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Curt Holman

Film and Theater Critic

Curt Holman was first published in Creative Loafing in 1993. A longtime film critic and former president of the Southeastern Film Critics Association, he also writes about television, theater, books and Southern culture. He has been published in local and national publications and has won the Green Eyeshades Award for Criticism and the Association of Alternate Newspapers’ award for Arts Criticism. Since 2016 he has co-hosted the Comics Canon podcast, reviewing the great comic book stories of yesterday and today. Follow him on Twitter at @Curt_Holman and on Letterboxd at Curt_Holman.

Articles By This Writer

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Thursday January 6, 2022 04:56 pm EST
‘Licorice Pizza’ tops moviegoing in the New Year

 

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Friday December 3, 2021 11:49 am EST
“Red Turns Into Blue” Revisits Athens Music Scene | more...

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Friday July 2, 2021 09:22 am EDT
‘Zola’ turns viral Twitter thread into stylish cinematic nightmare | more...

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Wednesday May 5, 2021 10:27 am EDT
Unsuspecting Atlantans prove to be the real heroes of the hidden-camera comedy | more...

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Wednesday March 3, 2021 04:31 pm EST
Does it take a pandemic to make the Academy Awards more diverse? | more...

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Monday December 7, 2020 06:03 pm EST
Looking for laughs in Christmas movies | more...

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Sunday November 8, 2020 03:34 pm EST
The Object Group’s ‘The Stranger’ and David Byrne’s ‘American Utopia’ bring live performances to the small screen | more...

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Thursday October 8, 2020 12:05 pm EDT
‘All In’ presents the nightmare of voter suppression, ‘Only’ a fictional pandemic | more...

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Wednesday September 2, 2020 03:17 pm EDT
What to do when the big screen is dark | more...

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Tuesday June 2, 2020 08:00 am EDT
Lockdown invites a closer look at 'Becky,' 'Shirley,' and other VOD releases | more...

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Friday May 1, 2020 12:00 am EDT
Saving a local landmark; screening double features at home | more...

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Monday March 2, 2020 02:37 pm EST
Low-budget, locally-filmed indie thrillers showcase female protagonists | more...

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Friday January 3, 2020 11:04 am EST
World War I film brings combat to life; Stephen King returns to Georgia with “The Outsider” | more...

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Tuesday December 3, 2019 05:30 pm EST
“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” ignores biopic clichés for surprisingly perfect holiday fare | more...

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Wednesday September 25, 2019 11:25 am EDT
Atlanta’s 32nd annual LGBTQ event presents films with urgency | more...
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Wednesday December 24, 2008 12:04 am EST

TITLE: The Spirit

GENRE: Style-drunk superhero story

THE PITCH: After Central City cop Denny Colt (Gabriel Macht) dies but gets better, he becomes a masked avenger called the Spirit who takes on criminals such as the similarly indestructible Octopus (Samuel L. Jackson) and seemingly countless femme fatales.

MONEY SHOTS: Nothing looks particularly good, but it'll be hard to forget the Octopus...

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Sunday November 22, 2009 03:00 pm EST
image-1The end of the world is no fun at all in The Road. The bedraggled survivors of an unidentified cataclysm possess no mohawks, leather outfits or supersonic dune buggies. A nameless father and son (Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee, respectively) spend their days struggling to find food in post-apocalyptic America, and have no time for kingly wish-fulfillment fantasies like, say,... | more...

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Friday November 20, 2009 05:00 am EST

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The prologue to the warm-n-fuzzy sports story The Blind Side plays so well, it’s like seeing a team return an opening kickoff to score a touchdown. A Southern-accented Sandra Bullock narrates an insider’s perspective on the five fateful seconds that cost the Washington Redskins’ Joe Theismann his career. Michael Lewis’ book The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game...

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Friday November 6, 2009 10:00 am EST

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The Men Who Stare at Goats begins with a wonderful disclaimer: “More of this is true than you would believe.” Most films use phrases like “Based on a true story” or “Inspired by actual events” as a fig leaf for outrageous liberties with little connection to reality. The real incidents behind The Men Who Stare at Goats indeed seem stranger than fiction,...

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Tuesday October 20, 2009 12:00 pm EDT

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The American perspective on Japanese culture tends to obsess over the more extreme entertainment forms — the bloody samurai films, the kinky anime, the sadistic game shows — that tend to drown out the soft-spoken ones. A long tradition of Japanese film, frequently associated with Yasujir? Ozu, emphasizes serenity and naturalism. Contemporary filmmaker Hirokazu Koreeda...

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Thursday October 1, 2009 02:54 pm EDT

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It's true: Absence makes the heart grow fonder. Ricky Gervais' The Invention of Lying serves as a virtual celebration of untruths by presenting a world in which deceit and falsehood do not exist. As inventions go, the lie proves nearly as significant as fire or the wheel.

Conversation is candid and merciless in Lying's alternate America. In the first scene, pudgy screenwriter...

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Wednesday November 11, 2009 12:00 pm EST

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Even if you’ve never heard the name Oliver Hirschbiegel, there’s a strong chance you’ve seen his work. The German filmmaker directed Downfall, the superb 2004 drama about the Third Reich's final days. Last year, a clip of Bruno Ganz’s Hitler chewing out his underlings became a YouTube hit when an online prankster rewrote the subtitles so the scene depicted...

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Thursday October 8, 2009 01:00 pm EDT

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I learned more from Chris Rock's documentary Good Hair than I did from all the other films and plays I’ve seen about African-American beauty parlors and barbershops put together. As a white guy with straight hair (and seemingly less of it every day), subjects like weaves and relaxers tend to be terra incognita. Even black audiences might view African-American hairstyle issues...

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Wednesday November 4, 2009 04:17 pm EST

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Though only 17 years old, Clareece “Precious” Jones (Gabourey Sidibe) suffers enough misfortunes for several Greek tragedies remounted in 1987 Harlem. Precious’ title character endures obesity, illiteracy, a baby with Down syndrome and a sociopathically hostile, selfish mother (Mo’Nique) — and those are just the preliminaries. When Precious gets warmed up,...

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Wednesday November 4, 2009 12:00 pm EST

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The establishment seems more firmly established in England than anywhere else. Two terrific new British films depict prodigiously intelligent characters who challenge entrenched English institutions and nearly outsmart themselves along the way. The protagonists of the soccer movie The Damned United and the coming-of-age romance An Education fit in the rebellious, angry young man...

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Thursday October 15, 2009 06:00 pm EDT
image-1Any cultural inferiority the United States feels toward the French will only be exacerbated by New York, I Love You. The anthology film follows the same model as 2008’s art house hit Paris, Je t’aime in offering a series of tales, mostly about love, on the streets of a cosmopolitan city. Both films showcase directors from around the world, but where Paris features work from such... | more...

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Friday October 16, 2009 12:00 pm EDT
image-1Spike Jonze and Dave Eggers’ Where the Wild Things Are remembers something most adults have forgotten: A huge gulf lies between the simplicity of children’s entertainment and the complexity of actual childhood. Growing up may be a time of pure delight, but it also features stretches of agonizing boredom, sudden fright, occasional sorrow and general perplexity at the arbitrary... | more...

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Thursday November 26, 2009 02:24 pm EST

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In the documentary Crude, Brothers Keeper director Joe Berlinger presents a courtroom drama that never takes place in a courtroom. The grim but engrossing film recounts the tactics and history of a civil lawsuit filed by thousands of native Ecuadoreans who allege that Texaco (now Chevron) polluted vast areas of the rain forest with oil, leading to contaminated drinking water and...

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Friday November 20, 2009 11:35 pm EST

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Medical narratives often depict ordinary people who turn to alternative healing methods when traditional Western health care fails. Seldom can you find families that go to the lengths of Rupert Isaacson and Kristen Neff, who traveled from Austin, Texas, to the steppes of Mongolia with the hopes of improving their son Rowan’s autistic condition.

Narrating the documentary...

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Monday October 19, 2009 09:15 pm EDT

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A decade after filling America with pants-wetting fear, The Blair Witch Project still haunts Hollywood. Filmmakers emulate its faux-documentary, first-person narrative style, while studios seek the next no-budget horror flick that can become a $100 million word-of-mouth hit. Paramount Pictures bets that Oren Peli’s Paranormal Activity will similarly set pulses and bladders...

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