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Mastodon.5a207b251b4ae

Local Albums

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The Pinx are back with the group’s third, self-released full-length, titled Sisters & Brothers. Sometime between crafting this latest album (out April 12) and 2016’s sophomore LP Freedom, singer, guitarist, and songwriter Adam McIntyre made the acquaintance of the MC5’s former guitarist Wayne Kramer — he even joined Kramer’s live band. This connection affected McIntyre’s songwriting in profound ways, giving Sisters & Brothers’ 10 songs a renewed energy that expands upon the glory days of rock culture with a highly personal take on rebellious music planted in the here and now. At face value, songs such as “Mercy!,” “Brain Fog,” and the album’s title track can come across as polished, cut-and-dried rock ‘n’ roll with an Alabama accent. But give each number a deeper listen and these winding grooves resonate to the tune of something much more profound than the outrageous stories and party anthems of Freedom. In “Get Up,” McIntyre sings, “I fight for justice and peace / I believe in the land of the free / I march for those behind me / For my sisters and my brothers and those in between.” The song is a thesis statement of sorts; it’s protest music that channels the spirit of 1969 into the dialogue of modern America, with an urgency that’s affecting and exhilarating. Give this music the proper listen it deserves: Turn off the computer, put a needle on the record, and listen to that thick, dark space that billows between instruments, bringing every note on the record to a bold point. ★★★☆☆ — Chad Radford

The Pinx play the Sisters & Brothers LP release party on Fri., April 12, with HeY!ALLigator, Gnomonaut, Chrome Castle. $10-$12. 9 p.m. 529, 529 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-228-6769. www.529atlanta.com."
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[http://thepinxrock.com/|The Pinx] are back with the group’s third, self-released full-length, titled ''Sisters & Brothers''. Sometime between crafting this latest album (out April 12) and 2016’s sophomore LP ''Freedom'', singer, guitarist, and songwriter Adam McIntyre made the acquaintance of the MC5’s former guitarist Wayne Kramer — he even joined Kramer’s live band. This connection affected McIntyre’s songwriting in profound ways, giving ''Sisters & Brothers''’ 10 songs a renewed energy that expands upon the glory days of rock culture with a highly personal take on rebellious music planted in the here and now. At face value, songs such as “Mercy!,” “Brain Fog,” and the album’s title track can come across as polished, cut-and-dried rock ‘n’ roll with an Alabama accent. But give each number a deeper listen and these winding grooves resonate to the tune of something much more profound than the outrageous stories and party anthems of ''Freedom''. In “Get Up,” McIntyre sings, “I fight for justice and peace / I believe in the land of the free / I march for those behind me / For my sisters and my brothers and those in between.” The song is a thesis statement of sorts; it’s protest music that channels the spirit of 1969 into the dialogue of modern America, with an urgency that’s affecting and exhilarating. Give this music the proper listen it deserves: Turn off the computer, put a needle on the record, and listen to that thick, dark space that billows between instruments, bringing every note on the record to a bold point. ★★★☆☆ — Chad Radford

''[https://creativeloafing.com/event-423128|The Pinx play the Sisters & Brothers LP release party on Fri., April 12, with HeY!ALLigator, Gnomonaut, Chrome Castle. $10-$12. 9 p.m. 529, 529 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-228-6769. www.529atlanta.com].''"
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The Pinx are back with the group’s third, self-released full-length, titled Sisters & Brothers. Sometime between crafting this latest album (out April 12) and 2016’s sophomore LP Freedom, singer, guitarist, and songwriter Adam McIntyre made the acquaintance of the MC5’s former guitarist Wayne Kramer — he even joined Kramer’s live band. This connection affected McIntyre’s songwriting in profound ways, giving Sisters & Brothers’ 10 songs a renewed energy that expands upon the glory days of rock culture with a highly personal take on rebellious music planted in the here and now. At face value, songs such as “Mercy!,” “Brain Fog,” and the album’s title track can come across as polished, cut-and-dried rock ‘n’ roll with an Alabama accent. But give each number a deeper listen and these winding grooves resonate to the tune of something much more profound than the outrageous stories and party anthems of Freedom. In “Get Up,” McIntyre sings, “I fight for justice and peace / I believe in the land of the free / I march for those behind me / For my sisters and my brothers and those in between.” The song is a thesis statement of sorts; it’s protest music that channels the spirit of 1969 into the dialogue of modern America, with an urgency that’s affecting and exhilarating. Give this music the proper listen it deserves: Turn off the computer, put a needle on the record, and listen to that thick, dark space that billows between instruments, bringing every note on the record to a bold point. ★★★☆☆ — Chad Radford

The Pinx play the Sisters & Brothers LP release party on Fri., April 12, with HeY!ALLigator, Gnomonaut, Chrome Castle. $10-$12. 9 p.m. 529, 529 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-228-6769. www.529atlanta.com.    Courtesy the Pinx THE PINX: 'Sisters & Brothers'    The Pinx: Validation and redemption, The Pinx let 'Freedom' ring, The Pinx embrace 'Freedom' with 'Boss Man', The Pinx: Look What You Made Me Do, The Pinx: An oral history of Atlanta's latest, greatest stoner rock trio  "the Pinx" "Wayne Kramer" "Mc5" "Sisters & Brothers" "Atlanta" "rock 'n' roll" "Atlanta music" "Adam McIntyre"                             Record Review: The Pinx "
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Article

Monday April 1, 2019 04:00 am EDT
‘Sisters & Brothers’ looks for salvation in the new dark age | more...
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  string(1917) "Near the 10-minute mark of her new self-produced album GIRLS, Yung Baby Tate channels her inner Chaka Khan, incorporating lyrics from “I’m Every Woman” in “That Girl.” The Decatur artist develops the message of Khan's trademark anthem into an album that explores and celebrates the female experience from multiple points of view. On each track, Tate, born Tate Farris, embodies a different persona, an admittedly creative approach. However, concept albums like GIRLS can feel forced when strict adherence to the theme overpowers artistic merit. Tate flirts with those pitfalls on cuts like “Cozy Girl,” where lyrics such as “Cozy girl for life/Cozy girl, CG4L/Cozy girl, I’m raw as hell,” fall flat in an album packed with compelling performances. What makes GIRLS work is Tate’s authenticity on each song; she develops the album’s 11 distinct girls into a virtual self-portrait. In the outro of “Play Girl,” Tate’s screaming of, “I’m not no motherfuckin’ PlayStation/I’m a human being with real emotions and a good heart,” sounds too heartfelt to be an act and segues perfectly into the beautiful Baby Rose-assisted “Lover Girl” and “Flower Girl.” The vulnerability in that three-piece combo conveys an emotional depth that nicely contrasts with the saucy bravado that dominates the album, especially on songs such as “That Girl” and “Bad Girl.” With GIRLS, Yung Baby Tate transforms a limiting concept into a passionate reminder that women are multifaceted, and so is female rap.
★★★☆☆ — Joshua Robinson

Yung Baby Tate, Leikeli47. $18-$22. 7 p.m. Thurs., April 4. The Loft, 1374 West Peachtree St. N.W. 404-885-1365. www.centerstage-atlanta.com.

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother"
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★★★☆☆ — Joshua Robinson

''Yung Baby Tate, Leikeli47. $18-$22. 7 p.m. Thurs., April 4. The Loft, 1374 West Peachtree St. N.W. 404-885-1365. www.centerstage-atlanta.com.''

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  string(2241) " YBT  2019-03-01T18:45:46+00:00 YBT.jpg      14305  2019-03-14T17:13:00+00:00 Yung Baby Tate: 'GIRLS' chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Joshua Robinson  2019-03-14T17:13:00+00:00  Near the 10-minute mark of her new self-produced album GIRLS, Yung Baby Tate channels her inner Chaka Khan, incorporating lyrics from “I’m Every Woman” in “That Girl.” The Decatur artist develops the message of Khan's trademark anthem into an album that explores and celebrates the female experience from multiple points of view. On each track, Tate, born Tate Farris, embodies a different persona, an admittedly creative approach. However, concept albums like GIRLS can feel forced when strict adherence to the theme overpowers artistic merit. Tate flirts with those pitfalls on cuts like “Cozy Girl,” where lyrics such as “Cozy girl for life/Cozy girl, CG4L/Cozy girl, I’m raw as hell,” fall flat in an album packed with compelling performances. What makes GIRLS work is Tate’s authenticity on each song; she develops the album’s 11 distinct girls into a virtual self-portrait. In the outro of “Play Girl,” Tate’s screaming of, “I’m not no motherfuckin’ PlayStation/I’m a human being with real emotions and a good heart,” sounds too heartfelt to be an act and segues perfectly into the beautiful Baby Rose-assisted “Lover Girl” and “Flower Girl.” The vulnerability in that three-piece combo conveys an emotional depth that nicely contrasts with the saucy bravado that dominates the album, especially on songs such as “That Girl” and “Bad Girl.” With GIRLS, Yung Baby Tate transforms a limiting concept into a passionate reminder that women are multifaceted, and so is female rap.
★★★☆☆ — Joshua Robinson

Yung Baby Tate, Leikeli47. $18-$22. 7 p.m. Thurs., April 4. The Loft, 1374 West Peachtree St. N.W. 404-885-1365. www.centerstage-atlanta.com.

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother    Yung Baby Tate THAT GIRL: Yung Baby Tate’s passion shines on GIRLS.                                   Yung Baby Tate: 'GIRLS' "
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Thursday March 14, 2019 01:13 pm EDT
Near the 10-minute mark of her new self-produced album GIRLS, Yung Baby Tate channels her inner Chaka Khan, incorporating lyrics from “I’m Every Woman” in “That Girl.” The Decatur artist develops the message of Khan's trademark anthem into an album that explores and celebrates the female experience from multiple points of view. On each track, Tate, born Tate Farris, embodies a different... | more...
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Whether taken at face value for its haunting subtlety or as an earnest gimmick, Cloak’s “2 Hits from Hell” 7-inch pays serious homage to the Misfits. From the cover art and title, both references to Glenn Danzig and Co.’s 1981 EP 3 Hits from Hell, to the blackened metal cover of “London Dungeon,” this single is testimony to the Atlanta band’s burgeoning greatness. The moment the needle sinks into the record’s deep black grooves, singer and guitarist Scott Taysom dials back the vocal melody while honing in on a mid-tempo rhythm. The song is a natural fit for Cloak’s Southern gothic style. Here, the group reaches beyond the loud/soft dynamic that guided its 2017 debut LP To Venomous Depths (Season of Mist) to embrace a measured sound. Cloak’s vision of “London Dungeon” is accessible, but never at the expense of the original song’s grit, or of Cloak’s ability to turn this horror punk classic into something new. When Taysom sings the opening lyrics, “They call us walking corpses, unholy living dead,” his exquisitely throaty growl conjures images of corpse-painted ghouls, rather than the famous fiends and monsters and of Danzig’s baritone yowl. A demo version of “Forever Burned,” a deep cut from To Venomous Depths, appears on the B side, underscoring Cloak’s faith in black metal. When unleashed from the album, however, the song’s stripped-down and slow-burning fury is a welcome look into the process behind the intricate riffing and scorched rhythms that draw power from atmosphere and texture. ★★★☆☆

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother"
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Whether taken at face value for its haunting subtlety or as an earnest gimmick, [https://cloakatlanta.bandcamp.com/|Cloak]’s “2 Hits from Hell” 7-inch pays serious homage to the Misfits. From the cover art and title, both references to Glenn Danzig and Co.’s 1981 EP ''3 Hits from Hell'', to the blackened metal cover of “London Dungeon,” this single is testimony to the Atlanta band’s burgeoning greatness. The moment the needle sinks into the record’s deep black grooves, singer and guitarist Scott Taysom dials back the vocal melody while honing in on a mid-tempo rhythm. The song is a natural fit for Cloak’s Southern gothic style. Here, the group reaches beyond the loud/soft dynamic that guided its 2017 debut LP ''To Venomous Depths'' (Season of Mist) to embrace a measured sound. Cloak’s vision of “London Dungeon” is accessible, but never at the expense of the original song’s grit, or of Cloak’s ability to turn this horror punk classic into something new. When Taysom sings the opening lyrics, “They call us walking corpses, unholy living dead,” his exquisitely throaty growl conjures images of corpse-painted ghouls, rather than the famous fiends and monsters and of Danzig’s baritone yowl. A demo version of “Forever Burned,” a deep cut from ''To Venomous Depths'', appears on the B side, underscoring Cloak’s faith in black metal. When unleashed from the album, however, the song’s stripped-down and slow-burning fury is a welcome look into the process behind the intricate riffing and scorched rhythms that draw power from atmosphere and texture. ★★★☆☆

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother"
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Whether taken at face value for its haunting subtlety or as an earnest gimmick, Cloak’s “2 Hits from Hell” 7-inch pays serious homage to the Misfits. From the cover art and title, both references to Glenn Danzig and Co.’s 1981 EP 3 Hits from Hell, to the blackened metal cover of “London Dungeon,” this single is testimony to the Atlanta band’s burgeoning greatness. The moment the needle sinks into the record’s deep black grooves, singer and guitarist Scott Taysom dials back the vocal melody while honing in on a mid-tempo rhythm. The song is a natural fit for Cloak’s Southern gothic style. Here, the group reaches beyond the loud/soft dynamic that guided its 2017 debut LP To Venomous Depths (Season of Mist) to embrace a measured sound. Cloak’s vision of “London Dungeon” is accessible, but never at the expense of the original song’s grit, or of Cloak’s ability to turn this horror punk classic into something new. When Taysom sings the opening lyrics, “They call us walking corpses, unholy living dead,” his exquisitely throaty growl conjures images of corpse-painted ghouls, rather than the famous fiends and monsters and of Danzig’s baritone yowl. A demo version of “Forever Burned,” a deep cut from To Venomous Depths, appears on the B side, underscoring Cloak’s faith in black metal. When unleashed from the album, however, the song’s stripped-down and slow-burning fury is a welcome look into the process behind the intricate riffing and scorched rhythms that draw power from atmosphere and texture. ★★★☆☆

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother    Midnight Cruiser Records CLOAK: ‘2 Hits From Hell’                                   Cloak: '2 Hits From Hell' "
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Friday March 1, 2019 02:27 pm EST
'London Dungeon' b/w 'Forever Burned' roar with darkness | more...

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  string(2229) " DSSA+Art+Small  2019-02-18T16:54:32+00:00 DSSA+Art+Small.jpg     Down South Showdown MVPs on wax 13728  2019-02-18T16:45:58+00:00 RECORD REVIEW: Down South Spaghetty Accident chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Ryan Bell  2019-02-18T16:45:58+00:00  From January 17-20, Little Five Points and East Atlanta hosted 30 garage, punk, and rock ’n’ roll torchbearers from around the country for the Down South Showdown festival. The gathering also doubled as a release party for the Down South Spaghetty Accident, a compilation LP, released by Spaghetty Town Records, featuring 14 groups that played throughout the weekend. The collection boasts songs by RMBLR, Dirty Fences, MAMA, Dinos Boys, and more, providing a nuanced snapshot of this extended family of like-minded musicians. While punk and rock ’n’ roll’s halcyon days have come and gone again and again, a determined core of rockers carry on, unfazed by current trends, while turning out a disarmingly catchy batch of songs. For these dedicated souls, rock ’n’ roll is eternal. “The Call” by Fixed Faces is an angsty, portentous number reminiscent of the Adverts in its darkness. With its indelible rhythms and poignant lyrics, “Next Time” by Atlanta’s RMBLR is a stirring youth anthem, and Criminal Kids’ “Run From the Police” is a hit that AC/DC would be proud to call its own. As a document of the scene, it is by design that the comp lacks musical diversity. What’s important here are the rough edges and in-the-red energy with which each song unfolds. There is no Auto-Tune, no recording budget. Lyrics about drinking beer, breaking the law, and getting wild on Saturday night abound. Nobody is changing the course of music here, and these groups like it that way. Whatever you’re doing this weekend, here’s a solid playlist. ★★★☆☆

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Article

Monday February 18, 2019 11:45 am EST
Down South Showdown MVPs on wax | more...
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  string(101) "'Future Hndrxx Presents: The WIZRD' is a narcissistic, yet infectious, self-declaration of greatness"
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  string(1792) "At a sprawling 20 tracks, Future’s seventh album, Future Hndrxx Presents: The WIZRD (Epic), is a narcissistic, yet infectious, self-declaration of greatness. The album is practically void of any featured artists, but Future’s ravenous energy is what makes songs such as the lead single, “Crushed Up,” so compelling. The extensive self-indulgence is equally irresistible; Future (born Nayvadius DeMun Wilburn) even samples himself throughout the album. However, the samples are more than audacious nods to how long Future has been dishing out hits. They also serve as motifs, ushering in transitions in a rewarding fashion for longtime fans. This technique is flawlessly executed on “Baptiize,” a deep cut featuring an exhilarating beat switch that flips a sample of “Slave Master” from 2015’s DS2. While plenty of credit goes to WIZRD’s long list of producers (ATL Jacob, Tay Keith, Wheezy, and more), Future’s charismatic delivery propels the trap extravaganza, demanding recognition. That desire resonates on “Krazy but True,” where he demands respect from his rap contemporaries as well. Lyrics like “I’m God to you niggas/I worked too hard just to spoil you niggas/You need to pay me my respects” are admittedly self-righteous, but the messiness is just as enjoyable. On WIZRD, Future mostly boasts his wealth, jewelry, and sexcapades without offering much substance. Nevertheless, the album still feels like a triumph and makes for a solid argument about Future’s musical and cultural contributions. Wizardry at the peak of self-reverence. ★★★☆☆

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother"
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★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother"
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  string(2711) " Music Future9 1 19  2019-02-05T14:46:15+00:00 Music_Future9-1_19.jpg   This is a very well-written review. Great work! What a great review. I have been following this guy for awhile now. His reviews are on point. Joshua artistically blends his technical knowledge of hip hop while commenting on the artist intent of the music.  He brings unique and authentic review without fear.  It is obvious he is locked in Wow!! I really enjoyed reading this article. You managed to paint a picture of my favorite artist with your words.  Very Well Done!!  'Future Hndrxx Presents: The WIZRD' is a narcissistic, yet infectious, self-declaration of greatness 13292  2019-02-05T14:39:25+00:00 RECORD REVIEW: Future chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Joshua Robinson  2019-02-05T14:39:25+00:00  At a sprawling 20 tracks, Future’s seventh album, Future Hndrxx Presents: The WIZRD (Epic), is a narcissistic, yet infectious, self-declaration of greatness. The album is practically void of any featured artists, but Future’s ravenous energy is what makes songs such as the lead single, “Crushed Up,” so compelling. The extensive self-indulgence is equally irresistible; Future (born Nayvadius DeMun Wilburn) even samples himself throughout the album. However, the samples are more than audacious nods to how long Future has been dishing out hits. They also serve as motifs, ushering in transitions in a rewarding fashion for longtime fans. This technique is flawlessly executed on “Baptiize,” a deep cut featuring an exhilarating beat switch that flips a sample of “Slave Master” from 2015’s DS2. While plenty of credit goes to WIZRD’s long list of producers (ATL Jacob, Tay Keith, Wheezy, and more), Future’s charismatic delivery propels the trap extravaganza, demanding recognition. That desire resonates on “Krazy but True,” where he demands respect from his rap contemporaries as well. Lyrics like “I’m God to you niggas/I worked too hard just to spoil you niggas/You need to pay me my respects” are admittedly self-righteous, but the messiness is just as enjoyable. On WIZRD, Future mostly boasts his wealth, jewelry, and sexcapades without offering much substance. Nevertheless, the album still feels like a triumph and makes for a solid argument about Future’s musical and cultural contributions. Wizardry at the peak of self-reverence. ★★★☆☆

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother    Courtsy Epic NEVER STOP: Future's seventh album commands respect.                                   RECORD REVIEW: Future "
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Tuesday February 5, 2019 09:39 am EST
'Future Hndrxx Presents: The WIZRD' is a narcissistic, yet infectious, self-declaration of greatness | more...
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There’s a swaying, oceanic movement that powers the Purkinje Shift’s latest LP, Threads (Chunklet), as the group weaves a frenzied and full-tilt guitar crunch into stark, geometric forms. “Schnapps in Munich” kicks off the A-side with aggressive rhythms, distortion, and unorthodox hardcore grit, laying out the coarse sonic textures and stylish instrumental precision the Purkinje Shift has honed since forming in 1996. The opening number is a ’90s time capsule as much as it is a new chapter for the group. When guitarist Gary Flom deploys the howling lap steel in “I Rope Steers,” the album opens up to reveal wholly new levels of depth between long-standing members Flom, guitarist Ben Davis, and drummer Lee Corum, the latter of whom joined the group circa 2010. Uncovering new avenues to explore is an impressive feat after year 23, especially for an on-again off-again group. It is the lap steel that guides the recurring motifs in songs such as “Honez” and “Sweet Science.” But even the songs built around standard guitars, such as “Hand-Tooled Leather” and “Let’s Quit Forever,” fit into the album’s structure as though pulled by the lap steel’s gravitational force, emanating from a few strategically placed moments throughout the record. Davis’ guitar undulates around interlocking notes and melodies hammered out by Corum and Flom with wild defiance. Each song trades breakneck speed with yawning atmosphere, cut from logic, muscle, and an enhanced group language that communicates the majesty of the music in ways both subtle and massive. ★★★★☆

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother"
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There’s a swaying, oceanic movement that powers [https://thepurkinjeshift.bandcamp.com/|the Purkinje Shift]’s latest LP, ''Threads'' (Chunklet), as the group weaves a frenzied and full-tilt guitar crunch into stark, geometric forms. “Schnapps in Munich” kicks off the A-side with aggressive rhythms, distortion, and unorthodox hardcore grit, laying out the coarse sonic textures and stylish instrumental precision the Purkinje Shift has honed since forming in 1996. The opening number is a ’90s time capsule as much as it is a new chapter for the group. When guitarist Gary Flom deploys the howling lap steel in “I Rope Steers,” the album opens up to reveal wholly new levels of depth between long-standing members Flom, guitarist Ben Davis, and drummer Lee Corum, the latter of whom joined the group circa 2010. Uncovering new avenues to explore is an impressive feat after year 23, especially for an on-again off-again group. It is the lap steel that guides the recurring motifs in songs such as “Honez” and “Sweet Science.” But even the songs built around standard guitars, such as “Hand-Tooled Leather” and “Let’s Quit Forever,” fit into the album’s structure as though pulled by the lap steel’s gravitational force, emanating from a few strategically placed moments throughout the record. Davis’ guitar undulates around interlocking notes and melodies hammered out by Corum and Flom with wild defiance. Each song trades breakneck speed with yawning atmosphere, cut from logic, muscle, and an enhanced group language that communicates the majesty of the music in ways both subtle and massive. ★★★★☆

__★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother__"
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There’s a swaying, oceanic movement that powers the Purkinje Shift’s latest LP, Threads (Chunklet), as the group weaves a frenzied and full-tilt guitar crunch into stark, geometric forms. “Schnapps in Munich” kicks off the A-side with aggressive rhythms, distortion, and unorthodox hardcore grit, laying out the coarse sonic textures and stylish instrumental precision the Purkinje Shift has honed since forming in 1996. The opening number is a ’90s time capsule as much as it is a new chapter for the group. When guitarist Gary Flom deploys the howling lap steel in “I Rope Steers,” the album opens up to reveal wholly new levels of depth between long-standing members Flom, guitarist Ben Davis, and drummer Lee Corum, the latter of whom joined the group circa 2010. Uncovering new avenues to explore is an impressive feat after year 23, especially for an on-again off-again group. It is the lap steel that guides the recurring motifs in songs such as “Honez” and “Sweet Science.” But even the songs built around standard guitars, such as “Hand-Tooled Leather” and “Let’s Quit Forever,” fit into the album’s structure as though pulled by the lap steel’s gravitational force, emanating from a few strategically placed moments throughout the record. Davis’ guitar undulates around interlocking notes and melodies hammered out by Corum and Flom with wild defiance. Each song trades breakneck speed with yawning atmosphere, cut from logic, muscle, and an enhanced group language that communicates the majesty of the music in ways both subtle and massive. ★★★★☆

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother    Courtesy Chunklet SWEET SCIENCE: The Purkinje Shift, ‘Threads.’                                   RECORD REVIEW: The Purkinje Shift "
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Friday February 1, 2019 12:15 am EST
'Threads' is a ’90s time capsule as much as it is a new chapter for the long-standing trio | more...
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Nobody realized they needed a Carbonas 2xLP singles compilation until it arrived. Drop a needle on opening cut, “Blackout (Waiting to Happen),” and it feels as though the world has been asleep since the Atlanta punk outfit called it quits circa 2008. Your Moral Superiors: Singles and Rarities (Goner) documents a rowdy era for Atlanta music. Much of the tension lies between singer Greg King’s emotionally wrought delivery and drummer Dave Rahn’s focus on motorik repetition, transforming what could be basic punk songs into gut-wrenching epics of romantic angst. “(Your Love Is) Inside Out” and “Day Turns into Night” highlight a body of work that settles in between classic punk agitation and power-pop charm. When juxtaposed with the jagged D-side demos, an impressive career arc is revealed. With 37 songs, getting through the whole thing requires dedication; covers, like the Paul Collins’ Beat’s “Walking Out On Love,” don’t bring anything new to the table. Still, Carbonas relegated much of their strongest material to their 7-inches corralled here. “Butcher,” from the 2008 Euro Tour EP, represents Carbonas at their most refined. Until now, much of this material has existed only as demos and rare singles. Presented together here, Your Moral Superiors offers the definitive overview of Atlanta’s greatest punk band to date. ★★★★☆

Carbonas, Predator, Ryan Dinosaur, and Wash play the Earl Fri., Jan. 11. $20. 9 p.m. (doors). 488 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-522-3950. www.badearl.com.

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother"
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~~#000000:Nobody realized they ''needed'' a ~~[https://carbonas.bandcamp.com/|Carbonas] ~~#000000:2xLP singles compilation until it arrived. Drop a needle on opening cut, “Blackout (Waiting to Happen),” and it feels as though the world has been asleep since the Atlanta punk outfit called it quits circa 2008. ''Your Moral Superiors: Singles and Rarities'' (Goner) documents a rowdy era for Atlanta music. Much of the tension lies between singer Greg King’s emotionally wrought delivery and drummer Dave Rahn’s focus on motorik repetition, transforming what could be basic punk songs into gut-wrenching epics of romantic angst. “(Your Love Is) Inside Out” and “Day Turns into Night” highlight a body of work that settles in between classic punk agitation and power-pop charm. When juxtaposed with the jagged D-side demos, an impressive career arc is revealed. With 37 songs, getting through the whole thing requires dedication; covers, like the Paul Collins’ Beat’s “Walking Out On Love,” don’t bring anything new to the table. Still, Carbonas relegated much of their strongest material to their 7-inches corralled here. “Butcher,” from the 2008 ''Euro Tour'' EP, represents Carbonas at their most refined. Until now, much of this material has existed only as demos and rare singles. Presented together here, ''Your Moral Superiors'' offers the definitive overview of Atlanta’s greatest punk band to date. ★★★★☆~~

''[http://www.badearl.com/events/4988/Carbonas|Carbonas, Predator, Ryan Dinosaur, and Wash play the Earl Fri., Jan. 11. $20. 9 p.m. (doors). 488 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-522-3950. www.badearl.com.]''

~~#000000:★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother~~"
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  string(2184) " Carbonas  2019-01-07T15:45:47+00:00 Carbonas.jpg     ‘Your Moral Superiors: Singles and Rarities’ 12332  2019-01-07T14:56:15+00:00 RECORD REVIEW: Carbonas chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Chad Radford Chad Radford 2019-01-07T14:56:15+00:00  

Nobody realized they needed a Carbonas 2xLP singles compilation until it arrived. Drop a needle on opening cut, “Blackout (Waiting to Happen),” and it feels as though the world has been asleep since the Atlanta punk outfit called it quits circa 2008. Your Moral Superiors: Singles and Rarities (Goner) documents a rowdy era for Atlanta music. Much of the tension lies between singer Greg King’s emotionally wrought delivery and drummer Dave Rahn’s focus on motorik repetition, transforming what could be basic punk songs into gut-wrenching epics of romantic angst. “(Your Love Is) Inside Out” and “Day Turns into Night” highlight a body of work that settles in between classic punk agitation and power-pop charm. When juxtaposed with the jagged D-side demos, an impressive career arc is revealed. With 37 songs, getting through the whole thing requires dedication; covers, like the Paul Collins’ Beat’s “Walking Out On Love,” don’t bring anything new to the table. Still, Carbonas relegated much of their strongest material to their 7-inches corralled here. “Butcher,” from the 2008 Euro Tour EP, represents Carbonas at their most refined. Until now, much of this material has existed only as demos and rare singles. Presented together here, Your Moral Superiors offers the definitive overview of Atlanta’s greatest punk band to date. ★★★★☆

Carbonas, Predator, Ryan Dinosaur, and Wash play the Earl Fri., Jan. 11. $20. 9 p.m. (doors). 488 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. 404-522-3950. www.badearl.com.

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother    Courtesy Goner Records NOSTALGIA BUFF: 'Your Moral Superiors' rounds up (most of) Carbonas' greatest hits and obscure demos.                                   RECORD REVIEW: Carbonas "
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Article

Monday January 7, 2019 09:56 am EST
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  string(95) "From Migos to Misanthropic Aggression, 40 of the city's most essential listens of the past year"
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  string(13211) "It really is staggering to tally up the amount of music that came out of Atlanta in 2018. From Janelle Monáe’s Dirty Computer to Misanthropic Aggression’s Inability to Cope, the richness, variety, and sheer volume the local music scene cranked out this year reflects an impressive step up on all fronts. Even with an exhaustive list of 40 titles, hard cuts had to be made. Since the year began, Migos’ Culture II proved to be a grower, not a shower, as the rising trap stars faced harsh criticism, but ultimately landed a spot co-headlining the January 31 pre-Super Bowl concert, with Lil John and Ludacris, at the State Farm Arena. On the other hand, 21 Savage’s I Am > I Was has been tearing up Billboard charts upon arrival. In the trenches of the metal scene, Gunpowder Gray and Dead Now unleashed monster riffs that surpassed everyone’s expectations, and electronic producers Charolastra (Peter Roglin), Fit Of Body (Ryan Parks), and Twins (Matt Weiner) reached deeper and higher into the ether to craft heady and psychedelic soundscapes like never before. Of course, all of these names are just the tip of the iceberg. There’s enough room to roam around in the music on this list for at least another year. Until that time, press play, let it ride, and get an earful of Atlanta's most essential music of the past year.



40. Migos: Culture II (Quality Control / Virgin EMI)


39. Michelle Malone: Slings and Arrows (SBS Records)
Read CL's record review.


38. Janelle Monáe: Dirty Computer (Bad Boy/Atlantic)
Read more about the Dirty Computer tour.


37. Young Thug: Slime Language (300 Entertainment)


36. Midnight Larks: Self-titled LP (Midnight Larks)
Read CL's album review.


35. Fit Of Body: Black Box No Cops (2MR).


34. Papa Jack Couch: Meriwether (Self-released)
Read CL's album review.


33. TWINS: That Which Is Not Said (2MR)


32. Delta Moon: Babylon is Falling (Landslide Records)


31. Tears For the Dying: Charon (Self-released)


30. Neighbor Lady: Maybe Later (Friendship Fever)
Read CL's album review.


29. Antarcticats: I Know You Are, But What Am I? (House Cat Records)
Read CL's album review.


28. Gregorio Franco: Apocalypse Prime (Self-released)
Listen to a CL podcast feat. Gregorio Franco.



27. Hospice: Self-titled cassette (Scavenger of Death)
Read more about Hospice on CL's "25 summer jams" list.


26. Harmacy: For the Mentally Ill (Self-released)
Read more about CL's 2018 critics pick for best new punk band.


25. Tiger! Tiger!: Backing The Wrong Horse (Chicken Ranch Records)


24. Adron: Water Music (Tribo Records)
Read more about Adron's Water Music.


23. Charolastra: Passenger (VLSC)
Read more about Charolastra on CL's "25 summer jams" list.


22. Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics: State of All Things (Self-released)
Read CL's album review.



21. Material Girls: Leather (Irrelevant Music)
Read CL's album review.


20. Ryan Dinosaur: Chapter One: The Final Chapter (Scavenger of Death)
EDITOR'S NOTE: Ryan Dinosaur is the recording project of CL music writer and Scavenger of Death label owner Ryan Bell.


19. 10th Letter: Ultra Violence (Greenbriar Records)


18. Dead Now: Self-titled LP (Brutal Panda)
Read more about CL's 2018 pick for Best Album By A New Group.


17. Subsonics: Flesh Colored Paint (Slovenly)
Read CL's album review.


16. Night Cleaner: Even (Geographic North)


15. Gunpowder Gray: Lethal Rock and Roll (Midnight Cruiser Records)


14. Misanthropic Aggression: Inability to Cope EP (Boris Records)


13. Yukons: South of the Equator (Self-released)
Read CL's recent interview with Yukons.


12. OkCello: Resolve
Watch OkCello's Live From the Archives performance.


11. 21 Savage: I Am > I Was (Epic Records Group)

 

10. Taylor Alxndr: Hologram (Self-released) Between balancing roles as a drag artist, underground queer icon, and all-around Atlanta socialite, Taylor Alxndr found time to push even more boundaries with Hologram. The Southern Fried Queer Pride co-founder’s six-song mini album takes identity politics to the dance-floor with songs such as “One Dot,” “Log Off!” and “Feel It All.” The album radiates with bright synth-pop flourishes built around lyrical themes of perception, the role that technology plays in (mis)communication, and the importance of rising above societal dissonance. For Alxndr, the medium is the message. Promoting respect, solidarity, and interconnectedness amid the city’s creative communities is the bottom line, and Hologram is one big step forward for Alxndr and for Atlanta. — Chad Radford

 

9. Playboi Carti: Die Lit (AWGE) In 2018, Playboi Carti took his signature brand of mumble rap and ran with it, creating the playful sing-rap style that defines his first proper album, Die Lit. Carti, born Jordan Carter, possesses a high-pitched, scatlike rap style that sets him apart from his counterparts such as Lil Uzi Vert, Travis Scott, Lil Yachty, et al. Carti’s technique is fully on parade in songs such as “Right Now,” “Poke It Out,” and “Choppa Won’t Miss” featuring Yung Thug, creating infectious hooks and one-liners like, “I'm on ’em beans for the real, I'm on the lean for real” in “Lean 4 Real” (featuring Skepta). Carti’s style is something to embrace. His energy and songs capture a snapshot of a young Atlantan in his prime. — Jalen Jenkins

 


8. Gringo Star: Back to the City (Nevado Music) Five albums into a decade-long run, Gringo Star’s founders, brothers Nicholas and Peter Furgiuele, are sharp, proven songwriters latching onto a hook-heavy, somewhat surfy American sound. With Back to the City, the group maintains a sunny Anglophile undercurrent with cryptic lyrics that reflect their indie-rock sensibilities. As with any serious band, growing older and more confident means tweaking the approach. The album was self-produced, and pushes boundaries by adding orchestration to a handful of tracks. “Easy” brings sweeping, cinematic violins to garage pop, marking a step up. While not quite hitting Phil Spector-level overindulgence, the strings add a dreamy boldness that raises the bar higher than Gringo Star’s previous efforts. The wistful mid-tempo psychedelic rocker “La La La” gets the orchestral treatment, bringing a fullness and maturity to glam fare and evoking the Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour. The surging ballad “Midnight till Dawn” is ready-made for the next Quentin Tarantino flick. Elsewhere, “Watchdog,” with its nasal vocal, reflects an edgy Only Ones-styled vibe. The album’s first single, “Mister Mystery,” cranks out power-pop crunch guitars and “ooohh” vocals with the effortless punch of late ’70s college radio. Live, these songs may lose some of the mystery gained in the studio. But Back to the City is a strong, decisive, and inspired step forward for Gringo Star, and shows the Furgiuele brothers are just beginning to tap their creativity. — Hal Horowitz
 


7. Breathers: Designed To Break (Irrelevant Music) Breathers’ first proper full-length is a sophisticated, Orwellian electronic pop odyssey. Upon first listen, songs such as “Low in the Sky,” “Centralia Road,” and “Only Operator” evoke the commercial new-wave pop motif of the ’80s à la Blancmange, Heaven 17, and late-era Human League. But as each song unfolds, the songwriting reveals a complexity in sound, production, and the anthemic vibe that drives the group’s vision of modern society. Vocalists and synth players Lee Gunselman and Jake Thomson, along with percussionist Mike Netland build each song largely around synthesizers. For “Low in the Sky,” cellist Andrew Cleveland and background vocalist Catherine Quesenberry (formerly of Shampoo and Qurious), add subtly organic layers to this brand of dystopian pop, without coming across as heavy-handed. Designed to Break is a musical manifesto as much as it is an easy listening experience. — CR



6. The Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra: Get It How You Live (Groid Music/Ropeadope) What does 21st-century big-band jazz sound like? The answer: Get It How You Live, which showcases the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra, a 19-piece ensemble led by trumpeter Russell Gunn. With a couple of exceptions, the compositions are Russell’s, complemented by arrangements from trombonist and Kennesaw State University jazz band director Wes Funderburk. Dionne Farris lends her soulful voice to a hair-raising rendition of her song “Fair,” along with a new Funderburk arrangement of her song “Hopeless,” the title song from 1997’s Love Jones. Dashill Smith delivers a lyrical punch to “The Critic’s Song,” which features a funky rhythmic core that careens into a free-blowing horn excursion led by alto saxophonist Brian Hogans. With a degree of precision and élan usually associated with more seasoned big bands, the RKJO maneuvers through a contemporary cornucopia of styles including traditional jazz, neo-bop, neo soul, and hip-hop. — Doug DeLoach 




5. Lunar Vacation: Artificial Flavors (Human Sounds Records) The charming innocence of youth lies at the heart of Lunar Vacation’s Natural Flavors EP, suspended in the pastel hues of nostalgia, experienced in real time. The lush tension and rhythmic interplay summoned by singer and guitarist Grace Repasky and guitarist Maggie Geeslin give rise to rich and yearning vignettes in songs such as “Daytime,” “The Basement,” and “Too Late, Colin.” Each number explores the depths of life’s many wonders taking shape, new relationships coming to fruition, and old relationships fading away the summer after high school graduation. Vaguely conceptual in nature, and somewhat cinematic, Lunar Vacation’s sophomore EP is a stunning document proving just how much more colorful dream pop can be. — CR 




4. 6lack East Atlanta Love Letter (LVRN) What sets 6lack head and shoulders above his Atlanta-based trap-minded peers is a an honest-to-goodness knack for storytelling, songwriting, and breaking the mold. Press play on East Atlanta Love Letter, and the spacious productions and lyrics reflecting on good times turned sour in songs such as “Switch,” “Pretty Little Fears,” and the album’s title track ooze with sobering reality. A bunch of flashy cameo features by Drake, J. Cole, Future, and the likes will catch the attention of the mainstream, but 6lack has carved out a lane for himself based solely on his own musical prowess. — CR 



3. Flamingo Shadow: Earth Music (Irrelevant Music) Flamingo Shadow’s debut full-length, Earth Music, arrived as a perfect painkiller for 2018. With so much doom and gloom dominating the news cycle, and social media transforming the population into a nation of zombies, Earth Music’s literal and metaphorical themes of perpetual motion — hitting the open road — are a rich counterpoint to modern malaise. Singer Madeline Adams’ voice resonates with breezy natural tones of confidence and elation. Songs such as “All Way Down,” “Taxi,” and “Riding on the Wind” channel the spirit of existential freedom into a psychedelic swirl of tropical post-punk, dance-floor pop, and ethereal textures. — CR 



2. Lonnie Holley: MITH (Jagjaguwar) In September, against a backdrop of nationwide social and political discord, Lonnie Holley dropped MITH. With sublime poetry and ethereal vision, the 68-year-old outlier artist’s third album (his first for Jagjaguwar) renders the hard-edged realities of modern American life into 10 beautifully jarring numbers with titles such as “I’m a Suspect,” “I Snuck Off the Slave Ship,” and “Sometimes I Wanna Dance.” Wrapped in an exquisite ambient framework created by Dave Nelson (trombone and loops), Marlon Patton (drums, percussion, Moog synth bass pedals), and guests Shahzad Ismaily, Laraaji, Sam Gendel, Richard Swift, Elizabeth Laprelle, and Anna Roberts-Gevalt, Holley leads listeners on a mostly improvised, hypnotically engaging path through impressionistic realms, touching everything from racial strife and “overdatafying” to blood kinship and spiritual salvation. Still, it’s the album’s first single and video, “I Woke Up in a Fucked-Up America,” that brings MITH to a fine point, and serves as a harrowing new national anthem. — DD 



1. The Rock*A*Teens: Sixth House (Merge) After 18 years between albums, the Rock*A*Teens, longstanding purveyors of the Cabbagetown sound, return with a career-defining masterpiece. Sixth House embraces glowing production that transcends the spectral guitar noise that usually shrouds Chris Lopez's tales of woe and deceit in the haunted South. Lopez's songs are populated by desperate characters living amid a bucolic landscape, but complications simmer just beneath the surface. Songs such as “Turn and Smile,” “Go Tell Everybody,” and “Closest to Heaven” turn shattering pain into catharsis layered in reflection and emotional depth — the culmination of a lifetime spent navigating Atlanta’s mean streets. www.mergerecords.com/the-rockateens. — CR"
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~~#000000:40. Migos: ''Culture II'' (Quality Control / Virgin EMI)~~

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~~#000000:39. Michelle Malone: ''Slings and Arrows'' (SBS Records)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-268395-Michelle-Malone,-still-tough|Read ''CL'''s record review.]

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~~#000000:38. Janelle Monáe: ''Dirty Computer'' (Bad Boy/Atlantic)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-411740-ATLANTA-UNTRAPPED:-Janelle-Monáe’s-Dirty-Computer-Tour|Read more about the ''Dirty Computer'' tour.]

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~~#000000:37. Young Thug: ''Slime Language'' (300 Entertainment)~~

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~~#000000:36. Midnight Larks: Self-titled LP (Midnight Larks)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-405330-Midnight-Larks'-debut-LP-shines-bright|Read ''CL'''s album review.]

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~~#000000:35. Fit Of Body: ''Black Box No Cops'' (2MR).~~

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~~#000000:34. Papa Jack Couch: ''Meriwether'' (Self-released)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-418227-RECORD-REVIEW:-Papa-Jack-Couch|Read ''CL'''s album review].

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~~#000000:33. TWINS: ''That Which Is Not Said'' (2MR)~~

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~~#000000:32. Delta Moon: ''Babylon is Falling'' (Landslide Records)~~

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~~#000000:31. Tears For the Dying: ''Charon'' (Self-released)~~

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~~#000000:30. Neighbor Lady: ''Maybe Later'' (Friendship Fever)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-406451-Neighbor-Lady’s-misty-memories|Read ''CL'''s album review.]

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~~#000000:29. Antarcticats: ''I Know You Are, But What Am I?'' (House Cat Records)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-405496-Antarcticats-surfs-deeper-waters|Read ''CL'''s album review.]

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~~#000000:28. Gregorio Franco: ''Apocalypse Prime'' (Self-released)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-417814-PODCAST:-Claudio-Simonetti's-Goblin-returns!|Listen to a ''CL'' podcast feat. Gregorio Franco.]


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~~#000000:27. Hospice: Self-titled cassette (Scavenger of Death)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-408161-25-Atlanta-summer-jams|Read more about Hospice on ''CL'''s "25 summer jams" list.]

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~~#000000:26. Harmacy: ''For the Mentally Ill'' (Self-released)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/bestofatlanta-143921-Best-New-Punk-Band|Read more about ''CL'''s 2018 critics pick for best new punk band.]

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~~#000000:25. Tiger! Tiger!: Backing The Wrong Horse (Chicken Ranch Records)~~

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~~#000000:24. Adron: ''Water Music'' (Tribo Records)~~
~~null:[https://creativeloafing.com/content-405885-7-fun-facts-about-Adron’s-‘Water-Music’|Read more about Adron's ''Water Music''.]~~

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~~#000000:23. Charolastra: ''Passenger'' (VLSC)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-408161-25-Atlanta-summer-jams|Read more about Charolastra on ''CL'''s "25 summer jams" list.]

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~~#000000:22. Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics: ''State of All Things'' (Self-released)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-382161-RECORD-REVIEW:-Ruby-Velle-&-the-Soulphonics’-‘State-of-All-Things’|Read ''CL'''s album review.]


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~~#000000:21. Material Girls: ''Leather'' (Irrelevant Music)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-410541-Material-Girls-hold-a-mirror-to-modern-hysteria-on-‘Leather’|Read ''CL'''s album review.]

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~~#000000:20. Ryan Dinosaur: ''Chapter One: The Final Chapter'' (Scavenger of Death)~~
~~#000000:''EDITOR'S NOTE: Ryan Dinosaur is the recording project of CL music writer and Scavenger of Death label owner Ryan Bell.''~~

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~~#000000:19. 10th Letter: ''Ultra Violence'' (Greenbriar Records)~~

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~~#000000:18. Dead Now: Self-titled LP (Brutal Panda)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/bestofatlanta-413844-Best-Album-by-a-New-Group|Read more about ''CL'''s 2018 pick for Best Album By A New Group.]

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~~#000000:17. Subsonics: ''Flesh Colored Paint'' (Slovenly)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-406030-Subsonics:-'Flesh-Colored-Paint'|Read ''CL'''s album review.]

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~~#000000:16. Night Cleaner: ''Even'' (Geographic North)~~

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~~#000000:15. Gunpowder Gray: ''Lethal Rock and Roll'' (Midnight Cruiser Records)~~

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~~#000000:14. Misanthropic Aggression: ''Inability to Cope'' EP (Boris Records)~~

{iframe src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=686278008/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/transparent=true/" width="640" height="760" scrolling="auto"}
~~#000000:13. Yukons: ''South of the Equator ''(Self-released)~~
[https://creativeloafing.com/content-418411-Yukons-look-to-the-future|Read ''CL'''s recent interview with Yukons.]

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~~#000000:12. OkCello: ''Resolve''~~
~~null:[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOZ5QlbTQAE|Watch OkCello's Live From the Archives performance.]~~

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~~#000000:11. 21 Savage: ''I Am > I Was'' (Epic Records Group)~~

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~~#000000:10. __Taylor Alxndr: ''Hologram''__ (Self-released) Between balancing roles as a drag artist, underground queer icon, and all-around Atlanta socialite, Taylor Alxndr found time to push even more boundaries with ''Hologram''. The Southern Fried Queer Pride co-founder’s six-song mini album takes identity politics to the dance-floor with songs such as “One Dot,” “Log Off!” and “Feel It All.” The album radiates with bright synth-pop flourishes built around lyrical themes of perception, the role that technology plays in (mis)communication, and the importance of rising above societal dissonance. For Alxndr, the medium is the message. Promoting respect, solidarity, and interconnectedness amid the city’s creative communities is the bottom line, and ''Hologram'' is one big step forward for Alxndr and for Atlanta. — Chad Radford~~

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~~#000000:9. __Playboi Carti: ''Die Lit''__ (AWGE) In 2018, Playboi Carti took his signature brand of mumble rap and ran with it, creating the playful sing-rap style that defines his first proper album, ''Die Lit''. Carti, born Jordan Carter, possesses a high-pitched, scatlike rap style that sets him apart from his counterparts such as Lil Uzi Vert, Travis Scott, Lil Yachty, et al. Carti’s technique is fully on parade in songs such as “Right Now,” “Poke It Out,” and “Choppa Won’t Miss” featuring Yung Thug, creating infectious hooks and one-liners like, “I'm on ’em beans for the real, I'm on the lean for real” in “Lean 4 Real” (featuring Skepta). Carti’s style is something to embrace. His energy and songs capture a snapshot of a young Atlantan in his prime. — Jalen Jenkins~~

 
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~~#000000:8. __Gringo Star__: ''Back to the City'' (Nevado Music) Five albums into a decade-long run, Gringo Star’s founders, brothers Nicholas and Peter Furgiuele, are sharp, proven songwriters latching onto a hook-heavy, somewhat surfy American sound. With ''Back to the City'', the group maintains a sunny Anglophile undercurrent with cryptic lyrics that reflect their indie-rock sensibilities. As with any serious band, growing older and more confident means tweaking the approach. The album was self-produced, and pushes boundaries by adding orchestration to a handful of tracks. “Easy” brings sweeping, cinematic violins to garage pop, marking a step up. While not quite hitting Phil Spector-level overindulgence, the strings add a dreamy boldness that raises the bar higher than Gringo Star’s previous efforts. The wistful mid-tempo psychedelic rocker “La La La” gets the orchestral treatment, bringing a fullness and maturity to glam fare and evoking the Beatles’ ''Magical Mystery Tour''. The surging ballad “Midnight till Dawn” is ready-made for the next Quentin Tarantino flick. Elsewhere, “Watchdog,” with its nasal vocal, reflects an edgy Only Ones-styled vibe. The album’s first single, “Mister Mystery,” cranks out power-pop crunch guitars and “ooohh” vocals with the effortless punch of late ’70s college radio. Live, these songs may lose some of the mystery gained in the studio. But ''Back to the City'' is a strong, decisive, and inspired step forward for Gringo Star, and shows the Furgiuele brothers are just beginning to tap their creativity. — Hal Horowitz~~
 
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~~#000000:7. __Breathers: ''Designed To Break''__ (Irrelevant Music) Breathers’ first proper full-length is a sophisticated, Orwellian electronic pop odyssey. Upon first listen, songs such as “Low in the Sky,” “Centralia Road,” and “Only Operator” evoke the commercial new-wave pop motif of the ’80s à la Blancmange, Heaven 17, and late-era Human League. But as each song unfolds, the songwriting reveals a complexity in sound, production, and the anthemic vibe that drives the group’s vision of modern society. Vocalists and synth players Lee Gunselman and Jake Thomson, along with percussionist Mike Netland build each song largely around synthesizers. For “Low in the Sky,” cellist Andrew Cleveland and background vocalist Catherine Quesenberry (formerly of Shampoo and Qurious), add subtly organic layers to this brand of dystopian pop, without coming across as heavy-handed. ''Designed to Break'' is a musical manifesto as much as it is an easy listening experience. — CR~~

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~~#000000:6. __The Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra: ''Get It How You Live'' (Groid Music/Ropeadope) What does 21st-century big-band jazz sound like? The answer: ''Get It How You Live,'' which showcases the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra, a 19-piece ensemble led by trumpeter Russell Gunn. With a couple of exceptions, the compositions are Russell’s, complemented by arrangements from trombonist and Kennesaw State University jazz band director Wes Funderburk. Dionne Farris lends her soulful voice to a hair-raising rendition of her song “Fair,” along with a new Funderburk arrangement of her song “Hopeless,” the title song from 1997’s ''Love Jones''. Dashill Smith delivers a lyrical punch to “The Critic’s Song,” which features a funky rhythmic core that careens into a free-blowing horn excursion led by alto saxophonist Brian Hogans. With a degree of precision and élan usually associated with more seasoned big bands, the RKJO maneuvers through a contemporary cornucopia of styles including traditional jazz, neo-bop, neo soul, and hip-hop. — Doug DeLoach __~~


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~~#000000:__5. __Lunar Vacation: ''Artificial Flavors'' (Human Sounds Records) The charming innocence of youth lies at the heart of Lunar Vacation’s ''Natural Flavors'' EP, suspended in the pastel hues of nostalgia, experienced in real time. The lush tension and rhythmic interplay summoned by singer and guitarist Grace Repasky and guitarist Maggie Geeslin give rise to rich and yearning vignettes in songs such as “Daytime,” “The Basement,” and “Too Late, Colin.” Each number explores the depths of life’s many wonders taking shape, new relationships coming to fruition, and old relationships fading away the summer after high school graduation. Vaguely conceptual in nature, and somewhat cinematic, Lunar Vacation’s sophomore EP is a stunning document proving just how much more colorful dream pop can be. — CR ~~


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~~#000000:4. __6lack ''East Atlanta Love Letter''__ (LVRN) What sets 6lack head and shoulders above his Atlanta-based trap-minded peers is a an honest-to-goodness knack for storytelling, songwriting, and breaking the mold. Press play on ''East Atlanta Love Letter'', and the spacious productions and lyrics reflecting on good times turned sour in songs such as “Switch,” “Pretty Little Fears,” and the album’s title track ooze with sobering reality. A bunch of flashy cameo features by Drake, J. Cole, Future, and the likes will catch the attention of the mainstream, but 6lack has carved out a lane for himself based solely on his own musical prowess. — CR ~~

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~~#000000:3. __Flamingo Shadow: ''Earth Music''__ (Irrelevant Music) Flamingo Shadow’s debut full-length, ''Earth Music'', arrived as a perfect painkiller for 2018. With so much doom and gloom dominating the news cycle, and social media transforming the population into a nation of zombies, ''Earth Music''’s literal and metaphorical themes of perpetual motion — hitting the open road — are a rich counterpoint to modern malaise. Singer Madeline Adams’ voice resonates with breezy natural tones of confidence and elation. Songs such as “All Way Down,” “Taxi,” and “Riding on the Wind” channel the spirit of existential freedom into a psychedelic swirl of tropical post-punk, dance-floor pop, and ethereal textures. — CR ~~

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~~#000000:2. __Lonnie Holley: ''MITH''__ (Jagjaguwar) In September, against a backdrop of nationwide social and political discord, Lonnie Holley dropped ''MITH''. With sublime poetry and ethereal vision, the 68-year-old outlier artist’s third album (his first for Jagjaguwar) renders the hard-edged realities of modern American life into 10 beautifully jarring numbers with titles such as “I’m a Suspect,” “I Snuck Off the Slave Ship,” and “Sometimes I Wanna Dance.” Wrapped in an exquisite ambient framework created by Dave Nelson (trombone and loops), Marlon Patton (drums, percussion, Moog synth bass pedals), and guests Shahzad Ismaily, Laraaji, Sam Gendel, Richard Swift, Elizabeth Laprelle, and Anna Roberts-Gevalt, Holley leads listeners on a mostly improvised, hypnotically engaging path through impressionistic realms, touching everything from racial strife and “overdatafying” to blood kinship and spiritual salvation. Still, it’s the album’s first single and video, “I Woke Up in a Fucked-Up America,” that brings ''MITH'' to a fine point, and serves as a harrowing new national anthem. — DD ~~

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~~#000000:1. __The Rock*A*Teens: ''Sixth House''__ (Merge) After 18 years between albums, the Rock*A*Teens, longstanding purveyors of the Cabbagetown sound, return with a career-defining masterpiece. ''Sixth House'' embraces glowing production that transcends the spectral guitar noise that usually shrouds Chris Lopez's tales of woe and deceit in the haunted South. Lopez's songs are populated by desperate characters living amid a bucolic landscape, but complications simmer just beneath the surface. Songs such as “Turn and Smile,” “Go Tell Everybody,” and “Closest to Heaven” turn shattering pain into catharsis layered in reflection and emotional depth — the culmination of a lifetime spent navigating Atlanta’s mean streets. www.mergerecords.com/the-rockateens. — CR~~"
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  string(13747) " Migos Culture 2  2018-12-31T17:39:40+00:00 Migos Culture 2.jpg     From Migos to Misanthropic Aggression, 40 of the city's most essential listens of the past year 12208  2018-12-30T23:07:06+00:00 Atlanta's best albums of 2018 chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Chad Radford Chad Radford 2018-12-30T23:07:06+00:00  It really is staggering to tally up the amount of music that came out of Atlanta in 2018. From Janelle Monáe’s Dirty Computer to Misanthropic Aggression’s Inability to Cope, the richness, variety, and sheer volume the local music scene cranked out this year reflects an impressive step up on all fronts. Even with an exhaustive list of 40 titles, hard cuts had to be made. Since the year began, Migos’ Culture II proved to be a grower, not a shower, as the rising trap stars faced harsh criticism, but ultimately landed a spot co-headlining the January 31 pre-Super Bowl concert, with Lil John and Ludacris, at the State Farm Arena. On the other hand, 21 Savage’s I Am > I Was has been tearing up Billboard charts upon arrival. In the trenches of the metal scene, Gunpowder Gray and Dead Now unleashed monster riffs that surpassed everyone’s expectations, and electronic producers Charolastra (Peter Roglin), Fit Of Body (Ryan Parks), and Twins (Matt Weiner) reached deeper and higher into the ether to craft heady and psychedelic soundscapes like never before. Of course, all of these names are just the tip of the iceberg. There’s enough room to roam around in the music on this list for at least another year. Until that time, press play, let it ride, and get an earful of Atlanta's most essential music of the past year.



40. Migos: Culture II (Quality Control / Virgin EMI)


39. Michelle Malone: Slings and Arrows (SBS Records)
Read CL's record review.


38. Janelle Monáe: Dirty Computer (Bad Boy/Atlantic)
Read more about the Dirty Computer tour.


37. Young Thug: Slime Language (300 Entertainment)


36. Midnight Larks: Self-titled LP (Midnight Larks)
Read CL's album review.


35. Fit Of Body: Black Box No Cops (2MR).


34. Papa Jack Couch: Meriwether (Self-released)
Read CL's album review.


33. TWINS: That Which Is Not Said (2MR)


32. Delta Moon: Babylon is Falling (Landslide Records)


31. Tears For the Dying: Charon (Self-released)


30. Neighbor Lady: Maybe Later (Friendship Fever)
Read CL's album review.


29. Antarcticats: I Know You Are, But What Am I? (House Cat Records)
Read CL's album review.


28. Gregorio Franco: Apocalypse Prime (Self-released)
Listen to a CL podcast feat. Gregorio Franco.



27. Hospice: Self-titled cassette (Scavenger of Death)
Read more about Hospice on CL's "25 summer jams" list.


26. Harmacy: For the Mentally Ill (Self-released)
Read more about CL's 2018 critics pick for best new punk band.


25. Tiger! Tiger!: Backing The Wrong Horse (Chicken Ranch Records)


24. Adron: Water Music (Tribo Records)
Read more about Adron's Water Music.


23. Charolastra: Passenger (VLSC)
Read more about Charolastra on CL's "25 summer jams" list.


22. Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics: State of All Things (Self-released)
Read CL's album review.



21. Material Girls: Leather (Irrelevant Music)
Read CL's album review.


20. Ryan Dinosaur: Chapter One: The Final Chapter (Scavenger of Death)
EDITOR'S NOTE: Ryan Dinosaur is the recording project of CL music writer and Scavenger of Death label owner Ryan Bell.


19. 10th Letter: Ultra Violence (Greenbriar Records)


18. Dead Now: Self-titled LP (Brutal Panda)
Read more about CL's 2018 pick for Best Album By A New Group.


17. Subsonics: Flesh Colored Paint (Slovenly)
Read CL's album review.


16. Night Cleaner: Even (Geographic North)


15. Gunpowder Gray: Lethal Rock and Roll (Midnight Cruiser Records)


14. Misanthropic Aggression: Inability to Cope EP (Boris Records)


13. Yukons: South of the Equator (Self-released)
Read CL's recent interview with Yukons.


12. OkCello: Resolve
Watch OkCello's Live From the Archives performance.


11. 21 Savage: I Am > I Was (Epic Records Group)

 

10. Taylor Alxndr: Hologram (Self-released) Between balancing roles as a drag artist, underground queer icon, and all-around Atlanta socialite, Taylor Alxndr found time to push even more boundaries with Hologram. The Southern Fried Queer Pride co-founder’s six-song mini album takes identity politics to the dance-floor with songs such as “One Dot,” “Log Off!” and “Feel It All.” The album radiates with bright synth-pop flourishes built around lyrical themes of perception, the role that technology plays in (mis)communication, and the importance of rising above societal dissonance. For Alxndr, the medium is the message. Promoting respect, solidarity, and interconnectedness amid the city’s creative communities is the bottom line, and Hologram is one big step forward for Alxndr and for Atlanta. — Chad Radford

 

9. Playboi Carti: Die Lit (AWGE) In 2018, Playboi Carti took his signature brand of mumble rap and ran with it, creating the playful sing-rap style that defines his first proper album, Die Lit. Carti, born Jordan Carter, possesses a high-pitched, scatlike rap style that sets him apart from his counterparts such as Lil Uzi Vert, Travis Scott, Lil Yachty, et al. Carti’s technique is fully on parade in songs such as “Right Now,” “Poke It Out,” and “Choppa Won’t Miss” featuring Yung Thug, creating infectious hooks and one-liners like, “I'm on ’em beans for the real, I'm on the lean for real” in “Lean 4 Real” (featuring Skepta). Carti’s style is something to embrace. His energy and songs capture a snapshot of a young Atlantan in his prime. — Jalen Jenkins

 


8. Gringo Star: Back to the City (Nevado Music) Five albums into a decade-long run, Gringo Star’s founders, brothers Nicholas and Peter Furgiuele, are sharp, proven songwriters latching onto a hook-heavy, somewhat surfy American sound. With Back to the City, the group maintains a sunny Anglophile undercurrent with cryptic lyrics that reflect their indie-rock sensibilities. As with any serious band, growing older and more confident means tweaking the approach. The album was self-produced, and pushes boundaries by adding orchestration to a handful of tracks. “Easy” brings sweeping, cinematic violins to garage pop, marking a step up. While not quite hitting Phil Spector-level overindulgence, the strings add a dreamy boldness that raises the bar higher than Gringo Star’s previous efforts. The wistful mid-tempo psychedelic rocker “La La La” gets the orchestral treatment, bringing a fullness and maturity to glam fare and evoking the Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour. The surging ballad “Midnight till Dawn” is ready-made for the next Quentin Tarantino flick. Elsewhere, “Watchdog,” with its nasal vocal, reflects an edgy Only Ones-styled vibe. The album’s first single, “Mister Mystery,” cranks out power-pop crunch guitars and “ooohh” vocals with the effortless punch of late ’70s college radio. Live, these songs may lose some of the mystery gained in the studio. But Back to the City is a strong, decisive, and inspired step forward for Gringo Star, and shows the Furgiuele brothers are just beginning to tap their creativity. — Hal Horowitz
 


7. Breathers: Designed To Break (Irrelevant Music) Breathers’ first proper full-length is a sophisticated, Orwellian electronic pop odyssey. Upon first listen, songs such as “Low in the Sky,” “Centralia Road,” and “Only Operator” evoke the commercial new-wave pop motif of the ’80s à la Blancmange, Heaven 17, and late-era Human League. But as each song unfolds, the songwriting reveals a complexity in sound, production, and the anthemic vibe that drives the group’s vision of modern society. Vocalists and synth players Lee Gunselman and Jake Thomson, along with percussionist Mike Netland build each song largely around synthesizers. For “Low in the Sky,” cellist Andrew Cleveland and background vocalist Catherine Quesenberry (formerly of Shampoo and Qurious), add subtly organic layers to this brand of dystopian pop, without coming across as heavy-handed. Designed to Break is a musical manifesto as much as it is an easy listening experience. — CR



6. The Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra: Get It How You Live (Groid Music/Ropeadope) What does 21st-century big-band jazz sound like? The answer: Get It How You Live, which showcases the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra, a 19-piece ensemble led by trumpeter Russell Gunn. With a couple of exceptions, the compositions are Russell’s, complemented by arrangements from trombonist and Kennesaw State University jazz band director Wes Funderburk. Dionne Farris lends her soulful voice to a hair-raising rendition of her song “Fair,” along with a new Funderburk arrangement of her song “Hopeless,” the title song from 1997’s Love Jones. Dashill Smith delivers a lyrical punch to “The Critic’s Song,” which features a funky rhythmic core that careens into a free-blowing horn excursion led by alto saxophonist Brian Hogans. With a degree of precision and élan usually associated with more seasoned big bands, the RKJO maneuvers through a contemporary cornucopia of styles including traditional jazz, neo-bop, neo soul, and hip-hop. — Doug DeLoach 




5. Lunar Vacation: Artificial Flavors (Human Sounds Records) The charming innocence of youth lies at the heart of Lunar Vacation’s Natural Flavors EP, suspended in the pastel hues of nostalgia, experienced in real time. The lush tension and rhythmic interplay summoned by singer and guitarist Grace Repasky and guitarist Maggie Geeslin give rise to rich and yearning vignettes in songs such as “Daytime,” “The Basement,” and “Too Late, Colin.” Each number explores the depths of life’s many wonders taking shape, new relationships coming to fruition, and old relationships fading away the summer after high school graduation. Vaguely conceptual in nature, and somewhat cinematic, Lunar Vacation’s sophomore EP is a stunning document proving just how much more colorful dream pop can be. — CR 




4. 6lack East Atlanta Love Letter (LVRN) What sets 6lack head and shoulders above his Atlanta-based trap-minded peers is a an honest-to-goodness knack for storytelling, songwriting, and breaking the mold. Press play on East Atlanta Love Letter, and the spacious productions and lyrics reflecting on good times turned sour in songs such as “Switch,” “Pretty Little Fears,” and the album’s title track ooze with sobering reality. A bunch of flashy cameo features by Drake, J. Cole, Future, and the likes will catch the attention of the mainstream, but 6lack has carved out a lane for himself based solely on his own musical prowess. — CR 



3. Flamingo Shadow: Earth Music (Irrelevant Music) Flamingo Shadow’s debut full-length, Earth Music, arrived as a perfect painkiller for 2018. With so much doom and gloom dominating the news cycle, and social media transforming the population into a nation of zombies, Earth Music’s literal and metaphorical themes of perpetual motion — hitting the open road — are a rich counterpoint to modern malaise. Singer Madeline Adams’ voice resonates with breezy natural tones of confidence and elation. Songs such as “All Way Down,” “Taxi,” and “Riding on the Wind” channel the spirit of existential freedom into a psychedelic swirl of tropical post-punk, dance-floor pop, and ethereal textures. — CR 



2. Lonnie Holley: MITH (Jagjaguwar) In September, against a backdrop of nationwide social and political discord, Lonnie Holley dropped MITH. With sublime poetry and ethereal vision, the 68-year-old outlier artist’s third album (his first for Jagjaguwar) renders the hard-edged realities of modern American life into 10 beautifully jarring numbers with titles such as “I’m a Suspect,” “I Snuck Off the Slave Ship,” and “Sometimes I Wanna Dance.” Wrapped in an exquisite ambient framework created by Dave Nelson (trombone and loops), Marlon Patton (drums, percussion, Moog synth bass pedals), and guests Shahzad Ismaily, Laraaji, Sam Gendel, Richard Swift, Elizabeth Laprelle, and Anna Roberts-Gevalt, Holley leads listeners on a mostly improvised, hypnotically engaging path through impressionistic realms, touching everything from racial strife and “overdatafying” to blood kinship and spiritual salvation. Still, it’s the album’s first single and video, “I Woke Up in a Fucked-Up America,” that brings MITH to a fine point, and serves as a harrowing new national anthem. — DD 



1. The Rock*A*Teens: Sixth House (Merge) After 18 years between albums, the Rock*A*Teens, longstanding purveyors of the Cabbagetown sound, return with a career-defining masterpiece. Sixth House embraces glowing production that transcends the spectral guitar noise that usually shrouds Chris Lopez's tales of woe and deceit in the haunted South. Lopez's songs are populated by desperate characters living amid a bucolic landscape, but complications simmer just beneath the surface. Songs such as “Turn and Smile,” “Go Tell Everybody,” and “Closest to Heaven” turn shattering pain into catharsis layered in reflection and emotional depth — the culmination of a lifetime spent navigating Atlanta’s mean streets. www.mergerecords.com/the-rockateens. — CR    Courtesy Quality Control / Virgin EMI MIGOS: Quavo, Offset, and Takeoff consummated their place as Atlanta trap superstars with 'Culture II.'                                   Atlanta's best albums of 2018 "
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Article

Sunday December 30, 2018 06:07 pm EST
From Migos to Misanthropic Aggression, 40 of the city's most essential listens of the past year | more...
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  string(71) "Doug Deloach cites the Top Five local albums to catch his ear this year"
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  string(5365) "The Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra: Get It How You Live (ROPEADOPE) —  What does 21 century big band jazz sound like? The answer is Get It How You Live, which showcases the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra, a 19-piece ensemble led by Atlanta-based trumpeter Russell Gunn. With a couple of exceptions, the compositions are Russell’s complemented by arrangements from trombonist and Kennesaw State University jazz band director Wes Funderburk. Dionne Farris lends her superlatively soulful voice to a hair-raising rendition of “Fair,” a song she wrote, along with a new arrangement by Funderburk of another Farris original, “Hopeless,” the title song from the 1997 film. Dashill Smith delivers a lyrical punch to “The Critic’s Song,” which features a funky rhythmic core that careens into a free-blowing horn excursion led by alto saxophonist Brian Hogans. With a degree of precision and élan usually associated with more seasoned big bands, the RKJO maneuvers through a thoroughly contemporary cornucopia of styles including trad jazz, neo-bop, new soul and hip hop.

Lonnie Holley: MITH (Jagjaguwar) —  In September, against a backdrop of unprecedented tension and discord, Lonnie Holley dropped MITH. Like the polished stone and rough concrete sculpture (also by Holley), which serves as the album’s titular inspiration, the third album by the 68-year-old artist is an example of hard-edged reality rendered poetically sublime by its creator’s laser-sharp vision and mindful handling. Abetted by a beautifully apropos ambient framework constructed by Dave Nelson (trombone and loops) and Marlon Patton (drums, percussion, Moog synth bass pedals), with guest support from Shahzad Ismaily, Laraaji, Sam Gendel, Richard Swift, Elizabeth Laprelle and Anna Roberts-Gevalt, Holley leads listeners on a mostly improvised, hypnotically engaging path through impressionistic realms, which touch on myriad themes ranging from racial strife and “overdatafying” to blood kinship and spiritual salvation. “I Woke Up in a Fucked Up America,” a video of which was distributed as a preview of MITH, stands out as a harrowing, dissenting national anthem.

Okorie Johnson: Resolve (Self-release) — Resolve is the product of a commitment by Okorie Johnson, an Atlanta-based cellist and composer self-dubbed OkCello, to explore the potential of his instrument in a solo improvised setting augmented by live electronic effects. Johnson draws from a broad compositional palette, which includes elements of jazz, funk, reggae, EDM, traditional African and Western classical music. Out of this mélange he creates songs that simultaneously resonate with deep familiarity and satisfying freshness, evoking themes ranging from migration (“Broken Teacup”), racism (“Incredulous”) and resilience (“I Wonder What Your Life Was Like”) to love (“You Make Me Smile”), joy (“Springtime in Wakanda”) and desire (“Silence,” the only track with vocals by OkCello). Recorded over a six-month period, Resolve was produced by OkCello, Monyea Crawford and Richard Rollie for LoveChild Productions.

Various Artists: Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by Bill Ferris (Dust-to-Digital) — Almost a decade in the making, Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by Bill Ferris chronicles the estimable work of the field recordist, filmmaker, folklorist, and teacher whose massive archives reside in the University of North Carolina’s Southern Folklife Collection. Functioning as a virtual time machine, Voices of Mississippi transports the listener to worlds inhabited by familiar creatures whose lives play out in unfamiliar temporal, cultural and contextual realms. Every bit as enthralling as the blues and gospel selections in the set are storytelling and spoken-word tracks featuring literary luminaries, such as Barry Hannah, Alice Walker, Alex Haley, Robert Penn Warren and Allen Ginsburg. Also in the mix are examples of bawdy toasts and “the dirty dozens,” representing stylistic precursors of rap. Voices of Mississippi includes a 120-page book edited by Ferris; two CDs featuring blues and gospel recordings (1966-1978); one CD of interviews and storytelling (1968-1994); a DVD featuring documentary films (1972-1980); and a code for downloading/streaming.

Clay Harper: Bleak Beauty (Self-release) — With Bleak Beauty, Clay Harper takes a deep dive into the art of darkness to create a wrenching evocation born of enduring love interrupted by untimely death. In April 2016, six months after being diagnosed with a brain tumor, Harper’s partner of twenty years, Stephanie Gwinn, died at Hospice Atlanta. During the ensuing months of grief and mourning, Harper chronicled his vexed but evolving psychological and emotional state in song form. The result is a compelling amalgamation of dolefully funky ruminations (“The Kindness of Strangers”), blues-inflected lamentations (“Let Me Sleep, I’m So Tired”) and swinging, streetwise observations (“Friday San Francisco”) by a masterfully intuitive songwriter. Recorded by Harper and Ruairi Kilcullen at RdK Audio in Little 5 Points and mixed at Harptone in Atlanta, Bleak Beauty features exquisitely sparing accompaniment by Chaz Jankel, Rick Richards, Duane Trucks, Kevin Scott, Mark Johnson, Tom Gray, Chris Case and Mark Bencuya."
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  string(5455) "__The Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra: __''Get It How You Live ''(ROPEADOPE) —  What does 21{SUP()}st{SUP} century big band jazz sound like? The answer is ''Get It How You Live'', which showcases the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra, a 19-piece ensemble led by Atlanta-based trumpeter Russell Gunn. With a couple of exceptions, the compositions are Russell’s complemented by arrangements from trombonist and Kennesaw State University jazz band director Wes Funderburk. Dionne Farris lends her superlatively soulful voice to a hair-raising rendition of “Fair,” a song she wrote, along with a new arrangement by Funderburk of another Farris original, “Hopeless,” the title song from the 1997 film. Dashill Smith delivers a lyrical punch to “The Critic’s Song,” which features a funky rhythmic core that careens into a free-blowing horn excursion led by alto saxophonist Brian Hogans. With a degree of precision and élan usually associated with more seasoned big bands, the RKJO maneuvers through a thoroughly contemporary cornucopia of styles including trad jazz, neo-bop, new soul and hip hop.

__Lonnie Holley: __MITH (Jagjaguwar) —  In September, against a backdrop of unprecedented tension and discord, Lonnie Holley dropped ''MITH''. Like the polished stone and rough concrete sculpture (also by Holley), which serves as the album’s titular inspiration, the third album by the 68-year-old artist is an example of hard-edged reality rendered poetically sublime by its creator’s laser-sharp vision and mindful handling. Abetted by a beautifully apropos ambient framework constructed by Dave Nelson (trombone and loops) and Marlon Patton (drums, percussion, Moog synth bass pedals), with guest support from Shahzad Ismaily, Laraaji, Sam Gendel, Richard Swift, Elizabeth Laprelle and Anna Roberts-Gevalt, Holley leads listeners on a mostly improvised, hypnotically engaging path through impressionistic realms, which touch on myriad themes ranging from racial strife and “overdatafying” to blood kinship and spiritual salvation. “I Woke Up in a Fucked Up America,” a video of which was distributed as a preview of ''MITH'', stands out as a harrowing, dissenting national anthem.

__Okorie Johnson: __''Resolve ''(Self-release) — ''Resolve'' is the product of a commitment by Okorie Johnson, an Atlanta-based cellist and composer self-dubbed OkCello, to explore the potential of his instrument in a solo improvised setting augmented by live electronic effects. Johnson draws from a broad compositional palette, which includes elements of jazz, funk, reggae, EDM, traditional African and Western classical music. Out of this mélange he creates songs that simultaneously resonate with deep familiarity and satisfying freshness, evoking themes ranging from migration (“Broken Teacup”), racism (“Incredulous”) and resilience (“I Wonder What Your Life Was Like”) to love (“You Make Me Smile”), joy (“Springtime in Wakanda”) and desire (“Silence,” the only track with vocals by OkCello). Recorded over a six-month period, ''Resolve'' was produced by OkCello, Monyea Crawford and Richard Rollie for LoveChild Productions.

__Various Artists: __''Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by Bill Ferris ''(Dust-to-Digital) — Almost a decade in the making, ''Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by Bill Ferris'' chronicles the estimable work of the field recordist, filmmaker, folklorist, and teacher whose massive archives reside in the University of North Carolina’s Southern Folklife Collection. Functioning as a virtual time machine, ''Voices of Mississippi'' transports the listener to worlds inhabited by familiar creatures whose lives play out in unfamiliar temporal, cultural and contextual realms. Every bit as enthralling as the blues and gospel selections in the set are storytelling and spoken-word tracks featuring literary luminaries, such as Barry Hannah, Alice Walker, Alex Haley, Robert Penn Warren and Allen Ginsburg. Also in the mix are examples of bawdy toasts and “the dirty dozens,” representing stylistic precursors of rap. ''Voices of Mississippi'' includes a 120-page book edited by Ferris; two CDs featuring blues and gospel recordings (1966-1978); one CD of interviews and storytelling (1968-1994); a DVD featuring documentary films (1972-1980); and a code for downloading/streaming.

__Clay Harper: __''Bleak Beauty ''(Self-release) — With ''Bleak Beauty'', Clay Harper takes a deep dive into the art of darkness to create a wrenching evocation born of enduring love interrupted by untimely death. In April 2016, six months after being diagnosed with a brain tumor, Harper’s partner of twenty years, Stephanie Gwinn, died at Hospice Atlanta. During the ensuing months of grief and mourning, Harper chronicled his vexed but evolving psychological and emotional state in song form. The result is a compelling amalgamation of dolefully funky ruminations (“The Kindness of Strangers”), blues-inflected lamentations (“Let Me Sleep, I’m So Tired”) and swinging, streetwise observations (“Friday San Francisco”) by a masterfully intuitive songwriter. Recorded by Harper and Ruairi Kilcullen at RdK Audio in Little 5 Points and mixed at Harptone in Atlanta, ''Bleak Beauty'' features exquisitely sparing accompaniment by Chaz Jankel, Rick Richards, Duane Trucks, Kevin Scott, Mark Johnson, Tom Gray, Chris Case and Mark Bencuya."
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  string(5754) " Dd2  2018-12-22T00:09:40+00:00 dd2.jpg     Doug Deloach cites the Top Five local albums to catch his ear this year 12109  2018-12-22T00:01:02+00:00 A look back at 2018 tony.paris@creativeloafing.com Tony Paris Doug Deloach  2018-12-22T00:01:02+00:00  The Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra: Get It How You Live (ROPEADOPE) —  What does 21 century big band jazz sound like? The answer is Get It How You Live, which showcases the Royal Krunk Jazz Orkestra, a 19-piece ensemble led by Atlanta-based trumpeter Russell Gunn. With a couple of exceptions, the compositions are Russell’s complemented by arrangements from trombonist and Kennesaw State University jazz band director Wes Funderburk. Dionne Farris lends her superlatively soulful voice to a hair-raising rendition of “Fair,” a song she wrote, along with a new arrangement by Funderburk of another Farris original, “Hopeless,” the title song from the 1997 film. Dashill Smith delivers a lyrical punch to “The Critic’s Song,” which features a funky rhythmic core that careens into a free-blowing horn excursion led by alto saxophonist Brian Hogans. With a degree of precision and élan usually associated with more seasoned big bands, the RKJO maneuvers through a thoroughly contemporary cornucopia of styles including trad jazz, neo-bop, new soul and hip hop.

Lonnie Holley: MITH (Jagjaguwar) —  In September, against a backdrop of unprecedented tension and discord, Lonnie Holley dropped MITH. Like the polished stone and rough concrete sculpture (also by Holley), which serves as the album’s titular inspiration, the third album by the 68-year-old artist is an example of hard-edged reality rendered poetically sublime by its creator’s laser-sharp vision and mindful handling. Abetted by a beautifully apropos ambient framework constructed by Dave Nelson (trombone and loops) and Marlon Patton (drums, percussion, Moog synth bass pedals), with guest support from Shahzad Ismaily, Laraaji, Sam Gendel, Richard Swift, Elizabeth Laprelle and Anna Roberts-Gevalt, Holley leads listeners on a mostly improvised, hypnotically engaging path through impressionistic realms, which touch on myriad themes ranging from racial strife and “overdatafying” to blood kinship and spiritual salvation. “I Woke Up in a Fucked Up America,” a video of which was distributed as a preview of MITH, stands out as a harrowing, dissenting national anthem.

Okorie Johnson: Resolve (Self-release) — Resolve is the product of a commitment by Okorie Johnson, an Atlanta-based cellist and composer self-dubbed OkCello, to explore the potential of his instrument in a solo improvised setting augmented by live electronic effects. Johnson draws from a broad compositional palette, which includes elements of jazz, funk, reggae, EDM, traditional African and Western classical music. Out of this mélange he creates songs that simultaneously resonate with deep familiarity and satisfying freshness, evoking themes ranging from migration (“Broken Teacup”), racism (“Incredulous”) and resilience (“I Wonder What Your Life Was Like”) to love (“You Make Me Smile”), joy (“Springtime in Wakanda”) and desire (“Silence,” the only track with vocals by OkCello). Recorded over a six-month period, Resolve was produced by OkCello, Monyea Crawford and Richard Rollie for LoveChild Productions.

Various Artists: Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by Bill Ferris (Dust-to-Digital) — Almost a decade in the making, Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by Bill Ferris chronicles the estimable work of the field recordist, filmmaker, folklorist, and teacher whose massive archives reside in the University of North Carolina’s Southern Folklife Collection. Functioning as a virtual time machine, Voices of Mississippi transports the listener to worlds inhabited by familiar creatures whose lives play out in unfamiliar temporal, cultural and contextual realms. Every bit as enthralling as the blues and gospel selections in the set are storytelling and spoken-word tracks featuring literary luminaries, such as Barry Hannah, Alice Walker, Alex Haley, Robert Penn Warren and Allen Ginsburg. Also in the mix are examples of bawdy toasts and “the dirty dozens,” representing stylistic precursors of rap. Voices of Mississippi includes a 120-page book edited by Ferris; two CDs featuring blues and gospel recordings (1966-1978); one CD of interviews and storytelling (1968-1994); a DVD featuring documentary films (1972-1980); and a code for downloading/streaming.

Clay Harper: Bleak Beauty (Self-release) — With Bleak Beauty, Clay Harper takes a deep dive into the art of darkness to create a wrenching evocation born of enduring love interrupted by untimely death. In April 2016, six months after being diagnosed with a brain tumor, Harper’s partner of twenty years, Stephanie Gwinn, died at Hospice Atlanta. During the ensuing months of grief and mourning, Harper chronicled his vexed but evolving psychological and emotional state in song form. The result is a compelling amalgamation of dolefully funky ruminations (“The Kindness of Strangers”), blues-inflected lamentations (“Let Me Sleep, I’m So Tired”) and swinging, streetwise observations (“Friday San Francisco”) by a masterfully intuitive songwriter. Recorded by Harper and Ruairi Kilcullen at RdK Audio in Little 5 Points and mixed at Harptone in Atlanta, Bleak Beauty features exquisitely sparing accompaniment by Chaz Jankel, Rick Richards, Duane Trucks, Kevin Scott, Mark Johnson, Tom Gray, Chris Case and Mark Bencuya.    All photos courtesy the respective labels. FIVE FOR '18: The pick of the crop.                                   A look back at 2018 "
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Friday December 21, 2018 07:01 pm EST
Doug Deloach cites the Top Five local albums to catch his ear this year | more...
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  string(1747) "More than the tales of heartache, smiles, bad luck, and devotion to the Almighty, what gives weight to Papa Jack Couch’s songs of life in rural Meriwether County, Georgia, is the exquisiteness of his voice. In “Life Its Own,” the opening number from his latest album, simply titled Meriwether, self-effacing humor and sweet grace find balance when he sings, “You thought your mother-in-law was dead, but she just got out of jail/When it rains it always pours, and then it starts to hail.” The song sets the tone for a series of portraits of everyone from petty criminals to antagonists with “manslaughtering eyes,” and the desperate people who love them.

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Countrypolitan, Delta folk, and New Orleans blues add color to songs such as “Crimes Against My Person,” “That Gospel Blood,” and “Love Is” (feat. Lexi Street). In the final number, “So Far, So Good,” a parade of barrelhouse piano and wilting horns and strings blend together as Couch sums up his irrepressible spirit with an aw shucks and a wink when he offers, “So far, so good, it must be going like the good Lord said that it should.”

Papa John Couch and Lexi Street play Eddie’s Attic Thurs., Dec. 20. $10-$14. 6:30 p.m. 515-B North McDonough St. (upstairs) 404-377-4976. www.eddiesattic.com.

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother

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~~#000000:Couch ruminates, with endearing Southern wisdom, on the trials and tribulations of vacillating between life’s highs and lows. Along the way, he fosters a one-of-a-kind musical atmosphere that borrows tone and pitch from a hodgepodge of styles.~~

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''[http://www.ticketfly.com/event/1760359?utm_medium=api|Papa John Couch and Lexi Street play Eddie’s Attic Thurs., Dec. 20. $10-$14. 6:30 p.m. 515-B North McDonough St. (upstairs) 404-377-4976. www.eddiesattic.com.]''

~~#000000:★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother~~

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  string(2174) " Music Crouch7 1 17  2018-12-06T16:04:16+00:00 Music_Crouch7-1_17.jpg     ‘Meriwether’ ruminates on life with endearing Southern wisdom 11688  2018-12-06T15:32:37+00:00 RECORD REVIEW: Papa Jack Couch chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Chad Radford Chad Radford 2018-12-06T15:32:37+00:00  More than the tales of heartache, smiles, bad luck, and devotion to the Almighty, what gives weight to Papa Jack Couch’s songs of life in rural Meriwether County, Georgia, is the exquisiteness of his voice. In “Life Its Own,” the opening number from his latest album, simply titled Meriwether, self-effacing humor and sweet grace find balance when he sings, “You thought your mother-in-law was dead, but she just got out of jail/When it rains it always pours, and then it starts to hail.” The song sets the tone for a series of portraits of everyone from petty criminals to antagonists with “manslaughtering eyes,” and the desperate people who love them.

Couch ruminates, with endearing Southern wisdom, on the trials and tribulations of vacillating between life’s highs and lows. Along the way, he fosters a one-of-a-kind musical atmosphere that borrows tone and pitch from a hodgepodge of styles.

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Papa John Couch and Lexi Street play Eddie’s Attic Thurs., Dec. 20. $10-$14. 6:30 p.m. 515-B North McDonough St. (upstairs) 404-377-4976. www.eddiesattic.com.

★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother

     Courtesy Papa Jack Couch PAPA JACK COUCH: 'Meriwether'                                   RECORD REVIEW: Papa Jack Couch "
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Thursday December 6, 2018 10:32 am EST
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Breathers’ first proper album, Designed To Break, has already yielded two sleeper hits on the local scene with “1-800-PAIN” and “Only Operator.” Both songs have been catching blog headlines over the months leading up to the album’s Sept. 12 release via Irrelevant Music.

“Low In The Sky,” the album’s third single, veers toward an airy side of the group’s new wave and synth pop affinities to show off a refined side of the group’s songwriting. In other words, the group’s synth-based hooks are lite on the percussive side and on the bottom end, giving a nod to the likes of Blancmange, Heaven 17, and late-era Human League — the commercial new wave hits of the mid-’80s. It’s a sound and aesthetic that strives to create a new sense of normality via a sound that’s unshakably synthetic. In the here and now it’s about as radically experimental as a band can get while coloring within the lines of the familiar. It’s disarmingly fertile musical terrain. Working alongside mixer and engineer Sumner Jones (Belle & Sebastian, Animal Collective) the group has created a bouncy and yearning album that’s bound by this ponderous resurrection of one-hit wonder hooks of the Reagan era without a hint of irony. This creates marvelous tension as a side effect.

Vocalists and synth players Lee Gunselman and Jake Thomson, along with percussionist Mike Netland build each song largely around synthesizers. For “Low In the Sky,” cellist Andrew Cleveland and background vocalist Catherine Quesenberry (formerly of Shampoo and Qurious), adding subtly organic layers to this brand of Dystopian pop.

By comparison to the album’s first two singles, “Low In The Sky” is leaner in its textural vibrancy. These are major chord sounds that never stray too far from the aesthetic that’s revealing itself with each new song. Gunselman’s vocals are focused and wistful here, driven by an undercurrent of apprehension hidden beneath warm and comfortable musical color, setting the stage for a peaceful, but uneasy listening experience.

Catch Breathers on the road in September

9/6-9/8 - HOPSCOTCH MUSIC FESTIVAL - Raleigh, NC
9/7 - Irrelevant Music Showcase FREE Hopscotch Day Party | Neptune's - Raleigh, NC
9/10 - Dew Drop Inn - Washington, DC
9/11 - Tundra Dome - Philadelphia, PA
9/12 - Alphaville - Brooklyn, NY
9/13 - Smog - Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
9/14 - The Glove - Brooklyn, NY
9/22 - Album Release Party | 529 - Atlanta, GA"
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[https://breathers.bandcamp.com/|Breathers]’ first proper album, ''Designed To Break'', has already yielded two sleeper hits on the local scene with “1-800-PAIN” and “Only Operator.” Both songs have been catching blog headlines over the months leading up to the album’s Sept. 12 release via Irrelevant Music.

“Low In The Sky,” the album’s third single, veers toward an airy side of the group’s new wave and synth pop affinities to show off a refined side of the group’s songwriting. In other words, the group’s synth-based hooks are lite on the percussive side and on the bottom end, giving a nod to the likes of Blancmange, Heaven 17, and late-era Human League — the ''commercial'' new wave hits of the mid-’80s. It’s a sound and aesthetic that strives to create a new sense of normality via a sound that’s unshakably synthetic. In the here and now it’s about as radically experimental as a band can get while coloring within the lines of the familiar. It’s disarmingly fertile musical terrain. Working alongside mixer and engineer Sumner Jones (Belle & Sebastian, Animal Collective) the group has created a bouncy and yearning album that’s bound by this ponderous resurrection of one-hit wonder hooks of the Reagan era without a hint of irony. This creates marvelous tension as a side effect.

Vocalists and synth players Lee Gunselman and Jake Thomson, along with percussionist Mike Netland build each song largely around synthesizers. For “Low In the Sky,” cellist Andrew Cleveland and background vocalist Catherine Quesenberry (formerly of Shampoo and Qurious), adding subtly organic layers to this brand of Dystopian pop.

By comparison to the album’s first two singles, “Low In The Sky” is leaner in its textural vibrancy. These are major chord sounds that never stray too far from the aesthetic that’s revealing itself with each new song. Gunselman’s vocals are focused and wistful here, driven by an undercurrent of apprehension hidden beneath warm and comfortable musical color, setting the stage for a peaceful, but uneasy listening experience.

__Catch Breathers on the road in September__

9/6-9/8 - HOPSCOTCH MUSIC FESTIVAL - Raleigh, NC
9/7 - Irrelevant Music Showcase FREE Hopscotch Day Party | Neptune's - Raleigh, NC
9/10 - Dew Drop Inn - Washington, DC
9/11 - Tundra Dome - Philadelphia, PA
9/12 - Alphaville - Brooklyn, NY
9/13 - Smog - Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
9/14 - The Glove - Brooklyn, NY
9/22 - Album Release Party | 529 - Atlanta, GA"
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  string(2947) " Designed To Break  2018-09-07T03:27:56+00:00 Designed To Break.jpg     The third single from 'Designed To Break' shows off a refined sonic palette 8834  2018-09-13T09:00:00+00:00 FIRST LISTEN: Breathers' 'Low In The Sky' chad.radford@creativeloafing.com Chad Radford Chad Radford Chad Radford 2018-09-13T09:00:00+00:00   

Breathers’ first proper album, Designed To Break, has already yielded two sleeper hits on the local scene with “1-800-PAIN” and “Only Operator.” Both songs have been catching blog headlines over the months leading up to the album’s Sept. 12 release via Irrelevant Music.

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Vocalists and synth players Lee Gunselman and Jake Thomson, along with percussionist Mike Netland build each song largely around synthesizers. For “Low In the Sky,” cellist Andrew Cleveland and background vocalist Catherine Quesenberry (formerly of Shampoo and Qurious), adding subtly organic layers to this brand of Dystopian pop.

By comparison to the album’s first two singles, “Low In The Sky” is leaner in its textural vibrancy. These are major chord sounds that never stray too far from the aesthetic that’s revealing itself with each new song. Gunselman’s vocals are focused and wistful here, driven by an undercurrent of apprehension hidden beneath warm and comfortable musical color, setting the stage for a peaceful, but uneasy listening experience.

Catch Breathers on the road in September

9/6-9/8 - HOPSCOTCH MUSIC FESTIVAL - Raleigh, NC
9/7 - Irrelevant Music Showcase FREE Hopscotch Day Party | Neptune's - Raleigh, NC
9/10 - Dew Drop Inn - Washington, DC
9/11 - Tundra Dome - Philadelphia, PA
9/12 - Alphaville - Brooklyn, NY
9/13 - Smog - Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
9/14 - The Glove - Brooklyn, NY
9/22 - Album Release Party | 529 - Atlanta, GA    Courtesy Irrelevant Music BREATHERS: 'Designed To Break'                                   FIRST LISTEN: Breathers' 'Low In The Sky' "
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Article

Thursday September 13, 2018 05:00 am EDT
The third single from 'Designed To Break' shows off a refined sonic palette | more...
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Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled “Keep Me Up,” which arrived July 27.

“Blue” presented a textured, full-bodied sound. Adelaide, along with Christopher Alan Yates (banjo and vocal harmonies), Trish Land (percussion), and Gabbie Watts (upright bass), crafted a colorful blend of Americana and folk. The group lingered on the video, seeking perfection. At last, the polished product was set free and arrived in April. 

Now, Adelaide reveals a different side of herself that transcends her goals of perfection and pushes for authenticity with ”Keep Me Up.” Both the songwriting and production take a raw turn without sacrificing the sound quality as Adelaide treks on as a soloist.

“Keep Me Up” is about seeing or thinking about someone you already did all of the work of getting over emotionally,” Adelaide says. “How you don't want them to make you happy or sad because it would rip your heart back open. It's about working hard to stay neutral when someone really has the ability to get under your skin.”

One month after the song's June release, Adelaide also released the video, which continued the push for realism. Filmed and edited by Nina Dolgin (WonderRoot), listeners are guided down a trail of nostalgia. The video was shot at the Goat Farm, and acts as a diary focusing on relationships. But the term relationship holds an extended meaning — from human connections to an intimacy with the city of Atlanta itself. 

“It’s kind of a love letter to the city,” she says. “I wanted it to be really simple and cozy.”
As a multifaceted artist, Adelaide’s tangible art takes refuge in her music and vice versa. Although songwriting and painting have different creative processes, she combines them by incorporating a visual element during live shows. 

“Both art and music inform one another, especially when it comes to performance,” she says. “I try to channel the energy that I want to present to the listeners. A lot of times I see that as color and it makes me think of painting and flow. The feeling of creation.”

Whether Adelaide treks on as a solo artist, collaborative musician, or painter, she’s sure to enthrall audiences with a kaleidoscope of talents that pull on multiple sensory channels. — Lauren Leathers



Bad Spell’s most recent release, a track titled “Don’t Go Out Tonight,” offers a healthy dose of fuzzed up, grimy psychedelia. Throughout the song, which was produced by Bad Spell and Ed Rawls of Living Room Studios, singer Bryan Malone’s scratchy vocals warn an unidentified compadre that the outside winds are picking up and carrying ominous tidings. Dealing with the topics of paranoia and loneliness, the song is both gloomy and grinding, maintaining momentum via drum crashes, organ pads courtesy of guest musician Spencer Garn, and a lengthy and commendable guitar solo that rips through the middle. “Don’t Go Out Tonight” will appear on an upcoming album of the same name, and the track is accompanied by an appropriately trippy and scuffed up music video, directed by Bad Spell’s own Bryan Malone. The band plays the Star Bar on Sat., Aug. 25, with Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, the Woggles, and DJ Vikki V.— Annika Von Grey



Illiterates’ latst single “Horton Heats A Who,” produced by Matt McCalvin (Gringo Star, Zoners, St. Pe), is theatrical, fun, and a little bit twisted. The song is fairly sparse, hanging on to the pace created by stuttering drums and singer Steve Albertson’s stream-of-consciousness vocal ranting. Sporadic and fairly manic guitar wails and punk laced gang vocals echo throughout the track, adding some aesthetic depth. A few key harmonized guitar moments bump up the complexity of the song, showcasing Illiterates as a group with some meaningful talent to go along with their spunk. The song will appear on the band’s upcoming debut LP Makeout Mountain and positions them as an up-and-coming act to watch.— AVG"
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~~#000000:__Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled “Keep Me Up,” which arrived July 27.__~~

~~#000000:__“Blue” presented a textured, full-bodied sound. Adelaide, along with Christopher Alan Yates (banjo and vocal harmonies), Trish Land (percussion), and Gabbie Watts (upright bass), crafted a colorful blend of Americana and folk. The group lingered on the video, seeking perfection. At last, the polished product was set free and arrived in April. __~~

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~~#000000:__“Keep Me Up” is about seeing or thinking about someone you already did all of the work of getting over emotionally,” Adelaide says. “How you don't want them to make you happy or sad because it would rip your heart back open. It's about working hard to stay neutral when someone really has the ability to get under your skin.”__~~

~~#000000:__One month after the song's June release, Adelaide also released the video, which continued the push for realism. Filmed and edited by Nina Dolgin (WonderRoot), listeners are guided down a trail of nostalgia. The video was shot at the Goat Farm, and acts as a diary focusing on relationships. But the term relationship holds an extended meaning — from human connections to an intimacy with the city of Atlanta itself. __~~

~~#000000:__“It’s kind of a love letter to the city,” she says. “I wanted it to be really simple and cozy.”__~~
~~#000000:__As a multifaceted artist, Adelaide’s tangible art takes refuge in her music and vice versa. Although songwriting and painting have different creative processes, she combines them by incorporating a visual element during live shows. __~~

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~~#000000:__Whether Adelaide treks on as a solo artist, collaborative musician, or painter, she’s sure to enthrall audiences with a kaleidoscope of talents that pull on multiple sensory channels. ____— Lauren Leathers__~~

~~#000000:{youtube movie="cv0-adpntLg" width="640" height="395" quality="high" allowFullScreen="y"}~~

~~#000000:__Bad Spell’s most recent release, a track titled “Don’t Go Out Tonight,” offers a healthy dose of fuzzed up, grimy psychedelia. Throughout the song, which was produced by Bad Spell and Ed Rawls of Living Room Studios, singer Bryan Malone’s scratchy vocals warn an unidentified compadre that the outside winds are picking up and carrying ominous tidings. Dealing with the topics of paranoia and loneliness, the song is both gloomy and grinding, maintaining momentum via drum crashes, organ pads courtesy of guest musician Spencer Garn, and a lengthy and commendable guitar solo that rips through the middle. “Don’t Go Out Tonight” will appear on an upcoming album of the same name, and the track is accompanied by an appropriately trippy and scuffed up music video, directed by Bad Spell’s own Bryan Malone. The band plays the Star Bar on Sat., Aug. 25, with Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, the Woggles, and DJ Vikki V.____— Annika Von Grey__~~

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~~#000000:__Illiterates’ latst single “Horton Heats A Who,” produced by Matt McCalvin (Gringo Star, Zoners, St. Pe), is theatrical, fun, and a little bit twisted. The song is fairly sparse, hanging on to the pace created by stuttering drums and singer Steve Albertson’s stream-of-consciousness vocal ranting. Sporadic and fairly manic guitar wails and punk laced gang vocals echo throughout the track, adding some aesthetic depth. A few key harmonized guitar moments bump up the complexity of the song, showcasing Illiterates as a group with some meaningful talent to go along with their spunk. The song will appear on the band’s upcoming debut LP ''Makeout Mountain'' and positions them as an up-and-coming act to watch.____— AVG__~~"
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Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled “Keep Me Up,” which arrived July 27.

“Blue” presented a textured, full-bodied sound. Adelaide, along with Christopher Alan Yates (banjo and vocal harmonies), Trish Land (percussion), and Gabbie Watts (upright bass), crafted a colorful blend of Americana and folk. The group lingered on the video, seeking perfection. At last, the polished product was set free and arrived in April. 

Now, Adelaide reveals a different side of herself that transcends her goals of perfection and pushes for authenticity with ”Keep Me Up.” Both the songwriting and production take a raw turn without sacrificing the sound quality as Adelaide treks on as a soloist.

“Keep Me Up” is about seeing or thinking about someone you already did all of the work of getting over emotionally,” Adelaide says. “How you don't want them to make you happy or sad because it would rip your heart back open. It's about working hard to stay neutral when someone really has the ability to get under your skin.”

One month after the song's June release, Adelaide also released the video, which continued the push for realism. Filmed and edited by Nina Dolgin (WonderRoot), listeners are guided down a trail of nostalgia. The video was shot at the Goat Farm, and acts as a diary focusing on relationships. But the term relationship holds an extended meaning — from human connections to an intimacy with the city of Atlanta itself. 

“It’s kind of a love letter to the city,” she says. “I wanted it to be really simple and cozy.”
As a multifaceted artist, Adelaide’s tangible art takes refuge in her music and vice versa. Although songwriting and painting have different creative processes, she combines them by incorporating a visual element during live shows. 

“Both art and music inform one another, especially when it comes to performance,” she says. “I try to channel the energy that I want to present to the listeners. A lot of times I see that as color and it makes me think of painting and flow. The feeling of creation.”

Whether Adelaide treks on as a solo artist, collaborative musician, or painter, she’s sure to enthrall audiences with a kaleidoscope of talents that pull on multiple sensory channels. — Lauren Leathers



Bad Spell’s most recent release, a track titled “Don’t Go Out Tonight,” offers a healthy dose of fuzzed up, grimy psychedelia. Throughout the song, which was produced by Bad Spell and Ed Rawls of Living Room Studios, singer Bryan Malone’s scratchy vocals warn an unidentified compadre that the outside winds are picking up and carrying ominous tidings. Dealing with the topics of paranoia and loneliness, the song is both gloomy and grinding, maintaining momentum via drum crashes, organ pads courtesy of guest musician Spencer Garn, and a lengthy and commendable guitar solo that rips through the middle. “Don’t Go Out Tonight” will appear on an upcoming album of the same name, and the track is accompanied by an appropriately trippy and scuffed up music video, directed by Bad Spell’s own Bryan Malone. The band plays the Star Bar on Sat., Aug. 25, with Barrence Whitfield & the Savages, the Woggles, and DJ Vikki V.— Annika Von Grey



Illiterates’ latst single “Horton Heats A Who,” produced by Matt McCalvin (Gringo Star, Zoners, St. Pe), is theatrical, fun, and a little bit twisted. The song is fairly sparse, hanging on to the pace created by stuttering drums and singer Steve Albertson’s stream-of-consciousness vocal ranting. Sporadic and fairly manic guitar wails and punk laced gang vocals echo throughout the track, adding some aesthetic depth. A few key harmonized guitar moments bump up the complexity of the song, showcasing Illiterates as a group with some meaningful talent to go along with their spunk. The song will appear on the band’s upcoming debut LP Makeout Mountain and positions them as an up-and-coming act to watch.— AVG    Mario Fernando for James Jewels SEEING COLORS: “I try to channel the energy that I want to present to the listeners. A lot of times I see that as color and it makes me think of painting and flow. The feeling of creation.” - Adelaide                                    NEW MUSIC MONDAY: Adelaide, Bad Spell, and Illiterates "
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Monday July 30, 2018 11:58 pm EDT


Adelaide Tai, better known simply as Adelaide, holds a variety of talents that appeal to a variety of senses. The singer/songwriter doubles as a painter, making her art and music explode with color through every gentle guitar melody and careful brushstroke. Earlier this year, she entranced audiences with her debut single “Blue,” and has been hard at work on a second single with a video titled...

| more...

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  string(1731) "Dr. Strangelove is here to transcend the noise of our hectic day-to-day grind and tune in to the funkadelic groove. Fresh off their performance at Sweetwater 420 Fest, the five-piece jam band dives deep into its influences for a psych-infused funk album that leans heavily on the group’s technical expertise and ability to craft melodies out of thin air.

Taking cues from across the spectrum — the buoyant melodies of Phish, the technical wizardry of Umphrey’s McGee, even the jazz-funk of Herbie Hancock — Dr. Strangelove’s members wear their influences on their sleeves. Yet, rather merely co-opting familiar sounds, Potions is a celebration of jam bands past and present while maintaining a keen eye on the future of the scene.

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Taking cues from across the spectrum — the buoyant melodies of Phish, the technical wizardry of Umphrey’s McGee, even the jazz-funk of Herbie Hancock — Dr. Strangelove’s members wear their influences on their sleeves. Yet, rather merely co-opting familiar sounds,'' Potions'' is a celebration of jam bands past and present while maintaining a keen eye on the future of the scene.

What remains apparent throughout the album is the chemistry between the members of the band, and these guys ''really'' know how to play. Oftentimes, during the lengthier tracks — “Mr. Proggers” and “Knights of Arabia” — the guitar and keys interplay with one another to explore new genres and melodies. Once the idea’s locked in, the band builds and expands it until reaching a peak, then taking it apart and replacing it with a new groove in its wake. Though occasionally some of the jams risk suffering from monotony, standout songs like “Sharon’s Anthem” bring the album back to life.

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Monday July 9, 2018 05:18 pm EDT
Debut album carves out a definitive place for the local jam band | more...
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Neighbor Lady’s brand of tangled, organic rock ’n’ roll delivers copious amounts of wisdom — the kind that can only be gained from experience. The group’s debut LP, Maybe Later, is steeped in misty memories punctuated by occasional bursts of sunlight, all wrapped up in Emily Braden’s passionate voice. Neighbor Lady began as Braden’s solo project, but as a living organism the group couldn’t exist without bassist Merideth Hanscom (Semicircle), drummer Andrew McFarland (Reptar), and guitarist Jack Blauvelt (Dana Swimmer). The embroidered flowers on the album cover set the tone for Braden’s gentle, melancholy visions, which stand out even in the psychedelic warbling of the album’s closer, “Wring Me Out.” It’s often difficult to separate authenticity from aesthetic in folk-rock. Braden’s plain-spoken lyrics, however, overflow with honesty as she channels the casual poetry of Carole King, the shimmering voice of Jenny Lewis, and the mystical energy of Feist.

Though Maybe Later boasts only seven songs, following Neighbor Lady’s winding path can be demanding. Braden clings to her dissolving dreams amid the album’s requisite sad song, “I Wish Nothing,” and it’s worth the emotional toll it takes. Throughout the album, polished hooks meet pastoral, heartland rhythms that invoke a connection to the land, recalling the energy of ’90s era Tom Petty on the intro track “Let it Bleed.” The playing is inspired, even if it’s slightly off the cuff. Braden’s emotional and melodic range ties the record together, leaving the listener swimming in indelible waves of nostalgia. ★★★☆☆


★★★★★ This album will change your life | ★★★★☆ A truly great album | ★★★☆☆ A solid effort, worth a listen | ★★☆☆☆ No thanks | ★☆☆☆☆ Don't bother

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Article

Sunday May 13, 2018 11:31 am EDT
Polished hooks meet heartland rhythms on ‘Maybe Later’ | more...
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  ["title"]=>
  string(26) "Cicada Rhythm defies genre"
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Cicada Rhythm was chosen as CL’s Best Local Folk Act of 2013, and Flagpole’s Best Local Americana Act of 2016, but neither of those prestigious awards adequately define the band’s eclectic approach. In light of April’s sophomore recording, Everywhere I Go (New West), pigeonholing this act becomes even more problematic.

The duo’s first, self-titled album showed that Americana and folk were just convenient labels to describe an outfit that incorporated those styles with many others. Strains of jazz, classical, blues, and indie rock also figured in Cicada Rhythm’s diverse and often offbeat sound.

That variety is amplified on Everywhere I Go. The collaboration of classically trained bassist/singer Andrea DeMarco with guitarist/vocalist Dave Kirslis is aided by a larger budget, along with production/instrumental assistance from Kenneth Pattengale (Milk Carton Kids) and Oliver Wood (the Wood Brothers). Their studio sound is augmented with pedal steel, strings, organ, and mandolin for a fuller, if still stark, attitude. The colorfully jaunty opener, “America’s Open Roads,” quickly turns darker on the following “Even in the Shallows,” which twists and swirls, discarding typical song structures for more oblique and stimulating ones.

The founding twosome trade lead vocals — both have quirky, jazz-inflected voices — and harmonize through a dozen songs that include country, indie rock, folk, and the occasional sing-along chorus, sometimes within the same song. The album is challenging, exciting, and unpredictable, all qualities that make Cicada Rhythm one of Atlanta’s most promising exports in any genre. ★★★★☆


Cicada Rhythm with Amigo and the Titos. $10. Fri., May 11. 9 p.m. (doors). The Earl, 488 Flat Shoals Ave. S.E. Atlanta. 404-522-3950. www.badearl.com.

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Article

Thursday May 10, 2018 01:32 pm EDT
Jazz, classical, blues, and indie rock guide ‘Everywhere I Go’ | more...
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It is the hallmark of exceptional songwriting and musicianship when lyrics as seemingly benign as “Don’t be confused by flesh colored paint,” are delivered in such a way that they’re open to interpretation. They have personal significance and hidden meanings for anyone within earshot, and no two people glean the same things from the words. Crafting this kind of simple, powerful rock ’n’ roll is a skill that Subsonics’ singer and guitarist Clay Reed has spent a lifetime honing. With the group’s eighth full-length album, Flesh Colored Paint (Slovenly), Reed, drummer Buffi Aguero, and bass player Rob Del Bueno yield 14 new songs in just over 25 minutes. It’s a tight, concise album yet there’s plenty of wiggle room between Reed’s subtle vibrato and the happy-go-lucky rhythms of the album. Within the first few seconds of Reed’s opening salvo in the album’s title track, “Where the donkeys wear shoes, don’t they look great,” the group is clearly expanding upon its palette of garage-punk, glam, and rock ’n’ roll strut and sneer. While their musical influences are clear, songs such as “Baby and Chita,” “Begging Hands,” and “Permanent Gnaw” delve into an observable next step in the Subsonics sound. “Johnny Left Hand” suffers a bit from a bratty and shrill backing vocal, but it’s only a minor speed bump. The album sounds clean, too. Every nuance in Reed’s voice and his barreling but restrained strumming reveal a balance of raw energy and refined songwriting, and the tension is exhilarating. ★★★☆☆

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Article

Thursday April 26, 2018 07:58 pm EDT
The group's 8th full-length balances raw energy and refined songwriting | more...
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Waiting five years between albums is typically something artists want to avoid doing. After all, the public’s attention span is short, and always ready for the next new thing. When it comes to Ruby Velle & the Soulphonics, the long break between 2012’s It’s About Time, and this year’s State of All Things seems advantageous. In the time between releases, retro-soul acts featuring lively horn sections such as St. Paul & the Broken Bones and Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats have captured devoted followings by way of similarly styled alternative R&B sounds. Velle and Co. are poised to ride into a scene that’s already tuned-in to the group’s style.

The time between albums also allowed the Soulphonics time to refine their grooves and compose stronger, socially relevant material. State of All Things is a vibrant and professionally produced sophomore effort that proves that Velle and Co. are serious about their career. Every one of the album’s tight, taut songs are enhanced by intricately arranged horns, keys, strings, and Velle’s tough/tender vocals. Velle's supple voice is as comfortable digging into a gritty groove like the album’s sturdy first single “Broken Woman,” as on the Motown-esque “Call Out My Name.” She projects a more soothing croon on the exquisite ballad “Way Back When,” finding impeccable balance with each instrument. When the band is at full tilt, and Velle leans into the sinewy “Shackles” or the grinding blues rocker “I Tried,” it’s clear they’re ready for the big leagues. ★★★★☆

Ruby Velle & the Soulphonics State of Things release party with the Greyhounds. $20-$25. Sat., March 24. Terminal West. 887 West Marietta St. N.W., Studio C. 404-876-5566. www.terminalwestatl.com.

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Article

Monday March 12, 2018 10:06 am EDT
  | more...
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10. Uniform | No Trending (State Laughter/Scavenger of Death)
Experimental punk outfit Uniform’s debut LP No Trending is a refined, melancholy survey of a modern world where smart technology and social media interspaces with the synapses of the human mind ushering in a subtle next wave of evolution. In songs such as “Altar State,” Crystal World,” and “Memory Form,” singer, guitarist, and Uniform mastermind Josh Feigert leads drummer Bobby Michaud, guitarists Andrew Wiggins and Bryan Scherer, and bass player Louise Laverne away from the group’s earlier, more aggressive leanings. The album’s dreary anthemic qualities underscore the crashing rhythms of “Bored Voyeur” and “Euphoric State.” Singing free of any perceptible post-production treatments, Feigert’s barreling and sympathetic voice brings compelling human character to the album’s dystopian themes — embracing the fact that, like it or not, humans are cyborgs now. It’s an unconscious movement, sublime by design, and now part of life. Wiggins, Sherer, and Feigert pull off fierce and yearning guitar solos that move at an unnaturally measured pace — slow, but driven by enough momentum to fall under the punk banner. It’s an absolute treat when a band brings punk into a modern context. No Trending is a vital album for Atlanta circa 2017, an angst-ridden lullaby for the new Dark Age that technology has ushered in. Play it loud. — Chad Radford

9. Faye Webster | Self-titled (Awful Records)
Awful Records’ resident guitarist and folk-inflected pop darling, Faye Webster, sidesteps the clichés of young singer-songwriters by blending the blunt storytelling aspects of street-hardened hip-hop with her airy voice and steel-stringed guitar melodies. Webster’s self-titled sophomore CD maneuvers coming-of-age obstacles such as isolation and insecurity on lead single “She Won’t Go Away” and “Alone Again,” and expired relationships on “Say It Now.” With “It Doesn’t Work Like That,” the genre-bending wunderkind mourns the trading of her favorite Atlanta Braves pitcher, and discusses her grandmother’s memory loss, all with skillful brevity that carries Atlanta hip-hop and dreamy songwriting to inventive new places. — Kristy Guilbault


8. EarthGang | Rags EP (Spillage Village)Jazzy instrumentals and intricate rhyme patterns make this release from the Spillage Village representatives stand apart from the new coterie of Atlanta hip-hop artists. Whereas SoundCloud has generated an affinity for post-structure, EarthGang embodies the creative space that still exists within the genre’s constructs. “Nowhere Fast,” shows a vulnerability that few are able or willing to articulate. Regarding a call with his father, Venus raps, “I hope he picking up the love inside my inflections, cause lately life done got my spirit on a bench press.” Likewise Venus, likewise.
— Montana Samuels

7. Cloak | To Venomous Depths (Season Of Mist)
Blackened metal gets a rock ‘n’ roll makeover on Cloak’s first proper full-length, To Venomous Depths. Rare is the metal group that can balance extreme, white-hot guitar riffs and growling vocals with equally extreme subtly. Songs such as “The Hunger,” “Beyond the Veil,” and “Deep Red” are cut from guitar noise, yearning ambiance, and imagery that reaches into existential darkness to bring back feelings of melancholy and nostalgia. It’s an impressive feat for a debut album that’s steeped in so many layers, rhythms, and fugue-like bouts of rich symphonic strings that new dimensions are revealed with each new listen. — CR

6. Mattiel | Self-titled (Burger Records)
Mattiel Brown’s self-titled debut album is a multidimensional collection of songs that find the Georgia native and songwriter collaborating with producers and bandmates Randy Michael and Jonah Swilley of InCrowd Songs. The album’s lead single and opening salvo, “Whites Of Their Eyes,” is a bluesy number driven by marshall drumming and a subdued passion for the music. Brown utilizes the subtle nuances of her voice on the record, and her delivery on “Count Your Blessings” recalls Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood’s late ’60s chemistry and heart-swelling ‘60s pop ambiance. Each of the album’s 11 songs is a homerun stacked with blues, folk, and garage rock influences that recall images of Motown and Stax Records’ dusty grooves. Brown’s strongest asset is her powerful, soulful voice. Here, projecting her lone presence and sincere reckoning over a choir of classic girl group abandon, horns, and big, revelatory rhythms lands on a truly transcendent musical experience. — Aja Arnold


5. J.I.D | The Never Story (Dreamville Records)
Debut albums are often difficult to quantify, but sometimes they create unbreakable expectations. Meek Mill’s Dreams and Nightmares or Kendrick Lamar’s Good Kid M.A.A.D City come to mind. With The Never Story J.I.D creates that same level of expectation. It’s not just bars, if expectations were formed simply off rapping well, we’d still be talking about Papoose. Rather, J.I.D raps well enough to keep up with or to better his contemporaries while supplying melodies that are all his own (see “Hoodbooger”). — MS

4. Omni | Multi-Task (Trouble In Mind)
With Multi-task, the second coming of new wave/post-punk trio Omni, everything is bigger, every rhythm, melody, and dusty groove is placed in meticulous order. Multi-Task whittles down the clutter to hone in on simple, compelling riffs that hammer in an irreverence, riffs that give as much of a nod to Gary Numan’s robotic stiffness circa The Pleasure Principle (sans electronics) as they do to Gang of Four’s post-punk funk, circa Entertainment And while romanticizing the aesthetics of 1979 is quaint, in songs such as  “Equestrian,” “Date Night,” and “After Dinner,” singer/bass player Philip Frobos’ subdued voice, Frankie Broyles wiry guitar lines, and drummer Doug Bleichner’s measured beats raise the bar high for the deliberate lo-fi aesthetics of 2017. — AA

3. 21 Savage | Issa Album (Slaughter Gang/Epic)
In the early days of 21 Savage’s rap career he was defined by accounts of stoic violence and a sense of uninhibited ruthlessness. Though the narrative remains that 21 is cut from the same cloth as his rap predecessors — a distant echo of the days in which realness outweighed nearly everything else — growth is what defined his debut full-length. Few expected the MC who once deadpanned “wet a nigga block and watch them niggas drown in it” on his breakout “Red Opps” to be hosting back to school drives and voicing displeasure with social injustice: “Police gunned his brother down, this shit too hard to handle/Loading up his chopper he gon’ show ‘em black lives matter,” from Issa’s “Nothing New.” — MS

2. 2 Chainz | Pretty Girls Like Trap (Def Jam)
With a marketing roll out that literally changed the landscape of Atlanta, making the Pink Trap House the most popular Atlanta attraction of 2017, 2 Chainz found himself with the daunting task of delivering a stellar project that lived up to the hype. The goal was certainly attained; the 16-track Pretty Girls Like Trap Music, featuring appearances from Gucci Mane and Monica to the Migos and Jhene Aiko, is yet another example of 2 Chainz’ unmatched ability to balance old and new, catering to fans in his age range and those who’ve never heard of Playaz Circle alike. — Tai Saint-Louis

1. Mastodon | Emperor of Sand (Warner Bros.)
Mastodon has transcended time, trends, band shake ups, a floundering music industry, and Grammy snubs, all the while crafting a singularly massive baroque metal roar. Emperor of Sand pulls off the Herculean task of revealing wholly new dimensions hidden within the group’s sound and songwriting dynamic — seven albums deep! For proof, look no further than “Show Yourself.” The album’s lead single offers an easy access point into a disarmingly strong batch of songs that find strength in drummer Brann Dailor stepping up his role as vocalist. The change in palette brought about one giant stomp the Atlanta metal behemoths evolution, fleshing out vivid new dimensions in Mastodon’s sound, and charging headlong into the future.
— CR

Check out CL's top picks: 30-21

Check out CL's top picks: 20-11 "
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10. __[https://uniformatl.bandcamp.com/album/no-trending|Uniform]__ | ''No Trending'' (State Laughter/Scavenger of Death)
Experimental punk outfit Uniform’s debut LP ''No Trending'' is a refined, melancholy survey of a modern world where smart technology and social media interspaces with the synapses of the human mind ushering in a subtle next wave of evolution. In songs such as “Altar State,” Crystal World,” and “Memory Form,” singer, guitarist, and Uniform mastermind Josh Feigert leads drummer Bobby Michaud, guitarists Andrew Wiggins and Bryan Scherer, and bass player Louise Laverne away from the group’s earlier, more aggressive leanings. The album’s dreary anthemic qualities underscore the crashing rhythms of “Bored Voyeur” and “Euphoric State.” Singing free of any perceptible post-production treatments, Feigert’s barreling and sympathetic voice brings compelling human character to the album’s dystopian themes — embracing the fact that, like it or not, humans are cyborgs now. It’s an unconscious movement, sublime by design, and now part of life. Wiggins, Sherer, and Feigert pull off fierce and yearning guitar solos that move at an unnaturally measured pace — slow, but driven by enough momentum to fall under the punk banner. It’s an absolute treat when a band brings punk into a modern context. No Trending is a vital album for Atlanta circa 2017, an angst-ridden lullaby for the new Dark Age that technology has ushered in. Play it loud. — Chad Radford
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9. __[https://www.fayewebster.com/|Faye Webster]__ | ''Self-titled'' (Awful Records)
Awful Records’ resident guitarist and folk-inflected pop darling, Faye Webster, sidesteps the clichés of young singer-songwriters by blending the blunt storytelling aspects of street-hardened hip-hop with her airy voice and steel-stringed guitar melodies. Webster’s self-titled sophomore CD maneuvers coming-of-age obstacles such as isolation and insecurity on lead single “She Won’t Go Away” and “Alone Again,” and expired relationships on “Say It Now.” With “It Doesn’t Work Like That,” the genre-bending wunderkind mourns the trading of her favorite Atlanta Braves pitcher, and discusses her grandmother’s memory loss, all with skillful brevity that carries Atlanta hip-hop and dreamy songwriting to inventive new places. — Kristy Guilbault
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8. __[http://www.earthgang.net/|EarthGang]__ | ''Rags'' EP (Spillage Village)Jazzy instrumentals and intricate rhyme patterns make this release from the Spillage Village representatives stand apart from the new coterie of Atlanta hip-hop artists. Whereas SoundCloud has generated an affinity for post-structure, EarthGang embodies the creative space that still exists within the genre’s constructs. “Nowhere Fast,” shows a vulnerability that few are able or willing to articulate. Regarding a call with his father, Venus raps, “I hope he picking up the love inside my inflections, cause lately life done got my spirit on a bench press.” Likewise Venus, likewise.
— Montana Samuels
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7. __[https://cloakatlanta.bandcamp.com|Cloak]__ | ''To Venomous Depths'' (Season Of Mist)
Blackened metal gets a rock ‘n’ roll makeover on Cloak’s first proper full-length, ''To Venomous Depths''. Rare is the metal group that can balance extreme, white-hot guitar riffs and growling vocals with equally extreme subtly. Songs such as “The Hunger,” “Beyond the Veil,” and “Deep Red” are cut from guitar noise, yearning ambiance, and imagery that reaches into existential darkness to bring back feelings of melancholy and nostalgia. It’s an impressive feat for a debut album that’s steeped in so many layers, rhythms, and fugue-like bouts of rich symphonic strings that new dimensions are revealed with each new listen. — CR
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6. __[https://mattiel.bandcamp.com|Mattiel]__ | ''Self-titled'' (Burger Records)
Mattiel Brown’s self-titled debut album is a multidimensional collection of songs that find the Georgia native and songwriter collaborating with producers and bandmates Randy Michael and Jonah Swilley of InCrowd Songs. The album’s lead single and opening salvo, “Whites Of Their Eyes,” is a bluesy number driven by marshall drumming and a subdued passion for the music. Brown utilizes the subtle nuances of her voice on the record, and her delivery on “Count Your Blessings” recalls Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood’s late ’60s chemistry and heart-swelling ‘60s pop ambiance. Each of the album’s 11 songs is a homerun stacked with blues, folk, and garage rock influences that recall images of Motown and Stax Records’ dusty grooves. Brown’s strongest asset is her powerful, soulful voice. Here, projecting her lone presence and sincere reckoning over a choir of classic girl group abandon, horns, and big, revelatory rhythms lands on a truly transcendent musical experience. — Aja Arnold

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5. __[http://www.jidsv.com|J.I.D]__ | ''The Never Story'' (Dreamville Records)
Debut albums are often difficult to quantify, but sometimes they create unbreakable expectations. Meek Mill’s Dreams and Nightmares or Kendrick Lamar’s ''Good Kid M.A.A.D City'' come to mind. With ''The Never Story'' J.I.D creates that same level of expectation. It’s not just bars, if expectations were formed simply off rapping well, we’d still be talking about Papoose. Rather, J.I.D raps well enough to keep up with or to better his contemporaries while supplying melodies that are all his own (see “Hoodbooger”). — MS
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4. __[https://omniatl.bandcamp.com|Omni]__ | ''Multi-Task'' (Trouble In Mind)
With Multi-task, the second coming of new wave/post-punk trio Omni, everything is bigger, every rhythm, melody, and dusty groove is placed in meticulous order. ''Multi-Task'' whittles down the clutter to hone in on simple, compelling riffs that hammer in an irreverence, riffs that give as much of a nod to Gary Numan’s robotic stiffness circa ''The Pleasure Principle'' (sans electronics) as they do to Gang of Four’s post-punk funk, circa ''Entertainment'' And while romanticizing the aesthetics of 1979 is quaint, in songs such as  “Equestrian,” “Date Night,” and “After Dinner,” singer/bass player Philip Frobos’ subdued voice, Frankie Broyles wiry guitar lines, and drummer Doug Bleichner’s measured beats raise the bar high for the deliberate lo-fi aesthetics of 2017. — AA
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3. __[http://www.21savage.com|21 Savage]__ | ''Issa Album'' (Slaughter Gang/Epic)
In the early days of 21 Savage’s rap career he was defined by accounts of stoic violence and a sense of uninhibited ruthlessness. Though the narrative remains that 21 is cut from the same cloth as his rap predecessors — a distant echo of the days in which realness outweighed nearly everything else — growth is what defined his debut full-length. Few expected the MC who once deadpanned “wet a nigga block and watch them niggas drown in it” on his breakout “Red Opps” to be hosting back to school drives and voicing displeasure with social injustice: “Police gunned his brother down, this shit too hard to handle/Loading up his chopper he gon’ show ‘em black lives matter,” from ''Issa''’s “Nothing New.” — MS
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2. __[http://www.2chainz.com|2 Chainz]__ | ''Pretty Girls Like Trap'' (Def Jam)
With a marketing roll out that literally changed the landscape of Atlanta, making the Pink Trap House the most popular Atlanta attraction of 2017, 2 Chainz found himself with the daunting task of delivering a stellar project that lived up to the hype. The goal was certainly attained; the 16-track Pretty Girls Like Trap Music, featuring appearances from Gucci Mane and Monica to the Migos and Jhene Aiko, is yet another example of 2 Chainz’ unmatched ability to balance old and new, catering to fans in his age range and those who’ve never heard of Playaz Circle alike. — Tai Saint-Louis
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1. __[http://www.mastodonrocks.com|Mastodon]__ | ''Emperor of Sand'' (Warner Bros.)
Mastodon has transcended time, trends, band shake ups, a floundering music industry, and Grammy snubs, all the while crafting a singularly massive baroque metal roar. ''Emperor of Sand'' pulls off the Herculean task of revealing wholly new dimensions hidden within the group’s sound and songwriting dynamic — seven albums deep! For proof, look no further than “Show Yourself.” The album’s lead single offers an easy access point into a disarmingly strong batch of songs that find strength in drummer Brann Dailor stepping up his role as vocalist. The change in palette brought about one giant stomp the Atlanta metal behemoths evolution, fleshing out vivid new dimensions in Mastodon’s sound, and charging headlong into the future.
— CR

__[http://www.creativeloafing.com/music/article/20984082/atlantas-best-albums-of-2017-numbers-3021|Check out ]''[http://www.creativeloafing.com/music/article/20984082/atlantas-best-albums-of-2017-numbers-3021|CL]''[http://www.creativeloafing.com/music/article/20984082/atlantas-best-albums-of-2017-numbers-3021|'s top picks: 30-21]__

__[http://www.creativeloafing.com/music/article/20984266/atlantas-best-albums-of-2017-numbers-2011|Check out ''CL'''s top picks: 20-11 ]__"
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  string(8945) " Mastodon.5a207b251b4ae  2018-02-05T14:20:55+00:00 Mastodon.5a207b251b4ae.jpg    best album Omni, Cloak, Mattiel, 21 Savage, Mastodon and more top picks from CL's year end music list 2534  2017-12-01T02:07:00+00:00 Atlanta's best albums of 2017: Numbers 10-1 ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Chad Radford Chad Radford 2017-12-01T02:07:00+00:00  
10. Uniform | No Trending (State Laughter/Scavenger of Death)
Experimental punk outfit Uniform’s debut LP No Trending is a refined, melancholy survey of a modern world where smart technology and social media interspaces with the synapses of the human mind ushering in a subtle next wave of evolution. In songs such as “Altar State,” Crystal World,” and “Memory Form,” singer, guitarist, and Uniform mastermind Josh Feigert leads drummer Bobby Michaud, guitarists Andrew Wiggins and Bryan Scherer, and bass player Louise Laverne away from the group’s earlier, more aggressive leanings. The album’s dreary anthemic qualities underscore the crashing rhythms of “Bored Voyeur” and “Euphoric State.” Singing free of any perceptible post-production treatments, Feigert’s barreling and sympathetic voice brings compelling human character to the album’s dystopian themes — embracing the fact that, like it or not, humans are cyborgs now. It’s an unconscious movement, sublime by design, and now part of life. Wiggins, Sherer, and Feigert pull off fierce and yearning guitar solos that move at an unnaturally measured pace — slow, but driven by enough momentum to fall under the punk banner. It’s an absolute treat when a band brings punk into a modern context. No Trending is a vital album for Atlanta circa 2017, an angst-ridden lullaby for the new Dark Age that technology has ushered in. Play it loud. — Chad Radford

9. Faye Webster | Self-titled (Awful Records)
Awful Records’ resident guitarist and folk-inflected pop darling, Faye Webster, sidesteps the clichés of young singer-songwriters by blending the blunt storytelling aspects of street-hardened hip-hop with her airy voice and steel-stringed guitar melodies. Webster’s self-titled sophomore CD maneuvers coming-of-age obstacles such as isolation and insecurity on lead single “She Won’t Go Away” and “Alone Again,” and expired relationships on “Say It Now.” With “It Doesn’t Work Like That,” the genre-bending wunderkind mourns the trading of her favorite Atlanta Braves pitcher, and discusses her grandmother’s memory loss, all with skillful brevity that carries Atlanta hip-hop and dreamy songwriting to inventive new places. — Kristy Guilbault


8. EarthGang | Rags EP (Spillage Village)Jazzy instrumentals and intricate rhyme patterns make this release from the Spillage Village representatives stand apart from the new coterie of Atlanta hip-hop artists. Whereas SoundCloud has generated an affinity for post-structure, EarthGang embodies the creative space that still exists within the genre’s constructs. “Nowhere Fast,” shows a vulnerability that few are able or willing to articulate. Regarding a call with his father, Venus raps, “I hope he picking up the love inside my inflections, cause lately life done got my spirit on a bench press.” Likewise Venus, likewise.
— Montana Samuels

7. Cloak | To Venomous Depths (Season Of Mist)
Blackened metal gets a rock ‘n’ roll makeover on Cloak’s first proper full-length, To Venomous Depths. Rare is the metal group that can balance extreme, white-hot guitar riffs and growling vocals with equally extreme subtly. Songs such as “The Hunger,” “Beyond the Veil,” and “Deep Red” are cut from guitar noise, yearning ambiance, and imagery that reaches into existential darkness to bring back feelings of melancholy and nostalgia. It’s an impressive feat for a debut album that’s steeped in so many layers, rhythms, and fugue-like bouts of rich symphonic strings that new dimensions are revealed with each new listen. — CR

6. Mattiel | Self-titled (Burger Records)
Mattiel Brown’s self-titled debut album is a multidimensional collection of songs that find the Georgia native and songwriter collaborating with producers and bandmates Randy Michael and Jonah Swilley of InCrowd Songs. The album’s lead single and opening salvo, “Whites Of Their Eyes,” is a bluesy number driven by marshall drumming and a subdued passion for the music. Brown utilizes the subtle nuances of her voice on the record, and her delivery on “Count Your Blessings” recalls Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood’s late ’60s chemistry and heart-swelling ‘60s pop ambiance. Each of the album’s 11 songs is a homerun stacked with blues, folk, and garage rock influences that recall images of Motown and Stax Records’ dusty grooves. Brown’s strongest asset is her powerful, soulful voice. Here, projecting her lone presence and sincere reckoning over a choir of classic girl group abandon, horns, and big, revelatory rhythms lands on a truly transcendent musical experience. — Aja Arnold


5. J.I.D | The Never Story (Dreamville Records)
Debut albums are often difficult to quantify, but sometimes they create unbreakable expectations. Meek Mill’s Dreams and Nightmares or Kendrick Lamar’s Good Kid M.A.A.D City come to mind. With The Never Story J.I.D creates that same level of expectation. It’s not just bars, if expectations were formed simply off rapping well, we’d still be talking about Papoose. Rather, J.I.D raps well enough to keep up with or to better his contemporaries while supplying melodies that are all his own (see “Hoodbooger”). — MS

4. Omni | Multi-Task (Trouble In Mind)
With Multi-task, the second coming of new wave/post-punk trio Omni, everything is bigger, every rhythm, melody, and dusty groove is placed in meticulous order. Multi-Task whittles down the clutter to hone in on simple, compelling riffs that hammer in an irreverence, riffs that give as much of a nod to Gary Numan’s robotic stiffness circa The Pleasure Principle (sans electronics) as they do to Gang of Four’s post-punk funk, circa Entertainment And while romanticizing the aesthetics of 1979 is quaint, in songs such as  “Equestrian,” “Date Night,” and “After Dinner,” singer/bass player Philip Frobos’ subdued voice, Frankie Broyles wiry guitar lines, and drummer Doug Bleichner’s measured beats raise the bar high for the deliberate lo-fi aesthetics of 2017. — AA

3. 21 Savage | Issa Album (Slaughter Gang/Epic)
In the early days of 21 Savage’s rap career he was defined by accounts of stoic violence and a sense of uninhibited ruthlessness. Though the narrative remains that 21 is cut from the same cloth as his rap predecessors — a distant echo of the days in which realness outweighed nearly everything else — growth is what defined his debut full-length. Few expected the MC who once deadpanned “wet a nigga block and watch them niggas drown in it” on his breakout “Red Opps” to be hosting back to school drives and voicing displeasure with social injustice: “Police gunned his brother down, this shit too hard to handle/Loading up his chopper he gon’ show ‘em black lives matter,” from Issa’s “Nothing New.” — MS

2. 2 Chainz | Pretty Girls Like Trap (Def Jam)
With a marketing roll out that literally changed the landscape of Atlanta, making the Pink Trap House the most popular Atlanta attraction of 2017, 2 Chainz found himself with the daunting task of delivering a stellar project that lived up to the hype. The goal was certainly attained; the 16-track Pretty Girls Like Trap Music, featuring appearances from Gucci Mane and Monica to the Migos and Jhene Aiko, is yet another example of 2 Chainz’ unmatched ability to balance old and new, catering to fans in his age range and those who’ve never heard of Playaz Circle alike. — Tai Saint-Louis

1. Mastodon | Emperor of Sand (Warner Bros.)
Mastodon has transcended time, trends, band shake ups, a floundering music industry, and Grammy snubs, all the while crafting a singularly massive baroque metal roar. Emperor of Sand pulls off the Herculean task of revealing wholly new dimensions hidden within the group’s sound and songwriting dynamic — seven albums deep! For proof, look no further than “Show Yourself.” The album’s lead single offers an easy access point into a disarmingly strong batch of songs that find strength in drummer Brann Dailor stepping up his role as vocalist. The change in palette brought about one giant stomp the Atlanta metal behemoths evolution, fleshing out vivid new dimensions in Mastodon’s sound, and charging headlong into the future.
— CR

Check out CL's top picks: 30-21

Check out CL's top picks: 20-11            "best album"  20984411         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/11/Mastodon.5a207b251b4ae.png                  Atlanta's best albums of 2017: Numbers 10-1 "
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Thursday November 30, 2017 09:07 pm EST
Omni, Cloak, Mattiel, 21 Savage, Mastodon and more top picks from CL's year end music list | more...
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20. Delta Moon | Cabbagetown (Jumping Jack Records)
It seems like forever ago that bluesy swamp-rocking Delta Moon won 2003’s International Blues Challenge. The four-piece, led by guitarists Tom Gray and Mark Johnson, has doubled down on its sound by writing progressive Southern blues songs, best exemplified on Cabbagetown. The grooves are loose and nimble, setting the foundation for the quartet’s road-hardened approach in “Rock And Roll Girl,” taking on the life of a touring musician. The jazz-inflected “21st Century Man,” gets down and dirty, and the group explores its roots on a grinding cover of Son House’s “Death Letter.” — Hal Horowitz

Medicine Music by A Drug Called Tradition
19. A Drug Called Tradition | Medicine Music (Psych Army Intergalactic)
Following the dissolution of heavy psych outfit Abby GoGo in 2014, singer/guitarist Bon Allinson joined forces with drummer Puma Navarro and bass player Asha Lakra to form psychedelic shoegaze group A Drug Called Tradition. The group debuted its Medicine Music LP in late July and the album delivers, for all intents and purposes, a lethal dose of fuzzed-out reverb over steady grooves that balance soul, Southern rock, and mind-bending reverb and distortion. Medicine Music begins with “With You Miss You,” a mid-tempo, tremolo-fueled number with telltale washed out vocals. The album follows one man’s journey driving through the desert in a rundown minivan, chain-smoking Marlboro Reds as he loses sight of the world by delving into introspection. The album balances upbeat and somber tracks such as “Again and Again” and the piquing dislocation in “Depression Stone.” Medicine Music is full of hypnotic swagger and wanderlust that’s restrained only enough for listeners to join the trip, get lost in the outskirts, and maybe find themselves returning a little more at ease. — Aja Arnold

18. Black Lips | Satan’s Graffiti or God’s Art? (Vice Records)As the story goes, Black Lips’ singer, bass player Jared Swilley was driving through rural Georgia when he had to do a double-take after driving by a church sign sporting the words, “Will you be God’s art or Satan’s graffiti?” It’s a striking phrase that’s loaded with ham-fisted fire and brimstone. It also projects a mystical yin and yang quality that encapsulates an exciting new chapter for Black Lips. The album’s first single, “Can’t Hold On,” is a harbinger of change for the group. First, the shifting lineup: Guitarist Jack Hines is on board as a full-time member, replacing Ian St. Pé, who left the group after 2014’s Underneath the Rainbow. Drummer Joe Bradley has parted ways with Black Lips as well. In his stead, drummer Oakley Munson (formerly of Athens, Georgia, weird rockers Puddin’ Tang). Saxophone Zumi Rosow has also joined as a full-time Black Lip, leaving the most indelible mark on the group’s sound, bringing a dose of feminine energy and skronking and wailing sax to the mix. But the most shocking turn of events is a guest appearance by Yoko Ono, adding subtle vocal textures to “Can’t Hold On” — one of the perks of hiring Sean Lennon, son of the Beatles’ John Lennon, to record the album. Songs such as “Occidental Front,” “Crystal Night,” and “Can’t Hold On” push the group’s haunted garage rock sound into colorful new terrain, but Rosow’s sax is the star of the show, ushering in a much needed change of pace for the group. — Chad Radford

17. Eliot Bronson | James (Rock Ridge Music)
Creative Loafing’s 2014 Best of Atlanta Critics Pick for Best Songwriter, Eliot Bronson, returns after three years down for this short but sweet — eight-song, 30-minute — confirmation that his tunesmith talents continue to mature. Dave Cobb, Nashville’s go-to producer du jour for sincere Americana (Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton) puts the pieces into place. But it’s Bronson’s heartfelt voice, folk and country-infused melodies, and romantic introspection on tunes like “The Mountain” that create effortlessly moving songs so warm it seems like you’ve heard them before. — HH

WEAPONS OF OUR ANCESTORS by Victor Mariachi & izo]
16. Victor Mariachi | Weapons Of Our Ancestors (Self-released)
Victor Mariachi’s proper debut album, Weapons Of Our Ancestors, builds on themes of how much smart technology and violence in modern America will negatively impact society’s future. Through songs such as “With A Vengeance (ft. Blaze),” “The Cycle,” and “No Escape,” Mariachi’s snarling rhymes tell the story of a day in the life of an immigrant trying make his way through a dystopian landscape. — CR

MG VS IQ by Material Girls
15. Material Girls | MG Vs. IQ (Chunklet/Irrelevant)
Before the cabaret-punk six-piece Material Girls debuted with the MG vs IQ EP, the group had become quite the sensation on East Atlanta stages, while remaining willfully obscure on the internet. Since MG vs IQ arrived, Material Girls have tantalized and confronted audiences with on-stage theatrics and drag performances that set the stage on fire with a post-punk assault on the senses. Songs such as “Drained,” Tightrope,” and “I Just Wanna Fall In Love With Myself” show off blaring horns, nervous organ lines, bongos, guitar, and bass rounded out by Ben Presley’s gravelly-smooth voice. The result is a short, sharp collection of gloriously raw glam punk numbers that are as catchy as they are audacious. — AA

World Underwater by CLAVVS
14. CLAVVS | World Underwater (Self-released)
Every summer needs poolside jams, and hypnotic electronic duo CLAVVS provides. With World Underwater, collaborators Amber Reneé and Graham Marsh create lush new worlds with their soundscapes, inviting listeners to drift away through the long hot days ahead. Slip on a swimsuit and queue up the banger “Bloom” to feel like the aquatic queen (or king) of the sirens. These danceable, atmospheric songs will stay on playlists well into the coming year. — MM

13. Goldyard | FUCKCULTURE III (Black 17 Media)
Fuck Culture III is Goldyard’s literal “FUCK YOU” to just about everyone. The cover art alone – courtesy of FRKO – is arguably the best of any album of 2017, period. The trio, which includes MCs In-Doe and A.T., along with producer Flick James, go the anthemic route on their third offering, taking on a tone that finds its storytellers coming off like most Americans pissed off with the current state of affairs. Whether they were celebrating the successes (“W’s”), playing the bad guys (“Pusha Man”), or getting lyrically pensive (“Naomi”) the G’yard gang got back to their winning ways. — Gavin Godfrey

2014-2016 by Faun and a Pan Flute
12. Faun and A Pan Flute | 2014​-​2016 (Self-released)
Faun and A Pan Flute’s second album, simply titled 2014-2016, captures a peculiar energy amassing on the cusp of major transition. The group was living at the moment just before a flashpoint, aesthetically, stylistically and personally, which translates to a greater sense of chemistry than anything Faun has displayed on record before. The album arrives as a natural conclusion to a chapter in Faun’s impressionistic jazz, rock, and modern classical music hybrids. It also sets up a pivotal next move to step off the diving board and plunge deeper into the musical vocabulary the group has created. And it is a singular language that’s growing more complex. Nothing is frivolously rendered here. But the focus on the personal strengthens the group’s hive mind as well. There’s an elevated level of collaborative intuition taking place, and that’s where Faun and A Pan Flute hits full stride. — CR

Lifetime of Love by Moon Diagrams
11. Moon Diagrams | Lifetime of Love (Geographic North)Deerhunter co-founder and drummer Moses Archuleta has been crafting sophisticated, ethereal pop for roughly a decade. Lifetime of Love, the debut album under his Moon Diagrams moniker, is a collection of recordings made between 2007 and 2017. Songs such as “Blue Ring” offer hooky synth patterns alongside controlled twitches and spasms reminiscent of David Byrne and Brian Eno’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, and are at once lush and primitive. Though largely comprised of samples, synthesizers, and drum machines, Lifetime of Love feels steeped in humanity, the album’s pulsing beats and pop flourishes are touched with just enough grit to remind listeners of the many human hands required to give these sounds life. — Emily Maxwell

Check back tomorrow to see what made the final cut for Atlanta's top 30 albums of 2017: Numbers 10-1.
In the meantime, check out numbers 30-21 here."
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20. __[http://deltamoon.com/|Delta Moon]__ | ''Cabbagetown'' (Jumping Jack Records)
It seems like forever ago that bluesy swamp-rocking Delta Moon won 2003’s International Blues Challenge. The four-piece, led by guitarists Tom Gray and Mark Johnson, has doubled down on its sound by writing progressive Southern blues songs, best exemplified on ''Cabbagetown''. The grooves are loose and nimble, setting the foundation for the quartet’s road-hardened approach in “Rock And Roll Girl,” taking on the life of a touring musician. The jazz-inflected “21st Century Man,” gets down and dirty, and the group explores its roots on a grinding cover of Son House’s “Death Letter.” — Hal Horowitz
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19. __[https://adrugcalledtradition.bandcamp.com/|A Drug Called Tradition]__ | ''Medicine Music'' (Psych Army Intergalactic)
Following the dissolution of heavy psych outfit Abby GoGo in 2014, singer/guitarist Bon Allinson joined forces with drummer Puma Navarro and bass player Asha Lakra to form psychedelic shoegaze group A Drug Called Tradition. The group debuted its ''Medicine Music'' LP in late July and the album delivers, for all intents and purposes, a lethal dose of fuzzed-out reverb over steady grooves that balance soul, Southern rock, and mind-bending reverb and distortion. ''Medicine Music'' begins with “With You Miss You,” a mid-tempo, tremolo-fueled number with telltale washed out vocals. The album follows one man’s journey driving through the desert in a rundown minivan, chain-smoking Marlboro Reds as he loses sight of the world by delving into introspection. The album balances upbeat and somber tracks such as “Again and Again” and the piquing dislocation in “Depression Stone.” ''Medicine Music'' is full of hypnotic swagger and wanderlust that’s restrained only enough for listeners to join the trip, get lost in the outskirts, and maybe find themselves returning a little more at ease. — Aja Arnold
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18. __[http://black-lips.com/|Black Lips]__ | ''Satan’s Graffiti or God’s Art?'' (Vice Records)As the story goes, Black Lips’ singer, bass player Jared Swilley was driving through rural Georgia when he had to do a double-take after driving by a church sign sporting the words, “Will you be God’s art or Satan’s graffiti?” It’s a striking phrase that’s loaded with ham-fisted fire and brimstone. It also projects a mystical yin and yang quality that encapsulates an exciting new chapter for Black Lips. The album’s first single, “Can’t Hold On,” is a harbinger of change for the group. First, the shifting lineup: Guitarist Jack Hines is on board as a full-time member, replacing Ian St. Pé, who left the group after 2014’s Underneath the Rainbow. Drummer Joe Bradley has parted ways with Black Lips as well. In his stead, drummer Oakley Munson (formerly of Athens, Georgia, weird rockers Puddin’ Tang). Saxophone Zumi Rosow has also joined as a full-time Black Lip, leaving the most indelible mark on the group’s sound, bringing a dose of feminine energy and skronking and wailing sax to the mix. But the most shocking turn of events is a guest appearance by Yoko Ono, adding subtle vocal textures to “Can’t Hold On” — one of the perks of hiring Sean Lennon, son of the Beatles’ John Lennon, to record the album. Songs such as “Occidental Front,” “Crystal Night,” and “Can’t Hold On” push the group’s haunted garage rock sound into colorful new terrain, but Rosow’s sax is the star of the show, ushering in a much needed change of pace for the group. — Chad Radford
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17. __[https://www.eliotbronson.com/|Eliot Bronson]__ | ''James'' (Rock Ridge Music)
''Creative Loafing''’s 2014 Best of Atlanta Critics Pick for Best Songwriter, Eliot Bronson, returns after three years down for this short but sweet — eight-song, 30-minute — confirmation that his tunesmith talents continue to mature. Dave Cobb, Nashville’s go-to producer du jour for sincere Americana (Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton) puts the pieces into place. But it’s Bronson’s heartfelt voice, folk and country-infused melodies, and romantic introspection on tunes like “The Mountain” that create effortlessly moving songs so warm it seems like you’ve heard them before. — HH
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[http://victormariachi.bandcamp.com/album/weapons-of-our-ancestors|WEAPONS OF OUR ANCESTORS by Victor Mariachi & izo]]
16. __[https://victormariachi.bandcamp.com/|Victor Mariachi]__ | ''Weapons Of Our Ancestors'' (Self-released)
Victor Mariachi’s proper debut album, ''Weapons Of Our Ancestors'', builds on themes of how much smart technology and violence in modern America will negatively impact society’s future. Through songs such as “With A Vengeance (ft. Blaze),” “The Cycle,” and “No Escape,” Mariachi’s snarling rhymes tell the story of a day in the life of an immigrant trying make his way through a dystopian landscape. — CR
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[http://chunklet.bandcamp.com/album/mg-vs-iq|MG VS IQ by Material Girls]
15. __[https://soundcloud.com/materialgirlsusa|Material Girls]__ | ''MG Vs. IQ'' (Chunklet/Irrelevant)
Before the cabaret-punk six-piece Material Girls debuted with the ''MG vs IQ ''EP, the group had become quite the sensation on East Atlanta stages, while remaining willfully obscure on the internet. Since ''MG vs IQ'' arrived, Material Girls have tantalized and confronted audiences with on-stage theatrics and drag performances that set the stage on fire with a post-punk assault on the senses. Songs such as “Drained,” Tightrope,” and “I Just Wanna Fall In Love With Myself” show off blaring horns, nervous organ lines, bongos, guitar, and bass rounded out by Ben Presley’s gravelly-smooth voice. The result is a short, sharp collection of gloriously raw glam punk numbers that are as catchy as they are audacious. — AA
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[http://clavvs.bandcamp.com/album/world-underwater|World Underwater by CLAVVS]
14. __[https://www.clavvs.com/|CLAVVS]__ | ''World Underwater'' (Self-released)
Every summer needs poolside jams, and hypnotic electronic duo CLAVVS provides. With ''World Underwater'', collaborators Amber Reneé and Graham Marsh create lush new worlds with their soundscapes, inviting listeners to drift away through the long hot days ahead. Slip on a swimsuit and queue up the banger “Bloom” to feel like the aquatic queen (or king) of the sirens. These danceable, atmospheric songs will stay on playlists well into the coming year. — MM
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13. __[http://www.everythingsgold.com/|Goldyard]__ | ''FUCKCULTURE III'' (Black 17 Media)
''Fuck Culture III'' is Goldyard’s literal “FUCK YOU” to just about everyone. The cover art alone – courtesy of FRKO – is arguably the best of any album of 2017, period. The trio, which includes MCs In-Doe and A.T., along with producer Flick James, go the anthemic route on their third offering, taking on a tone that finds its storytellers coming off like most Americans pissed off with the current state of affairs. Whether they were celebrating the successes (“W’s”), playing the bad guys (“Pusha Man”), or getting lyrically pensive (“Naomi”) the G’yard gang got back to their winning ways. — Gavin Godfrey
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[http://faunandapanflute.bandcamp.com/album/2014-2016-2|2014-2016 by Faun and a Pan Flute]
12. __[https://faunandapanflute.bandcamp.com/|Faun and A Pan Flute]__ | ''2014​-​2016'' (Self-released)
Faun and A Pan Flute’s second album, simply titled ''2014-2016'', captures a peculiar energy amassing on the cusp of major transition. The group was living at the moment just before a flashpoint, aesthetically, stylistically and personally, which translates to a greater sense of chemistry than anything Faun has displayed on record before. The album arrives as a natural conclusion to a chapter in Faun’s impressionistic jazz, rock, and modern classical music hybrids. It also sets up a pivotal next move to step off the diving board and plunge deeper into the musical vocabulary the group has created. And it is a singular language that’s growing more complex. Nothing is frivolously rendered here. But the focus on the personal strengthens the group’s hive mind as well. There’s an elevated level of collaborative intuition taking place, and that’s where Faun and A Pan Flute hits full stride. — CR
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[http://geographicnorth.bandcamp.com/album/lifetime-of-love|Lifetime of Love by Moon Diagrams]
11. __[https://geographicnorth.bandcamp.com/album/lifetime-of-love|Moon Diagrams]__ | ''Lifetime of Love'' (Geographic North)Deerhunter co-founder and drummer Moses Archuleta has been crafting sophisticated, ethereal pop for roughly a decade. Lifetime of Love, the debut album under his Moon Diagrams moniker, is a collection of recordings made between 2007 and 2017. Songs such as “Blue Ring” offer hooky synth patterns alongside controlled twitches and spasms reminiscent of David Byrne and Brian Eno’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, and are at once lush and primitive. Though largely comprised of samples, synthesizers, and drum machines, Lifetime of Love feels steeped in humanity, the album’s pulsing beats and pop flourishes are touched with just enough grit to remind listeners of the many human hands required to give these sounds life. — Emily Maxwell

__Check back tomorrow to see what made the final cut for Atlanta's top 30 albums of 2017: Numbers 10-1.__
__[http://www.creativeloafing.com/music/article/20984082/atlantas-best-albums-of-2017-numbers-3021|In the meantime, check out numbers 30-21 here.]__"
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20. Delta Moon | Cabbagetown (Jumping Jack Records)
It seems like forever ago that bluesy swamp-rocking Delta Moon won 2003’s International Blues Challenge. The four-piece, led by guitarists Tom Gray and Mark Johnson, has doubled down on its sound by writing progressive Southern blues songs, best exemplified on Cabbagetown. The grooves are loose and nimble, setting the foundation for the quartet’s road-hardened approach in “Rock And Roll Girl,” taking on the life of a touring musician. The jazz-inflected “21st Century Man,” gets down and dirty, and the group explores its roots on a grinding cover of Son House’s “Death Letter.” — Hal Horowitz

Medicine Music by A Drug Called Tradition
19. A Drug Called Tradition | Medicine Music (Psych Army Intergalactic)
Following the dissolution of heavy psych outfit Abby GoGo in 2014, singer/guitarist Bon Allinson joined forces with drummer Puma Navarro and bass player Asha Lakra to form psychedelic shoegaze group A Drug Called Tradition. The group debuted its Medicine Music LP in late July and the album delivers, for all intents and purposes, a lethal dose of fuzzed-out reverb over steady grooves that balance soul, Southern rock, and mind-bending reverb and distortion. Medicine Music begins with “With You Miss You,” a mid-tempo, tremolo-fueled number with telltale washed out vocals. The album follows one man’s journey driving through the desert in a rundown minivan, chain-smoking Marlboro Reds as he loses sight of the world by delving into introspection. The album balances upbeat and somber tracks such as “Again and Again” and the piquing dislocation in “Depression Stone.” Medicine Music is full of hypnotic swagger and wanderlust that’s restrained only enough for listeners to join the trip, get lost in the outskirts, and maybe find themselves returning a little more at ease. — Aja Arnold

18. Black Lips | Satan’s Graffiti or God’s Art? (Vice Records)As the story goes, Black Lips’ singer, bass player Jared Swilley was driving through rural Georgia when he had to do a double-take after driving by a church sign sporting the words, “Will you be God’s art or Satan’s graffiti?” It’s a striking phrase that’s loaded with ham-fisted fire and brimstone. It also projects a mystical yin and yang quality that encapsulates an exciting new chapter for Black Lips. The album’s first single, “Can’t Hold On,” is a harbinger of change for the group. First, the shifting lineup: Guitarist Jack Hines is on board as a full-time member, replacing Ian St. Pé, who left the group after 2014’s Underneath the Rainbow. Drummer Joe Bradley has parted ways with Black Lips as well. In his stead, drummer Oakley Munson (formerly of Athens, Georgia, weird rockers Puddin’ Tang). Saxophone Zumi Rosow has also joined as a full-time Black Lip, leaving the most indelible mark on the group’s sound, bringing a dose of feminine energy and skronking and wailing sax to the mix. But the most shocking turn of events is a guest appearance by Yoko Ono, adding subtle vocal textures to “Can’t Hold On” — one of the perks of hiring Sean Lennon, son of the Beatles’ John Lennon, to record the album. Songs such as “Occidental Front,” “Crystal Night,” and “Can’t Hold On” push the group’s haunted garage rock sound into colorful new terrain, but Rosow’s sax is the star of the show, ushering in a much needed change of pace for the group. — Chad Radford

17. Eliot Bronson | James (Rock Ridge Music)
Creative Loafing’s 2014 Best of Atlanta Critics Pick for Best Songwriter, Eliot Bronson, returns after three years down for this short but sweet — eight-song, 30-minute — confirmation that his tunesmith talents continue to mature. Dave Cobb, Nashville’s go-to producer du jour for sincere Americana (Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton) puts the pieces into place. But it’s Bronson’s heartfelt voice, folk and country-infused melodies, and romantic introspection on tunes like “The Mountain” that create effortlessly moving songs so warm it seems like you’ve heard them before. — HH

WEAPONS OF OUR ANCESTORS by Victor Mariachi & izo]
16. Victor Mariachi | Weapons Of Our Ancestors (Self-released)
Victor Mariachi’s proper debut album, Weapons Of Our Ancestors, builds on themes of how much smart technology and violence in modern America will negatively impact society’s future. Through songs such as “With A Vengeance (ft. Blaze),” “The Cycle,” and “No Escape,” Mariachi’s snarling rhymes tell the story of a day in the life of an immigrant trying make his way through a dystopian landscape. — CR

MG VS IQ by Material Girls
15. Material Girls | MG Vs. IQ (Chunklet/Irrelevant)
Before the cabaret-punk six-piece Material Girls debuted with the MG vs IQ EP, the group had become quite the sensation on East Atlanta stages, while remaining willfully obscure on the internet. Since MG vs IQ arrived, Material Girls have tantalized and confronted audiences with on-stage theatrics and drag performances that set the stage on fire with a post-punk assault on the senses. Songs such as “Drained,” Tightrope,” and “I Just Wanna Fall In Love With Myself” show off blaring horns, nervous organ lines, bongos, guitar, and bass rounded out by Ben Presley’s gravelly-smooth voice. The result is a short, sharp collection of gloriously raw glam punk numbers that are as catchy as they are audacious. — AA

World Underwater by CLAVVS
14. CLAVVS | World Underwater (Self-released)
Every summer needs poolside jams, and hypnotic electronic duo CLAVVS provides. With World Underwater, collaborators Amber Reneé and Graham Marsh create lush new worlds with their soundscapes, inviting listeners to drift away through the long hot days ahead. Slip on a swimsuit and queue up the banger “Bloom” to feel like the aquatic queen (or king) of the sirens. These danceable, atmospheric songs will stay on playlists well into the coming year. — MM

13. Goldyard | FUCKCULTURE III (Black 17 Media)
Fuck Culture III is Goldyard’s literal “FUCK YOU” to just about everyone. The cover art alone – courtesy of FRKO – is arguably the best of any album of 2017, period. The trio, which includes MCs In-Doe and A.T., along with producer Flick James, go the anthemic route on their third offering, taking on a tone that finds its storytellers coming off like most Americans pissed off with the current state of affairs. Whether they were celebrating the successes (“W’s”), playing the bad guys (“Pusha Man”), or getting lyrically pensive (“Naomi”) the G’yard gang got back to their winning ways. — Gavin Godfrey

2014-2016 by Faun and a Pan Flute
12. Faun and A Pan Flute | 2014​-​2016 (Self-released)
Faun and A Pan Flute’s second album, simply titled 2014-2016, captures a peculiar energy amassing on the cusp of major transition. The group was living at the moment just before a flashpoint, aesthetically, stylistically and personally, which translates to a greater sense of chemistry than anything Faun has displayed on record before. The album arrives as a natural conclusion to a chapter in Faun’s impressionistic jazz, rock, and modern classical music hybrids. It also sets up a pivotal next move to step off the diving board and plunge deeper into the musical vocabulary the group has created. And it is a singular language that’s growing more complex. Nothing is frivolously rendered here. But the focus on the personal strengthens the group’s hive mind as well. There’s an elevated level of collaborative intuition taking place, and that’s where Faun and A Pan Flute hits full stride. — CR

Lifetime of Love by Moon Diagrams
11. Moon Diagrams | Lifetime of Love (Geographic North)Deerhunter co-founder and drummer Moses Archuleta has been crafting sophisticated, ethereal pop for roughly a decade. Lifetime of Love, the debut album under his Moon Diagrams moniker, is a collection of recordings made between 2007 and 2017. Songs such as “Blue Ring” offer hooky synth patterns alongside controlled twitches and spasms reminiscent of David Byrne and Brian Eno’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, and are at once lush and primitive. Though largely comprised of samples, synthesizers, and drum machines, Lifetime of Love feels steeped in humanity, the album’s pulsing beats and pop flourishes are touched with just enough grit to remind listeners of the many human hands required to give these sounds life. — Emily Maxwell

Check back tomorrow to see what made the final cut for Atlanta's top 30 albums of 2017: Numbers 10-1.
In the meantime, check out numbers 30-21 here.             20984266         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/11/Music_1_16_Mariachi_05.5a1f2edc630e6.png                  Atlanta's best albums of 2017: Numbers 20-11 "
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Wednesday November 29, 2017 09:35 pm EST
Victor Mariachi, Material Girls, Eliot Bronson, and more top picks from CL's year end music list | more...
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  string(7721) "It has been an excellent year for Atlanta music. Over the months and weeks leading into the holiday season, CL’s music scribes subjected themselves to rigorous debate and critical ballyhoo to settle on this list of the city’s top 30 albums of 2017. Two of the titles we’ve selected are EPs, but their arrival sent tremors throughout the city’s nightlife scene — enough that we would be remiss not to include them here. So without further ado, here are numbers 30 through 21. Please dive in and give a listen to the music that’s kept our headphones buzzing and the office ambiance flowing all year long.

Be sure to check back tomorrow to find out who made the cut for numbers 20 through 11.

30. Manchester Orchestra | A Black Mile To the Surface (Loma Vista Recordings)
Singer and guitar player Andy Hull’s beloved alt-rock outfit has a history with continually switching gears, but on Manchester Orchestra’s fifth studio full-length, the group substitutes its signature cut-and-dry instrumentation for an opulent vision. Hull’s vocals glimmer during the a capella moments of “The Gold,” balanced by folky harmonization and delicately plucked guitar riffs, and howl on tracks like “The Mistake” and “The Moth.” The album’s distillation of acoustic balladry, sonic atmosphere, and post-hardcore strumming is bolstered by the nearly 12-minute combination of “The Alien” segueing into “The Sunshine,” and finally concluding its lush vision with “The Grocery.” It’s a dramatic album steeped in imagination, sure to reveal all new layers of depth with each listen. — Kristy Guilbault

29. Lil Yachty | Teenage Emotions (Quality Control Music, Capitol Records, and Motown)
It’s OK if you’re still trying to make sense of Lil Yachty, he doesn’t care. Before his debut album dropped, Yachty told Billboard, “I’ve found myself. I’m like the youth’s big brother now. I have to be that voice for them.” Despite hip-hop purists getting furious at every little thing the Atlanta artist says or does, Lil Boat has made it his mission to create for those tween masses who obsess over his maunder rap delivery (“Like A Star”), his pop leanings (“Forever Young”), and his unfiltered raunchiness (“Peek A Boo”),  like him or not. — Gavin Godfrey

28. Biters | The Future Ain’t What It Used to Be (Earache Records)
Biters’ members are true rock ’n’ roll road warriors, devoting all of their time together to spreading the good word everywhere, from far-flung European venues to this year’s KISS Kruise. The band somehow made time to write and record its strongest album to date with the fifth Biter, local producer Dan Dixon. The Future Ain’t What It Used To Be drops less than subtle references to the band’s glam, punk, and hard rock heroes while lamenting current rock’s poor bill of health. Songs such as “Vulture City” and “Stone Cold Love” might just restore your faith in this generation’s musical ambitions. — Bobby Moore

27. The Whiskey Gentry | Dead Ringer (Pitch-A-Tent Records)The first benchmark Atlanta record was by Fiddlin’ John Carson. His famed 1923 single “The Little Log Cabin In the Lane” was released decades before rock ’n’ roll became a major Southern export. The Whiskey Gentry draws liberally from this local and regional timeline with Dead Ringer. Husband-and-wife duo Lauren Staley and Jason Morrow and their band mates are a rocking string band that thrives beyond Carson and his post-World War I peers’ wildest dreams on French language cow-punk stomper “Paris,” and the equally rollicking title track. Dead Ringer is 2017’s finest addition to Atlanta’s ongoing Americana boom. — BM

Youth Detention///(Nail My Feet Down To The Southside Of Town) by Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires
26.  Lee Bains III & Glory Fires | Youth Detention (Don Giovanni)
Former Dexateens member Lee Bains III, along with his band, the Glory Fires, returned this summer to release Youth Detention, a riotous meditation on life in the modern South. At once frenzied and contemplative, the album finds Bains and company marrying Skynyrd-style twang with breathless punk to electrifying ends. Lyrically, Youth Detention serves as a sort of time capsule, examining the complexity and discomfort associated with Southern heritage at the present moment. While Bains’ verbose anthems are ones of fury and exasperation, they also function as joyous and snide “Dear John” letters to the old guard. — Emily Maxwell

In The Tides of Time by LONER
25. LONER | In the Tides of Time (Self-released)
From the very beginning, In the Tides of Time was intended as more of a snapshot of a living organism than a simple collection of songs. LONER is the same band that turned its release party into an interstellar murder mystery, so it’s not surprising that even the recording process was an experiment in pushing the limits of collaboration and pop music. Throughout the resulting tracks, Joshua Loner and company were able to capture the chaos of existence and translate it into wandering saxophone solos, racing flute melodies, and esoteric poetry that delights and inspires. — Russell Rockwell

Hurt Plaza by Pamela_ and her sons
24. Pamela_ and her sons | Hurt Plaza (CGI)
After a few years of captivating audiences with her electrifying live performances, Pamela_ and her sons, aka Alessandra Hoshor of dance duo BIG DED, released her first studio full-length. Named after a street in Downtown Atlanta and a silk tapestry she designed in 2015, Hurt Plaza is an inexplicable collection of techno-inspired cuts and experimental electronics, with Hoshor’s deliberately unintelligible vocals providing surreal textures, as heard on the album’s highlight, “Sad Laugh.” It’s a self-aware enigma, balancing subtlety and terror. — Ben Braunstein

Art School Jocks by Art School Jocks
23. Art School Jocks | Self-titled EP (Father/Daughter Records)
Art School Jocks’ debut EP strikes a balance between basement pop ebullience and politically-charged indie-punk tooth and claw. Early single “Just a Gwen” gained national attention by balancing addictive lo-fi hooks, fuzzy tones, and melodic vocals steeped in socio-political anthems that take aim at the normalization of misogyny, ignorance, and rape culture.This one is not for the faint of heart. — Aja Arnold

22. Bret Busch | Pills Lace & Confetti (Self-released)If a sign that reads “Atlanta music royalty” should be hung around anyone’s neck, it’s Bret Busch. Whether fronting the city’s favorite Smiths tribute act Smithsonian, or sharing time in the studio with Janelle Monáe’s house band and the Rock*A*Teens’ Chris Lopez, Busch exudes all class, all the time. Pills Lace & Confetti is a radiant pop masterpiece — simple by design and complex in its range of emotional depth, wrapped in lush, melodic pop. — Chad Radford

12" by Pallas
21. Pallas | 12” (Drop Medium)
Though Pallas’ debut features only seven songs ranging anywhere from one to two minutes-long, it leaves this short-lived band well-remembered. Known as an exceptional live band for over a year before the record’s arrival, Pallas translated the feeling of the group’s live performances to the record perfectly, with each member’s styling so unique that listeners can almost visualize the group playing while the record spins. Each song perfectly blends elements of post-punk, noise, art-rock, and no wave to create a one-of-a-kind sound that’s smooth and melodic, then chaotic, then smooth again. How did they pull that off? — Spencer Korchan

Best 2017 Albums 1-10
Best 2017 Albums 11-20"
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Be sure to check back tomorrow to find out who made the cut for numbers 20 through 11.
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30. __[http://themanchesterorchestra.com/|Manchester Orchestra]__ | ''A Black Mile To the Surface'' (Loma Vista Recordings)
Singer and guitar player Andy Hull’s beloved alt-rock outfit has a history with continually switching gears, but on Manchester Orchestra’s fifth studio full-length, the group substitutes its signature cut-and-dry instrumentation for an opulent vision. Hull’s vocals glimmer during the a capella moments of “The Gold,” balanced by folky harmonization and delicately plucked guitar riffs, and howl on tracks like “The Mistake” and “The Moth.” The album’s distillation of acoustic balladry, sonic atmosphere, and post-hardcore strumming is bolstered by the nearly 12-minute combination of “The Alien” segueing into “The Sunshine,” and finally concluding its lush vision with “The Grocery.” It’s a dramatic album steeped in imagination, sure to reveal all new layers of depth with each listen. — Kristy Guilbault
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29. __[https://www.lilyachty.com/|Lil Yachty]__ | ''Teenage Emotions'' (Quality Control Music, Capitol Records, and Motown)
It’s OK if you’re still trying to make sense of Lil Yachty, he doesn’t care. Before his debut album dropped, Yachty told ''Billboard'', “I’ve found myself. I’m like the youth’s big brother now. I have to be that voice for them.” Despite hip-hop purists getting furious at every little thing the Atlanta artist says or does, Lil Boat has made it his mission to create for those tween masses who obsess over his maunder rap delivery (“Like A Star”), his pop leanings (“Forever Young”), and his unfiltered raunchiness (“Peek A Boo”),  like him or not. — Gavin Godfrey
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28. __[https://www.bitersband.com/|Biters]__ | ''The Future Ain’t What It Used to Be'' (Earache Records)
Biters’ members are true rock ’n’ roll road warriors, devoting all of their time together to spreading the good word everywhere, from far-flung European venues to this year’s KISS Kruise. The band somehow made time to write and record its strongest album to date with the fifth Biter, local producer Dan Dixon. ''The Future Ain’t What It Used To Be'' drops less than subtle references to the band’s glam, punk, and hard rock heroes while lamenting current rock’s poor bill of health. Songs such as “Vulture City” and “Stone Cold Love” might just restore your faith in this generation’s musical ambitions. — Bobby Moore
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27. __[https://www.thewhiskeygentry.com/|The Whiskey Gentry]__ | ''Dead Ringer'' (Pitch-A-Tent Records)The first benchmark Atlanta record was by Fiddlin’ John Carson. His famed 1923 single “The Little Log Cabin In the Lane” was released decades before rock ’n’ roll became a major Southern export. The Whiskey Gentry draws liberally from this local and regional timeline with ''Dead Ringer''. Husband-and-wife duo Lauren Staley and Jason Morrow and their band mates are a rocking string band that thrives beyond Carson and his post-World War I peers’ wildest dreams on French language cow-punk stomper “Paris,” and the equally rollicking title track. ''Dead Ringer'' is 2017’s finest addition to Atlanta’s ongoing Americana boom. — BM
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[http://leebainsiii.bandcamp.com/album/youth-detention-nail-my-feet-down-to-the-southside-of-town|Youth Detention///(Nail My Feet Down To The Southside Of Town) by Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires]
26.  __[http://www.thegloryfires.com/|Lee Bains III & Glory Fires]__[http://www.thegloryfires.com/| ]| ''Youth Detention'' (Don Giovanni)
Former Dexateens member Lee Bains III, along with his band, the Glory Fires, returned this summer to release ''Youth Detention'', a riotous meditation on life in the modern South. At once frenzied and contemplative, the album finds Bains and company marrying Skynyrd-style twang with breathless punk to electrifying ends. Lyrically, ''Youth Detention'' serves as a sort of time capsule, examining the complexity and discomfort associated with Southern heritage at the present moment. While Bains’ verbose anthems are ones of fury and exasperation, they also function as joyous and snide “Dear John” letters to the old guard. — Emily Maxwell
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[http://loneratl.bandcamp.com/album/in-the-tides-of-time-2|In The Tides of Time by LONER]
25. __[https://www.facebook.com/LonerATL/|LONER]__ | ''In the Tides of Time'' (Self-released)
From the very beginning, ''In the Tides of Time'' was intended as more of a snapshot of a living organism than a simple collection of songs. LONER is the same band that turned its release party into an interstellar murder mystery, so it’s not surprising that even the recording process was an experiment in pushing the limits of collaboration and pop music. Throughout the resulting tracks, Joshua Loner and company were able to capture the chaos of existence and translate it into wandering saxophone solos, racing flute melodies, and esoteric poetry that delights and inspires. — Russell Rockwell
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[http://cgirecords.bandcamp.com/album/hurt-plaza|Hurt Plaza by Pamela_ and her sons]
24. __[http://pamelaandhersons.com/|Pamela_ and her sons]__ | ''Hurt Plaza'' (CGI)
After a few years of captivating audiences with her electrifying live performances, Pamela_ and her sons, aka Alessandra Hoshor of dance duo BIG DED, released her first studio full-length. Named after a street in Downtown Atlanta and a silk tapestry she designed in 2015, ''Hurt Plaza'' is an inexplicable collection of techno-inspired cuts and experimental electronics, with Hoshor’s deliberately unintelligible vocals providing surreal textures, as heard on the album’s highlight, “Sad Laugh.” It’s a self-aware enigma, balancing subtlety and terror. — Ben Braunstein
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[http://fatherdaughterrecords.bandcamp.com/album/art-school-jocks|Art School Jocks by Art School Jocks]
23. __[https://www.artschooljocks.com/|Art School Jocks]__ | Self-titled EP (Father/Daughter Records)
Art School Jocks’ debut EP strikes a balance between basement pop ebullience and politically-charged indie-punk tooth and claw. Early single “Just a Gwen” gained national attention by balancing addictive lo-fi hooks, fuzzy tones, and melodic vocals steeped in socio-political anthems that take aim at the normalization of misogyny, ignorance, and rape culture.This one is not for the faint of heart. — Aja Arnold
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22. __Bret Busch__ | ''Pills Lace & Confetti'' (Self-released)If a sign that reads “Atlanta music royalty” should be hung around anyone’s neck, it’s Bret Busch. Whether fronting the city’s favorite Smiths tribute act Smithsonian, or sharing time in the studio with Janelle Monáe’s house band and the Rock*A*Teens’ Chris Lopez, Busch exudes all class, all the time. ''Pills Lace & Confetti ''is a radiant pop masterpiece — simple by design and complex in its range of emotional depth, wrapped in lush, melodic pop. — Chad Radford
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[http://dropmedium.bandcamp.com/album/12|12" by Pallas]
21. __[https://dropmedium.bandcamp.com/album/12|Pallas]__ |'' 12”'' (Drop Medium)
Though Pallas’ debut features only seven songs ranging anywhere from one to two minutes-long, it leaves this short-lived band well-remembered. Known as an exceptional live band for over a year before the record’s arrival, Pallas translated the feeling of the group’s live performances to the record perfectly, with each member’s styling so unique that listeners can almost visualize the group playing while the record spins. Each song perfectly blends elements of post-punk, noise, art-rock, and no wave to create a one-of-a-kind sound that’s smooth and melodic, then chaotic, then smooth again. How did they pull that off? — Spencer Korchan

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  string(8256) " Music 1 29 Yachty 05.5a1dd28f7c1a1  2018-02-05T13:59:05+00:00 Music_1_29_Yachty_05.5a1dd28f7c1a1.jpg     Biters, Lil Yachty, the Whiskey Gentry, and more kick off CL's year end music list 2533  2017-11-29T00:22:00+00:00 Atlanta's best albums of 2017: Numbers 30-21 ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Chad Radford Chad Radford 2017-11-29T00:22:00+00:00  It has been an excellent year for Atlanta music. Over the months and weeks leading into the holiday season, CL’s music scribes subjected themselves to rigorous debate and critical ballyhoo to settle on this list of the city’s top 30 albums of 2017. Two of the titles we’ve selected are EPs, but their arrival sent tremors throughout the city’s nightlife scene — enough that we would be remiss not to include them here. So without further ado, here are numbers 30 through 21. Please dive in and give a listen to the music that’s kept our headphones buzzing and the office ambiance flowing all year long.

Be sure to check back tomorrow to find out who made the cut for numbers 20 through 11.

30. Manchester Orchestra | A Black Mile To the Surface (Loma Vista Recordings)
Singer and guitar player Andy Hull’s beloved alt-rock outfit has a history with continually switching gears, but on Manchester Orchestra’s fifth studio full-length, the group substitutes its signature cut-and-dry instrumentation for an opulent vision. Hull’s vocals glimmer during the a capella moments of “The Gold,” balanced by folky harmonization and delicately plucked guitar riffs, and howl on tracks like “The Mistake” and “The Moth.” The album’s distillation of acoustic balladry, sonic atmosphere, and post-hardcore strumming is bolstered by the nearly 12-minute combination of “The Alien” segueing into “The Sunshine,” and finally concluding its lush vision with “The Grocery.” It’s a dramatic album steeped in imagination, sure to reveal all new layers of depth with each listen. — Kristy Guilbault

29. Lil Yachty | Teenage Emotions (Quality Control Music, Capitol Records, and Motown)
It’s OK if you’re still trying to make sense of Lil Yachty, he doesn’t care. Before his debut album dropped, Yachty told Billboard, “I’ve found myself. I’m like the youth’s big brother now. I have to be that voice for them.” Despite hip-hop purists getting furious at every little thing the Atlanta artist says or does, Lil Boat has made it his mission to create for those tween masses who obsess over his maunder rap delivery (“Like A Star”), his pop leanings (“Forever Young”), and his unfiltered raunchiness (“Peek A Boo”),  like him or not. — Gavin Godfrey

28. Biters | The Future Ain’t What It Used to Be (Earache Records)
Biters’ members are true rock ’n’ roll road warriors, devoting all of their time together to spreading the good word everywhere, from far-flung European venues to this year’s KISS Kruise. The band somehow made time to write and record its strongest album to date with the fifth Biter, local producer Dan Dixon. The Future Ain’t What It Used To Be drops less than subtle references to the band’s glam, punk, and hard rock heroes while lamenting current rock’s poor bill of health. Songs such as “Vulture City” and “Stone Cold Love” might just restore your faith in this generation’s musical ambitions. — Bobby Moore

27. The Whiskey Gentry | Dead Ringer (Pitch-A-Tent Records)The first benchmark Atlanta record was by Fiddlin’ John Carson. His famed 1923 single “The Little Log Cabin In the Lane” was released decades before rock ’n’ roll became a major Southern export. The Whiskey Gentry draws liberally from this local and regional timeline with Dead Ringer. Husband-and-wife duo Lauren Staley and Jason Morrow and their band mates are a rocking string band that thrives beyond Carson and his post-World War I peers’ wildest dreams on French language cow-punk stomper “Paris,” and the equally rollicking title track. Dead Ringer is 2017’s finest addition to Atlanta’s ongoing Americana boom. — BM

Youth Detention///(Nail My Feet Down To The Southside Of Town) by Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires
26.  Lee Bains III & Glory Fires | Youth Detention (Don Giovanni)
Former Dexateens member Lee Bains III, along with his band, the Glory Fires, returned this summer to release Youth Detention, a riotous meditation on life in the modern South. At once frenzied and contemplative, the album finds Bains and company marrying Skynyrd-style twang with breathless punk to electrifying ends. Lyrically, Youth Detention serves as a sort of time capsule, examining the complexity and discomfort associated with Southern heritage at the present moment. While Bains’ verbose anthems are ones of fury and exasperation, they also function as joyous and snide “Dear John” letters to the old guard. — Emily Maxwell

In The Tides of Time by LONER
25. LONER | In the Tides of Time (Self-released)
From the very beginning, In the Tides of Time was intended as more of a snapshot of a living organism than a simple collection of songs. LONER is the same band that turned its release party into an interstellar murder mystery, so it’s not surprising that even the recording process was an experiment in pushing the limits of collaboration and pop music. Throughout the resulting tracks, Joshua Loner and company were able to capture the chaos of existence and translate it into wandering saxophone solos, racing flute melodies, and esoteric poetry that delights and inspires. — Russell Rockwell

Hurt Plaza by Pamela_ and her sons
24. Pamela_ and her sons | Hurt Plaza (CGI)
After a few years of captivating audiences with her electrifying live performances, Pamela_ and her sons, aka Alessandra Hoshor of dance duo BIG DED, released her first studio full-length. Named after a street in Downtown Atlanta and a silk tapestry she designed in 2015, Hurt Plaza is an inexplicable collection of techno-inspired cuts and experimental electronics, with Hoshor’s deliberately unintelligible vocals providing surreal textures, as heard on the album’s highlight, “Sad Laugh.” It’s a self-aware enigma, balancing subtlety and terror. — Ben Braunstein

Art School Jocks by Art School Jocks
23. Art School Jocks | Self-titled EP (Father/Daughter Records)
Art School Jocks’ debut EP strikes a balance between basement pop ebullience and politically-charged indie-punk tooth and claw. Early single “Just a Gwen” gained national attention by balancing addictive lo-fi hooks, fuzzy tones, and melodic vocals steeped in socio-political anthems that take aim at the normalization of misogyny, ignorance, and rape culture.This one is not for the faint of heart. — Aja Arnold

22. Bret Busch | Pills Lace & Confetti (Self-released)If a sign that reads “Atlanta music royalty” should be hung around anyone’s neck, it’s Bret Busch. Whether fronting the city’s favorite Smiths tribute act Smithsonian, or sharing time in the studio with Janelle Monáe’s house band and the Rock*A*Teens’ Chris Lopez, Busch exudes all class, all the time. Pills Lace & Confetti is a radiant pop masterpiece — simple by design and complex in its range of emotional depth, wrapped in lush, melodic pop. — Chad Radford

12" by Pallas
21. Pallas | 12” (Drop Medium)
Though Pallas’ debut features only seven songs ranging anywhere from one to two minutes-long, it leaves this short-lived band well-remembered. Known as an exceptional live band for over a year before the record’s arrival, Pallas translated the feeling of the group’s live performances to the record perfectly, with each member’s styling so unique that listeners can almost visualize the group playing while the record spins. Each song perfectly blends elements of post-punk, noise, art-rock, and no wave to create a one-of-a-kind sound that’s smooth and melodic, then chaotic, then smooth again. How did they pull that off? — Spencer Korchan

Best 2017 Albums 1-10
Best 2017 Albums 11-20             20984082         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2017/11/Music_1_29_Yachty_05.5a1dd28f7c1a1.png                  Atlanta's best albums of 2017: Numbers 30-21 "
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Tuesday November 28, 2017 07:22 pm EST
Biters, Lil Yachty, the Whiskey Gentry, and more kick off CL's year end music list | more...
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  string(32) "Atlanta's 10 best albums of 2016"
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  string(77) "CL scribes call out the best of the best in local local music pt. 2 ... Brrr!"
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  string(7896) "What a long strange trip 2016 has been — a real life Empire Strikes Back scenario unfolded over a year bookended by the deaths of Mr. Space Oddity himself, David Bowie, and the first American to orbit the Earth, John Glenn. In Atlanta, gentrification continues ravaging the land, picking away at the cultural institutions and neighborhoods the city's creative types have long called home. But ATLiens are at their best under duress. After a lengthy voting process followed by exhaustive debate, CL's staff of music scribes, interns, and confidants made the case for Atlanta’s 10 best albums of the year. Polling was democratic; no Russian hackers influenced the selection process. Each one pushes the city into progressive new musical terrain, and comes strongly endorsed by the team of writers that work here. When the votes were counted the winner was clear. It was a landslide.
10. Jeff Crompton Trio, Magic Word (Southern Crescent)

This is what a 21st century jazz trio should sound like. Jeff Crompton (alto sax), Evan Lipson (bass), and Bob Stagner (drums), bound by a deep immersion in an evolving, more than century-old art form, play like men possessed. They’re on a quest for something elusive and profoundly beautiful, which they find in a balanced triumvirate of swinging, soulful noise. Crompton’s nine compositions (all his, save for two improvs) draw mostly from Ornette Coleman’s post-bop wavelengths, deeply colored by John Coltrane’s blues. — Doug DeLoach

9. Warehouse, super low (Bayonet)
super low by Warehouse
Warehouse’s sophomore album at first feels dominated by frontwoman Elaine Edenfield’s snarling voice. From piercing wails to sultry grumbles, she startles and disarms with impressive vocal dynamism. She is matched, however, by bassist Josh Hughes and drummer Doug Bleichner’s breathless rhythms and Ben Jackson and Alex Bailey’s shimmering guitars, balancing spontaneous outbursts with structured tension. Songs such as “Oscillator,” “Reservoir,” and “Simultaneous Contrasts” temper meticulous control and terse improvisation into an atmosphere of shimmering and melodic post-punk. — Emily Maxwell


8. Rae Sremmurd, (Eardruma/Interscope Records)
Don’t let the viral mega-success of “Black Beatles” take away from the bigger story. Rae Sremmurd successfully followed up its zeitgeist moment with a sophomore album that’s measured and mature while retaining the euphoric vibe that made Swae Lee and Slim Jxmmi stars. The brothers have a knack for squeaky melody, and Mike WiLL Made-It provides the big trap beats. Add it all up for a collection of party-starters that are more interesting and ambitious than anything Rae Sremmurd has kicked out yet. — Ben Salmon

7. Lil Yachty, Lil Boat (Quality Control Music, Capitol Records/Motown)
With his debut mixtape, Lil Yachty placed himself at the forefront of a new wave of Atlanta hip-hop artists whose lo-fi, DIY, and emotionally distraught take on the music is widely criticized by many of their predecessors. But Yachty remains unfazed by the criticism, and it shows. Lil Boat is the perfect embodiment of what Yachty calls bubblegum trap — street cred bolstered by appearances from Quavo, Young Thug, and Skippa da Flippa, but it’s mostly fun. — Tai Saint-Louis

6. Omni, Deluxe (Trouble In Mind)
Deluxe by Omni
As albums sprawl outward in the age of streaming, efficiency is an increasingly lost art. But not for Omni. Singer and bass player Philip Frobos builds tension in the rhythms as Frankie Broyles slices through it every time with shards of electric guitar and drums on the group’s debut album. Full disclosure, the group’s former drummer, Billy Mitchell, is a regular CL contributor. Songs such as “Wire,” “Afterlife,” and “Earrings” are prickly new wave dance pop numbers that rarely exceed three-and-a-half minutes while clicking and whirring like nifty little gadgets. — Ben Salmon
5. Speakerfoxxx and Bosco, Girls in the Yard (Fool’s Gold)

A-Town homegirls Speakerfoxxx and Bosco’s Girls In The Yard collaboration arrived this year as a bass-dropping, confetti cannon-popping summer jam with a lesson in self-esteem to boot. The project is full to the brim with anthemic girl power and party songs. Think of “Shooter” as the ride-or-die chick’s club-banger lament upon realizing her dude ain’t quite the hitter he hyped himself up to be, followed by the sense of empowerment that comes from being unafraid to fly solo. With individual grinds that have established them as noteworthy Atlanta-based artists and tastemakers for years, this collective effort is fueling a heightened level of success for both. You might say they’re on some grown woman shit. — Rodney Carmichael

4. Young Thug, Jeffery (300 Entertainment/ATL)
There’s no denying that Young Thug’s proper debut full-length, Jeffery, was one of Atlanta’s most talked-about albums of 2016. Through songs such as “Wyclef Jean,” “Future Swag,” and “Harambe,” Thugger, born Jeffery Lamar Williams, incorporates everything from rhythmic reggae production to the frenzied tempos of NOLA bounce. Jeffery breaks the mold for Atlanta hip-hop in 2016 and finds Young Thug thinking in much bigger terms. — Joseph Tiller and Chad Radford
3. Hello Ocho, In Portuguese (Self-released)

Hello Ocho’s second proper album, In Portuguese, arrived a confident and sprawling offering from a band that’s quickly become a local fixture. The psychedelic qualities swirling inside songs such as “Tear Wagon,” “Lurky Murky,” and “Nail Tractor” are filled with magnificent sonic highs and spooky valleys teeming with mystery and hallucinatory wonders. Working alongside producer Ben Price, the group rendered an album that functions like a maze of jazz and post-rock structures where every chiming note, rhythm, and melody snakes around one another, forming a slow and glowing mass of wonders for the imagination. It’s music for taking drugs to, a soundtrack for painting beautiful works of art, and Hello Ocho’s final full-length in this configuration. At least they went out on a high note. — Billy Mitchell and Chad Radford
2. Childish Gambino, Awaken, My Love! (Glassnote)

Childish Gambino, aka Donald Glover, is fearless when it comes to trying out new things. Awaken, My Love!, the third album from the star of FX’s hit TV show “Atlanta,” and his longtime cohort Ludwig Göransson, is a collection of psychedelic soul, funk, and ’70s rock excursions. Songs such as “Me And Your Mama,” “Riot,” and “Baby Boy” carry socially and politically conscious undertones, steeped in heavy bass lines, fuzzed-out guitars, and Gambino’s wide vocal range — he doesn’t rap here, but he does croon and scream. Awaken, My Love! is a testament to Gambino’s musical and lyrical versatility. It’s a trippy, one-of-a-kind avatar that owes as much to millennial aesthetics as it does to the era that turned out Sly and the Family Stone and Funkadelic’s weirdest moments of perfection. — Joseph Tiller
1. Gucci Mane, Everybody Looking (Atlantic Urban)

Time in the pen was good for Guwop. After a three-year prison bid, health, recovery, and mental focus weigh heavy on the Zone 6 trap god’s psyche. With Everybody Looking, Gucci, along with producers Mike WiLL and Zaytoven, crafts an album worthy of a lifetime achievement award. “Out Do Ya,” “Pussy Print” ft. Kanye West, and the brilliant “1st Day Out Tha Feds” push trap production to groundbreaking new musical terrain. Variety is thick here, and the album’s message is essentially the same as the cautionary tale Gucci delivered with 2009’s “Heavy.” But now, he’s looking at the flip side of the coin. He’s back on the streets, he’s cleaned up, and in 2016, he was unstoppable. Brrr! — Chad Radford"
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{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_Top10_3_10.585af37e0bb52.jpg"}10. Jeff Crompton Trio, ''Magic Word'' (Southern Crescent)
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This is what a 21st century jazz trio should sound like. Jeff Crompton (alto sax), Evan Lipson (bass), and Bob Stagner (drums), bound by a deep immersion in an evolving, more than century-old art form, play like men possessed. They’re on a quest for something elusive and profoundly beautiful, which they find in a balanced triumvirate of swinging, soulful noise. Crompton’s nine compositions (all his, save for two improvs) draw mostly from Ornette Coleman’s post-bop wavelengths, deeply colored by John Coltrane’s blues. — Doug DeLoach
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{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_Top10_3_9_35.585af38bd48c0.jpg"}9. Warehouse, ''super low'' (Bayonet)
[http://warehouseatl.bandcamp.com/album/super-low|super low by Warehouse]
Warehouse’s sophomore album at first feels dominated by frontwoman Elaine Edenfield’s snarling voice. From piercing wails to sultry grumbles, she startles and disarms with impressive vocal dynamism. She is matched, however, by bassist Josh Hughes and drummer Doug Bleichner’s breathless rhythms and Ben Jackson and Alex Bailey’s shimmering guitars, balancing spontaneous outbursts with structured tension. Songs such as “Oscillator,” “Reservoir,” and “Simultaneous Contrasts” temper meticulous control and terse improvisation into an atmosphere of shimmering and melodic post-punk. — Emily Maxwell
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8. Rae Sremmurd, (Eardruma/Interscope Records)
Don’t let the viral mega-success of “Black Beatles” take away from the bigger story. Rae Sremmurd successfully followed up its zeitgeist moment with a sophomore album that’s measured and mature while retaining the euphoric vibe that made Swae Lee and Slim Jxmmi stars. The brothers have a knack for squeaky melody, and Mike WiLL Made-It provides the big trap beats. Add it all up for a collection of party-starters that are more interesting and ambitious than anything Rae Sremmurd has kicked out yet. — Ben Salmon
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{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_Top10_3_7_35.585af387956cd.jpg"}7. Lil Yachty, ''Lil Boat'' (Quality Control Music, Capitol Records/Motown)
With his debut mixtape, Lil Yachty placed himself at the forefront of a new wave of Atlanta hip-hop artists whose lo-fi, DIY, and emotionally distraught take on the music is widely criticized by many of their predecessors. But Yachty remains unfazed by the criticism, and it shows. ''Lil Boat'' is the perfect embodiment of what Yachty calls bubblegum trap — street cred bolstered by appearances from Quavo, Young Thug, and Skippa da Flippa, but it’s mostly fun. — Tai Saint-Louis
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{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_Top10_3_6_35.585af38652e19.jpg"}6. Omni, ''Deluxe'' (Trouble In Mind)
[http://omniatl.bandcamp.com/album/deluxe|Deluxe by Omni]
As albums sprawl outward in the age of streaming, efficiency is an increasingly lost art. But not for Omni. Singer and bass player Philip Frobos builds tension in the rhythms as Frankie Broyles slices through it every time with shards of electric guitar and drums on the group’s debut album. Full disclosure, the group’s former drummer, Billy Mitchell, is a regular CL contributor. Songs such as “Wire,” “Afterlife,” and “Earrings” are prickly new wave dance pop numbers that rarely exceed three-and-a-half minutes while clicking and whirring like nifty little gadgets. — Ben Salmon
{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_Top10_3_5_35.585af37c79a85.jpg"}5. Speakerfoxxx and Bosco, ''Girls in the Yard'' (Fool’s Gold)
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A-Town homegirls Speakerfoxxx and Bosco’s ''Girls In The Yard'' collaboration arrived this year as a bass-dropping, confetti cannon-popping summer jam with a lesson in self-esteem to boot. The project is full to the brim with anthemic girl power and party songs. Think of “Shooter” as the ride-or-die chick’s club-banger lament upon realizing her dude ain’t quite the hitter he hyped himself up to be, followed by the sense of empowerment that comes from being unafraid to fly solo. With individual grinds that have established them as noteworthy Atlanta-based artists and tastemakers for years, this collective effort is fueling a heightened level of success for both. You might say they’re on some grown woman shit. — Rodney Carmichael
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{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_Top10_3_4_35.585af38ce28cc.jpg"}4. Young Thug, ''Jeffery'' (300 Entertainment/ATL)
There’s no denying that Young Thug’s proper debut full-length, ''Jeffery'', was one of Atlanta’s most talked-about albums of 2016. Through songs such as “Wyclef Jean,” “Future Swag,” and “Harambe,” Thugger, born Jeffery Lamar Williams, incorporates everything from rhythmic reggae production to the frenzied tempos of NOLA bounce. ''Jeffery'' breaks the mold for Atlanta hip-hop in 2016 and finds Young Thug thinking in much bigger terms. — Joseph Tiller and Chad Radford
{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_Top10_3_3_35.585af379b6a3b.jpg"}3. Hello Ocho, ''In Portuguese'' (Self-released)
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Hello Ocho’s second proper album, ''In Portuguese'', arrived a confident and sprawling offering from a band that’s quickly become a local fixture. The psychedelic qualities swirling inside songs such as “Tear Wagon,” “Lurky Murky,” and “Nail Tractor” are filled with magnificent sonic highs and spooky valleys teeming with mystery and hallucinatory wonders. Working alongside producer Ben Price, the group rendered an album that functions like a maze of jazz and post-rock structures where every chiming note, rhythm, and melody snakes around one another, forming a slow and glowing mass of wonders for the imagination. It’s music for taking drugs to, a soundtrack for painting beautiful works of art, and Hello Ocho’s final full-length in this configuration. At least they went out on a high note. — Billy Mitchell and Chad Radford
{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/Music_top1_3_2_35.585af3774f429.jpg"}2. Childish Gambino, ''Awaken, My Love! ''(Glassnote)
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Childish Gambino, aka Donald Glover, is fearless when it comes to trying out new things. ''Awaken, My Love!'', the third album from the star of FX’s hit TV show “Atlanta,” and his longtime cohort Ludwig Göransson, is a collection of psychedelic soul, funk, and ’70s rock excursions. Songs such as “Me And Your Mama,” “Riot,” and “Baby Boy” carry socially and politically conscious undertones, steeped in heavy bass lines, fuzzed-out guitars, and Gambino’s wide vocal range — he doesn’t rap here, but he does croon and scream. ''Awaken, My Love!'' is a testament to Gambino’s musical and lyrical versatility. It’s a trippy, one-of-a-kind avatar that owes as much to millennial aesthetics as it does to the era that turned out Sly and the Family Stone and Funkadelic’s weirdest moments of perfection. — Joseph Tiller
{img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/16x9/640w/Music_Top1__3_1_35.585af375d3948.jpg"}1. Gucci Mane, ''Everybody Looking'' (Atlantic Urban)
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Time in the pen was good for Guwop. After a three-year prison bid, health, recovery, and mental focus weigh heavy on the Zone 6 trap god’s psyche. With ''Everybody Looking'', Gucci, along with producers Mike WiLL and Zaytoven, crafts an album worthy of a lifetime achievement award. “Out Do Ya,” “Pussy Print” ft. Kanye West, and the brilliant “1st Day Out Tha Feds” push trap production to groundbreaking new musical terrain. Variety is thick here, and the album’s message is essentially the same as the cautionary tale Gucci delivered with 2009’s “Heavy.” But now, he’s looking at the flip side of the coin. He’s back on the streets, he’s cleaned up, and in 2016, he was unstoppable. Brrr! — Chad Radford"
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  string(8294) "    CL scribes call out the best of the best in local local music pt. 2 ... Brrr!   2016-12-22T21:03:00+00:00 Atlanta's 10 best albums of 2016 ben.eason@creativeloafing.com Ben Eason Chad Radford Chad Radford 2016-12-22T21:03:00+00:00  What a long strange trip 2016 has been — a real life Empire Strikes Back scenario unfolded over a year bookended by the deaths of Mr. Space Oddity himself, David Bowie, and the first American to orbit the Earth, John Glenn. In Atlanta, gentrification continues ravaging the land, picking away at the cultural institutions and neighborhoods the city's creative types have long called home. But ATLiens are at their best under duress. After a lengthy voting process followed by exhaustive debate, CL's staff of music scribes, interns, and confidants made the case for Atlanta’s 10 best albums of the year. Polling was democratic; no Russian hackers influenced the selection process. Each one pushes the city into progressive new musical terrain, and comes strongly endorsed by the team of writers that work here. When the votes were counted the winner was clear. It was a landslide.
10. Jeff Crompton Trio, Magic Word (Southern Crescent)

This is what a 21st century jazz trio should sound like. Jeff Crompton (alto sax), Evan Lipson (bass), and Bob Stagner (drums), bound by a deep immersion in an evolving, more than century-old art form, play like men possessed. They’re on a quest for something elusive and profoundly beautiful, which they find in a balanced triumvirate of swinging, soulful noise. Crompton’s nine compositions (all his, save for two improvs) draw mostly from Ornette Coleman’s post-bop wavelengths, deeply colored by John Coltrane’s blues. — Doug DeLoach

9. Warehouse, super low (Bayonet)
super low by Warehouse
Warehouse’s sophomore album at first feels dominated by frontwoman Elaine Edenfield’s snarling voice. From piercing wails to sultry grumbles, she startles and disarms with impressive vocal dynamism. She is matched, however, by bassist Josh Hughes and drummer Doug Bleichner’s breathless rhythms and Ben Jackson and Alex Bailey’s shimmering guitars, balancing spontaneous outbursts with structured tension. Songs such as “Oscillator,” “Reservoir,” and “Simultaneous Contrasts” temper meticulous control and terse improvisation into an atmosphere of shimmering and melodic post-punk. — Emily Maxwell


8. Rae Sremmurd, (Eardruma/Interscope Records)
Don’t let the viral mega-success of “Black Beatles” take away from the bigger story. Rae Sremmurd successfully followed up its zeitgeist moment with a sophomore album that’s measured and mature while retaining the euphoric vibe that made Swae Lee and Slim Jxmmi stars. The brothers have a knack for squeaky melody, and Mike WiLL Made-It provides the big trap beats. Add it all up for a collection of party-starters that are more interesting and ambitious than anything Rae Sremmurd has kicked out yet. — Ben Salmon

7. Lil Yachty, Lil Boat (Quality Control Music, Capitol Records/Motown)
With his debut mixtape, Lil Yachty placed himself at the forefront of a new wave of Atlanta hip-hop artists whose lo-fi, DIY, and emotionally distraught take on the music is widely criticized by many of their predecessors. But Yachty remains unfazed by the criticism, and it shows. Lil Boat is the perfect embodiment of what Yachty calls bubblegum trap — street cred bolstered by appearances from Quavo, Young Thug, and Skippa da Flippa, but it’s mostly fun. — Tai Saint-Louis

6. Omni, Deluxe (Trouble In Mind)
Deluxe by Omni
As albums sprawl outward in the age of streaming, efficiency is an increasingly lost art. But not for Omni. Singer and bass player Philip Frobos builds tension in the rhythms as Frankie Broyles slices through it every time with shards of electric guitar and drums on the group’s debut album. Full disclosure, the group’s former drummer, Billy Mitchell, is a regular CL contributor. Songs such as “Wire,” “Afterlife,” and “Earrings” are prickly new wave dance pop numbers that rarely exceed three-and-a-half minutes while clicking and whirring like nifty little gadgets. — Ben Salmon
5. Speakerfoxxx and Bosco, Girls in the Yard (Fool’s Gold)

A-Town homegirls Speakerfoxxx and Bosco’s Girls In The Yard collaboration arrived this year as a bass-dropping, confetti cannon-popping summer jam with a lesson in self-esteem to boot. The project is full to the brim with anthemic girl power and party songs. Think of “Shooter” as the ride-or-die chick’s club-banger lament upon realizing her dude ain’t quite the hitter he hyped himself up to be, followed by the sense of empowerment that comes from being unafraid to fly solo. With individual grinds that have established them as noteworthy Atlanta-based artists and tastemakers for years, this collective effort is fueling a heightened level of success for both. You might say they’re on some grown woman shit. — Rodney Carmichael

4. Young Thug, Jeffery (300 Entertainment/ATL)
There’s no denying that Young Thug’s proper debut full-length, Jeffery, was one of Atlanta’s most talked-about albums of 2016. Through songs such as “Wyclef Jean,” “Future Swag,” and “Harambe,” Thugger, born Jeffery Lamar Williams, incorporates everything from rhythmic reggae production to the frenzied tempos of NOLA bounce. Jeffery breaks the mold for Atlanta hip-hop in 2016 and finds Young Thug thinking in much bigger terms. — Joseph Tiller and Chad Radford
3. Hello Ocho, In Portuguese (Self-released)

Hello Ocho’s second proper album, In Portuguese, arrived a confident and sprawling offering from a band that’s quickly become a local fixture. The psychedelic qualities swirling inside songs such as “Tear Wagon,” “Lurky Murky,” and “Nail Tractor” are filled with magnificent sonic highs and spooky valleys teeming with mystery and hallucinatory wonders. Working alongside producer Ben Price, the group rendered an album that functions like a maze of jazz and post-rock structures where every chiming note, rhythm, and melody snakes around one another, forming a slow and glowing mass of wonders for the imagination. It’s music for taking drugs to, a soundtrack for painting beautiful works of art, and Hello Ocho’s final full-length in this configuration. At least they went out on a high note. — Billy Mitchell and Chad Radford
2. Childish Gambino, Awaken, My Love! (Glassnote)

Childish Gambino, aka Donald Glover, is fearless when it comes to trying out new things. Awaken, My Love!, the third album from the star of FX’s hit TV show “Atlanta,” and his longtime cohort Ludwig Göransson, is a collection of psychedelic soul, funk, and ’70s rock excursions. Songs such as “Me And Your Mama,” “Riot,” and “Baby Boy” carry socially and politically conscious undertones, steeped in heavy bass lines, fuzzed-out guitars, and Gambino’s wide vocal range — he doesn’t rap here, but he does croon and scream. Awaken, My Love! is a testament to Gambino’s musical and lyrical versatility. It’s a trippy, one-of-a-kind avatar that owes as much to millennial aesthetics as it does to the era that turned out Sly and the Family Stone and Funkadelic’s weirdest moments of perfection. — Joseph Tiller
1. Gucci Mane, Everybody Looking (Atlantic Urban)

Time in the pen was good for Guwop. After a three-year prison bid, health, recovery, and mental focus weigh heavy on the Zone 6 trap god’s psyche. With Everybody Looking, Gucci, along with producers Mike WiLL and Zaytoven, crafts an album worthy of a lifetime achievement award. “Out Do Ya,” “Pussy Print” ft. Kanye West, and the brilliant “1st Day Out Tha Feds” push trap production to groundbreaking new musical terrain. Variety is thick here, and the album’s message is essentially the same as the cautionary tale Gucci delivered with 2009’s “Heavy.” But now, he’s looking at the flip side of the coin. He’s back on the streets, he’s cleaned up, and in 2016, he was unstoppable. Brrr! — Chad Radford             20847355         http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/12/Music_Top1__3_1_35.585af375d3948.png                  Atlanta's 10 best albums of 2016 "
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Article

Thursday December 22, 2016 04:03 pm EST
CL scribes call out the best of the best in local local music pt. 2 ... Brrr! | more...
array(81) {
  ["title"]=>
  string(39) "Atlanta's 40 best albums of 2016, pt. 1"
  ["modification_date"]=>
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    string(29) "ben.eason@creativeloafing.com"
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  ["date"]=>
  string(25) "2016-12-22T04:57:00+00:00"
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  string(39) "Atlanta's 40 best albums of 2016, pt. 1"
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  ["tracker_field_contentCreator_text"]=>
  string(9) "Ben Eason"
  ["tracker_field_contentByline"]=>
  string(12) "Chad Radford"
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  string(12) "Chad Radford"
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  ["tracker_field_contentBylinePerson_text"]=>
  string(12) "Chad Radford"
  ["tracker_field_description"]=>
  string(82) "CL scribes look back at the local releases that defined the year in music (#40-11)"
  ["tracker_field_description_raw"]=>
  string(82) "CL scribes look back at the local releases that defined the year in music (#40-11)"
  ["tracker_field_contentDate"]=>
  string(25) "2016-12-22T04:57:00+00:00"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage"]=>
  string(49) "Content:_:Atlanta's 40 best albums of 2016, pt. 1"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_text"]=>
  string(9071) "What a long strange trip 2016 has been — a real life Empire Strikes Back scenario unfolded over a year bookend by the deaths of Mr. Space Oddity himself David Bowie and the first American to orbit the Earth, John Glenn. It's been a year of one tragedy after another. In Atlanta, gentrification continues ravaging the land, picking away at the cultural institutions and neighborhoods the city's creative types have long called home. But ATLiens appear to be at their best under duress. After a lengthy voting process followed by exhaustive debate, CL's staff of music scribes, interns, and close confidants made the case for a whopping 40 full-length albums to be considered for a year-end round up of the best music the city had to offer. Polling was democratic; no Russian hackers influenced the selection process. Each of these albums is strongly endorsed by the team of writers at work here. There are a lot of choice albums on the list, but the heat turns up for the top 10.

Enjoy numbers 40 through 11.


Big Medicine by Brother Hawk

40. Brother Hawk, Big Medicine (self-released)


LP by Slang

39. Slang, LP (self-released)



38. Chelsea Shag, Colours (self-released)



37. Femignome, ANXT (self-released)


36. DJ Drama, Quality Street Music 2 (E1 Music)

35. Whores, Gold (E1 Music)


<a href="http://bigbrutusband.bandcamp.com/album/tiny-box">(Tiny Box) by Big Brutus</a>

34. Big Brutus, Tiny Box (self-released)



&lt;a href="http://illegaldrugs1.bandcamp.com/album/illegal-drugs"&gt;Illegal Drugs by Illegal Drugs&lt;/a&gt;

33. Illegal Drugs, Illegal Drugs (self-released)

<iframe style="border: 0; width: 640px; height: 760px;" src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=2609436210/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/transparent=true/" seamless="">&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://atlantarecords.bandcamp.com/album/heaven-earth"&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Heaven &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp; Earth by Khari Cabral &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp; Jiva&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;</iframe>


&amp;lt;a href="http://atlantarecords.bandcamp.com/album/heaven-earth"&amp;gt;Heaven &amp;amp;amp; Earth by Khari Cabral &amp;amp;amp; Jiva&amp;lt;/a&amp;gt;

32. Khari Cabral Simmons and Jiva, Heaven & Earth (Atlanta Records)





31.  Future, Evol (Epic/Freebandz/A1)



&amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thepinx.bandcamp.com/album/freedom"&amp;amp;amp;gt;Freedom by The Pinx&amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;gt;

30. The Pinx, Freedom (self-released)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://sairaraza.bandcamp.com/album/inertia"&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;INERTIA by Saira Raza&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

29. Saira Raza, Inertia (self-released) 



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://closedcasketactivities.bandcamp.com/album/zone-6-music"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Zone 6 Music by Criminal Instinct&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

28. Criminal Instinct, Zone 6 Music (Closed Casket Activities)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://blakerainey.bandcamp.com/album/helicopter-rose"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Helicopter Rose by Blake Rainey and his Demons&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

27. Blake Rainey and His Demons, Helicopter Rose (Southern Lovers Recordings)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://deatonandbarnwell.bandcamp.com/album/the-arbalest-original-motion-picture-soundtrack"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The Arbalest - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by Deaton and Barnwell&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

26. Ian Deaton and Thomas Barnwell, The Arbalest (Deanwell Global Music)





25. 21 Savage x Metro Boomin', Savage Mode (Slaughter Gang, LLC)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://maudlinband.bandcamp.com/album/s-t-cassette"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;S/T Cassette by MAỤDLIN&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

24. Maudlin, Self-titled cassette (self-released)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://johnburkemusic.bandcamp.com/album/orogen"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Orogen by John Burke&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

23. John Burke, Orogen (self-released)





22. Blackberry Smoke, Like An Arrow (3 Legged Records)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://littletybee.bandcamp.com/album/little-tybee"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Little Tybee by Little Tybee&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

21. Little Tybee, Little Tybee (On the Grid Creative)





20.  Big Jesus, Oneiric (Mascot)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://wildhoneyrecords.bandcamp.com/album/winter-in-september"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Winter In September by Shantih Shantih&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

19.  Shantih Shantih, Winter In September (Wild Honey Records)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://dotsdotsdots.bandcamp.com/album/we-swim"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;We Swim by Dot.s&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

18. Dot.s: We Swim (Deer Bear Wolf)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://clavvs.bandcamp.com/album/halfblood"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;halfblood by CLAVVS&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

17. Clavvs, Halfblood (self-released)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://dftals.bandcamp.com/album/10"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;10 by Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

16. Duet For Theremin and Lap Steel, 10 (self-released)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://psycharmy.bandcamp.com/album/the-revenge"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The Revenge by 10th Letter&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

15. 10th Letter, The Revenge (Psych Army Intergalactic)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thecoathangers.bandcamp.com/album/nosebleed-weekend"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Nosebleed Weekend by The Coathangers&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

14. The Coathangers, Nosebleed Weekend (Suicide Squeeze)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thedifferencemachine.bandcamp.com/album/the-4th-side-of-the-eternal-triangle"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The 4th Side of the Eternal Triangle by The Difference Machine&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

13. The Difference Machine, 4th Side of the Eternal Triangle (Psych Army Intergalactic)





12.  6lack, Free 6lack (LVRN/Interscope Records)



&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://geographicnorth.bandcamp.com/album/anatomy-of-the-image-3"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Anatomy of the Image by Lyonnais&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;"
  ["tracker_field_contentWikiPage_raw"]=>
  string(11513) "What a long strange trip 2016 has been — a real life ''Empire Strikes Back'' scenario unfolded over a year bookend by the deaths of Mr. Space Oddity himself David Bowie and the first American to orbit the Earth, John Glenn. It's been a year of one tragedy after another. In Atlanta, gentrification continues ravaging the land, picking away at the cultural institutions and neighborhoods the city's creative types have long called home. But ATLiens appear to be at their best under duress. After a lengthy voting process followed by exhaustive debate, ''CL'''s staff of music scribes, interns, and close confidants made the case for a whopping 40 full-length albums to be considered for a year-end round up of the best music the city had to offer. Polling was democratic; no Russian hackers influenced the selection process. Each of these albums is strongly endorsed by the team of writers at work here. There are a lot of choice albums on the list, but the heat turns up for the top 10.

Enjoy numbers 40 through 11.

{HTML()}

40. Brother Hawk, Big Medicine (self-released)

{HTML} [http://brotherhawk.bandcamp.com/album/big-medicine|Big Medicine by Brother Hawk] 40. Brother Hawk, Big Medicine (self-released) {HTML()}{HTML} [http://slangatlanta.bandcamp.com/album/lp|LP by Slang] 39. Slang, ''LP'' (self-released) {HTML()}{HTML} 38. Chelsea Shag, ''Colours'' (self-released) {HTML()}{HTML} 37. Femignome, ''ANXT'' (self-released) {HTML()}{HTML} {img src="https://cdn.creativeloafing.com/files/base/scomm/clatl/image/2016/12/640w/dj_drama_quality_street_music_2.585afc9e22829.jpg"}36. DJ Drama, ''Quality Street Music'' ''2'' (E1 Music) 35. Whores, ''Gold'' (E1 Music) {HTML()}{HTML} (Tiny Box) by Big Brutus 34. Big Brutus, ''Tiny Box'' (self-released) {HTML()}{HTML} <a href="http://illegaldrugs1.bandcamp.com/album/illegal-drugs">Illegal Drugs by Illegal Drugs</a> 33. Illegal Drugs, ''Illegal Drugs'' (self-released) &lt;a href="http://atlantarecords.bandcamp.com/album/heaven-earth"&gt;Heaven &amp;amp; Earth by Khari Cabral &amp;amp; Jiva&lt;/a&gt; 32. Khari Cabral Simmons and Jiva, ''Heaven & Earth'' (Atlanta Records) 31.  Future, ''Evol'' (Epic/Freebandz/A1) &amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thepinx.bandcamp.com/album/freedom"&amp;amp;gt;Freedom by The Pinx&amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;gt; 30. The Pinx, ''Freedom'' (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://sairaraza.bandcamp.com/album/inertia"&amp;amp;amp;gt;INERTIA by Saira Raza&amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;gt; 29. Saira Raza, ''Inertia'' (self-released)  &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://closedcasketactivities.bandcamp.com/album/zone-6-music"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Zone 6 Music by Criminal Instinct&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 28. Criminal Instinct, ''Zone 6 Music'' (Closed Casket Activities) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://blakerainey.bandcamp.com/album/helicopter-rose"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Helicopter Rose by Blake Rainey and his Demons&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 27. Blake Rainey and His Demons, ''Helicopter Rose'' (Southern Lovers Recordings) &amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://deatonandbarnwell.bandcamp.com/album/the-arbalest-original-motion-picture-soundtrack"&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The Arbalest - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by Deaton and Barnwell&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 26. Ian Deaton and Thomas Barnwell, ''The Arbalest'' (Deanwell Global Music) 25. 21 Savage x Metro Boomin', ''Savage Mode'' (Slaughter Gang, LLC) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://maudlinband.bandcamp.com/album/s-t-cassette"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;S/T Cassette by MAỤDLIN&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 24. Maudlin, Self-titled cassette (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://johnburkemusic.bandcamp.com/album/orogen"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Orogen by John Burke&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 23. John Burke, ''Orogen'' (self-released) 22. Blackberry Smoke, ''Like An Arrow'' (3 Legged Records) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://littletybee.bandcamp.com/album/little-tybee"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Little Tybee by Little Tybee&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 21. Little Tybee, ''Little Tybee'' (On the Grid Creative) 20.  Big Jesus, ''Oneiric'' (Mascot) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://wildhoneyrecords.bandcamp.com/album/winter-in-september"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Winter In September by Shantih Shantih&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 19.  Shantih Shantih, ''Winter In September'' (Wild Honey Records) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://dotsdotsdots.bandcamp.com/album/we-swim"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;We Swim by Dot.s&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 18. Dot.s: ''We Swim'' (Deer Bear Wolf) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://clavvs.bandcamp.com/album/halfblood"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;halfblood by CLAVVS&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 17. Clavvs, ''Halfblood'' (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://dftals.bandcamp.com/album/10"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;10 by Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 16. Duet For Theremin and Lap Steel, ''10'' (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://psycharmy.bandcamp.com/album/the-revenge"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The Revenge by 10th Letter&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 15. 10th Letter, ''The Revenge'' (Psych Army Intergalactic) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thecoathangers.bandcamp.com/album/nosebleed-weekend"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Nosebleed Weekend by The Coathangers&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 14. The Coathangers, ''Nosebleed Weekend'' (Suicide Squeeze) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thedifferencemachine.bandcamp.com/album/the-4th-side-of-the-eternal-triangle"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The 4th Side of the Eternal Triangle by The Difference Machine&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 13. 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It's been a year of one tragedy after another. In Atlanta, gentrification continues ravaging the land, picking away at the cultural institutions and neighborhoods the city's creative types have long called home. But ATLiens appear to be at their best under duress. After a lengthy voting process followed by exhaustive debate, CL's staff of music scribes, interns, and close confidants made the case for a whopping 40 full-length albums to be considered for a year-end round up of the best music the city had to offer. Polling was democratic; no Russian hackers influenced the selection process. Each of these albums is strongly endorsed by the team of writers at work here. There are a lot of choice albums on the list, but the heat turns up for the top 10. Enjoy numbers 40 through 11. Big Medicine by Brother Hawk 40. Brother Hawk, Big Medicine (self-released) LP by Slang 39. Slang, LP (self-released) 38. Chelsea Shag, Colours (self-released) 37. Femignome, ANXT (self-released) 36. DJ Drama, Quality Street Music 2 (E1 Music) 35. Whores, Gold (E1 Music) <a href="http://bigbrutusband.bandcamp.com/album/tiny-box">(Tiny Box) by Big Brutus</a> 34. Big Brutus, Tiny Box (self-released) &lt;a href="http://illegaldrugs1.bandcamp.com/album/illegal-drugs"&gt;Illegal Drugs by Illegal Drugs&lt;/a&gt; 33. Illegal Drugs, Illegal Drugs (self-released) <iframe style="border: 0; width: 640px; height: 760px;" src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=2609436210/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/transparent=true/" seamless="">&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://atlantarecords.bandcamp.com/album/heaven-earth"&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Heaven &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp; Earth by Khari Cabral &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp; Jiva&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;</iframe> &amp;lt;a href="http://atlantarecords.bandcamp.com/album/heaven-earth"&amp;gt;Heaven &amp;amp;amp; Earth by Khari Cabral &amp;amp;amp; Jiva&amp;lt;/a&amp;gt; 32. Khari Cabral Simmons and Jiva, Heaven & Earth (Atlanta Records) 31.  Future, Evol (Epic/Freebandz/A1) &amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thepinx.bandcamp.com/album/freedom"&amp;amp;amp;gt;Freedom by The Pinx&amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;gt; 30. The Pinx, Freedom (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://sairaraza.bandcamp.com/album/inertia"&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;INERTIA by Saira Raza&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 29. Saira Raza, Inertia (self-released)  &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://closedcasketactivities.bandcamp.com/album/zone-6-music"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Zone 6 Music by Criminal Instinct&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 28. Criminal Instinct, Zone 6 Music (Closed Casket Activities) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://blakerainey.bandcamp.com/album/helicopter-rose"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Helicopter Rose by Blake Rainey and his Demons&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 27. Blake Rainey and His Demons, Helicopter Rose (Southern Lovers Recordings) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://deatonandbarnwell.bandcamp.com/album/the-arbalest-original-motion-picture-soundtrack"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The Arbalest - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by Deaton and Barnwell&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 26. Ian Deaton and Thomas Barnwell, The Arbalest (Deanwell Global Music) 25. 21 Savage x Metro Boomin', Savage Mode (Slaughter Gang, LLC) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://maudlinband.bandcamp.com/album/s-t-cassette"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;S/T Cassette by MAỤDLIN&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 24. Maudlin, Self-titled cassette (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://johnburkemusic.bandcamp.com/album/orogen"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Orogen by John Burke&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 23. John Burke, Orogen (self-released) 22. Blackberry Smoke, Like An Arrow (3 Legged Records) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://littletybee.bandcamp.com/album/little-tybee"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Little Tybee by Little Tybee&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 21. Little Tybee, Little Tybee (On the Grid Creative) 20.  Big Jesus, Oneiric (Mascot) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://wildhoneyrecords.bandcamp.com/album/winter-in-september"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Winter In September by Shantih Shantih&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 19.  Shantih Shantih, Winter In September (Wild Honey Records) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://dotsdotsdots.bandcamp.com/album/we-swim"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;We Swim by Dot.s&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 18. Dot.s: We Swim (Deer Bear Wolf) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://clavvs.bandcamp.com/album/halfblood"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;halfblood by CLAVVS&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 17. Clavvs, Halfblood (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://dftals.bandcamp.com/album/10"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;10 by Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 16. Duet For Theremin and Lap Steel, 10 (self-released) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://psycharmy.bandcamp.com/album/the-revenge"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The Revenge by 10th Letter&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 15. 10th Letter, The Revenge (Psych Army Intergalactic) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thecoathangers.bandcamp.com/album/nosebleed-weekend"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Nosebleed Weekend by The Coathangers&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 14. The Coathangers, Nosebleed Weekend (Suicide Squeeze) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://thedifferencemachine.bandcamp.com/album/the-4th-side-of-the-eternal-triangle"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;The 4th Side of the Eternal Triangle by The Difference Machine&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 13. The Difference Machine, 4th Side of the Eternal Triangle (Psych Army Intergalactic) 12.  6lack, Free 6lack (LVRN/Interscope Records) &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="http://geographicnorth.bandcamp.com/album/anatomy-of-the-image-3"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Anatomy of the Image by Lyonnais&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; 20847450 http://dev.creativeloafing.com/image/2016/12/Music_Top10_3_15.585b178dc48e3.png Atlanta's 40 best albums of 2016, pt. 1 " ["score"]=> float(0) ["_index"]=> string(21) "atlantawiki_tiki_main" ["objectlink"]=> string(36) "No value for 'contentTitle'" ["photos"]=> string(130) "Coming Soon " ["desc"]=> string(91) "CL scribes look back at the local releases that defined the year in music (#40-11)" ["chit_category"]=> string(11) "88" }

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Wednesday December 21, 2016 11:57 pm EST
CL scribes look back at the local releases that defined the year in music (#40-11) | more...