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Best of Atlanta 2007 Cityscape

 

Best Of Atlanta 2007 Cityscape Large


Cityscape

The past year hasn’t been awful. Meteors didn’t pummel the 17th Street bridge to dust. Locusts didn’t swarm the samosa tray at Your DeKalb Farmers Market. Mounted Mongol invaders didn’t sack Grant Park and eat Mei Lan. Yet.

But a spike in crime, a dip in the housing market, careless missteps by police and city leaders, and, well, Michael Vick have turned our civic mood ring from blue to gray.

What better time, then, to seek solace by reflecting on some of the things old and new, trendy and timeless, that we love about our town — whether it’s the diversity of Buford Highway or the charm of our distinctive intown neighborhoods.

Maddening though it can be sometimes (witness the last session of the General Assembly), Atlanta is a profoundly interesting place to live. In a generation, it’s morphed from a provincial podunk to a behemoth of international business and a cultural mecca.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a hipster in an ironic tee, a scenester clubbing in designer duds, a company foot soldier producing stacks of TPS reports or a refugee fleeing an African war zone. Atlanta has a job for you, a place to live and a bar for you to hang out with your friends.

— Andisheh Nouraee

Best Local Troublemaker BOA Award Winner

Sgt. Michael Scott Kreher
It takes personal courage to challenge authority in the Atlanta Police Department. Former Deputy Chief Lou Arcangeli suffered retaliation when he went public with substantiated accusations that former Mayor Bill Campbell and Chief Beverly Harvard had manipulated crime statistics to make the city lookmore...

It takes personal courage to challenge authority in the Atlanta Police Department. Former Deputy Chief Lou Arcangeli suffered retaliation when he went public with substantiated accusations that former Mayor Bill Campbell and Chief Beverly Harvard had manipulated crime statistics to make the city look safer before the ’96 Olympics. In the last year SGT. MICHAEL SCOTT KREHER, president of the Atlanta chapter of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers union, and some of his colleagues have exposed the APD’s deepening morale problems, as well as revealed the city’s touted war on crime as a quota-driven exercise in meaningless statistics. Without Kreher, the public wouldn’t know much of what’s gone wrong with the APD. Chief Richard Pennington has responded by transferring Kreher and other union officials to graveyard shifts and lower-status jobs.


www.ibpolocal623.com

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Best Neighborhood Festival BOA Award Winner

Inman Park Festival
To avoid the stifling heat of summer, Atlanta crams a full six months of outdoor civic togetherness into the three spring months. The festival season’s two biggies, Dogwood and Gay Pride at Piedmont Park, are justifiably well-regarded. But for those looking for a real neighborhoody festivalmore...
To avoid the stifling heat of summer, Atlanta crams a full six months of outdoor civic togetherness into the three spring months. The festival season’s two biggies, Dogwood and Gay Pride at Piedmont Park, are justifiably well-regarded. But for those looking for a real neighborhoody festival experience, the INMAN PARK FESTIVAL can’t be beat. Some of the event’s charm is just lucky geography — it’s fun to meander through the ’hood’s winding, shady streets. But the organizers deserve credit — by controlling the quality of the arts, entertainment and even the food, they’ve deftly grown it into a huge festival while avoiding corporate-carnival blandness. less...

Best Old Thing About Atlanta Made New Again BOA Award Winner

The Beltline
Just when it seemed Atlanta was as likely to issue free personal jet packs to every resident as it was to make progress on THE BELTLINE, the city worked behind the scenes to team with a group of private investors to buy the proposed 22-mile loop’s northeast quadrant from Gwinnett developer Waynemore...

Just when it seemed Atlanta was as likely to issue free personal jet packs to every resident as it was to make progress on THE BELTLINE, the city worked behind the scenes to team with a group of private investors to buy the proposed 22-mile loop’s northeast quadrant from Gwinnett developer Wayne Mason, who tried but failed to get approval for two huge condo towers on the Beltline overlooking Piedmont Park. Few details are known, but it appears Atlanta will get its transit right-of-way and parks, developers will get to put swank homes and retail on some of the city’s most desirable land, and Mason will make an eight-figure profit just for sitting on the land for three years.


www.beltline.org

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