx, the downtime is proving to be quite an inspiration.

“I was a prolific writer as a teenager, and without my daily tasks of driving kids around and doing things I think I have to do but don’t, I go right back to what recharges and equally burns my energy, which is making music,” McIntyre says. “It’s all I want to do. So knowing that I was about to have a lot of time to create, I decided to get naked.”

McIntyre has created a trilogy of albums — a blues album, The Devil Got My Soul!; a more direct rock ‘n’ roll album, You’re Doing It Right; and a third, currently unreleased, album tentatively titled Quarantology III. McIntyre plans to change the name before it’s unleashed unto the public.

All three albums represent variations on a theme: McIntyre’s efforts to get comfortable without the “rock suit” he’s fashioned for himself while singing and playing guitar with the Pinx. “It’s a wonderful, beautiful suit if I do say so,” he adds. “But what if I wasn’t expected to do that? I took off the suit and made a blues record because that’s how I started. You’re Doing It Right is going even farther into removing identity. It’s running around wearing only purple paint. In space.”

Songs on McIntyre’s third record will largely be about becoming nobody, which he says is based on Ram Dass’s talks on ego vs. identity vs. the soul. “I’m looking to make a very fun record about losing yourself and seeing what is still left,” he says. “I guess it’s a trilogy of taking off your clothes, spiritually.”

To kick off this seemingly spontaneous series, in late March, McIntyre rolled out the first single from The Devil Got My Soul!, titled “Do The Damn Thing,” which features a blistering solo by Wayne Kramer of the MC5.

With all of this new material taking shape, McIntyre has also found time for a whole batch of Pinx songs as well. The group has a new EP tentatively scheduled for a July release, and four to five songs are coming together for the next full-length album as well. More details are coming soon.

Of course, McIntyre isn’t the only local rock dude to turn out a new record this spring. Chunklet Industries and Mathis Hunter’s self-run indie label Ley Lines have teamed up to release Hunter’s latest album, Mood Lighting.

Following a new single from the LP that previewed in April, “Clone It Off,” Mood Lighting emerges as a layered, inward journey that’s as sentimentally profound as it is psychedelic. Each number reflects on the ins and outs of reconnecting with one’s identity in the wake of a relationship coming to an end. For this outing, Hunter takes up guitar, bass, percussion, and various other musical duties, and is joined by a coterie of Atlanta all-stars including drummer Lee Corum, Rich Morris on keys, and Andy Morrison playing guitar and lap steel. 

Keep your eyes peeled for a new video for the album’s closing number “Don’t Be Long” to arrive in June.

In other Chunklet-related news, on June 5, the label is rolling out a handful of stellar new releases including a Honey Radar singles comp featuring liner notes by Byron Coley; a new single by Shark Toys, which includes a Desperate Bicycles cover on the B-side; and 7-inch singles by Atlanta acts Vangas, Reverends, and the almighty Purkinje Shift.

Another Risk Of The Heart is the latest release from longtime Atlanta songwriting hero Blake Rainey and the Young Antiques. Released via Southern Lovers Recording Co., Another Risk Of The Heart is pressed on gorgeous blue vinyl, and finds singer and guitarist Rainey flanked by bass player Blake Parris and new drummer John Speaks (Skirt, the Jody Grind), all reveling in new anthemic songs with titles such as “Euclid Creeper,” “I Think You’ll Never,” and “Goin’ Home” featuring vocals by Atlanta expat Kelly Hogan (Neko Case, the Decemberists, Rock*A*Teens, The Jody Grind).

Each song was recorded in Rainey’s home Southern Lovers Recording Studios, blending his signature blend of power pop hooks and storytelling with a rural Southern inflection and crystalline production. Chris Lopez ( Rock*A*Teens, Tenement Halls) and Tom Cheshire (West End Motel, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves) also make guest appearances throughout the album.

Grace Bellury’s indie rock outfit Karaoke has a new video out for the song “Lo Hi.” The song is set to appear on a forthcoming album, title TBD. The video, directed by DJ Barbie Corvette, is a single shot — no cuts — in which the group’s synth player Adrian Benedykt Świtoń dances and writhes around a glowing hotel room eating pizza, smoking cigarettes, and staring into the camera with fixed, bedroom eyes. Sultry. Absurd. Awesome. The “Lo Hi” video is the first in a series of five new videos in which all members of the group will get their individual screen time. Look for more coming very soon.

Last, but not least, on May 22, Brian Revels & the Heat Lightning released a brand-new album, Jasper County Blues. Check it out on Spotify. —CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com."
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  string(5454) "For most of us, after nearly three months of sheltering in place, the charm of quarantine time has worn off. But for __Adam McIntyre__ of __The Pinx__, the downtime is proving to be quite an inspiration.

“I was a prolific writer as a teenager, and without my daily tasks of driving kids around and doing things I think I have to do but don’t, I go right back to what recharges and equally burns my energy, which is making music,” McIntyre says. “It’s all I want to do. So knowing that I was about to have a lot of time to create, I decided to get naked.”

McIntyre has created a trilogy of albums — a blues album, ''The Devil Got My Soul!''; a more direct rock ‘n’ roll album, ''You’re Doing It Right''; and a third, currently unreleased, album tentatively titled ''Quarantology III''. McIntyre plans to change the name before it’s unleashed unto the public.

All three albums represent variations on a theme: McIntyre’s efforts to get comfortable without the “rock suit” he’s fashioned for himself while singing and playing guitar with the Pinx. “It’s a wonderful, beautiful suit if I do say so,” he adds. “But what if I wasn’t expected to do that? I took off the suit and made a blues record because that’s how I started. ''You’re Doing It Right'' is going even farther into removing identity. It’s running around wearing only purple paint. In space.”

Songs on McIntyre’s third record will largely be about becoming nobody, which he says is based on Ram Dass’s talks on ego vs. identity vs. the soul. “I’m looking to make a very fun record about losing yourself and seeing what is still left,” he says. “I guess it’s a trilogy of taking off your clothes, spiritually.”

To kick off this seemingly spontaneous series, in late March, McIntyre rolled out the first single from ''The Devil Got My Soul!'', titled “Do The Damn Thing,” which features a blistering solo by __Wayne Kramer__ of the MC5.

With all of this new material taking shape, McIntyre has also found time for a whole batch of Pinx songs as well. The group has a new EP tentatively scheduled for a July release, and four to five songs are coming together for the next full-length album as well. More details are coming soon.

Of course, McIntyre isn’t the only local rock dude to turn out a new record this spring. __Chunklet Industries__ and __Mathis Hunter__’s self-run indie label ''Ley Lines'' have teamed up to release Hunter’s latest album, ''Mood Lighting''.

Following a new single from the LP that previewed in April, “Clone It Off,” ''Mood Lighting'' emerges as a layered, inward journey that’s as sentimentally profound as it is psychedelic. Each number reflects on the ins and outs of reconnecting with one’s identity in the wake of a relationship coming to an end. For this outing, Hunter takes up guitar, bass, percussion, and various other musical duties, and is joined by a coterie of Atlanta all-stars including drummer __Lee Corum__, __Rich Morris__ on keys, and __Andy Morrison__ playing guitar and lap steel. 

Keep your eyes peeled for a new video for the album’s closing number “Don’t Be Long” to arrive in June.

In other Chunklet-related news, on June 5, the label is rolling out a handful of stellar new releases including a __Honey Radar__ singles comp featuring liner notes by __Byron Coley__; a new single by __Shark Toys__, which includes a Desperate Bicycles cover on the B-side; and 7-inch singles by Atlanta acts __Vangas__, __Reverends__, and the almighty __Purkinje Shift__.

''Another Risk Of The Heart'' is the latest release from longtime Atlanta songwriting hero __Blake Rainey__ and the __Young Antiques__. Released via __Southern Lovers Recording Co.__, ''Another Risk Of The Heart'' is pressed on gorgeous blue vinyl, and finds singer and guitarist Rainey flanked by bass player Blake Parris and new drummer John Speaks (Skirt, the Jody Grind), all reveling in new anthemic songs with titles such as “Euclid Creeper,” “I Think You’ll Never,” and “Goin’ Home” featuring vocals by Atlanta expat __Kelly Hogan__ (Neko Case, the Decemberists, Rock*A*Teens, The Jody Grind).

Each song was recorded in Rainey’s home Southern Lovers Recording Studios, blending his signature blend of power pop hooks and storytelling with a rural Southern inflection and crystalline production. __Chris Lopez__ ( Rock*A*Teens, Tenement Halls) and __Tom Cheshire__ (West End Motel, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves) also make guest appearances throughout the album.

__Grace Bellury__’s indie rock outfit __Karaoke__ has a new video out for the song “Lo Hi.” The song is set to appear on a forthcoming album, title TBD. The video, directed by __DJ Barbie Corvette__, is a single shot — no cuts — in which the group’s synth player __Adrian Benedykt Świtoń__ dances and writhes around a glowing hotel room eating pizza, smoking cigarettes, and staring into the camera with fixed, bedroom eyes. Sultry. Absurd. Awesome. The “Lo Hi” video is the first in a series of five new videos in which all members of the group will get their individual screen time. Look for more coming very soon.

Last, but not least, on May 22, __Brian Revels & the Heat Lightning__ released a brand-new album, ''Jasper County Blues''. Check it out on Spotify. __—CL—__

''Send local music news items to chad.radford@creativeloafing.com''."
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  string(5841) " Adam McIntyre Of The Pinx Web  2020-06-04T13:39:00+00:00 Adam_McIntyre_of_the_Pinx_web.jpg    amn atlmusicnews New releases from Adam McIntyre, Mathis Hunter, Young Antiques, and more 31431  2020-06-04T03:59:00+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: Music for guys who like music jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford Chad Radford 2020-06-04T03:59:00+00:00  For most of us, after nearly three months of sheltering in place, the charm of quarantine time has worn off. But for Adam McIntyre of The Pinx, the downtime is proving to be quite an inspiration.

“I was a prolific writer as a teenager, and without my daily tasks of driving kids around and doing things I think I have to do but don’t, I go right back to what recharges and equally burns my energy, which is making music,” McIntyre says. “It’s all I want to do. So knowing that I was about to have a lot of time to create, I decided to get naked.”

McIntyre has created a trilogy of albums — a blues album, The Devil Got My Soul!; a more direct rock ‘n’ roll album, You’re Doing It Right; and a third, currently unreleased, album tentatively titled Quarantology III. McIntyre plans to change the name before it’s unleashed unto the public.

All three albums represent variations on a theme: McIntyre’s efforts to get comfortable without the “rock suit” he’s fashioned for himself while singing and playing guitar with the Pinx. “It’s a wonderful, beautiful suit if I do say so,” he adds. “But what if I wasn’t expected to do that? I took off the suit and made a blues record because that’s how I started. You’re Doing It Right is going even farther into removing identity. It’s running around wearing only purple paint. In space.”

Songs on McIntyre’s third record will largely be about becoming nobody, which he says is based on Ram Dass’s talks on ego vs. identity vs. the soul. “I’m looking to make a very fun record about losing yourself and seeing what is still left,” he says. “I guess it’s a trilogy of taking off your clothes, spiritually.”

To kick off this seemingly spontaneous series, in late March, McIntyre rolled out the first single from The Devil Got My Soul!, titled “Do The Damn Thing,” which features a blistering solo by Wayne Kramer of the MC5.

With all of this new material taking shape, McIntyre has also found time for a whole batch of Pinx songs as well. The group has a new EP tentatively scheduled for a July release, and four to five songs are coming together for the next full-length album as well. More details are coming soon.

Of course, McIntyre isn’t the only local rock dude to turn out a new record this spring. Chunklet Industries and Mathis Hunter’s self-run indie label Ley Lines have teamed up to release Hunter’s latest album, Mood Lighting.

Following a new single from the LP that previewed in April, “Clone It Off,” Mood Lighting emerges as a layered, inward journey that’s as sentimentally profound as it is psychedelic. Each number reflects on the ins and outs of reconnecting with one’s identity in the wake of a relationship coming to an end. For this outing, Hunter takes up guitar, bass, percussion, and various other musical duties, and is joined by a coterie of Atlanta all-stars including drummer Lee Corum, Rich Morris on keys, and Andy Morrison playing guitar and lap steel. 

Keep your eyes peeled for a new video for the album’s closing number “Don’t Be Long” to arrive in June.

In other Chunklet-related news, on June 5, the label is rolling out a handful of stellar new releases including a Honey Radar singles comp featuring liner notes by Byron Coley; a new single by Shark Toys, which includes a Desperate Bicycles cover on the B-side; and 7-inch singles by Atlanta acts Vangas, Reverends, and the almighty Purkinje Shift.

Another Risk Of The Heart is the latest release from longtime Atlanta songwriting hero Blake Rainey and the Young Antiques. Released via Southern Lovers Recording Co., Another Risk Of The Heart is pressed on gorgeous blue vinyl, and finds singer and guitarist Rainey flanked by bass player Blake Parris and new drummer John Speaks (Skirt, the Jody Grind), all reveling in new anthemic songs with titles such as “Euclid Creeper,” “I Think You’ll Never,” and “Goin’ Home” featuring vocals by Atlanta expat Kelly Hogan (Neko Case, the Decemberists, Rock*A*Teens, The Jody Grind).

Each song was recorded in Rainey’s home Southern Lovers Recording Studios, blending his signature blend of power pop hooks and storytelling with a rural Southern inflection and crystalline production. Chris Lopez ( Rock*A*Teens, Tenement Halls) and Tom Cheshire (West End Motel, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves) also make guest appearances throughout the album.

Grace Bellury’s indie rock outfit Karaoke has a new video out for the song “Lo Hi.” The song is set to appear on a forthcoming album, title TBD. The video, directed by DJ Barbie Corvette, is a single shot — no cuts — in which the group’s synth player Adrian Benedykt Świtoń dances and writhes around a glowing hotel room eating pizza, smoking cigarettes, and staring into the camera with fixed, bedroom eyes. Sultry. Absurd. Awesome. The “Lo Hi” video is the first in a series of five new videos in which all members of the group will get their individual screen time. Look for more coming very soon.

Last, but not least, on May 22, Brian Revels & the Heat Lightning released a brand-new album, Jasper County Blues. Check it out on Spotify. —CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com.    Courtesy Adam McIntyre PURPLE HAZE: Adam McIntyre of the Pinx.  0,0,10    AMN atlmusicnews                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: Music for guys who like music "
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  string(82) "New music from DfTaLS, Misanthropic Aggression, Tears For the Dying, and Bad Moods"
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  string(6551) "The financial hardships wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic reach far and wide. Among the hardest-hit institutions across the country have been independent music venues.

Since Georgians began sheltering in place the second week of March, business for the city’s live music destinations has ground to a halt, and, aside from setting up GoFundMe accounts, revenue streams have remained shut off. A new coalition of venues and promoters, however, dubbed the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) has formed to lobby for, and to create a lifeline to support these indie music institutions, their staffs, artists, and their communities.

“Music venues were the first to close and will be the last to open,” said Dayna Frank, NIVA board member and owner of First Avenue in Minneapolis, in an April 20 press release. “It’s just brutal right now, and the future is predictable to no one. We can’t envision a world without these music venues, so we’ve created NIVA to fight for their ability to survive this shutdown, which we hear could go into 2021,” Frank goes on to say. “Our first order of business is to push to secure federal funding to preserve the ecosystem of live music venues and touring artists.”

One of the organization’s first acts was to petition Capitol Hill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, on April 22, with an open letter asking for assistance in ensuring the Small Business Paycheck Protection Program services the venues who need it most. The letter also asked for tax relief, including deferral of federal taxes for closed businesses, a forgiveness program, and for extensions on PPA loans until it’s safe for the concert industry to resume business. Continued federal support for unemployment insurance for employees of shuttered businesses, mortgage and rent forbearance, and the establishment of a grant-funded business recovery fund were also among the NIVA letter’s requests.

As of press time, more than 900 music venues in all 50 states have joined NIVA, including the 40 Watt in Athens, along with Atlanta promoters OK Productions and Rival Entertainment, as well as venues such as the Center Stage-Vinyl-The Loft complex, Smith’s Olde Bar, and The Masquerade.

“We joined NIVA because we believe there is strength in numbers,” says The Masquerade’s talent buyer Greg Green. “Instead of being just one of 800 small voices trying to be heard, we believe that the unified voice of all of these wonderful independent live music venues and promoters will carry a lot more weight regarding the issues facing our industry during this incredibly difficult time. Also, we think having the resource of all of the other members’ experience and knowledge available to us will be invaluable as we try to navigate ahead in the coming months and get back to presenting great concerts.”

There is no cost for venues to acquire NIVA membership.

In new-releases news, Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel is back with a new full-length album, titled Halocline. The music will be available to listen to via Bandcamp on May 16. In the meantime, check out the first single — the first time DfTaLS has even released a single — titled “Maelstrom.” It’s a six-and-a-half-minute improv set that projects something of an aquatic theme. The term “halocline” is what happens when two bodies of water are separated due to their different salinities. This first single is a full-bodied drift that finds theremin player Scott Burland and lap steel player Frank Schultz joined by Louisville, Kentucky-based vocalist Dane Waters.

Stream the song for free, or pay $1. There is also a preorder for the 16-track album up on Bandcamp as well. Every penny from their Bandcamp sales will be donated evenly to two charities: Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

There’s talk of a CD and possibly a vinyl release of Halocline coming out via Stickfigure Records in the near future, once the pandemic has receded and the world starts moving again. Until then, it’s a Bandcamp exclusive.

Schultz has also recently unveiled a new collaboration with composer, percussionist, and mad genius Klimchak, titled Six Feet Apart. For this project, Schultz rounded up a handful of improv pieces on the lap steel, and sent them off to a few folks to see if anyone was interested in expanding upon them. Klimchak was in, and composed his own sections to go along with Schultz’s improvisational pieces. The result is three pieces — “Off the Clock,” “Adrift and Lost,” and “Limping into Destiny” — 20 minutes of textured ambient droning bliss.

Six Feet Apart is available on Bandcamp now. Any and all proceeds will be donated to Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

In April, blackened death metal-punk trio Misanthropic Aggression rolled out a new 7-inch EP, titled Alcoholic Polyneuropathic Freaks in Hell. The three-song single is available now via Boris Records. National distribution via MVD begins in June.

Death rock and goth-punk trio Tears for the Dying recently unveiled the group’s second full-length, titled Memories. The album was engineered and produced by Tom Ashton of the March Violets, and recorded at Subvon Studio in Athens. This time around, singer, guitarist, and bass player Adria Schlenker, Debra Beat, and Candy Cancer shed the keyboard for most of the album’s tracks in favor of a raw, guitar-driven assault — all three members share guitar and bass duties here. Check out that smoldering cover of Christian Death’s “Spiritual Cramp”!

Bad Moods’ latest 7-inch, featuring a new version of “Super Collider” b/w “La France” and “Radiology” 7-inch has been making the rounds recently as well. Singer, guitar player, and songwriter Tim Haught and drummer Champ Hammett are formerly of Atlanta hardcore staples Foundation — Champ also played in Criminal Instinct. With Bad Moods they veer away from hardcore, taking a more straight-ahead approach to indie rock songwriting, with an emphasis on recording rather than playing live regularly. “The goal, in the beginning, was to sound kind of like the Lemonheads, or something like that,” Haught says. “In the end it comes across more like a power pop version of Leatherface.”

Keep an ear out for more Bad Moods recordings coming down the line soon. —­CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com."
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  string(6580) "The financial hardships wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic reach far and wide. Among the hardest-hit institutions across the country have been independent music venues.

Since Georgians began sheltering in place the second week of March, business for the city’s live music destinations has ground to a halt, and, aside from setting up GoFundMe accounts, revenue streams have remained shut off. A new coalition of venues and promoters, however, dubbed the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) has formed to lobby for, and to create a lifeline to support these indie music institutions, their staffs, artists, and their communities.

“Music venues were the first to close and will be the last to open,” said Dayna Frank, NIVA board member and owner of First Avenue in Minneapolis, in an April 20 press release. “It’s just brutal right now, and the future is predictable to no one. We can’t envision a world without these music venues, so we’ve created NIVA to fight for their ability to survive this shutdown, which we hear could go into 2021,” Frank goes on to say. “Our first order of business is to push to secure federal funding to preserve the ecosystem of live music venues and touring artists.”

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As of press time, more than 900 music venues in all 50 states have joined NIVA, including the 40 Watt in Athens, along with Atlanta promoters OK Productions and Rival Entertainment, as well as venues such as the Center Stage-Vinyl-The Loft complex, Smith’s Olde Bar, and The Masquerade.

“We joined NIVA because we believe there is strength in numbers,” says The Masquerade’s talent buyer Greg Green. “Instead of being just one of 800 small voices trying to be heard, we believe that the unified voice of all of these wonderful independent live music venues and promoters will carry a lot more weight regarding the issues facing our industry during this incredibly difficult time. Also, we think having the resource of all of the other members’ experience and knowledge available to us will be invaluable as we try to navigate ahead in the coming months and get back to presenting great concerts.”

There is no cost for venues to acquire NIVA membership.

In new-releases news, Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel is back with a new full-length album, titled ''Halocline''. The music will be available to listen to via Bandcamp on May 16. In the meantime, check out the first single — the first time DfTaLS has even released a single — titled “Maelstrom.” It’s a six-and-a-half-minute improv set that projects something of an aquatic theme. The term “halocline” is what happens when two bodies of water are separated due to their different salinities. This first single is a full-bodied drift that finds theremin player Scott Burland and lap steel player Frank Schultz joined by Louisville, Kentucky-based vocalist Dane Waters.

Stream the song for free, or pay $1. There is also a preorder for the 16-track album up on Bandcamp as well. Every penny from their Bandcamp sales will be donated evenly to two charities: Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

There’s talk of a CD and possibly a vinyl release of ''Halocline'' coming out via Stickfigure Records in the near future, once the pandemic has receded and the world starts moving again. Until then, it’s a Bandcamp exclusive.

Schultz has also recently unveiled a new collaboration with composer, percussionist, and mad genius Klimchak, titled ''Six Feet Apart''. For this project, Schultz rounded up a handful of improv pieces on the lap steel, and sent them off to a few folks to see if anyone was interested in expanding upon them. Klimchak was in, and composed his own sections to go along with Schultz’s improvisational pieces. The result is three pieces — “Off the Clock,” “Adrift and Lost,” and “Limping into Destiny” — 20 minutes of textured ambient droning bliss.

''Six Feet Apart'' is available on Bandcamp now. Any and all proceeds will be donated to Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

In April, blackened death metal-punk trio Misanthropic Aggression rolled out a new 7-inch EP, titled ''Alcoholic Polyneuropathic Freaks in Hell''. The three-song single is available now via Boris Records. National distribution via MVD begins in June.

Death rock and goth-punk trio Tears for the Dying recently unveiled the group’s second full-length, titled ''Memories''. The album was engineered and produced by Tom Ashton of the March Violets, and recorded at Subvon Studio in Athens. This time around, singer, guitarist, and bass player Adria Schlenker, Debra Beat, and Candy Cancer shed the keyboard for most of the album’s tracks in favor of a raw, guitar-driven assault — all three members share guitar and bass duties here. Check out that smoldering cover of Christian Death’s “Spiritual Cramp”!

Bad Moods’ latest 7-inch, featuring a new version of “Super Collider” b/w “La France” and “Radiology” 7-inch has been making the rounds recently as well. Singer, guitar player, and songwriter Tim Haught and drummer Champ Hammett are formerly of Atlanta hardcore staples Foundation — Champ also played in Criminal Instinct. With Bad Moods they veer away from hardcore, taking a more straight-ahead approach to indie rock songwriting, with an emphasis on recording rather than playing live regularly. “The goal, in the beginning, was to sound kind of like the Lemonheads, or something like that,” Haught says. “In the end it comes across more like a power pop version of Leatherface.”

Keep an ear out for more Bad Moods recordings coming down the line soon. __—­CL—__

''Send local music news items to chad.radford@creativeloafing.com.''"
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  string(7210) " Masquerade Credit Elena De Soto 1 2 Web  2020-05-11T20:22:29+00:00 Masquerade_Credit_Elena_de_Soto-1_2_web.jpg    amn New music from DfTaLS, Misanthropic Aggression, Tears For the Dying, and Bad Moods 31020  2020-05-01T04:13:00+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA fights to keep music venues alive jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford Chad Radford 2020-05-01T04:13:00+00:00  The financial hardships wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic reach far and wide. Among the hardest-hit institutions across the country have been independent music venues.

Since Georgians began sheltering in place the second week of March, business for the city’s live music destinations has ground to a halt, and, aside from setting up GoFundMe accounts, revenue streams have remained shut off. A new coalition of venues and promoters, however, dubbed the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) has formed to lobby for, and to create a lifeline to support these indie music institutions, their staffs, artists, and their communities.

“Music venues were the first to close and will be the last to open,” said Dayna Frank, NIVA board member and owner of First Avenue in Minneapolis, in an April 20 press release. “It’s just brutal right now, and the future is predictable to no one. We can’t envision a world without these music venues, so we’ve created NIVA to fight for their ability to survive this shutdown, which we hear could go into 2021,” Frank goes on to say. “Our first order of business is to push to secure federal funding to preserve the ecosystem of live music venues and touring artists.”

One of the organization’s first acts was to petition Capitol Hill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, on April 22, with an open letter asking for assistance in ensuring the Small Business Paycheck Protection Program services the venues who need it most. The letter also asked for tax relief, including deferral of federal taxes for closed businesses, a forgiveness program, and for extensions on PPA loans until it’s safe for the concert industry to resume business. Continued federal support for unemployment insurance for employees of shuttered businesses, mortgage and rent forbearance, and the establishment of a grant-funded business recovery fund were also among the NIVA letter’s requests.

As of press time, more than 900 music venues in all 50 states have joined NIVA, including the 40 Watt in Athens, along with Atlanta promoters OK Productions and Rival Entertainment, as well as venues such as the Center Stage-Vinyl-The Loft complex, Smith’s Olde Bar, and The Masquerade.

“We joined NIVA because we believe there is strength in numbers,” says The Masquerade’s talent buyer Greg Green. “Instead of being just one of 800 small voices trying to be heard, we believe that the unified voice of all of these wonderful independent live music venues and promoters will carry a lot more weight regarding the issues facing our industry during this incredibly difficult time. Also, we think having the resource of all of the other members’ experience and knowledge available to us will be invaluable as we try to navigate ahead in the coming months and get back to presenting great concerts.”

There is no cost for venues to acquire NIVA membership.

In new-releases news, Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel is back with a new full-length album, titled Halocline. The music will be available to listen to via Bandcamp on May 16. In the meantime, check out the first single — the first time DfTaLS has even released a single — titled “Maelstrom.” It’s a six-and-a-half-minute improv set that projects something of an aquatic theme. The term “halocline” is what happens when two bodies of water are separated due to their different salinities. This first single is a full-bodied drift that finds theremin player Scott Burland and lap steel player Frank Schultz joined by Louisville, Kentucky-based vocalist Dane Waters.

Stream the song for free, or pay $1. There is also a preorder for the 16-track album up on Bandcamp as well. Every penny from their Bandcamp sales will be donated evenly to two charities: Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

There’s talk of a CD and possibly a vinyl release of Halocline coming out via Stickfigure Records in the near future, once the pandemic has receded and the world starts moving again. Until then, it’s a Bandcamp exclusive.

Schultz has also recently unveiled a new collaboration with composer, percussionist, and mad genius Klimchak, titled Six Feet Apart. For this project, Schultz rounded up a handful of improv pieces on the lap steel, and sent them off to a few folks to see if anyone was interested in expanding upon them. Klimchak was in, and composed his own sections to go along with Schultz’s improvisational pieces. The result is three pieces — “Off the Clock,” “Adrift and Lost,” and “Limping into Destiny” — 20 minutes of textured ambient droning bliss.

Six Feet Apart is available on Bandcamp now. Any and all proceeds will be donated to Giving Kitchen and the Atlanta Musicians’ Emergency Relief Fund.

In April, blackened death metal-punk trio Misanthropic Aggression rolled out a new 7-inch EP, titled Alcoholic Polyneuropathic Freaks in Hell. The three-song single is available now via Boris Records. National distribution via MVD begins in June.

Death rock and goth-punk trio Tears for the Dying recently unveiled the group’s second full-length, titled Memories. The album was engineered and produced by Tom Ashton of the March Violets, and recorded at Subvon Studio in Athens. This time around, singer, guitarist, and bass player Adria Schlenker, Debra Beat, and Candy Cancer shed the keyboard for most of the album’s tracks in favor of a raw, guitar-driven assault — all three members share guitar and bass duties here. Check out that smoldering cover of Christian Death’s “Spiritual Cramp”!

Bad Moods’ latest 7-inch, featuring a new version of “Super Collider” b/w “La France” and “Radiology” 7-inch has been making the rounds recently as well. Singer, guitar player, and songwriter Tim Haught and drummer Champ Hammett are formerly of Atlanta hardcore staples Foundation — Champ also played in Criminal Instinct. With Bad Moods they veer away from hardcore, taking a more straight-ahead approach to indie rock songwriting, with an emphasis on recording rather than playing live regularly. “The goal, in the beginning, was to sound kind of like the Lemonheads, or something like that,” Haught says. “In the end it comes across more like a power pop version of Leatherface.”

Keep an ear out for more Bad Moods recordings coming down the line soon. —­CL—

Send local music news items to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com.    Elena DeSoto SOUND OF MUSIC: The Masquerade and more Atlanta music destinations and promoters join the National Independent Venue Association to lobby for support.  0,0,10    AMN                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: NIVA fights to keep music venues alive "
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Friday May 1, 2020 12:13 am EDT
New music from DfTaLS, Misanthropic Aggression, Tears For the Dying, and Bad Moods | more...
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  string(101) "Plus: The Star Bar will live again, new music from Nikki & the Phantom Callers, Picture One, and more"
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  string(8086) "For the Atlanta music scene, and everyone else around the planet, life is on pause, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold. Every music venue in town has suffered cancelations and closures en masse. The timing could not have been more inconvenient for The Star Community Bar, which closed its doors on January 1, 2020. Since then, the lauded Little 5 Points music venue and dive bar at 437 Moreland Avenue has remained in a holding pattern.

According to a March 13 feature story published by the Atlanta Business Chronicle in January, new owners Luke Lewis, Bruce McLeod, former Trackside Tavern and The Comet Pub & Lanes bartender Dan Meade, and longtime bartender at The Highlander, Christopher Jackson, have taken over business operations and signed a new lease with plans to get The Star Bar back up and running as soon as possible, with most of the previous staff back in place.

The plan has been to not change a thing for the storied music hangout, which has been a pillar of the local scene since 1991. Aside from giving the place a thorough cleaning and a new coat of paint, the stage, the photo booth, and the Elvis Vault will live on. Plans to reopen the Little Vinyl Lounge downstairs are still coming together. Aside from that, the mantra has been to reopen “sometime soon,” but as of press time, social distancing and self-quarantining are keeping everyone locked away at home. The Star Bar’s doors remain shuttered for the time being.

“A proper opening date has changed several times because of licensing issues with the city,” says the Star Bar’s music promoter Bryan Malone. “Everything appeared to be in the clear, and then this global pandemic began to take root. I was hoping to announce then that we’d be opening this coming weekend, but held off in light of news reports which seemed too ominous to ignore. If you had told me on January 2  that we’d still be waiting midway through March I would have thought it quite unlikely,” he adds. “But this virus threatens to delay not only that, but everything else — life in general. Indefinitely.”

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available.

In recent years, Tom Gray has been rocking stages around the world, singing and playing slide guitar with progressive blues outfit Delta Moon. After being sidelined in 2019 to deal with a stage four lung cancer diagnosis, Gray has a little more time on his hands than usual. Since February, he’s been involved in launching a campaign to reissue material that he recorded in the late ’70s and early ’80s with his new wave band the Brains. He’s even talking about offering up some unreleased material as well.

In March, Gray and the Swimming Pool Q’s singer and guitarist Jeff Calder went to Preserve South in Buford, Georgia, to bake the original master tapes for all of the Brains’ recordings to which Gray owns the rights. This includes the group’s 1978 debut 7-inch, featuring the song “Money Changes Everything,” later made famous by pop star Cyndi Lauper with her version as the opening number of her 1983 LP, She’s So Unusual. Gray and Calder are also working on the master tapes containing the Brains’ 1982 EP, Dancing Under Streetlights (Landslide Records), as well as some unreleased material. The group’s 1980 self-titled full-length and 1981’s Electronic Eden LPs were originally released by the now defunct Mercury Records. Those masters are currently owned by the Universal Music Group, but Gray and Calder hope to gain access to them soon. 

“Back in the CD era, several reissue labels were interested in the Brains albums, but Mercury was a stone wall,” says Gray. “Today we will be dealing with Universal. The plan, based on the advice of an LA attorney who knows today’s business, is to create enough online interest to show Universal that this would be worth their trouble.”

This reissue campaign will mark the first time these recordings by the Brains have been made available in any format other than the original, long out-of-print vinyl pressings. Stay tuned for more information, including release dates, as it becomes available over the coming weeks.

In new releases news, Picture One, the solo recording project of multi-instrumentalist and co-owner of the Deanwell Global Music label Thomas Barnwell unveiled his third full-length LP, titled Across the Depths of Seven Lakes. Over the last decade, Barnwell has played guitar on releases by local acts including the Orphins and Thy Mighty Contract, and in 2016, co-composed the score for director Adam Pinney’s film, The Arbalest. Barnwell has also reissued material by seminal proto-goth and darkwave acts including French post-punk group Asylum Party and Atlanta’s early ’80s synth-punk outfit the Modern Mannequins.

Picture One finds Barnwell delving into a more personal side of his mostly-instrumental songwriting. Across the Depths of Seven Lakes (out April 3), however, is the first Picture One release on which Barnwell shows off his voice and lyrics.

“I started singing on this record because I wanted to process a lot of what I have been going through over the last couple of years,” he says. “Trying to be more creative than I have been — I haven’t done lyrics in maybe 10 years. I just wanted that connection again. When you play stuff live, people really connect with vocals a lot,” he adds. “ And I wanted to make something that I would personally want to listen to multiple times.”

In other new releases news, 4-IZE recently dropped a new album, titled Look Into My IZE, which he describes as “the most hip-hop album of 2020.” The album features collaborations with a bevy of heavy-hitters including the late Sean Price, Rapper Big Pooh, Talib Kweli, Señor Kaos, J-Live, Shawnna, and the almighty Ludacris, the latter of whom tears it up on the song “Shit On Deez Niggaz.” Guest producers on the album include Floyd the Locsmif, Swizz Beatz, Illastrate, 9th Wonder, J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League, D.R.U.G.S. Beats, and Planet Asia.

“Music has always been an informal method of therapy, being noted as an excellent power to expel diseases, as well as a sovereign remedy against despair and melancholy,” 4IZE says in a press release. “For the listener as well as the artist.”

Under the direction of Sarajevo-born guitarist Eddie Beho, Sataraš Quartet has spent the last few years fleshing out a singular repertoire of Southern European jazz and folk music inflections, American blues, and improvisation. In April, the group unveiled its debut album, Errors and Omissions. The album’s arrival was also accompanied by a new two-song EP by the group’s rhythm section of Colin Bragg and Blake Helton, titled Mask Mania.

April 3 also marks the arrival of Nikki & the Phantom Callers’ debut album, titled Everybody’s Going to Hell (But You and Me). The album’s first proper single, “Fallen Angel,” is accompanied by a video directed by Video Rahim and Ashley Simpson, and premiered in March via Wide Open Country. The album finds the countrypolitan rockers reveling in a creative, upbeat blend of modern indie and timeless Southern rock influences in songs with titles such as “Howl With Me,” “Mamas Should Know,” and “They’ve Never Walked Through Shadows.”

“Your first album is always kind of like your first set list,” says singer and guitarist Nikki Speake. “You gather up what you have and see how it all fits together. Some of the songs were written 20 years ago, most were written and recorded within the last year. When I write songs, it’s sort of like a therapy session,” Speake adds. “I’m trying to get through what’s on my mind, and everyone in the group seems to be on the same musical wavelength. We don’t have to think about it much, and we’re just trying to have fun with it.”

For the time being, release shows are being postponed through April and May. Stay tuned for more announcements coming soon.

Send Atlanta music news tips to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com."
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  string(8231) "For the Atlanta music scene, and everyone else around the planet, life is on pause, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold. Every music venue in town has suffered cancelations and closures en masse. The timing could not have been more inconvenient for __The Star Community Bar__, which closed its doors on January 1, 2020. Since then, the lauded Little 5 Points music venue and dive bar at 437 Moreland Avenue has remained in a holding pattern.

According to a March 13 feature story published by the ''Atlanta Business Chronicle'' in January, new owners __Luke Lewis__, __Bruce McLeod__, former Trackside Tavern and The Comet Pub & Lanes bartender __Dan Meade__, and longtime bartender at __The Highlander, Christopher Jackson__, have taken over business operations and signed a new lease with plans to get The Star Bar back up and running as soon as possible, with most of the previous staff back in place.

The plan has been to not change a thing for the storied music hangout, which has been a pillar of the local scene since 1991. Aside from giving the place a thorough cleaning and a new coat of paint, the stage, the photo booth, and the Elvis Vault will live on. Plans to reopen the Little Vinyl Lounge downstairs are still coming together. Aside from that, the mantra has been to reopen “sometime soon,” but as of press time, social distancing and self-quarantining are keeping everyone locked away at home. The Star Bar’s doors remain shuttered for the time being.

“A proper opening date has changed several times because of licensing issues with the city,” says the Star Bar’s music promoter Bryan Malone. “Everything appeared to be in the clear, and then this global pandemic began to take root. I was hoping to announce then that we’d be opening this coming weekend, but held off in light of news reports which seemed too ominous to ignore. If you had told me on January 2  that we’d still be waiting midway through March I would have thought it quite unlikely,” he adds. “But this virus threatens to delay not only that, but everything else — life in general. Indefinitely.”

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available.

In recent years, Tom Gray has been rocking stages around the world, singing and playing slide guitar with progressive blues outfit Delta Moon. After being sidelined in 2019 to deal with a stage four lung cancer diagnosis, Gray has a little more time on his hands than usual. Since February, he’s been involved in launching a campaign to reissue material that he recorded in the late ’70s and early ’80s with his new wave band __the Brains__. He’s even talking about offering up some unreleased material as well.

In March, Gray and the Swimming Pool Q’s singer and guitarist Jeff Calder went to Preserve South in Buford, Georgia, to bake the original master tapes for all of the Brains’ recordings to which Gray owns the rights. This includes the group’s 1978 debut 7-inch, featuring the song “Money Changes Everything,” later made famous by pop star Cyndi Lauper with her version as the opening number of her 1983 LP, ''She’s So Unusual''. Gray and Calder are also working on the master tapes containing the Brains’ 1982 EP, ''Dancing Under Streetlights'' (Landslide Records), as well as some unreleased material. The group’s 1980 self-titled full-length and 1981’s ''Electronic Eden'' LPs were originally released by the now defunct Mercury Records. Those masters are currently owned by the Universal Music Group, but Gray and Calder hope to gain access to them soon. 

“Back in the CD era, several reissue labels were interested in the Brains albums, but Mercury was a stone wall,” says Gray. “Today we will be dealing with Universal. The plan, based on the advice of an LA attorney who knows today’s business, is to create enough online interest to show Universal that this would be worth their trouble.”

This reissue campaign will mark the first time these recordings by the Brains have been made available in any format other than the original, long out-of-print vinyl pressings. Stay tuned for more information, including release dates, as it becomes available over the coming weeks.

In new releases news, __Picture One__, the solo recording project of multi-instrumentalist and co-owner of the Deanwell Global Music label Thomas Barnwell unveiled his third full-length LP, titled ''Across the Depths of Seven Lakes''. Over the last decade, Barnwell has played guitar on releases by local acts including the Orphins and Thy Mighty Contract, and in 2016, co-composed the score for director Adam Pinney’s film, ''The Arbalest''. Barnwell has also reissued material by seminal proto-goth and darkwave acts including French post-punk group Asylum Party and Atlanta’s early ’80s synth-punk outfit the Modern Mannequins.

Picture One finds Barnwell delving into a more personal side of his mostly-instrumental songwriting. ''Across the Depths of Seven Lakes'' (out April 3), however, is the first Picture One release on which Barnwell shows off his voice and lyrics.

“I started singing on this record because I wanted to process a lot of what I have been going through over the last couple of years,” he says. “Trying to be more creative than I have been — I haven’t done lyrics in maybe 10 years. I just wanted that connection again. When you play stuff live, people really connect with vocals a lot,” he adds. “ And I wanted to make something that I would personally want to listen to multiple times.”

In other new releases news, __4-IZE__ recently dropped a new album, titled ''Look Into My IZE'', which he describes as “the most hip-hop album of 2020.” The album features collaborations with a bevy of heavy-hitters including the late __Sean Price__, __Rapper Big Pooh__, __Talib Kweli__, __Señor Kaos__, __J-Live__, __Shawnna__, and the almighty __Ludacris__, the latter of whom tears it up on the song “Shit On Deez Niggaz.” Guest producers on the album include __Floyd the Locsmif__, __Swizz Beatz__, __Illastrate__, __9th Wonder__, __J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League__, __D.R.U.G.S. Beats__, and __Planet Asia__.

“Music has always been an informal method of therapy, being noted as an excellent power to expel diseases, as well as a sovereign remedy against despair and melancholy,” 4IZE says in a press release. “For the listener as well as the artist.”

Under the direction of Sarajevo-born guitarist Eddie Beho, __Sataraš Quartet__ has spent the last few years fleshing out a singular repertoire of Southern European jazz and folk music inflections, American blues, and improvisation. In April, the group unveiled its debut album, ''Errors and Omissions''. The album’s arrival was also accompanied by a new two-song EP by the group’s rhythm section of Colin Bragg and Blake Helton, titled ''Mask Mania''.

April 3 also marks the arrival of __Nikki & the Phantom Callers__’ debut album, titled ''Everybody’s Going to Hell (But You and Me)''. The album’s first proper single, “Fallen Angel,” is accompanied by a video directed by Video Rahim and Ashley Simpson, and premiered in March via ''Wide Open Country''. The album finds the countrypolitan rockers reveling in a creative, upbeat blend of modern indie and timeless Southern rock influences in songs with titles such as “Howl With Me,” “Mamas Should Know,” and “They’ve Never Walked Through Shadows.”

“Your first album is always kind of like your first set list,” says singer and guitarist Nikki Speake. “You gather up what you have and see how it all fits together. Some of the songs were written 20 years ago, most were written and recorded within the last year. When I write songs, it’s sort of like a therapy session,” Speake adds. “I’m trying to get through what’s on my mind, and everyone in the group seems to be on the same musical wavelength. We don’t have to think about it much, and we’re just trying to have fun with it.”

For the time being, release shows are being postponed through April and May. Stay tuned for more announcements coming soon.

''Send Atlanta music news tips to chad.radford@creativeloafing.com.''"
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  string(8999) " Nikki & The Phantom Callers Photo By Jaysen Michael  2020-04-06T15:19:05+00:00 Nikki_&_the_Phantom_Callers_Photo_by_Jaysen_Michael.jpg    atlmn Plus: The Star Bar will live again, new music from Nikki & the Phantom Callers, Picture One, and more 30455  2020-04-06T15:17:04+00:00 ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: The Brains redux jim.harris@creativeloafing.com Jim Harris Chad Radford  2020-04-06T15:17:04+00:00  For the Atlanta music scene, and everyone else around the planet, life is on pause, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold. Every music venue in town has suffered cancelations and closures en masse. The timing could not have been more inconvenient for The Star Community Bar, which closed its doors on January 1, 2020. Since then, the lauded Little 5 Points music venue and dive bar at 437 Moreland Avenue has remained in a holding pattern.

According to a March 13 feature story published by the Atlanta Business Chronicle in January, new owners Luke Lewis, Bruce McLeod, former Trackside Tavern and The Comet Pub & Lanes bartender Dan Meade, and longtime bartender at The Highlander, Christopher Jackson, have taken over business operations and signed a new lease with plans to get The Star Bar back up and running as soon as possible, with most of the previous staff back in place.

The plan has been to not change a thing for the storied music hangout, which has been a pillar of the local scene since 1991. Aside from giving the place a thorough cleaning and a new coat of paint, the stage, the photo booth, and the Elvis Vault will live on. Plans to reopen the Little Vinyl Lounge downstairs are still coming together. Aside from that, the mantra has been to reopen “sometime soon,” but as of press time, social distancing and self-quarantining are keeping everyone locked away at home. The Star Bar’s doors remain shuttered for the time being.

“A proper opening date has changed several times because of licensing issues with the city,” says the Star Bar’s music promoter Bryan Malone. “Everything appeared to be in the clear, and then this global pandemic began to take root. I was hoping to announce then that we’d be opening this coming weekend, but held off in light of news reports which seemed too ominous to ignore. If you had told me on January 2  that we’d still be waiting midway through March I would have thought it quite unlikely,” he adds. “But this virus threatens to delay not only that, but everything else — life in general. Indefinitely.”

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available.

In recent years, Tom Gray has been rocking stages around the world, singing and playing slide guitar with progressive blues outfit Delta Moon. After being sidelined in 2019 to deal with a stage four lung cancer diagnosis, Gray has a little more time on his hands than usual. Since February, he’s been involved in launching a campaign to reissue material that he recorded in the late ’70s and early ’80s with his new wave band the Brains. He’s even talking about offering up some unreleased material as well.

In March, Gray and the Swimming Pool Q’s singer and guitarist Jeff Calder went to Preserve South in Buford, Georgia, to bake the original master tapes for all of the Brains’ recordings to which Gray owns the rights. This includes the group’s 1978 debut 7-inch, featuring the song “Money Changes Everything,” later made famous by pop star Cyndi Lauper with her version as the opening number of her 1983 LP, She’s So Unusual. Gray and Calder are also working on the master tapes containing the Brains’ 1982 EP, Dancing Under Streetlights (Landslide Records), as well as some unreleased material. The group’s 1980 self-titled full-length and 1981’s Electronic Eden LPs were originally released by the now defunct Mercury Records. Those masters are currently owned by the Universal Music Group, but Gray and Calder hope to gain access to them soon. 

“Back in the CD era, several reissue labels were interested in the Brains albums, but Mercury was a stone wall,” says Gray. “Today we will be dealing with Universal. The plan, based on the advice of an LA attorney who knows today’s business, is to create enough online interest to show Universal that this would be worth their trouble.”

This reissue campaign will mark the first time these recordings by the Brains have been made available in any format other than the original, long out-of-print vinyl pressings. Stay tuned for more information, including release dates, as it becomes available over the coming weeks.

In new releases news, Picture One, the solo recording project of multi-instrumentalist and co-owner of the Deanwell Global Music label Thomas Barnwell unveiled his third full-length LP, titled Across the Depths of Seven Lakes. Over the last decade, Barnwell has played guitar on releases by local acts including the Orphins and Thy Mighty Contract, and in 2016, co-composed the score for director Adam Pinney’s film, The Arbalest. Barnwell has also reissued material by seminal proto-goth and darkwave acts including French post-punk group Asylum Party and Atlanta’s early ’80s synth-punk outfit the Modern Mannequins.

Picture One finds Barnwell delving into a more personal side of his mostly-instrumental songwriting. Across the Depths of Seven Lakes (out April 3), however, is the first Picture One release on which Barnwell shows off his voice and lyrics.

“I started singing on this record because I wanted to process a lot of what I have been going through over the last couple of years,” he says. “Trying to be more creative than I have been — I haven’t done lyrics in maybe 10 years. I just wanted that connection again. When you play stuff live, people really connect with vocals a lot,” he adds. “ And I wanted to make something that I would personally want to listen to multiple times.”

In other new releases news, 4-IZE recently dropped a new album, titled Look Into My IZE, which he describes as “the most hip-hop album of 2020.” The album features collaborations with a bevy of heavy-hitters including the late Sean Price, Rapper Big Pooh, Talib Kweli, Señor Kaos, J-Live, Shawnna, and the almighty Ludacris, the latter of whom tears it up on the song “Shit On Deez Niggaz.” Guest producers on the album include Floyd the Locsmif, Swizz Beatz, Illastrate, 9th Wonder, J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League, D.R.U.G.S. Beats, and Planet Asia.

“Music has always been an informal method of therapy, being noted as an excellent power to expel diseases, as well as a sovereign remedy against despair and melancholy,” 4IZE says in a press release. “For the listener as well as the artist.”

Under the direction of Sarajevo-born guitarist Eddie Beho, Sataraš Quartet has spent the last few years fleshing out a singular repertoire of Southern European jazz and folk music inflections, American blues, and improvisation. In April, the group unveiled its debut album, Errors and Omissions. The album’s arrival was also accompanied by a new two-song EP by the group’s rhythm section of Colin Bragg and Blake Helton, titled Mask Mania.

April 3 also marks the arrival of Nikki & the Phantom Callers’ debut album, titled Everybody’s Going to Hell (But You and Me). The album’s first proper single, “Fallen Angel,” is accompanied by a video directed by Video Rahim and Ashley Simpson, and premiered in March via Wide Open Country. The album finds the countrypolitan rockers reveling in a creative, upbeat blend of modern indie and timeless Southern rock influences in songs with titles such as “Howl With Me,” “Mamas Should Know,” and “They’ve Never Walked Through Shadows.”

“Your first album is always kind of like your first set list,” says singer and guitarist Nikki Speake. “You gather up what you have and see how it all fits together. Some of the songs were written 20 years ago, most were written and recorded within the last year. When I write songs, it’s sort of like a therapy session,” Speake adds. “I’m trying to get through what’s on my mind, and everyone in the group seems to be on the same musical wavelength. We don’t have to think about it much, and we’re just trying to have fun with it.”

For the time being, release shows are being postponed through April and May. Stay tuned for more announcements coming soon.

Send Atlanta music news tips to chad.radford at creativeloafing.com.    Jaysen Michael SOUTHERN CHARM: Nikki & the Phantom Callers’ debut album, ‘Everybody’s Going To Hell (But You and Me),’ is out now.  0,0,10 luke.lewis@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470530 trackerid:9), bruce.mcleod@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470531 trackerid:9), dan.meade@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470532 trackerid:9), christopher.jackson@creativeloafing.com (itemId:470533 trackerid:9), The Brains (itemId:470535 trackerid:8)   ATLMN                             ATLANTA MUSIC NEWS: The Brains redux "
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Welcome to Creative Loafing’s weekend roundup podcast for March 13-15! Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford discuss their top picks for the weekend, including ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more! Tune in and turn out.

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Welcome to Creative Loafing’s weekend roundup podcast for March 13-15! Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford discuss their top picks for the weekend, including ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more! Tune in and turn out.

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  string(801) " Algiers1  2020-03-13T16:29:37+00:00 algiers1.jpg     ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more 30137  2020-03-13T16:15:19+00:00 PODCAST: Weekend roundup March 13-15 will.cardwell@gmail.com Will Cardwell Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford  2020-03-13T16:15:19+00:00  

Welcome to Creative Loafing’s weekend roundup podcast for March 13-15! Will Cardwell, Jacob Chisenhall, and Chad Radford discuss their top picks for the weekend, including ASO presents Return of the Jedi, Uniform & The Body, and more! Tune in and turn out.

!!Friday, March 13
 

!!Saturday, March 14
 

!!Sunday, March 15
     CHRISTIAN HAGSTEDT INDUSTRIAL POP: Algiers plays 529 Saturday, March 14.  0,0,10                                 PODCAST: Weekend roundup March 13-15 "
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Article

Friday March 13, 2020 12:15 pm EDT
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