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8 places to satisfy your sandwich craving in Atlanta

When only delicious things between two slices of bread will do

Acg Seedo Sandwich1 1 53 Magnum
Photo credit: Mia Yakel

What’s better than two fluffy, chewy slices of bread filled with perfectly flavored meat, complementary spread, and crispy vegetable accoutrement? Pretty much nothing. Sandwiches are the perfectly portable and always satisfying meal. If you’re wondering about Atlanta’s sandwich game in particular, it’s on point. Whether it’s the unadulterated Italian basics at Toscano and Sons, refined classics at Star Provisions, or solid banh mi of the $3 variety, you’ve got options. Here are 10 places to get you started.

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Well-known for its excellence in baked goods and homey atmosphere, Alon's addition of an open kitchen and carryout case creates a swankier feel and options that are meant to be eaten at home. The meatballs look good and taste even better. You'll want to sop up the leftover sauce with some of Alon's ... | more...

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At owner David Robert's (of Marietta's Sam & Dave's) Community Q table runners pinch your kids' cheeks, seem genuinely concerned whether you're enjoying your meal, and just "get" what it means to make someone feel at home in an establishment. And the food definitely doesn't hurt the impact. Pleasant... | more...

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Next door to sister stall Yalla, Todd Ginsberg of the General Muir brings his signature deli style to house-made deli items, sandwiches, and burgers. | more...

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With its subtle Korean influences, Heirloom Market consistently turns out some of the best and most unique barbecue in town. If you want to sample a wide array of Heirloom's Far East meets West meat-and-three mastery, the Georgia Sampler is the way to go - two trays piled with pulled pork, smoked ch... | more...

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A varied clientele proves the universal language of food sometimes transcends cultural differences. Loyal customers come for the fresh French bread, Asian sweets, and inexpensive bowls of rice or noodle soup. | more...

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The takeout menu varies slightly each day, but count on seductively constructed sandwiches such as the shrimp po'boy or the prosciutto and Parmesan, among other options. You'll also find a butcher and a specialty cheese counter in the back of the space. | more...

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Victory Sandwich is a hip bar known for its Jack and Coke slushies, ping-pong table, and a selection of cheap-but-tasty little sandwiches that cost $4 each. The menu changes somewhat regularly, but you can usually count on favorites like the Beast on Yeast (roast beef with horseradish sauce) and the... | more...

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In East Atlanta Village, there's a little window that shouts, "Buford Hwy EAV." The shop goes by the name We Suki Suki ("we like like"), and the proprietor, a woman named Q, packs enough energy and drive to fuel all of EAV. The premise is simple — banh mi and bubble tea worthy of Buford Highway, but... | more...

 
The list above first appeared in the 2015 CL Cityguide and was updated by CL Staff recently.



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